background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, DECEMBER 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

doi: 10.1515/geoca-2017-0038

www.geologicacarpathica.com

Some perisphinctoid ammonites of the Štramberk 

Limestone and their dating with associated microfossils 

(Tithonian to Lower Berriasian, Outer Western 

Carpathians, Czech Republic)  

 

ZDENĚK VAŠÍČEK

1

, DANIELA REHÁKOVÁ

2

 and PETR SKUPIEN

3, 

1

 Institute of Geonics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Studentská 1768, 708 00 Ostrava-Poruba, Czech Republic 

2

 Comenius University, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of Geology and Paleontology, Mlynská dolina G,  Ilkovičova 6,  

842 15 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

3 

Institute of Geological Engineering, VŠB — Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba, Czech Republic;  

 

petr.skupien@vsb.cz

(Manuscript received June 5, 2017; accepted in revised form September 28, 2017)

Abstract: The  present  contribution  deals  with  the  taxonomy  of  seven  species  of  perisphinctoid  ammonite  from  the 

Štramberk Limestone (Outer Western Carpathians, Czech Republic) deposited in Moravian-Silesian museums. The age 

of these studied ammonites is compared with that of index microfossils contained in the matrix adhering to or infilling 

the  studied  specimens.  The  ammonites  document  a  stratigraphic  range  from  earliest  Tithonian  to  early  Berriasian.   

In addition to taxonomy and new ontogenetic data on some species, we also present data on their palaeogeographic  

distribution.  The  occurrence  of  Subboreal  himalayitids  in  the  Štramberk  Limestone  of  an  early  Berriasian  age  is   

determined by both the microfauna and accompanying ammonites, which indicate connection of the Silesian-part of  

the Tethyan Carpathian area with the Subboreal Russian Platform Basin. These records also suggest an early Berriasian 

age (Jacobi Chron) for the lowermost part of the Ryazanian stage in its type area. 

Keywords: Ammonoidea, Calpionellids, calcareous dinoflagellates, Upper Jurassic, Lower Cretaceous, biostratigraphy, 

Western Carpathians.

Introduction

The Moravian–Silesian museums (Ostrava, Opava, Nový Jičín) 

in the Czech Republic and the Naturhistorisches Museum in 

Vienna and Bayerische Staatssammlung für Paläontologie und 

Geologie in Munich hold large numbers of ammonites found 

in the Štramberk Limestone. The above-mentioned ammonites 

all come from old collections, some of which date from the 

nineteenth century. A common feature of these collections is 

the absence of detailed locality data for the specimens. On the 

original labels, only “Štramberk” or “Stramberg” are usually 

stated. Some of these specimens do not even come from the 

Štramberk area. These ammonite finds are associated with the 

occurrence of Štramberk-type limestones which occur in the 

form of so-called “exotic blocks” (term of Hohenegger 1861) 

in the Outer Western Carpathians in the north-eastern Czech 

Republic and south-western Poland.

The above-mentioned ammonite specimens held in foreign 

collections  were  initially  studied  by  Zittel  (1868,  from  the 

Zámecký lom — Castle Hill Quarry — and exotic blocks) and 

Blaschke (1911, Kotouč Quarry). They are often holotypes or 

lectotypes.  Their  precise  stratigraphic  positions,  however, 

were  not  known.  This  was  usually  recognized  later,  on  the 

basis of studies of profiles with ammonites, primarily at sites 

in Western and Central Europe.

The  primary  focus  of  the  paper  is  to  describe  the  peri-

sphinctoid ammonites from old collections and discuss their 

taxonomy and age. We also try to precisely determine the age 

of some of the Štramberk ammonites deposited in Moravian–

Silesian  museums:  we  do  this  by  studying  the  microfossil 

 contents of thin sections of the rocks adhering to or infilling 

the  ammonites,  as  in  studies  by  Oloriz  &  Tavera  (1982), 

Kaiser-Weidich & Schairer (1990). Where it was possible, we 

cut off pieces of rock for preparation of 38 thin sections from 

the rock matrix of 27 ammonite specimens. However, only 16 

thin  sections,  from  10  ammonite  specimens,  contain  strati-

graphically important microfossils. Comparative thin sections 

come from the Kotouč Quarry at Štramberk, which recently 

yielded some new ammonite finds. Ammonite specimens with 

matrix lacking any index microfossils are not included in the 

taxonomic part of this paper.

Geological setting

The  Štramberk  Limestone  is  exposed  at  several  quarries 

(Kotouč,  Municipal,  Horní  Skalka  and  Castle  Hill)  in  the 

immediate vicinity of the town of Štramberk (Figs. 1 and 2) in 

the form of carbonate megablocks (in a wide range of sizes), 

breccias  and  conglomerates.  The  Štramberk  Limestone 

background image

584

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

Subsilesian Unit

Silesian Unit

Rača Unit

Bílé Karpaty Unit

Bystrica Unit

Vi

enna Basin

N

0

20 km

Subsilesian Unit

C. Foredeep

Ostrava

Brno

Žilina

Přerov

Carpathia

n

Foredeep

Czech

Republic

Slovakia

Poland

Austria

Germany

Hungary

Štramberk

Koňákov

Kotouč Quarry

Kotouč Hill

Municipal

Quarry

Horní Skalka Quarry

Castle Hill

Quarry

0

300 m

Castle
Hill

N

Čupek

Bílá hora

557

represents a deposit that was formed during the latest Jurassic 

–earliest  Cretaceous  in  a  carbonate  platform  belt  along  the 

northern  Tethyan  margin  in  the  area  of  the  Outer  Western 

Carpathians. Block accumulations of the Štramberk Limestone 

form part of the continental-rise sediments of the Baška Facies 

in  the  Silesian  Unit,  which  were  deposited  in  the  flysch  

trough  of  the  Baška  Subunit  (for  more  details,  see  Picha  

et al. 2006).

According to Picha et al. (2006), the Štramberk carbonate 

platform was rimmed by coral reefs, and these were the source 

of carbonate clasts. Gravitational slides and turbidity currents 

transported both small and large blocks and fragments of lime-

stones from the edge of the platform to the bottom of the adja-

cent  basin.  However,  during  the  course  of  later  (Neogene) 

tectonic thrusting of the Silesian nappe, large tectonic pieces 

of  the  carbonate  platform  were  separated  from  the  softer,  

less  resistant  rocks  situated  on  the  slopes  of  the  platform.  

The result is a mélange, in which larger blocks from the car-

bonate platform appear to have the characteristics of klippen.

The age of the Štramberk Limestone was assumed to be, as 

the  latest,  Kimmeridgian  and  Tithonian  (e.g.,  Houša  1990; 

Houša  in  Houša  &  Vašíček  2004).  However,  calpionellids 

(Houša in Houša & Vašíček 2004) and ammonites (Vašíček et 

al. 2013; Vašíček & Skupien 2013, 2014; 2016) from the lime-

stone  bodies  are  indicative  of  the  higher  part  of  the  early 

Tithonian,  the  entire  late  Tithonian  and  the  lowermost 

Berriasian (Vašíček et al. 2016).

Methods and Material

In  the  Štramberk  Limestone,  ammonites  are  generally 

favourably  preserved,  their  moulds  are  usually  undeformed.  

In the selected material, the specimens in which at least a half 

of the last whorl is preserved prevail. This makes it possible to 

measure all size parameters, to determine the whorl cross sec-

tion, and to determine the half-whorl density of ribs. A usual 

problem  is  that  in  most  of  the  studied  specimens,  juvenile 

whorls  are  not  preserved.  In  addition  to  literary  sources,  

the study of most ammonites was supported by examination of 

the  original  materials  in  Munich  (Zittel  1868)  and  Vienna 

(Blaschke 1911) [as well]. 

The following abbreviations are used when citing museum 

ammonite collections:

AS  III  —  von  Zittel’s  collection,  Bayerische  Staats-

sammlung für Geologie, Munich

NHMW  —  Blaschke’s  collection,  Naturhistorisches 

Museum, Vienna

PL — collections of the Nový Jičín Regional Museum

Z — collections of the Silesian Museum in Opava

B — collections of the Museum of Ostrava in Ostrava

UK — Remeš’s collection, Charles University in Prague. 

Our  micropalaeontological  study  is  based  on  38  thin  sec-

tions. Rock sampling for thin sections was performed perpen-

dicularly  to  the  presupposed  bedding.  The  bedding  was 

derived from the sagittal plane of an ammonite’s shell symme-

try, assuming that the specimen must have lain on the bottom 

of the sea parallel to this plane. In the other specimens, where 

such an above-mentioned cut was not possible, one was made 

parallel  to  the  plane  of  symmetry  of  an  ammonite.  Thin  

sections were preferentially prepared from the finer parts of 

detrital limestone.

Fig. 1.  Tectonic  map  of  the  Outer  Western  Carpathian  area  of  the 

Czech Republic (after Skupien & Smaržová 2011).

Fig. 2. Geographical situation of bodies of Štramberk Limestone in 

the vicinity of Štramberk.

background image

585

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

The thin sections are marked with 5-digit numbers and are 

stored in the thin section book at the Department of Laboratory 

Research on Geomaterials of the Institute of Geonics of the 

Czech Academy of Sciences in Ostrava-Poruba. The museum 

number of the ammonite is also stated in this book together 

with the number of the thin section. The thin sections were 

made in the laboratory of the Institute of Geonics, Academy of 

Sciences of the Czech Republic and during the time of their 

evaluation they are stored in the collections of the Department 

of Geology and Palaeontology (Faculty of Natural Sciences) 

in Bratislava.

Microfacies  analysis  focused  on  determination  of  strati-

graphically  important  bio  markers,  and  accompanying  bio-

clasts  were  studied  under  a  light  microscope.  Thin-sections 

have been evaluated under an optical microscope (LEICA DM 

2500). The calpionellids and cysts of calcareous dinoflagel-

lates  were  evaluated  among  spectra  of  further  residual 

 bioclasts.  Together,  they  offered  the  information  useful  for 

stratigraphy and palaeoenvironmental interpretation. A LEICA 

DFC  290  HD  camera  was  used  for  microfacies  and  micro-

fossil documentation. The calpionellid zonation of Reháková 

and  Michalík  (1997),  the  dinoflagellate  cyst  zonation  of 

Reháková (2000) and a limestone textural classification after 

Dunham (1962) were adopted.  The definitions of microfacies 

types of Wilson (1975) were used.

Taxonomy of ammonites

At the supragenetic level, the ammonite taxonomy adopted 

here  is  conservative.  As  already  noted  by  Donovan  et  al. 

(1981) and Cecca et al. (1989), the systematics of Tithonian 

families are in a state of chaos. For early Berriasian ammo-

nites, we follow Klein (2005), albeit with a change in the taxo-

nomic position of the genus Riasanites.

All  the  specimen  dimensions  are  given  in  millimetres:  

D — diameter (Dmax — largest diameter measured), H — whorl 

height,  B  —  whorl  breadth,  and  U  —  umbilical  diameter.  

The ratios of the parameters to shell diameter (H/D, B/D, U/D) 

are given in brackets. The whorl breadth to height ratio (B/H) 

is  also  indicated.  Where  possible,  the  number  of  inner 

 (primary) ribs at the umbilicus (UR) and the number of ventro-

lateral ribs (VR) are given for a half whorl. If possible sexual 

dimorphism is recognized; the abbreviations m (microconchs) 

and M (macroconchs) are used, in brackets.

The  stratigraphic  position  of  Tithonian  ammonite  species 

within  the  ammonite  zonal  succession  is  derived  from  data 

presented  by  Zeiss  (2001,  2003)  and  Scherzinger  and 

Schweigert (2003, 2016). The Berriasian ammonite zones fol-

low Reboulet et al. (2014). 

Suborder: Ammonitina Fischer, 1882

Superfamily: Perisphinctoidea Steinmann, in Steinmann & 

Döderlein, 1890

Family: Ataxioceratidae Buckman, 1921

Subfamily: Lithacoceratinae Zeiss, 1968

Genus: Lithacoceras Hyatt, 1900

Type species: Ammonites ulmensis Oppel, 1858.

Remark: The taxonomy of the subfamily Lithacoceratinae 

Zeiss,  1968  was  briefly  dealt  with  by  Zeiss  et  al.  (1996). 

According to the latter authors, typical representatives of this 

subfamily are large or very large, and they have fascipartite 

branching of ribs in the middle stages of growth. The latest, 

adult, whorls bear rough, simple ribs. 

Lithacoceras eigeltingense Ohmert and Zeiss, 1980 (M)

Fig. 3

1980 Lithacoceras (Lithacoceras) eigeltingense n. sp.; Ohmert and 

Zeiss, p. 12, pl. 1, figs 1–3.

Material:  The  only  specimen,  PL3228,  is  preserved  as 

an internal mould. Juvenile whorls are only partially preserved 

and are not very clearly visible. The last half of the last whorl 

comprises a body chamber.

Description: Large semi-evolutely coiled macroconch with 

a  wide  umbilicus. The  height  of  the  last  whorl  exceeds  the 

width. The low, rounded umbilical wall falls obliquely to the 

line of coiling. The sides of the whorl are moderately arched. 

The whorl reaches its greatest width at the level of the base of 

primary  ribs. The  flanks  of  the  whorl  then  steadily  fall  and 

merge into a rounded, moderately wide ventral side.

The youngest juvenile whorls in their lower part, which is 

not covered with a subsequent whorl, bear relatively sparse, 

simple, moderately thick curved ribs, which are concave to the 

aperture. Other whorls are poorly preserved. On the penulti-

mate whorl, there are simple, concave, curved, not very thick 

ribs, which suddenly become relatively sparser. As the umbi-

lical wall changes into the flanks of the whorl, the primary ribs 

gradually  intensify  into  the  longitudinally-elongated  thick 

bases of ones. A short, unfavourably preserved, portion on the 

last quarter of the penultimate whorl (at an umbilical width of 

approximately 140 mm) is followed by a change in the charac-

ter of the ribs, in the form of sparsely distributed coarse and 

consequently blunt-shaped ribs. The strengthening, concavely 

curved ribs on the last whorl become more sparcely spaced 

and bare blunt umbilical tubercles. Just at the beginning of the 

last  whorl,  still  on  the  phragmocone,  it  is  possible  to  see 

(imperfectly) that the ridge-shaped ribs may branch into some 

more  obscure,  relatively  thin  fascipartite,  gradually  disap-

pearing ribs at approximately 2/3 of the height of the whorl. 

These ribs are not closed and dense, but are rather sparsely 

distributed. In the next part of the shell, fascipartite ribs are no 

longer  visible.  In  general,  the  ribs  of  the  last  whorl  have 

a   triangular  shape.  They  are  curved,  and  concave  towards  

the aperture. Towards the ventral side, the ribs and inter-rib 

depressions disappear.

Measurements: At  almost  the  maximum  diameter  of  the 

specimen, with D = 337 mm, H = 98.0 (0.29), U = 160.0 (0.47), 

B ca. 84.5 (0.25), and B/H ca. 0.86. At D’ = 287 mm, H’ = 86.0 

(0.29)  U’ = 135.0  (0.47),  B’ = 71.5  (0.25)  and  B’/H’ = 0.83.  

background image

586

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

The end of the phragmocone occurs at a diameter of approxi-

mately 280 mm. When the umbilicus width is 110 mm, there 

are approximately 50 primary ribs on half of the internal whorl. 

On the last half-whorl, there are only 9–10 ridge-like ribs.

Remarks:  The  Štramberk  specimen  differs  from  other 

 morphologically  close  species  primarily  by  its  large  size, 

which places it in the macroconch category. In juvenile and 

adult specimens it is characterized by concave, curved ribs.  

The tran sition of the thinner ribs on the internal whorls into 

different,  consequent  thicker  ribs  is  relatively  abrupt  and 

occurs at a shell diameter of approximately 150 mm.

Based on the preliminary investigation of morphologically 

related  species  in  the  literature,  namely  macroconchs,  with 

large dimensions and relatively close dimensional parameters, 

only some representatives of the genera Lithacoceras Hyatt, 

1900, Ernstbrunnia Zeiss, 2001 and Usseliceras Zeiss, 1968 

are similar to the Štramberk specimen.

Data on the dimensions of the possibly close species, such 

as Lithacoceras zeissi Sapunov, 1979, Lithacoceras eigeltin­

gense  Ohmert  and  Zeiss,  1980,  Ernstbrunnia bachmayeri 

Zeiss,  2001,  or  Usseliceras franconicum  Zeiss,  1968,  show 

that they are all characterized by close H/D (0.30 to 0.33) and 

U/D (0.44 to 0.45) ratios. On their body chambers, there are 

9–10 ridge-shaped ribs on half a whorl.

The  differences  are  only  found  by  means  of  a  detailed 

 ana lysis  of  the  ribbing  of  the  above  mentioned  species.  

In  the  case  of  the  genus  Lithacoceras,  some  ribs  that  are 

 concave  and  curved  towards  the  aperture  may  bifurcate  

Fig. 3. Lithacoceras eigeltingense Ohmert and Zeiss, 1980, spec. PL 3228, Nový Jičín Regional Museum, Kotouč Quarry, lower part of  

the Early Tithonian. Scale bar equals 20 mm.

background image

587

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

on the internal whorls near the umbilical seam. On the ventral 

side  of  the  majority  of  the  last  whorl,  there  are  uniform  

thin  and  dense  ribs.  The  juvenile  ribbing  stage  in  L. zeissi 

changes  to  adult  ribbing  at  an  umbilicus  width  of  approxi-

mately 85 mm.

In representatives of the genus Ernstbrunnia the ribs on the 

internal  whorls  are  straight  or  nearly  straight.  They  do  not 

bifurcate  near  the  umbilicus.  On  smaller  paratypes  of  the 

robust species E. bachmayeri Zeiss, 2001 (pl. 11, figs. 1, 2), 

the initial section of relatively sparse and simple juvenile ribs 

are  followed  by  very  dense,  thin  ribs  on  the  inner  whorls.  

The transition from dense to adult ribbing is slow and roughly 

occurs  approximately  at  an  umbilicus  width  of  100  mm.  

The genus Ernstbrunnia , when preserved, shows dense, uni-

form ribs on the ventral side (see, e.g., E. toriseri Zeiss, 2001, 

pl. 14, fig. 4). These outer ribs resemble similar ribbing seen in 

the genus Lithacoceras.

Most likely, the only close to the discussed specimen (but 

not identical) species of the genus Usseliceras is Usseliceras 

franconicum. The Štramberk specimen, however, differs by its 

much larger size, and thus also it shows a much later changes 

from relatively long-lasting juvenile ribbing into adult blunt-

shaped ribs (only when the umbilicus width is approximately 

150 mm).

The  overall  analysis  shows  that  with  respect  to  the  size 

parameters and overall morphology, the Štramberk specimen 

best  corresponds  to  Lithacoceras  Hyatt,  1900.  The  type 

 species of that genus is L. ulmense (Oppel), first figured in 

Oppel, 1863 (pl. 74, fig. 1). The type specimen of this species 

differs from the Štramberk specimen by the higher number of 

ribs  on  the  last  half-whorl,  and  an  earlier  onset  of  strong 

 ribbing,  whereas  the  shell  diameter  is  the  same.  The  lower 

Tithonian  species  of  the  genus,  namely  Lithacoceras eigel­

tingense  Ohmert  and  Zeiss,  1980,  corresponds  best,  both 

 morphologically and dimensionally, to L. ulmense. According 

to  Ohmert  and  Zeiss  (1980),  the  largest  specimen  of  

L. eigeltingense originating  from  the  Eigeltingen  locality 

reaches  D = 280  mm;  the  specimen  has  H = 80.0  (0.29)  and 

U = 130.0 (0.46).

Zeiss et al. (1996) concluded that the genus (or subgenus) 

Virgatolithacoceras  Olóriz,  1978  is  synonymous  with  the 

genus  (subgenus)  Lithacoceras.  That  is  why  some  species 

have not been considered to be Virgatolithacoceras. Zeiss et 

al. (1996) therefore defined the new genus Euvirgalithacoceras 

(type  species  Virgatosphinctes supremus  Sutner  in  Schneid, 

1914).  Schweigert  (1996)  already  classified  Lithacoceras 

eigeltingense  as  Euvirgalithacoceras.  The  other  species,  

L. zeissi,  could  also  belong  to  Euvirgatolithacoceras.  It  is 

smaller in size, and the ribs on the living chamber are mar-

kedly concave and curved, as in E. eigeltingense.

Recently, the species E. eigeltingense has been attributed to 

the genus Lithacoceras by Parent et al., 2006, 2013. In accor-

dance with the above-mentioned authors, we also classify the 

Štramberk specimen as belonging to the genus Lithacoceras.

Distribution:  L. eigeltingense  is  known  from  the  basal 

Tithonian of the Swabian Alb Hills. According to Schweigert 

and  Scherzinger  (1995)  and  others  (e.g.,  Schweigert  and  

Zeiss, 1998, Scherzinger and Schweigert, 2016), the “eigel­

tingense-horizon”  is  the  basal  horizon  in  the  ammonite 

Lithacoceras riedense Subzone, namely in the basal part of the 

Tithonian (Hybonoticeras hybonotum Zone).

Associated microfossils: In thin sections nos. 14 980 and 

14 981  of  the  rock  from  accompanying  specimen  PL3228 

(deposited  in  Nový  Jičín  Museum),  Parastomiosphaera 

malmica  is  abundant.  This  species  provides  evidence  for  

the early part of the early Tithonian.

Subfamily: Sublithacoceratinae Zeiss, 1968

Genus: Blaschkeiceras Zeiss, 2001

Type species: Perisphinctes (Aulacosphinctes) Schoepflini 

Blaschke, 1911.

Blaschkeiceras schoepflini (Blaschke, 1911) (m)

Figs. 4A–E, 5

1911 Perisphinctes (Aulacosphinctes) Schöpflini n. sp; Blaschke, 

p. 158, pl. 4, fig. 1.

1911 Perisphinctes (Virgatosphinctes) Kittli n. sp.; Blaschke, p. 158, 

pl. 3, fig. 1.

?1984 Dorsoplanitoides? cf. kittli Blaschke; Vígh, p. 204, pl. 3,  

fig. 1.  

2001 Blaschkeiceras schoepflini (Blaschke); Zeiss, p. 42, pl. 9, figs 

1, 2, 4 (m), fig. 3 (?M), text-figs 3, 4.

?2001 Blaschkeiceras cf. kittli (Blaschke); Zeiss, p. 43, pl. 18, figs 1, 3.

Material:  An incompletely preserved external mould (spec. 

PL4925), consisting of the last three whorls, with unpreserved 

internal whorls. The last half-whorl is sometimes incomplete. 

At  least  the  terminal  portion  is  part  of  the  living  chamber.  

The  holotypes  of  B. schoepflini and B. kittli,  deposited  in 

Blaschke’s collection in Vienna, were also studied.

Description:  An  evolute  shell  with  slightly  overlapping, 

slowly expanding whorls. The whorls are strongly arched and 

low. The low umbi lical wall continually passes into the flanks. 

They also continue into the rounded venter. The width of the 

whorl is the same as its height. The greatest width of the whorl 

is in the lower third of the height of the whorl.

All the ribs on the inner whorl, up to a diameter of 80 mm, 

seem  to  be  relatively  simple  and  sparsely  spaced. They  are 

biplicate with a high rib furcation point. At appro ximately 2/3 

of  the  height  of  the  whorl  on  the  last  whorl  (almost  to  the 

maxi mum of the preserved diameter), all the ribs are biplicate. 

Rib furcation point on the internal whorls lies high; it overlies  

the  following  whorl.  The  expressive  ribs  are  substantially 

straight and slightly inclined towards the aperture. On the ven-

tral side, the ribs are slightly arched,  without interruption or 

weake ning. Only at the end of the last whorl, triplicate ribs 

appear in addition to bifurcate ribs. In one case, approximately 

in  the  middle  of  the  incomplete  last  whorl,  a  constriction 

 cannot be excluded.

Measurements:  Incomplete  spec.  PL4925  reaches  a  dia-

meter of 104.5 mm. If D is 104.3 mm, H = 32.1 (0.31), U = 53.4 

(0.51), B = 32.2 (0.31); B/H = 1.00.  On the penultimate whorl 

background image

588

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

Fig. 4. A, B — Blaschkeiceras schoepflini (Blaschke, 1911), holotype deposited in the Naturhistorisches Museum in Vienna, in lateral and 

ventral  views;  C–E:  Blaschkeiceras schoepflini (Blaschke,  1911),  spec.  PL4925  deposited  in  the  Nový  Jičín  Regional  Museum.  

C — ventral view; D, E — lateral views, debris on the 9

th

 level of the Kotouč Quarry, Early Tithonian. Scale bar equals 20 mm.

background image

589

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

(if  D  is  approximately  65  mm),  there  are  46  primary  ribs.  

On the last half-whorl, there are 28 ribs around the umbilicus.

On  the  B. schoepflini  holotype,  which  is  deposited  in  the 

Naturhistorisches  Museum  in  Vienna  (NHMW),  one  of  us  

(Z. V.)  made  the  following  measurements:  by  D = 94.5  mm, 

H = 25.6 (0.28), U = 47.5 (0.50), B = 30.0 (0.32); B/H = 1.13.  

Dmax  is  96  mm.  The  phragmocone  end  has  a  diameter  of 

approximately  67  mm.  The  specimen  has  corroded  ribbing, 

and  carries  approximately  20  primary  ribs  on  the  last 

half-whorl.

The measured data on the holotype for B. kittli (Fig. 5) are 

as  follows:  when  D = 159.5  mm,  H = 46.3  (0.29),  U = 79.5 

Fig. 5. A, B — Blaschkeiceras kittli (Blaschke, 1911), holotype deposited in the Naturhistorisches Museum in Vienna, in lateral and ventral 

views, Kotouč Quarry, Early Tithonian. Scale bar equals 20 mm. 

background image

590

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

(0.50),  and  B  ca.  50.0  (0.31);  B/H = 8.1.  Dmax  is  approxi-

mately 190 mm, and the phragmocone ends when the umbi-

licus width is 80 mm. By D = 160 mm, 14 of the primary ribs 

fall on half of the whorl. 

Remarks:  B. schoepflini  is  characterized  by  an  evolute 

 coiling in medium-sized shells (U/D of approximately 0.50) 

and sparse ribs. Initially, all the ribs bifurcate at approximately 

2/3 of the whorl height, and at the end, triple ribs also appear.

In addition to the holotype of B. schoepflini, Zeiss’s speci-

mens (2001) and the further specimen described here, larger 

similar specimens, called Pseudovirgatites kittli by Blaschke 

(1911)  exist  —  see  Zeiss,  2001,  p.  43).  The  holotype  of 

Pseudovirgatites kittli is deposited in the NHMW. The phrag-

mocone of the holotype ends when the umbilical diameter is 

approximately  80  mm.  Early  whorls  are  ribbed  similarly  to 

those of B. schoepflini. Already at the beginning of the penul-

timate  whorl,  thicker  ribs  with  bullate  umbilical  tubercles 

 follow after the previous simple ribbing. On the last whorl, 

around the middle of the whorl height, fasciculate ribs (con-

sisting of 3–4 ribs) join them. The width of the umbilicus and 

the ribbing of the inner ribs are similar to those in B. schoep­

flini.  In  view  of  these  circumstances,  in  accordance  with  

one  of  Zeiss’s  opinions  (2001,  p.  43),  we  can  assume  that  

B. schoepflini  is  the  microconch  while  Blaschkeiceras kittli 

(Blaschke) could be considered as its macroconchiate counter-

part.  In addition to the different ribbing of the adult portion of 

B. kittliB. schoepflini also differs in the fact that close to the 

umbilical seam on inner whorls, the points of bifurcation of 

ribs  are  not  visible,  whereas  in  B. kittli the  ribs  are  visible.  

In B. kittli, the coarse ribbing begins only when the shell dia-

meter is larger than that of specimens of B. schoepflini.

Distribution. In addition to further unlocalized finds in the 

area  of    Štramberk,  B. schoepflini occurs  in  the  area  of 

Ernstbrunn  (Lower  Austria)  in  the  upper  part  of  the  lower 

Tithonian  and  unspecified  upper  Tithonian  (Zeiss,  2001)  

and  in  the  Gerecse  Mountains  in  Hungary  (?  the  lower 

Tithonian).

Associated microfossils: The described specimen, PL4925, 

was found in the debris after several phases of blasting in the 

northeastern part of the Kotouč Quarry’s eighth level. The thin 

section of the encasing limestone no. 13 748 contains micro-

fossils,  including  Parastomiosphaera malmica,  from  the 

lower Tithonian. 

Genus: Kutekiceras Zeiss, 2001

Type species: Perisphinctes pseudocolubrinus Kilian, 1895.

Kutekiceras pseudocolubrinum (Kilian, 1895)

Fig. 6A–B

1870 Ammonites colubrinus Reinecke sp.; Zittel, p. 107, pl. 33 (9), 

figs. 6 a –c (lectotype in Donze & Enay, 1961, p. 181), pl. 34, 

?figs 4–6.

1880 Ammonites colubrinus Rein.; Favre, p. 32, pl. 2, fig. 12.

1895 Perisphinctes pseudocolubrinus n. sp. (= A. colubrinus Zittel, 

Kilian, Toucas, non Reinecke); Kilian, p. 679.

1915 Perisphinctes pseudocolubrinus Kilian; Schneid, p. 326, pl. 2, 

figs 7, 7a.

1961 Perisphinctes(?) pseudocolubrinus Kilian; Donze & Enay, 

p. 180. 

1978 Subdichotomoceras pseudocolubrinus (Kilian); Olóriz Saéz, 

p. 476, pl. 55, figs 8–10.

?1985 Subdichotomoceras cf. pseudocolubrinum (Kilian); Tavera 

Benitez, p. 56, pl. 5, fig. 3, text-fig. 5F.

1990 Subdichotomoceras pseudocolubrinum (Kilian); Fözy, p. 327, 

pl. 1, fig. 6.

2001 Kutekiceras pseudocolubrinum (Kilian); Zeiss, p. 45, pl. 10, 

figs 1–4,?8, text-fig. 6. 

2013 Kutekiceras pseudocolubrinum (Kilian); Fözy & Scherzinger, 

p. 233, pl. 16, figs 1, 2, 6.

Material: A quite favourably preserved internal mould with 

somewhat corroded inner whorls with unfavourably preserved 

fragments of the suture lines (spec. Z-7349). The last 1/8 of 

the whorl is a part of the body chamber.

Description: An evolute specimen with low whorl heights.  

Whorls  a  little  wider  than  high.  The  umbilicus  is  wide.  

The umbilical wall is low and declines obliquely to the umbi-

lical seam. This wall passes through the curved zone into the 

vaulted  flanks.  The  largest  whorl  width  is  at  approximately 

half  the  whorl  height.  The  flanks  gradually  pass  into  the 

rounded venter.

The  sculpture  consists  of  stronger,  sparsely  spaced  and 

slightly proverse ribs. Primaries are straight in the lower half 

of  the  whorl.  At  approximately  half  the  whorl  height  they 

bifurcate (on the inner whorls just below the umbilical seam). 

At  the  point  of  bifurcation,  weak  lateral  tubercles  are  sug-

gested. The front branch of the bifurcated ribs conti nues with 

the same direction as the primary ribs. The rear branch is back-

ward inclined. The only simple ribs and intercalatories occur 

at the end of the last whorl. On the ventral side, there is a nar-

row  and  shallow  siphonal  belt  with  slightly  weakened  ribs. 

The bifurcate ribs on the opposite side mutually alternate, and 

the rear secondary rib on one side is the front rib on the oppo-

site side.

Measurements: Dmax = 59.8 mm, H = 16.6 (0.28), U = 31.0 

(0.52), and B = 18.3 (0.31); B/H = 1.10. The phrag mocone ends 

at a diameter of approximately 55 mm. On the last half-whorl, 

there are 25 primary ribs and 49 ribs on the ventral side.

Remarks:  Our  figured  specimen  corresponds  well  to  the 

specimen  depicted  by  Zeiss  (2001,  pl.  10,  figs.  1,  2)  and 

includes a shallow siphonal furrow and a zigzag arrangement 

of  the  bifurcated  ribs  on  the  outside.    However,  the  above- 

mentioned species does not include Zeiss’s specimens (2001, 

pl. 10, figs. 5–7) which he marked with an aff. or a cf.

Distribution: According to Fözy and Scherzinger (2013), 

the above- mentioned species is supposed to be abundant in the 

lower Tithonian of the Mediterranean bioprovince. How ever, 

there are usually no data on its detailed stratigraphic position. 

This is the case, for example, with the lectotype from Italy and 

finds from Hungary and Austria (Ernst brunn). According to 

Olóriz Saéz (1978), it occurs in the Haploceras verruciferum 

and  Richterella richteri  zones  (the  upper  part  of  the  lower 

Tithonian) in Spain.

background image

591

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

Fig. 6. A, B — Kutekiceras pseudocolubrinum (Kilian, 1895), spec. Z-7349 deposited in the Silesian Museum in Opava, in the ventral and 

lateral views, Early Tithonian; C — Paraulacosphinctes transitorius (Oppel, 1865), spec. 3232 deposited in the Nový Jičín Regional Museum, 

Kotouč Quarry, Late Tithonian; D, E — Riasanites cf. swistowianus (Nikitin, 1888), spec. B13303 depo sited in the Museum of Ostrava in 

Ostrava in the lateral and ventral views, Kotouč Quarry, Early Berriasian; F, G — Pseudargentiniceras abscissum (Oppel, 1865), spec. Z-4604 

deposited in the Silesian Museum in Opava, in the lateral and ventral views, Kotouč Quarry, Early Berriasian. Scale bar equals 20 mm. 

background image

592

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

Subfamily Paraulacosphinctinae Tavera, 1985

Genus Paraulacosphinctes Schindewolf, 1925

Type species: Ammonites senex (Oppel, 1865). Štramberk.

Paraulacosphinctes transitorius (Oppel, 1865  

in Zittel, 1868)

Figs. 6C, 7A–B

1865 Ammonites transitorius  Oppel, p. 554.

1868 Ammonites transitorius Opp.; Zittel, p. 103, pl. 22, figs. 1–4, 6 

(m), fig. 5 (M). 

1890 Perisphinctes transitorius Oppel; Toucas, p. 599, pl. 16, figs 

5a,b, 6a,b (m).

1890 Perisphinctes senex Oppel sp.; Toucas, p. 599, pl. 16, fig. 7 

(m),?8. 

1936 Perisphinctes (Aulacosphinctes) eudichotomus Oppel; Roman, 

p. 15, pl. 1, figs 8, 8a, 10, 10a (m), non fig. 11 (= ?Zittelia 

algeriana Tavera Benitez, 1985). 

?1936 Persisphinctes (Virgatosphinctes) transitorius Oppel; Roman, 

p. 15, pl. 1, fig. 9 (m).

1965 Virgatosphinctes transitorius (Oppel); Houša in Špinar et al., 

p. 524, fig. VIII-272 (m).

1977 Paraulacosphinctes transitorius (Oppel) sensu Sapunov; 

Sapunov, pl. 5, fig. 2 (m).

?1978 Virgatosphinctes transitorius (Oppel); Řehoř et al., p. 85, pl. 

36, fig. 2 (M).

1979 Paraulacosphinctes transitorius (Oppel); Sapunov, p. 127, pl. 

36, fig. 2 (m), non fig. 1 (= P. senoides? Tavera Benitez, 

1985). 

1985 Paraulacosphinctes transitorius (Oppel); Tavera Benitez, 

p. 84, pl. 11, figs 1–5 (m), text-figs 7A, 7D.

2001 Paraulacosphinctes transitorius (Oppel); Zeiss, p. 62, pl. 19, 

figs 1, 1a (M),?text-fig. 22.

2011 Paraulacosphinctes cf. transitorius (Oppel); Arkadiev, p. 240, 

plate, figs 1–3 (m),?4.

2012 Paraulacosphinctes cf. transitorius (Oppel); Arkadiev & 

Bogdanova, p. 140, pl. 1, figs 1–3 (m), ?4 (= Arkadiev, 2011).

Material:  Specimens  AS  III  235  to  AS  III  240  of  von 

Zittel’s type material (1868) are held in Munich. The speci-

mens  are  partly  preserved  as  internal  moulds  and  partly  as 

an external moulds. For the larger specimen III AS 236, which 

was labelled as a paratype by Zeiss (2001, p. 62 = Zittel, 1868, 

pl. 22, fig. 5), only a fragment is depicted. Another part of this 

specimen,  which  was  not  illustrated  by  Zittel,  is  shown  by 

Zeiss (2001, pl. 21, fig. 1). Specimen III AS 237 (in Zittel, 

1868, pl. 22, figs. 1 a–c) represents the lectotype defined by 

Sapunov  (1979,  p.  127).  Specimen AS  III  240  has  a  well- 

preserved suture, which was depicted by Zittel (1868, pl. 22, 

fig. 3). In addition to the type material, a very favourably pre-

served specimen from the Nový Jičín Museum, PL3232, and 

less than half of an incomplete large specimen deposited in 

Remeš’s  collection  at  Charles  University  in  Prague  (spec.  

UK 2) have also been examined. The latter specimen has only 

partly  and  poorly  preserved  middle  whorls,  approximately 

half of the penultimate whorl, and more than a quarter of the 

last whorl. The internal whorls have a well-preserved recrys-

tallized  original  shell.  The  last  whorl,  which  as  a  whole 

belongs to the phragmocone, is preserved as an internal mould 

with partially preserved suture-lines. On its surface, remnants 

of the umbilical wall of the subsequent whorl are still visible. 

In the past, the ventral side of this specimen was partly and 

inappropriately affected by grinding.

Microconchs: Medium-size, semi-evolute shells with rela-

tively wide umbilicus. Whorls are, with the possible exception 

of the earliest whorls, slightly higher than wide. The whorls 

are widest near the umbilicus. The whorl flanks are mode rately 

arched and merge into the narrower, rounded ventral side.

The whorls have relatively thin and quite sparsely spaced 

ribs  which  closely  bifurcate  at  the  upper  part  of  the  whorl 

flank.  The  bifurcated  ribs  are  close  to  each  other.  Near  to  

base of the low umbilical wall, the ribs are concave and curved 

towards  the  aperture.  On  the  flanks,  the  ribs  are  basically 

straight up or slightly S-shaped and slightly proverse. On the 

internal  whorls,  the  furcation  point  of  ribs  is  not  visible. 

Occasionally,  there  may  be  simple  ribs  with  intercalatories.  

In  the  type  material,  a  siphonal  furrow  is  always  drawn  (in 

Zittel,  1868,  pl.  22).  Instead  of  the  furrow,  in  the  type  spe-

cimens, it is, in fact, usually a smooth strip or belt. On the 

lectotype (Zittel, pl. 22, fig. 1), which is represented by phrag-

mocone, and on the specimen in pl. 22, fig. 2a, a very shallow 

depression occurs in places (especially near the aperture), with 

continuous ribbing that lacks deflection. Near the end of the 

last  whorl,  the  above-mentioned  smooth  strip  is  already 

missing.

Macroconchs:  Large  semi-evolute  shells.  The  rather  low 

and  rounded  umbilical  wall  diagonally  dipping  towards  the 

previous  whorl.  The  whorl  flanks  are  heavily  arched.  

The largest arching is located around the base of the whorl. 

The ventral side is narrower and strongly arched. The whorl 

height is slightly greater than the width.

On the internal whorls, only simple, proverse, fairly straight 

and not very thick ribs are visible. At the beginning of the last 

whorl,  it  is  obvious  that  the  ribs  above  the  umbilical  seam 

closely bifurcate, and the furcation points therefore are con-

cealed  on  the  internal  whorls.  Eventually,  bifurcate  ribs  are 

replaced with triplicate ribs, which are followed by fascipartite 

ribs. Short intercalatory ribs are also inserted there. The ribs 

gradually  become  thicker  and  more  widely  spaced.  After 

approximately half of the last whorl, a constriction appears, 

accompanied by a rib with many branches along the rear side 

of the constriction and a simple rib along its front side. In the 

final  quarter  of  the  last  whorl  of  specimen  PL3232,  in  the 

lower part of the height of the whorl, there are thick, sparse 

simple ribs that bear umbilical bullae. At approximately half 

the whorl height, these primary ribs break down into a bundle 

of three to four thinner ribs. The bundles may be intercalated 

with one inserted rib. The ribs pass the ventral side without 

any hint of a siphonal furrow or interruptions; they are only 

slightly  curved  to  the  aperture.  On  the  phragmocone’s  

incompletely  preserved  penultimate  whorl  (not  the  terminal 

one)  of  spec.  UK2,  there  are  strong  bulky-shaped  ribs  that 

begin  with  relatively  blunt,  massive  umbilical  tubercles. 

Above half the height of the whorl towards the venter, the ribs 

become  thinner. The primary ribs at the preserved beginning 

background image

593

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

of the last whorl are followed by bundles of ribs with three to 

four branches, which diminish to the ventral side. The ribs are 

concave and curved towards the aperture. The last preserved 

ribs  on  the  side  of  the  whorl  have  generally  the  shape  of 

an asymmetrical triangle with a straighter rear side. 

Measurements: Measurements of the P. transitorius are in 

the Table 1. At the end of the last quarter of the whorl (spec. 

PL3232), there are only 6 primary ribs. The whorl height is 

slightly greater than its width (at H = ca. 56.5 mm, B = 53.5 mm, 

and B/H = 0.95).

Fig. 7.  A–B: Paraulacosphinctes transitorius (Oppel, 1865), spec. UK2 deposited in the Remeš collection, Charles University in Prague, 

Department  of  Palaeontology.  A  —  detail  view  of  ribbing  on  the  beginning  of  the  last  whorl,  B  —  whole  view,  Kotouč  Quarry,  

Late Tithonian; C — Pseudosubplanites lorioli (Zittel, 1868), spec. PL 4927, deposited in the Nový Jičín Regional Museum. Kotouč Quarry, 

the 5

th

 level, layer 021, Early Tithonian. Scale bar equals 20 mm. 

background image

594

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

Remarks: From the above description, we therefore con-

sider P. transitorius to be a dimorphic species. The dimorphic 

couple in this case have the same name for micro- and macro-

conchs.  The  microconchs  reach  a  maximum  diameter  of 

approximately 130 mm. The whorl flanks are relatively flat. 

On the phragmocone, a ventral furrow or a smooth tape, which 

disappears towards the aperture, are evident. On the half whorl 

on specimens with diameters of approximately 90 mm, there 

are approximately 40 primary ribs and twice that amount on 

the ventral side.

The  macroconchs  reach  up  to  a  maximum  diameter  of 

260 mm (e.g., the not illustrated specimen AS III 239 from 

Zittel’s collection in Munich). The whorl flanks are arched, 

which  declines  to  the  ventral  side.  The  adult  whorl  shape  

is  shown  in  text-fig.  6B  in  Vašíček  and  Skupien  (2016).  

The dense ribbing of the internal whorls up to diameters of 

approximately 120–130 mm is replaced by increasingly sparser 

and taller ribs. It is unclear whether a siphonal furrow is deve-

loped on early whorls because there is no specimen available 

that would properly expose the ventral side. On the last whorl 

of  the  largest  available  specimens,  there  are  thick  ribs  with 

distinct blunt umbilical tubercles. Above half the height of the 

whorl, the thick ribs are followed by barely visible bundles of 

triple ribs or ribs with four branches. The primary ribs and the 

rib bundles diminish towards the ventral side, or bundle ribs 

are not visible (Zittel 1868, pl. 22, fig. 5). Akin to most micro-

conchs, the B/H ratio for the macroconchs is close to 1 (typi-

cally  0.90  to  0.95).  In  their  synonymies,  Tavera  Benitez 

(1985),  Sapunov  (1979), Arkadiev  (2011),  and Arkadiev  & 

Bogdanova (2012) do not consider Zittel’s specimen (1868, 

p. 22, fig. 5) to be P. transitorius.

A close species is Paraulacosphinctes senex (Oppel, 1865). 

A  basic  comparison  with  P. transitorius and  the  measured 

parameters of Munich macroconchs are listed in Vašíček and 

Skupien (2016, p. 20). When comparing both species in that 

contribution, however, there is misinformation; the lectotype 

P. transitorius is mistakenly stated as the paratype, i.e., spec. 

AS  III  236  (a  fragment  of  which  is  shown  in  Zittel  (1868,  

pl. 22, Fig. 5). The lectotype is specimen AS III 237, as deter-

mined by Sapunov (1979).

Distribution:  According  to  Zeiss  (2001),  P. transitorius 

occurs  in  the  upper  Tithonian  at  Štramberk  and  in  Lower 

Austria.  Furthermore,  microconchs  of  the  above-mentioned 

species  are  reported  from  the  upper  Tithonian  of  Spain, 

Algeria,  Bulgaria  and  Crimea.  Many  specimens  under  this 

name are deposited in collections in Vienna and Munich. 

Associated microfossils:  The  thin  section  of  limestone  

(no.  14 904)  with  P. transitorius  from  Remeš’s  collection 

(UK2) contains microfossils, including Saccocoma sp., which 

demonstrate the Tithonian.

Subfamily: Himalayitinae Spath, 1925

Genus: Riasanites Spath, 1925

Type species: Hoplites rjasanensis Nikitin, 1888. Ryazanian 

Stage of the Russian Platform (see Mitta, 2008, p. 251).

Remark: Mitta (2008, 2011) regarded the genus Riasanites 

as a  member of the family Himalyitidae Spath, 1925 rather 

than family Neocomitidae as in previous concepts. 

Riasanites cf. swistowianus (Nikitin, 1888)

Fig. 6 D–E

1888 Hoplites swistowianus Nikitin p. 93, pl. 1, figs 5–8.

2008 Riasanites swistowianus (Nikitin); Mitta, p. 258, pl. 5, figs 5, 

10, pl. 6, figs 1–10 (cum syn.).

Material:  A  specimen  with  approximately  the  two  last 

whorls  with  partially  preserved  recrystallized  original  shell 

(spec. B13303). The last whorl with two imperfectly preserved 

parts belongs to a slightly corroded internal mould with badly 

preserved fragments of suture-lines, except on the final seg-

ment. It is not completely clear whether the entire specimen 

belongs  to  the  phragmocone  or  whether  its  end  segment 

already represents the beginning of the body chamber.

Description: An evolute shell with relatively low, not very 

wide whorls and a wide umbilicus. The whorl height is about 

the same as the width. The umbilical wall is low, rounded and 

continually  merges  into  the  whorl  flanks.  The  flanks  are 

slightly arched. The greatest width of the whorl is in the lowest 

quarter  of  its  height. The  flanks  with  an  indistinct  shoulder 

Table 1: Measurements (in mm) and ratios of Paraulacosphinctes transitorius (Oppel, 1865). AS III — Bayerische Staatssammlung in Munich,  

PL — Nový Jičín Regional Museum.

Spec.

D

H

U

B

H/D

U/D

B/D

B/H

UR

VR

AS III 238 (pl. 22/6)
AS III 235 (pl. 22/2)
AS III 237 (lectotype)
AS III 236 – 2

nd

 part 

PL3232 

(M)

42.6
67.1
90.5

126.0
144.0

15.0
23.5
30.4
37.7
43.3

16.7
26.4
38.0
60.0
65.0

15.7
22.2
27.5
34.0

c.41.0

0.32
0.35

0.335

0.30
0.30

0.39
0.39
0.42
0.48
0.45

0.37
0.33
0.30
0.27
0.28

1.05
0.94
0.90
0.90
0.95

39
45

32

75

96

Measurements based on the literature

Sapunov (1979)
Tavera (1985) – RR31
              spec. TMj.3.5
Arkadiev (2011)

85.0
82.3
93.0
95.0

25.5
27.2
30.0
31.5

39.5
33.6
40.1
39.5

23.3
24.2

0.30
0.33
0.32
0.33

0.46
0.41
0.43
0.42

0.28
0.26

0.86
0.81

36
43
39

78

background image

595

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

merge into the slightly arched ventral side. The cross-section 

of the whorl is subquadrangular.

The  shell  is  sparsely  ribbed.  Near  the  umbilical  seam, 

 simple, initially straight and then slightly S-shaped, relatively 

sharp, ribs begin, and are inclined to the aperture. On the last 

whorl,  the  bifurcate,  widely  open  ribs  diverge  at  different 

 levels  at  approximately  the  middle  of  the  whorl  height.  

The front secondary rib is often proversely diverted from its 

original direction. Sparsely spaced ribs pass the ventral side 

without  interruption;  they  are  slightly  curved  towards  the 

aperture. Places where the ribs bifurcate on the penultimate 

whorl are not overlain by the last whorl. Occasionally, there 

are simple ribs.

Measurements:  The  specimen  reaches  a  diameter  of 

47 mm. By D = 39.6 mm, H = 13.5 (0.34), U = 17.5 (0.44), and 

B  ca.  12.0  (0.30).  When  Hmax = 15.3  mm,  Bmax  is  ca. 

15.0 mm; B/H is ca. 0.98.  By the shell diameter 47 mm, there 

are 7 primary ribs at the umbilicus and 14 ventrolateral ribs on 

the last quarter of the last whorl. One of the ribs is simple.

Remarks: Dimensional parameters, sparse ribs that pass the 

ventral side without interruption, and the whorl cross-section 

are close to those features in R. swistowianus. Because of the 

imperfect preservation of the specimen, the determination is 

given with a cf.

Distribution: R. swistowianus is species typical for the lower 

part  of  the  Ryazanian  Stage  in  Central  Russia.  After  Mitta 

(2007) this is the index species of the swistowianus  horizon,  

the lowermost Riasanites­bearing horizon of the Ryazanian.

Associated microfossils:  The  specimen  deposited  in  the 

Museum of Ostrava has no precise locality data. In the thin 

section  of  accompanying  limestone  no.  13 979,  inter alia

Calpionella alpina and Crassicollaria parvula occur, demon-

strating the lower Berriasian. 

Family: Neocomitidae Salfeld, 1921

Subfamily: Pseudosubplanitinae Nikolov and Sapunov, 1977

Genus: Pseudosubplanites Le Hégarat, 1973

Type species: Pseudosubplanites berriasensis Le Hégarat, 

1973.

Pseudosubplanites lorioli (Zittel, 1868)

Fig. 7 C

1868 Ammonites Lorioli Zitt.; Zittel, p. 103, pl. 20, figs 6 a – c, 8 

(lectotype), non fig. 7 a, b.

?1880 Ammonites (Phylloceras) Lorioli, Zittel; Favre, p. 33, pl. 3, 

figs 1, 2.

?1889 Perisphinctes Lorioli Zitt.; Kilian, p. 652, pl. 28, fig. 3 a, b.

non 1890 Perisphinctes Lorioli Zittel sp.; Toucas,  p. 589, pl. 16,  

fig. 2 a, b (= ?Pseudosubplanites sp.).

?1939 Beriasella euxina (Retowski); Mazenot, p. 125, pl. 20, fig. 5a, b.

1939 Berriasella Lorioli (Zittel); Mazenot, p. 125, pl. 19, figs 3 a – d 

(lectotype), 4 a, b, 5 a, b, 6 a, b, 7 a,b.

1982 Pseudosubplanites lorioli (Zittel); Nikolov, p. 42, pl. 2, fig. 3, 

pl. 5, fig. 5, non fig. pl. 2, fig. 2 (= Hegaratella crymensis 

Bogdanova et Arkadiev, 2005), non pl. 5, fig. 6  

(= Pseudosubplanites fasciculatus Bogdanova et Arkadiev, 

2005), non pl. 5, fig. 7 (= Berriasella jacobi Mazenot, 1939), 

non pl. 5, fig. 8 (= Beriasella oppeli Kilian, 1889)

1985 Berriasella (Pseudosubplanites) lorioli (Zittel); Tavera 

Benitez, p. 261, fig. 20/I, pl. 36, fig. 10.

2012 Pseudosubplanites lorioli (von Zittel); Cecca et al., p. 111,  

fig. 5A,B.

?2013 Pseudosubplanites lorioli (Zittel); Szives & Fözy, p. 313,  

pl. 9, fig. 3.

2016 Pseudosubplanites lorioli (Zittel); Hoedemaeker et al., p. 120, 

pl. 2, figs 12 – 17 (m), pl. 3, figs 1 – 9 (M) - cum syn. 

Material: Two incomplete specimens (PL 4927, PL 4928) 

from our new collection from the Kotouč Quarry. The more 

complete of these has less than a quarter of the last whorl pre-

served, as a deformed external mould, with a very imperfect 

imprint of the internal whorls and there is a poorly preserved 

counterpart  of  the  same  specimen.  Furthermore,  there  are 

an imperfectly preserved fragment of approximately quarter of 

the last whorl, a corresponding whorl portion of the previous 

one and a plaster cast of the lectotype (spec. AS III 90).

Description: Semi-evolute specimens with relatively high, 

but  quite  narrow,  whorls  and  moderately  broad  umbilicus.  

The cross section of the slightly arched last whorl is generally 

an elongate hexagon (leaving aside the low umbilical and sub-

trapezoidal  wall).  A  low  umbilical  wall  obliquely  declines 

towards the umbilical seam. At the greatest whorl width, the 

umbilical wall quite suddenly passes into slightly arched high 

flanks. The flanks rather abruptly merge into a slightly arched 

and rather narrow ventral side.

The  last  whorl  carries  quite  wide  and  not  very  densely 

spaced ribs. The ribs start above the umbilical seam as simple 

ribs.  At  approximately  half  way  up  the  whorl,  all  the  ribs 

(closely)  bifurcate  into  secondary  ribs.  Overall,  they  are 

slightly  S-shaped.  The  front  secondary  ribs  continue  in  the 

direction of the primary rib. The rear secondary rib is diverted 

back and, when compared to the front one, is distinctly con-

cave curved towards the aperture. All the ribs on the relatively 

flat venter are only slightly bent towards the aperture and are 

not interrupted. Slight thickening is indicated where the ribs 

bifurcate. In addition, a thickening of the short ribs is noti-

ceable where the flanks merge into the venter.

Measurements: Accurate measurement and quantification 

of ribs on our material is not possible when there is not any 

measu rable  diameter.  With  a  more  complete  specimen  (PL 

4927), it can be estimated that the shell reached a maximum 

diameter  of  approximately  49  mm.  If  the  said  diameter  is 

H = 19.2 (0.39), U = 15.5 (0.32), and B is approximately 13.0 

(0.265), then B/H = 0.68. On a quarter of the whorl, there are 

approximately  10  ribs  at  the  umbilicus  and  19  ribs  in  the 

 ventral area.

On the second fragment, B is approximately 11.5 mm, and 

H is 16.0 mm, and B/H = 0.72. 

Description of lectotype  (Zittel’s  collection):  A  small 

semi-evolute  specimen  with  whorls  of  medium  height  and 

moderately  broad  umbilicus. The  umbilical  wall  is  low  and 

continuously  gives  way  to  slightly  arched  flanks. After  the 

indicated edge, the flanks pass into the relatively narrow and 

background image

596

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

slightly arched ventral side. The phragmocone ends occur at 

a diameter of 25 mm.

The sculpture consists of S-shaped ribs, all of which bifur-

cate at approximately the mid whorl or slightly above. The front 

bifurcation immediately follows the course of the primary rib, 

and the rear secondary rib is tilted backwards. The rear rib is 

concave and curved towards the aperture. The ribs cross the 

venter without interruption and in a nearly straight line.

Measurements:  When  D = 34.5  mm  (nearly  max.),  

the  lectotype  has  H = 13.2  (0.38),  U  =  11.7  (0.34),  B = 10.5 

(0.30), and B/H = 0.795. On half of the whorl at this diameter, 

there  are  18  primary  ribs  at  the  umbilicus  and  35  ribs  on  

the  perimeter,  whereas  there  are  32  to  33  primary  ribs  on  

the entire whorl.

Remarks: The lectotype of P. lorioli has been reinterpreted 

many times. In the second half of the last whorl of of Zittel’s 

lectotype (D = 34.5 mm), there are 18 primary ribs, whereas on 

the  whole  of  the  whorl,  the  number  of  ribs  is  32–33.  This 

means that in P. lorioli during the growth of the shell, the num-

ber of ribs changed significantly. After studying the lectotype 

cast at our disposal, a considerably more significant finding is 

that there are only bifurcated ribs on the last whorl. On his 

drawing of the lectotype, Le Hégarat (1973) (pl. 1, fig. 3) mis-

takenly  depicts  one  triplicate  rib.  On  the  opposite  side  of  

the whorl as on the whole specimen, only bifurcate ribs are 

located. Le Hégarat’s triple rib on the lectotype P. lorioli is 

mentioned again in later works. It must be added that Mazenot 

(1939) admits a very rare occurrence of triple ribs in P. lorioli

as demonstrated by some later pictures of the species. Mazenot 

(1939)  also  found  that  the  body  chamber  on  the  lectotype 

begins at a diameter of approximately 25 mm (see the arrow in 

pl. 19, fig. 3b).

P. lorioli has been recently revised by Hoedemaeker et al. 

(2016), who supposes sexual dimorphism [of the male P. lorioli], 

distinguishing microconchs (m) and macroconchs (M).

Distribution:  According  to  Hoedemaeker  et  al.  (2016), 

P. lorioli  occurs  in  the  Berriasella jacobi Zone  (the  lower 

Berriasian) in France, Spain, Bulgaria and Iran. Zittel’s lecto-

type came from the no longer existing site of the quarried out 

Koňákov quarry (Koniakau) near Český Těšín.

Associated microfossils:  We  found  two  fragments  of 

P. lorioli in 2016 in the Štramberk Limestone in the Kotouč 

Quarry  in  Štramberk,  on  the  fifth  level  of  the  section  B,  

layer 021. The micropalaeontological contents of calpionellids 

Calpionella alpina Lorenz,  Crassicollaria massutiniana 

(Colom), Crassicollaria parvula Remane, Crassicollaria   brevis 

Remane  of  the  accompanying  rock  indicate  the  lower 

Berriasian (the Calpionella alpina Subzone).     

Subfamily: Neocomitinae Salfeld, 1921

Genus: Pseudargentiniceras Spath, 1925

Type species: Ammonites abscissus Oppel, 1865.

Pseudargentiniceras abscissum (Oppel in von Zittel, 1868)

Fig. 6F, G

1865 Ammonites abscissus Oppel, p. 556.

1868 Ammonites abscissus  Oppel in von Zittel, p. 97, pl. 19, figs 1a,b, 

2, 4a–c, ?3a, b.

2005 Pseudargentiniceras abscissum (Oppel); Klein, p. 232 (cum syn.).

2013 Pseudargentiniceras abscissum (Oppel); Szives & Fözy, 

p. 320, pl. 5, fig. 3.

Material: Less than half of the specimen with an incom-

plete last and penultimate whorl with only one side of a poorly 

preserved internal mould (spec. Z4606). The entire specimen 

belongs to the phragmocone.

Description:  A  semi-involute  shell  with  medium-height 

whorls,  which  are  relatively  narrow.  The  umbilical  wall  is  

low  and  declines  very  steeply  towards  the  umbilical  seam.  

The umbilical wall continuously changes into slightly arched 

flanks. The last whorl reaches its greatest width in the lower 

third of the height of the whorl. The flanks then clearly incline 

to the venter. The flanks are not sharply separated from venter 

side. The ventral side is narrow and relatively flat.

The  ribbing  is  moderately  dense  and  of  a  uniform  type. 

Simple primary ribs begin in the upper part of the umbilical 

wall and, are not initially sharp. Overall, the ribs are slightly 

S-shaped. At the bottom part, the ribs are almost straight and 

proverse. At approximately half of the whorl height, they are 

slightly  convex  towards  the  aperture.  At  2/3  of  the  whorl 

height, all the ribs closely bifurcate and incline towards the 

aperture. In the ventral region, they have a concave curvature. 

The rear branch of the bifurcated pair follows the course of the 

primary rib. The front branch proversely diverts. All the ribs 

cross  the  venter  without  interruption  and  deflection. At  the 

beginning of the last whorl, preserved as an internal mould, 

a narrow furrow is indicated in the siphonal area. At one point 

near  the  end  of  the  specimen,  despite  a  poorly  preserved 

umbilical  area,  umbilical  tubercles  are  visible  on  two  ribs. 

Furcation points on the penultimate whorl are overlapped by 

the last whorl.

Measurements:  Specimen  no.  Z4606  reached  approxi-

mately  87  mm  in  diameter.   At  the  estimated  D = 84.5  mm, 

H = 31.0  (0.37),  U = 32.8  (0.39),  and  B = 21.0  (0.25).  When 

Bmax = 21.5  mm,  Hmax = 29.3  mm;  B/H = 0.73. At  the  esti-

mated Dmax, the estimated number of ribs on the last whorl is 

26 at the umbilicus, and 52 ventrolateral ribs.

Remarks: The last half of the last whorl of the largest speci-

mens  [of  that  species]  deposited  in  Zittel’s  collection  in 

Munich  (pl.  19,  fig.  1b)  has  no  contact  with  the  previous 

whorl. However, this anomaly could be the result of the spe-

cific mode of preservation. Characteristic umbilical tubercles 

on the lectotype (Zittel, 1868, pl. 19, fig. 4 a–c) occur only 

above a diameter of ca. 70 mm. 

Distribution: In addition to finds at Štramberk, P. abscissum 

occurs  in  the  lower  Berriasian  (Berriasella jacobi  Zone)  in 

south-eastern France, Spain and Hungary.

Associated microfossils: According to the collection label, 

the  old  find  by  V.  Houša  originated  from  the  second  level  

of the Kotouč Quarry in the Štramberk Limestone boulder in 

the Plaňava Formation. In thin section no. 13 714, the small 

background image

597

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

forms of Calpionella alpina dominate over loricas of Crassi­

collaria parvula,  C. brevis,  Tintinnopsella carpathica and 

other  microfaunistic  remnants.  This  is  the  evidence  of  the 

lower Berriasian age.

Results of microfacies analysis                  

Some of samples studied yielded stratigraphically important 

bio markers which make it possible to divide them into three 

biozones (see Figs. 8–11). The first group (represented by thin 

sections 13 748, 14 980, 14 981 from limestones with ammonite 

species Lithacoceras eigeltingense, Blaschkeiceras  schoepflini, 

B. kittli, and  Kutekiceras pseudocolubrinum),  belong  to 

pelbio intraclastic,  pelbioclastic  wackestones,  packstones  to 

grainstones  (Fig.  8A–C)  in  which  fragments  of  bivalves, 

 crinoids (also planktonic Saccocoma sp. Fig. 8 F, G, H), echi-

noid ossicles, aptychi, ooids, sponges, sponge spicules, corals, 

gastropods, ostracods, brachiopods, bryozoans, fragments of 

miliolid foraminifera, benthic foraminifera (Pseudocyclammina 

lituus (Yokoyama) (Fig. 8D), Mohlerina basiliensis (Mohler), 

Protomarssonella  sp., Lenticulina sp., Trocholina sp., 

Pseudogaudryina  sp., Andersenolina sp.,  Nodosaria  sp., 

Lenticulina sp.), dasycladalean algae (Salpingoporella annulata 

Carozzi, Fig. 8E),  red algae,  microencrusters of Crescentiella 

morronenis  (Crescenti),  tubes  of  Aeolisacus  sp., Terebella 

lapilloides Münster (Fig. 8G),  algal microproblematicum of 

Muranella  sp.,  and  cysts  of  calcareous  dinoflagellates  — 

 common Parastomiosphaera malmica  (Borza)  (Fig.  8I, J), 

Colomisphaera minutissima (Colom)  (Fig.  8K)  and 

Colomisphaera misolensis (Vogler). The age of this part of the 

Štramberk Limestone is earliest early Tithonian, on the basis 

of  the  presence  of  the  dinoflagellate  Parastomiosphaera 

 malmica,  the biomarker of the Malmica Zone (sensu Reháková, 

2000).  According  to  morphological  varieties  of  saccocomid 

skeletal elements observed in thin sections the early Tithonian 

Sc6 Saccocomid Zone proposed by Benzaggagh et al. (2015) 

can be confirmed . Authors have correlated this zone with the 

Micracanthoceras ponti ammonite Zone.  

In the second group of samples (thin sections 14 904, 14 905, 

14 982,  14 983  and  15 119/B,  from  limestones  with  Para­

ulacosphinctes transitorius, P. senex and  Boughdiriella 

choutensis)  pelbiooncoidal  wackestones  to  grainstones,  bio-

clastic-intraclastic  wackestones,  packstones,  grainstones  to 

rudstones were identified (Fig. 9A–D).  The limestones  studied 

contain  ooids,  irregular  algal  nodules  surrounding  small 

 bioclasts  and  micritized  rounded  clasts  with  fragments  of 

bivalves, crinoids, echinoids, ophiuroids, spicules, ostracods, 

bryozoans,  brachiopods,  fragments  of  dasycladalean  algae 

(Salpingoporella annulata Carozzi, Macroporella praturloni 

Dragastan,  Clypeina  sp.,  also  microproblematicum  of 

Muranella sp.), worm tubes of Terebella sp., calcimicrobes of 

Girvanella  type,  miliolids  (Rumanolocullina  verbizhiensis 

(Dulub), Quinquelocullina  sp.,  Istrolocullina  sp.),  benthic 

 foraminifera — Labyrinthina mirabilis Weynschenk, Paalzo­

wella  sp.,  Redmondoides lugeoni (Septfontaine)  (Fig.  9E),  

Andresenolina sp., Pseudogaudryina sp., Protomarssonella sp., 

Protopeneroplis striata Weynscheck, Pseudocyclammina sp., 

Neotrocholina molesta  (Gorbatchik),  Lenticulina  sp., 

Trocholina  sp.,  Valvulina  sp.,  Textularia  sp.,  Spirillina  sp., 

microencrusters of Crescentiella morronensis, Koskinobullina 

socialis Cherchi and Schroeder, and structures of “Bacinella”.  

The  calpionellids  Tintinnopsella remanei Borza  (Fig.  9I), 

Calpionella alpina  Lorenz,  Calpionella grandalpina  Nagy, 

Crassicollaria massutiniana (Colom) (Fig. 9J), Crassicollaria 

parvula  Remane  (Fig.  9K,  L)  were  identified.  Bioclasts  are 

locally  rimmed  by  micrite  borders.  Oncoids  contain[s] 

bivalves,  ostracods,  brachiopods,  crinoids, Saccocoma sp. 

(Fig. 9F, G, H), foraminifera and algal fragments. Elements of 

Saccocoma sp. were also observed in both matrix and in clasts 

of biomicrite mudstones.

In  general Crescentiella morronensis dominates  among 

microencrusters.  This  represents  a  slightly  deeper  environ-

ment  showing  less  water  energy  and  lower  oxygenation 

(Chiocchini et al. 1994). Locally, voids filled by two types of 

calcite were identified in the bioclastic-intraclastic limestones. 

Interparticle pores are filled by fibrous Mg-calcite cement, and 

secondary  solution  pores  are  filled  by  blocky  sparry  calcite 

cement. Such type of cement formed on the slope and a dis-

tally steepened ramp (Flügel 2004). The calpionellid associa-

tions observed are of the Late Tithonian standard Crassicollaria 

Zone  (Reháková  &  Michalík  1997).  On  the  basis  of  sacco-

comid  skeletal  elements  present  in  thin  sections,  the  late 

Tithonian  Sc7  Saccocomid  Zone  (sensu  Benzaggagh  et  al., 

2015)  coinciding  with  the  Micracanthoceras microcanthum 

ammonite  Zone  can  be  identified. The  third  group  is  repre-

sented  by  thin  sections  13 714,  13 979,  14 815,  14 984, 

14 986 –14 988,  14 987  and  15 842  from  limestones  with 

Pseudargentiniceras abscissum, Delphinella cf.  janus, 

Pseudosubplanites lorioli, Riasanites cf.  swistowianus  and 

Riasanella  cf.  rausingi.  This  group  can  be  characterized  as 

biomicrite wackestones, peloidal-bioclastic-intraclastic wacke-

stones, packestones to grainstones, bioclastic-intraclastic rud-

stones (some of the rudstone layers are rich in organic matter, 

dispersed in the matrix)Voids filled by blocky calcite were 

also  locally  observed.  Their  matrix  is  locally  recrystallized 

and there are vadose silt accumulations around coral clasts. 

Some of the bioclasts are micritized (requiring subaerial expo-

sure and restrictive facies). Limestones contain calpionellids 

— small forms of Calpionella alpina (Fig. 10 G, H, I, J) domi-

nating  over  Crassicollaria parvula (Fig.  10K, L),  Crassi­

collaria brevis Remane, Tintinnopsella carpathica (Murgeanu 

and  Filipescu)  (Fig.  10M, N),  cysts  of  Stomiosphaerina 

 proxima Řehánek, Cadosina sp., spores of Globochaete alpina 

Lombard, foraminifera  Pseudogaudryina sp., Epistomina sp., 

Andersenolina alpina (Leupold)  (Fig.  10A),  Andersenolina 

cherchiae (Arnaud-Vanneau, Boisseau and Darsac) (Fig. 10A), 

Andresenolina sp., Haplophragmoides joukowskyi Charrolais, 

Brönnimann and Zaninetti (Fig. 10B), Protopeneroplis ultra­

granulata  (Gorbachik)  (Fig.  10C),  Pseudomarssonella  sp., 

(Fig.  10D),  Uvigerinammina uvigeriniformis  (Seibold  and 

Seibold) (Fig. 10E), Trocholina odukpaniensis Dessauvagie, 

background image

598

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

A

J

G

D

B

K

H

E

C

I

F

100

m

µ

50

m

µ

50

m

µ

50

m

µ

Fig. 8. Early Tithonian microfacies and microfossils. A — Lenticulina sp. in pelbiointraclastic packstone to grainstone, thin section 14 981;  

B — Mercierella dacica Dragastan in pelbioclastic  wackestone,  thin section 14 981; C — Fragments of dasycladacean algae, ooids and 

microproblematicum of Muranella sp. in bioclastic wackestone, thin section 14 980; D — Fragment of Pseudocyclammina lituus (Yokoyama), 

thin  section  14 980;  E  —  Salpingoporella annulata Carozzi,    thin  section  14 980;  FH  —  Saccocoma  sp.,  thin  sections  14 980;  14 981;  

G — Terebella lapilloides Münster, Saccocoma sp., in pelbiomicrosparite wackestone, thin section 14 981;  IJ — Parastomiosphaera   malmica 

(Borza), thin sections 14 980, 14 981; K — Colomisphaera minutissima (Colom), thin section 14 981. 

background image

599

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

A

J

G

D

B

K

H

E

C

L

I

F

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

Fig. 9. Late Tithonian microfacies and microfossils. A — Crescentiella morronensis  (Crescenti), gastropod shell and ?Calpionella grandalpina 

Nagy (lower middle part of the picture), in pelbiomicrosparite  wackestone to packstone,thin section 14 904; B — Fragments of bryozoa and 

sponges with encrusting foraminifera (Nubecularia  sp.) in pelbioclastic wackestone, thin section 14 982; C — Oncoids, foraminifera in pel-

biooncoidal partially microsparite wackestone, thin section 14 983; D — Carpathocancer triangulates (Mišík, Soták and Ziegler),  microen-

crusters of Crescentiella morronensis  (Crescenti), in pelbio intraclastic wackestone to packstone, thin section 14 982; E — Redmondoides 

lugeoni (Septfontaine), thin section 14 987; FH — Saccocoma Aggasiz, thin section 14 904; I — Tintinnopsella remanei Borza, thin section 

14 983; J — Crassicollaria massutiniana (Colom), thin section 14 905;  KL — Crassicollaria parvula Remane, thin section 14 905.

background image

600

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

Trocholina  sp.,  Ichnusella burlini (Gorbatchik),  miliolids 

(Quinqueloculina verbizhiensis  Dulub;  Fig.  10F),  Quinque­

loculina frumenta Asbel  and  Danitsch),  microencrusters  of 

Crescentiella morronenis, worm tubes of Terebella lapilloides 

Münster,  calcimicrobes  of  Girvanella  type,  incertae  sedis 

Labes atramentosa Eliášová, fragments of crinoids, echinoids, 

A

J

G

D

B

K

H

E

C

L

M

N

I

F

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

100

m

µ

Fig. 10. Early Berriasian microfacies and microfossils. A — Bioclastic wackestone. There are Andersenolina alpina (Leupold), Andersenolina 

cherchiae  (Arnaud-Vanneau,  Boisseau  and  Darsac),  crinoids,  echinoids  and  calpionellids  in  micrite  matrix,  thin  section  13 714;  

B  —  Haplophragmoides joukowskyi  Charrolais,  Brönnimann  and  Zaninetti,  thin  section  14 815;  C  —  Protopeneroplis ultragranulata 

(Gorbachik),  thin  section  14 986;  D  —  Pseudomarssonella  sp.,  thin  section  13 714;  E  —  Uvigerinammina uvigeriniformis  (Seibold  and 

Seibold), thin section 14 986. F — Quinqueloculina verbizhiensis Dulub, thin section 14 815; G J — Calpionella alpina Lorenz, thin sections 

13 714, 14 815, 14 987; KL — Crassicollaria parvula Remane, thin sections 15 842, 14 984; MN — Tintinnopsella carpathica (Murgeanu 

and Filipescu), thin section 13 714. 

background image

601

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

ophiuroids, corals, bryozoans, hydrozoa, dasycladacean algae, 

Muranella sp., brachiopods, ostracods, gastropods, bivalves, 

sponge  spicules,  juvenile  ammonites  and  lithoclasts  of  bio-

micrite  and  pelbiomicrite  wackestones  (signalling  synsedi-

mentary erosion). Some of the bioclasts are silicified. On the 

basis  of  the  calpionellid  association  early  Berriasian Alpina 

Subzone of the standard Calpionella Zone can be established 

(Reháková & Michalík 1997). The presence of the foramini-

feran species Haplophragmoides joukowskyi should also indi-

cate a Berriasian age. Microfacies and the variable spectra of 

fossiliferous  sediments  mentioned  above  indicate  that  they 

were deposited in a rimmed platform environment (the exter-

nal subtidal shallow marine conditions) with bioclastic shoal 

facies (Wilson 1975).

Discussion

The ammonite species that are described in the taxonomic 

part, deposited in several Moravian-Silesian museums and in 

Vienna,  together  with  three  species  recently  found  in  the 

Kotouč Quarry (as stated in Vašíček & Skupien 2016), repre-

sent, according to data in the literature and according to micro-

fossils (calpionellids and cysts of calcareous dinoflagellates) 

found  in  thin  sections,  intervals  of  three  different  ages  (see 

Fig. 11). The oldest belongs to the early Tithonian (thin sec-

tions Nos. 13 748, 14 980, 14 981 and 15 865), the second to the 

Late  Tithonian  (thin  sections  Nos.  14 904,  14 905,  14 982, 

14 983 and 15 119 B) and the last to the early Berriasian (thin 

sections  Nos.  13 714,  13 979,  14 984,  14 986  —  14 988  and 

15 842).

The stratigraphically oldest assemblage of ammonites and 

microfossils are early Tithonian in age. It includes ammonites 

Lithacoceras eigeltingense (thin  sections  14  980 –14 981), 

Blaschkeiceras schoepflini (thin  section  13 748),  B. kittli  

and  Kutekiceras pseudocolubrinum  (thin  section  15 685).  

The  second  assemblage  of  the  late  Tithonian  ammonites 

includes Paraulacosphinctes transitorius (thin section 14 904), 

relative species P. senex — thin sections 14 905, 14 982–14 983 

and Boughdiriella chouetense (nom. corr. in Frau et al. 2016), 

Mediterranean

Submediterranean

N - Italy, S - Spain

S - Germany

E - Austria, Moravia

Andreaei

Transitorius

Simplisphinctes

Volanense

(Ponti)

Admirandum/

Biruncinatum

Richteri

Semiforme/

Verruciferum

Darwini

Hybonotum

Microcanthum

upper

T

ithonian

lower

Fallauxi

Semi

-

form

e

Crassicollaria

Zone

Parastomiosphaera ma

lmica Zone

Chitinoidella Zone

Alpina Subzone

Remanei

Colomi

Intermedia

Hybonotum

Riedense

Rueppellianus

Moernsheimensis

Vimineus

Penicillatum

Ciliata

Callodiscus

Lithographicum

Mucronatum

(Pseudoscythica)

Richteri

Volanense

Fallauxi

Magnum

Transitorius

Lithacoceras
eigeltingense

Blaschkeiceras
schoepflini 
(m, M)

Kutekiceras
pseudocolubrinum

Paraulacosphinctes
transitorius

Pseudargentiniceras
abscissum

Riasanites cf.
swistowianus

Pseudosubplanites
lorioli

Riasanella cf.
rausingi

Boughdiriella
chouetensis

Delphinella

janus

cf.

Ammonites

Calpionelids

Calc.
cyst. Z.

Thin

section

no.

14980,
14981

13748

15685

14904

15119B

13979

13714

14986-88

14984

15842

Ciliata

Palmatus

Berriasian

lower

Jacobi

Calpionella

Zone

Mucronatum

Fig. 11. Ammonite and calpionellid zonation of the Tithonian and lowermost Berriasian with marking of the stratigraphic position of ammo-

nites and microfossils.  

background image

602

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

in thin section 15 119 B. The last assemblage contains the early 

Berriasian  ammonites  Pseudargentiniceras abscissum (thin 

section  13 714),  Delphinella  cf.  janus  (thin  section  14 984), 

Pseudosubplanites lorioli (thin section 15 842), Riasanites cf. 

swistowianus (thin section 13 979) and Riasanella cf. rausingi 

(thin sections 14 986–14 988).

The  large-sized  specimen  from  the  category  of  the  entire 

processed set belongs to Lithacoceras eigeltingense Ohmert 

and Zeiss, 1980. Parastomiosphaera malmica, the marker of 

the  early  Tithonian  calcareous  dinoflagellate  Malmica  cysts 

Zone (Lakova et al. 1999; Reháková 2000), occurs abundantly 

in its rock matrix. According to the literature, this ammonite 

species  occurs  in  the  lower  Tithonian  in  the  Hybonoticeras 

hybonotum ammonite Zone, in the basal Lithacoceras riedense 

Subzone. 

The  second  representative  of  the  early  Tithonian  is 

Blaschkeiceras schoepflini (Blaschke,  1911),  which  belongs 

to the subfamily Sublithacoceratinae. Based on the study of 

the type material in Vienna, we have concluded that B. schoep­

flini (m) together with Blaschkeiceras kittli (M) form a dimor-

phic pair. In one of the derived thin sections from the associated 

rocks, P. malmica also occurs.

The  late  Tithonian  is  represented  by  Paraulacosphinctes 

transitorius (Oppel, 1865) and Boughdiriella chouetense Frau, 

Bulot and Wimbledon, 2015. P. transitorius is a rather prob-

lematic species. It is usually confused with P. senex (Oppel, 

1868);  as  in  the  discussion  in  Vašíček  &  Skupien  (2016). 

Based  on  the  study  of  the  type  material  in  Munich,  we  

have  concluded  that  microconchs  and  macroconchs  of 

P.  transi torius were included in the type series. The shell size  

of the microconchs is less than about 130 mm, whereas that  

of the macroconchs is less than 260 mm. In one of the asso-

ciated rocks (thin section 14 904) the calpionellid associations 

are  those  of  the  lower  part  of  the  Crassicollaria  Zone 

(Intermedia  or  Massutiniana  subzones  sensu  Reháková  & 

Michalík 1997; Lakova & Petrova 2013), which corresponds 

to the lower part of the upper Tithonian (Paraulocosphinctes 

transitorius ammonite Zone).

The late Tithonian species B. chouetense, as recently col-

lected  in  France  and  found  by  us  in  the  Kotouč  Quarry 

(described in Vašíček & Skupien 2016), is a significant  novelty 

for  the  Štramberk  Limestone,  both  in  the  sense  of  the  geo-

graphical  distribution  of  the  species  and  especially  from 

a  stratigraphic  perspective. According  to  the  authors  of  the 

species, B. chouetense occurs in the uppermost Tithonian in 

the Protacanthodiscus andreaei Zone. The spectra of calpio-

nellids  observed  in  the  thin  section  No.  15  119B  belong  to 

upper part of the late Tithonian Crassicollaria Zone. The con-

tent of microfossils corresponds to the stratigraphic position of 

the mentioned species in Kotouč. 

Five early Berriasian ammonite species and corresponding 

guide  microfossils  typical  for  the  Alpina  Subzone  of  the 

Calpionella  Zone  were  identified  in  associated  rock  matrix. 

They are Pseudosubplanites lorioli (Zittel, 1870), Delphinella 

cf.  janus  (Retowski,  1893),  Pseudargentiniceras abscissum 

(Oppel,  1865), Riasanites cf.  swistowianus  (Nikitin,  1888) 

and Riasanella cf. rausingi Mitta, 2011. With the exception of 

P. lorioli, all the above-mentioned species have already been 

illustrated  and  described  in Vašíček  &  Skupien  (2016).  Our 

recent find of P. lorioli in the Kotouč Quarry also represents 

a  novelty  for  the  area  of  Štramberk  because  the  mentioned 

species  was  not  previously  known  from  the  Štramberk 

Limestone in that area. The lectotype of this species comes 

from the no longer existing locality of a worked out limestone 

quarry  at  Koňákov  near  Český  Těšín,  from  a  differently 

coloured  grey  limestone.  The  determined  early  Berriasian 

 species correspond to a level in the Berriasella jacobi ammo-

nite Zone.

From a palaeogeographic perspective, all the species des-

cribed here are characteristic of the Mediterranean to Black 

Sea Tethyan area, but Riasanites and Riasanella belong to the 

Subboreal elements. 

To classify stratigraphically the studied specimens and sam-

ples more accurately we have tried, based on current data in 

the literature, to compile a suitable ammonite and calpionellid 

zonation, as given in Fig. 11. It is the Tithonian deposits of the 

Pavlov Hills in southern Moravia and their continuation in the 

so-called Waschberg Zone of Lower Austria that are geologi-

cally the closest to Štramberk. The above mentioned Austrian 

region together with Štramberk was proposed by Zeiss (2001, 

2003) as an ammonite zonation correlated with the zonation of 

the Mediterranean area (N. Italy, S. Spain and S. Germany). 

The ammonite zonation for southern Germany has been some-

what modified by Scherzinger & Schweigert (2003). Recently, 

Wimbledon  et  al.  (2013)  modified  the  upper  Tithonian 

 zonation, when in the uppermost Tithonian they defined the 

Protacanthodiscus andreaei  Zone  instead  of  the  former 

Durangites  (i.e.  Durangites vulgaris)  Zone.  We  have  thus 

applied the mentioned changes in the Tithonian stage to our 

scheme in Fig. 11. In the recently most used ammonite zona-

tion for the Lower Cretaceous, in the Berriasian stage, ammo-

nite  zones  are  placed  according  to  Reboulet  et  al.  (2014). 

Calpionellid zones follow the paper by Reháková & Michalík 

(1977)  and  the  dinoflagellate  cyst  zonation  is  used  after 

Reháková (2000). The ammonites of the youngest part of the 

Štramberk Limestone in the thin sections are accompanied by 

Calpionella alpina.

In the now used ammonite zonation (Fig. 11) based on both 

data in the literature and the accompanying guide microfossils 

in the ammonite matrices, we placed the derived stratigraphic 

position of the ammonite species under study coming from the 

Štramberk Limestone in  the  Kotouč  Quarry.    In  accordance 

with Zeiss (2001) we regard the area of Štramberk in the Outer 

Western Carpathians as part of the ammonite Submediterranean 

bioprovince.  

Conclusions

The occurrence of rare but stratigraphically important calca-

reous  microfossils  (dinoflagellates  and  calpionellids)  in  the 

Štram berk Limestone matrix filling and surrounding  ammo nite 

background image

603

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

specimens  has  allowed    us  to  identify    the  early    Tithonian 

Malmica cyst Zone, the late Tithonian Crassicollaria Zone  and 

the early Berriasian Calpionella alpina Subzone of the standard 

Calpionella Zone. This brings more light to the age of unloca-

lized ammonite specimens collected in the past and residing in 

museum collections without their exact localization.    

From  the  perspective  of  taxonomy,  the  finding  of  sexual 

dimorphism  in  the  species  Blaschkeiceras schoepflini (m), 

forming a dimorphic pair with B. kittli (M), and the finding of 

two  shell  size  groups  in  the  case  of  Paraulacosphinctes 

 transitorius  (without different species names), are of impor-

tance  to  the  studied  ammonites.  Smaller  shells  belong  to 

microconchs  (m),  and  shells  that  are  up  to  twice  as  large 

belong to macroconchs (M). 

The  most  significant  new  stratigraphic  information  is  the 

determination  of  Lithacoceras eigeltingense. This  species 

occurs  in  the  basal  part  of  the  lower  Tithonian,  in  the 

Hybonoticeras hybonotum ammonite Zone. This circumstance 

moves  the  previously  stated  stratigraphic  range  of  the 

Štramberk Limestone (also according to the microfossil data), 

one  ammonite  zone  lower.  In  the  data  given  by  Oloriz  and 

Tavera (1982), coming from Zámek Hill Quarry, the basal part 

of the Tithonian in the Štramberk Limestone was unknown.  

The recent find of an exactly localized Boughdiriella choue­

tense in the Kotouč Quarry is also of substantial importance. 

According to data in the literature, this species occurs in the 

upper part of the Protacanthodiscus andreaei ammonite Zone, 

which  means  in  the  uppermost Tithonian.  Other  ammonites 

that unambiguously indicate the uppermost Tithonian not yet 

known in the area around Štramberk.

On the other hand, our results confirm that the youngest part 

of the Štramberk Limestone belongs to the early Berriasian, to 

the Berriasella jacobi ammonite Zone (or Berriasella jacobi 

auctorum  Zone  according  to  Frau  et  al.  2016  b)  or  to  the 

Calpionella alpina Subzone.

The  occurrence  of  Riasanites  and  Riasanella  in  the 

Štramberk  Limestone  is  remarkable  and  indicates  early 

Berriasian  communication  of  the  Silesian  Unit  with  the 

Subboreal region of the Russian Platform. Moreover, the fact 

that both microfauna and accompanying ammonites prove the 

early Berriasian for both species of Riasanites and Riasanella 

determined herein is also of stratigraphic significance. 

Acknowledgements:  For  access  to  or  loans  of  collection 

 material we are obliged to Dr. O. Frühbauerová (Nový Jičín 

Regional  Museum),  Dr.  L.  Jarošová  (Silesian  Museum  of 

Opava)  and  Prof.  Dr.  H.  Immel  (University  Munich).  For 

 consultations and advice in the identification of some species 

we are grateful to Dr. G. Schweigert (Staatliches Museum für 

Naturkunde,  Stuttgart).  We  thank  M.A.  Rogov  (Russian 

 Aca demy  of  Sciences)  A.  Wierzbowski  (University  of 

 Warsaw) and W. Wimbledon (University of Bristol) for review 

with  constructive  remarks  and  suggestions,  We  also  thank  

K.  Mezihoráková  (Ostrava)  for  taking  the  majority  of  

the   photographs,  Assoc.-Prof.  Ing.  J.  Ščučka  Ph  D.  for 

 supplying  photographs  of  macroconchs  and  Dr.  M.  Hyžný 

(Comenius University in Bratislava) for taking photographs of 

Blaschkeiceras schoepflini and B. kittli deposited in Blaschke’s 

collection  in  Vienna.  We  also  express  our  thanks  to  the 

 management  of   Kotouč  Quarry  for  allowing  access  to  their 

grounds. The present paper has been supported by the Project 

for  Long-Term  Stra tegic  Development  of  the  Institute  of 

Geonics,  Czech  Academy  of  Sciences  and  project  GACR  

16-09979S. The research of D. Reháková was supported by 

the APVV-14-0118 project, as well as by the VEGA Projects 

2/0034/16 and 2/0057/16. 

References

Arkadiev  V.V.  2011:  Novye  dannye  ob  ammonitach  roda  Parau­

lacosphinctes  iz  verkhnego  titona  Gornogo  Kryma.  

Stratigrafija i geologicheskaja Korreljacija   19,  120–124  (in 

Russian).

Arkadiev  V.V.,  Bogdanova  T.N.,  Guzhikov  A.J.,  Lobacheva  S.V., 

Myshkina N.V., Platonov E.S. et al. 2012: Golovonogie molljuski 

(ammonity).  In:    Arkadiev  V.V.  &  Bogdanova  T.N.  (Eds  .): 

 Berrias Gornogo Kryma.  Izdatel´stvo LEMA, Sankt-Peterburg, 

123–224. 

Benzaggagh  M.,  Homberg  C.,  Schnyder  J.  &  Ben  Abdesselam- 

Mahdoui  S.  2015:  Description  and  biozonation  of  crinoid 

 saccocomid  sections  from  the  Upper  Jurassic  sediments 

 (Oxfordian-Tithonian) of the western Tethyan realm. Annales de 

Paléontologie 101, 95–117. 

Blaschke F. 1911: Zur Tithonfauna von Stramberg in Mähren. Annalen 

des Kaiserlich­königlichen naturhistorischen Hofmuseums 25, 

143–222.

Bogdanova T.N. & Arkadiev V.V. 2005: Revision of species of the 

ammonite genus Pseudosubplanites from the Berriasian of the 

Crimean mountains. Cretaceous Research 26, 488–506.

Buckman S.S. 1921: Yorkshire Type Ammonites 1–7 (1909–1930). 

Wesley & Son, London, 1–790.

Cecca F., Enay R. & Le Hégarat G. 1989: L´Ardescien (Tithonique 

superiéur)  de  la  région  stratotypique:  séries  de  référence  et 

faunes  (ammonites,  calpionelles)  de  la  bordure  ardéchoise.   

Documents des Laboratories de Géologie de la Faculté des 

 Sciences de Lyon 107, 1–115.

Cecca F., Seyed-Emami K., Schnyder J., Benzaggagh M., Majidifard 

M.R. & Monfred M.M. 2012: Early Berriasian ammonites from 

Shal, Talesh region (NW Alborz Mountains, Iran). Cretaceous 

Research 33, 106–115.

Chiocchini M., Farinacci A., Mancinelli A., Molinari V. & Potetti M. 

1994:  Foraminifera,  dasycladacean  algae  and  calpionelid  

biostratigraphy of the Mesozoic carbonate sequences of the cen-

tral Apennines (Italy) [Biostratigrafia a foraminiferi, dasicladali 

e  calpionelle  delle  successioni  carbon-atiche  mesozoiche 

dell‘Appennino  centrale  (Italia)].  Studii geologici Camerti

Spec. Publ., 9–129 (in Italian).

Donovan D.T., Callomon J.H. & Howarth M.K. 1981: Classification 

of the Jurassic Ammonitina. In: House M. R., Senior J. R. (Eds.): 

The Ammonoidea. Systematic Association, Special Volume. Ac­

ademic Press, London and New York, 101–155.

Donze P. & Enay R. 1961: Les Céphalopodes du Tithonique inférieur 

de la Croix-de-Saint-Concors près Chambéry (Savoie). Travaux 

du Laboratoire de Géologique de la Faculté des Sciences de 

Lyon, N.S. 7, 1–236.

Dunham  R.J.  1962:  Classification  of  carbonate  rocks  according  to 

 depositional texture. In: Ham W. E. (Ed.): Classification of car-

bonate rocks. A symposium. American Association of Petroleum 

Geologists Memoir 1, 108–171.                  

background image

604

VAŠÍČEK, REHÁKOVÁ and SKUPIEN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

Favre E. 1880: Description des fossils des couches tithoniques des 

Alpes fribourgeoises. Mémoires de la Société Paléontologique 

Suisse 6, 1–74.

Flügel  E.  2004:  Microfacies  of  carbonate  rocks.  Analysis,  Inter-

pretation and Application. Springer­Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, 

1–976.

Fözy I. 1990: Ammonite succession from three Upper Jurassic sec-

tions  in  the  Bakony  Mts.  (Hungary).  In:  Pallini  G.,  Cecca  F., 

Cresta  S.  &  Santantonio  M.  (Eds.):  Atti  II  Convegno  Inter-

nationale  Fossili,  Evoluzione,  Ambiente,  Pergola  25–30  

Ottobre 1987. Comitato centenario Raffaele Piccinini, Pergola, 

323–339. 

Fözy I. & Scherzinger A. 2013: Systematic descriptions of Tithonian 

ammonites of the Gerecse Mountains.  In: Fözy I. (Ed.): Late 

Jurassic–Early  Cretaceous  Fauna,  Biostratigraphy,  Facies  and 

Deformation History of the Carbonate Formations in the Gerecse 

and  Pilis  Mountains  (Transdanubian  Range,  Hungary).  Geo­

Litera Publishing House, Szeged, 207–292.

Frau  C.,  Bulot  L.G.  &  Wimbledon  W.A.P.  2015:  Upper  Tithonian 

 Himalayitidae  Spath,  1925  (Perisphinctoidea,  Ammonitina) 

from  Le  Chouet  (Drôme,  France):  implications  for  the  syste-

matics.  Geol. Carpath. 66, 117–132.

Hoedemaeker  P.J.,  Janssen  N.M.M.,  Casellato  C.E.,  Gardin  S., 

 Reháková  D.  &  Jamrichová  M.  2016:  Jurassic/Cretaceous 

boundary  in  the  Río Argos  succession  (Caravaca,  SE  Spain). 

 Revue de Paléobiologie 35, 1, 111–247.

Hohenegger L. 1861: Die geognostischen Verhätnisse der Nordkar-

pathen in Schlesien und den angrenzenden Theilen von Mähren 

und  Galizien  als  Erläuterung  zu  der  geognostichen  Karte  der 

Nordkarpathen. Justus Perthes Verlag, Gotha, 1–50. 

Houša V. 1965: Podtřída Ammonoidea Zittel, 1884 — Amoniti. In: 

Špinar  Z.  (Ed.):  Systematická  paleontologie  bezobratlých. 

 Academia, Nakladatelství Československé akademie věd, Praha, 

454–549 (in Czech).

Houša V. 1990: Stratigraphy and calpionellid zonation of the Štram-

berk  Limestone  and  associated  Lower  Cretaceous  beds.  

In:   Pallini  G.  et.  al.  (Eds.): Atti  del  secondo  convegno  inter-

nazionale  Fossili,  Evoluzione,  Ambiente,  Pergola  25–30  

Ottobre 1987.  Comitato centenario Raffaele Piccinini, Pergola, 

365–370.

Houša V. & Vašíček Z. 2004: Ammonoidea of the Lower Cretaceous 

deposits (Late Berriasian, Valanginian, Early Hauterivian) from 

Štramberk, Czech Republic. Geolines 18, 7–57.

Hyatt A. 1900: Cephalopoda. In: Zittel K.A.: Textbook of Palaeontol-

ogy, 1

st

 English edition, trasl. Eastman C. R., Macmillan,   London 

& New York, 502–592.

Kaiser-Weidich B. & Schairer G. 1990: Stratigraphische Korrelation 

von Ammoniten, Calpionellen und Nannoconiden aus Oberjura 

und Unterkreide der Nördlichen Kalkalpen. Eclogae geologicae 

Helvetiae 83, 353–387.

Kilian W. 1889: Études paléontologiques sur les terrains secondaires 

et tertiares de l´Andalousie. Le gisement tithonique de Fuente 

los  Frailes  près  de  Cabra  (province  de  Cordove).  In:  Mission 

d´Anda lousie.  Mémoires presents pour divers savants à 

l´Académie des Sciences de l´Institut National de France 30, 

581–739. 

Kilian W. 1895: Notice stratigraphique sur les environs de Sisteron et 

contributions  à  la  connaisance  des  terrains  du  Sud-Est  dela 

France.  Bulletin de la Société géologique de France 3, 23,  

659–679.

Klein J. 2005: Lower Cretaceous Ammonites I. Perisphinctaceae 1 

Himalayitidae, Olcostephanidae, Holcodiscidae, Neocomitidae, 

Oosterellidae.  In:  Riegraf  W.  (Ed.):  Fossilium  Catalogus  I: 

 Animalia, 139. Backhuys Publishers, Leiden, 1–484.

Lakova  I.  &  Petrova  S.  2013:  Towards  a  standard  Tithonian  to 

 Valanginian  calpionellid  zonation  of  the Tethyan  Realm.  Acta 

Geol. Pol. 63, 2, 201–221.

Lakova I., Stoykova K. & Ivanova D. 1999: Calpionellid, nannofos-

sils and calcareous dinocyst bioevents and integrated biochro-

nology  of  the  Tithonian  to  Valanginian  in  the  West  Balkan 

Mountains, Bulgaria.  Geol. Carpath. 50, 151–168.

Le Hégarat G. 1973: Berriasien du sud-est de la France. Documents 

des Laboratoires de Géologie de la Faculté des Sciences de Lyon 

43 (for 1971), 1–576.

Mazenot G. 1939: Les Palaeohoplitidae tithoniques et berriasiens du 

sud-est  de  la  France.  Mémoires de la Société géologique de 

France, nouvelle série 18 (Mémoire 41), 1–303.

Mitta V.V. 2008: Ammonites of Tethyan origin from the Ryazanian of 

the Russian Platform: genus Riasanites Spath. Paleontological 

Journal 42, 251–259.

Mitta V.V. 2011: Ammonites of Tethyan origin In the Ryazanian Stage 

of the Russian Platform: genus Riasanella gen. nov. Paleonto­

logical Journal 45, 13–22.

Nikitin  S.N.  1888:  Sledy  melovogo  perioda  v  Central´noi  Rossii. 

 Trudy geologicheskogo komiteta 5, 2, 1–205 (in Russian).

Nikolov T.G. 1982: Les ammonites de la famille Berriaselidae Spath, 

1922. Tithonique supérieur–Berriasien. Editions Académie Bul­

gare des Sciences, Sofia, 1–251. 

Nikolov T.G. & Sapunov I.G. 1977: Sur une sous-famille nouvelle 

— Pseudosubplanitinae subfam. nov. (Berriasellidae). Comptes 

rendus de l´Académie bulgare des Sciences 30, 101–103.

Ohmert W. & Zeiss A. 1980: Ammoniten aus den Hangenden Bank-

kalken (Unter-Tithon) der Schwäbischen Alb (Südwestdeutsch-

land).  Abhandlungen des Geologischen Landesamtes Baden­ 

Württemberg 9, 5–50.

Oloriz F. & Tavera J.M. 1982: Stratigraphische Position der Kalke 

von Stramberg (ČSSR) – Überarbeitung der jünsten Hypothesen. 

Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie, Monatshefte 1, 

14–49. 

Olóriz Saéz F. 1978: Kimmeridgian–lower Tithonian in the central 

part  of  the  Baetic  Cordilleras  (Subbetic  Zone).  Paleontology, 

Biostratigraphy [Kimmeridgiano-Tithónico inferier en el sector 

central  de  las  Cordilleras  Béticas  (Zona  Subbética).  Paleon-

tología, Bioestratigrafía]. PhD. Thesis, Universidad de Granada

Granada 184, 1–758 (in Spanish).

Oppel A. 1856–1858: Die Juraformation Englands, Frankreichs und 

des südwestlichen Deutschlands. Würtebembergisches naturwis­

senschaftlichen Jahrbuch Stuttgart 12–14, 1–857.

Oppel A.  1863:  Über  jurassische  Cephalopoden.  Paläontologische 

Mittheilungen aus dem  Museum des königlich Bayerischen 

 Staates 3, 127–266.

Oppel  A.  1865:  Die  tithonische  Etage.  Zeitschrift der Deutschen 

 geologischen  Gesellschaft  17,  535 –558.

Parent H., Scherzinger A. & Schweigert G. 2006: The earliest ammo-

nite faunas from the Andean Tithonian of the Neuquén-Mendoza 

Basin,  Argentina–Chile.  Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und 

 Paläontologie, Abhandlungen 241, 253–267.

Parent  H.,  Garridi  A.C.,  Schweigert  G.  &  Scherzinger  A.  2013:  

The Tithonian stratigraphy and ammonite fauna of the transect 

Portada Covunco-Cerrito Caracoles (Neuquén Basin, Argentina). 

Neues Jahrbuch für Geologie und Paläontologie, Abhandlungen 

269, 1, 1–50. 

Picha F. J., Stráník Z. & Krejčí O. 2006: Geology and Hydrocarbon 

resources of the Outer Western Carpathians and their foreland, 

Czech  Republic.  In:  Golonka  J.  &  Picha  F.  J.  (Eds.):  The 

 Carpathians  and  their  Foreland:  Geology  and  Hydrocarbon 

 Resources.  American Association of Petroleun Geologists 

 Memoir 84. 49–175. 

Reboulet S., Szives O., Aguirre-Urreta B., Barragán R., Company M., 

Idakieva V., Ivanov M., Kakabadze M.V., Moreno-Bedmar J.A., 

Sandoval J., Baraboshkin E.J. et al. 2014: Report on the 5

th

 Inter-

national  Meeting  of  the  IUGS  Lower  Cretaceous  Ammonite 

Working Group, the Kilian Group (Ankara, Turkey, 31

st

 August 

2013). Cretaceous Res. 50, 126–137.

background image

605

PERISPHINCTOID AMMONITES OF THE ŠTRAMBERK LIMESTONE (OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS) 

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 583–605

Reháková D. 2000:  Evolution and distribution of the Late Jurassic 

and Early Cretaceous calcareous dinoflagellates recorded in the 

Western Carpathians pelagic carbonate facies. Mineralia   Slovaca 

32, 79–88.

Reháková  D.  &  Michalík  J.  1997:  Evolution  and  distribution  of 

calpio nellids  —  the  most  characteristic  constituents  of  Lower 

Cretaceous  Tethyan  microplankton.  Cretaceous Research 18, 

493–504.

Řehoř F., Řehořová M. & Vašíček Z. 1978: Za zkamenělinami severní 

Moravy. Ostravské museum, Ostrava, 1–279 (in Czech).

Retowski O. 1893: Die tithonische Ablagerungen von Theodosia. Ein 

Beitrag  zur  Paläontologie  der  Krim.  Bulletin de la Société 

 Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscow, n.s. 7, 206–301.

Roman  F.  1936:  Le  Tithonique  du  Massif  du  Djurdjura  (Province 

d´Alger). Matériaux pour la Carte géologoque de l´Algérie, 1re 

série, Paléontologie 7, 1–43.

Salfeld H. 1921: Kiel- und Furchenbildung auf der Schalenaussen-

seite der Ammonoideen in ihrer Bedeutung für die Systematik 

und  Festlegung  von  Biozonen.  Zentrablatt für Mineralogie, 

 Geologie,  Paläontologie  1921, 343–347. 

Sapunov I.G. 1977: Ammonite stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic in 

Bulgaria,  IV.  Tithonian:  Substages,  Zones  and  Subzones. 

 Geologica Balcanica 7/2, 43–64.

Sapunov I.G. 1979: Les fossiles de Bulgarie, III. 3. Jurassique supérieur, 

Ammonoidea. Academie Bulgare des Sciences, Sofia, 1–263.

Scherzinger A. & Schweigert G. 2003: Ein Profil in der Usseltal- und 

Rennertshofen-Formation  der  südlichen  Frankenalb  (Unter-Ti-

thonium). Zitteliana 43, 3–17.

Scherzinger A. & Schweigert G. 2016: The ammonite genera Gravesia 

Salfeld  and  Pseudogravesia  Hantzpergue  in  the  Tithonian  of 

S  Germany  and  their  correlation  value  with  Western  Europe. 

Proceedings of the Geologists´ Association 127, 288–296.

Schindewolf  A.  H.  1925:  Entwurf  einer  Systematik  der  Peri-

sphinctiden.  Neues Jahrbuch für Mineralogie, Geologie und 

Paläontologie (Abt. B), Beilage-Band 52, 309–343. 

Schneid T. 1915: Die Ammonitenfauna der obertithonischen Kalke 

von Neuburg a. D. Geologische und Paläontologische Abhand­

lungen, Neue Folge 13, 305–416.

Schweigert  G.  1996:  Die  Hangende  Bankkalk-Formation  im 

Schwäbischen  Oberjura.  Jahresberichte und Mitteilungen des 

Oberrheinisches geologischen Vereines, N.F. 78, 281–308.

Schweigert G. & Scherzinger A. 1995: Erstnachweis heteromorpher 

Ammoniten  im  Schwäbischen  Oberjura.  Jahresberichte und 

Mittelungen des Oberrheinischen geologischen Vereins, Neue 

Folge, 77, 307–319. 

Schweigert  G.  &  Zeiss  A.  1998:  Berckhemeria  n.  g.  (Passen-

dorferiinae),  eine  neue  Ammonitengattung  aus  dem  Unter- 

Tithonium  (Hybonotum-Zone)  von  Süddeutschland.  Neues 

Jahrbuch für Geologie, Paläontologie,  Monatshefte  1998,  9, 

559–576. 

Skupien  P.  &  Smaržová  A.  2011:  Palynological  and  geochemical 

 response to environmental changes in the Lower Cretaceous in 

the Outer Western Carpathians; a record from the Silesian unit, 

Czech Republic. Cretaceous Res. 32, 538–551.

Spath  L.F.  1925:  VII.  Ammonites  and  Aptychi  In:  J.  W.  Gregory 

(Ed.): The collection of fossils and rocks from Somaliland made 

by Messrs. Wyllie B.K.W. and Smellie, W. R. Monographs of the 

Geological Department of Hunterian Museum, Glasgow Univer­

sity 1, 111–164.

Steinmann  G.  &  Döderlein  L.  1890:  Elemente  der  Paläontologie. 

 Wilhelm Engelmann, Leipzig, 1–848.

Sutner  R.  in  Schneid  T.  1914:  Die  Geologie  der  Fränkischen Alb 

zwischen Eichstätt und Neuburg a. D. Geognostische Jahreshefte 

27, 59–172.

Szives O. & Fözy I. 2013: Systematic descriptions of Early Creta-

ceous  ammonites  of  the  carbonate  formations  of  the  Gerecse 

Mountains,  Hungary.  In:  Fözy  I.  (Ed.):  Late  Jurassic–Early 

 Cretaceous  fauna,  biostratigraphy,  facies  and  deformation 

 history  of  the  carbonate  formations  in  the  Gerecse  and  Pilis 

Mountains  (Transdanubian  Range,  Hungary).  GeoLitera 

 Publishing  House, Szeged, 293–342. 

Tavera Benitez J.M. 1985: The ammonites of the Upper Tithonian– 

Berriasian  of  the  Subbetic  Zone  (Cordilleras  Beticas)  

[Los ammonites del Tithonico superior – Berriasense de la Zona 

Subbetica (Cordilleras Beticas)]. PhD. Thesis, Universidad de 

Granada,  GR 587, 1–381 (in Spanish). 

Toucas  A.  1890:  Étude  de  la  faune  des  couches  tithoniques  de 

l´Ardèche.  Bulletin de la Société géologique de France, série 

3/18, 560–629.

Vašíček  Z.  &  Skupien  P.  2013:  Early  Berriasian  ammonites  from  

the Štramberk Limestone in the Kotouč Quarry (Outer Western 

Carpathians, Czech Republic). Annales Societatis Geologorum 

Poloniae 83, 329–342.

Vašíček  Z.  &  Skupien  P.  2014:  Recent  discoveries  of  Tithonian 

 ammonites in the Štramberk Limestone (Kotouč Quarry, Outer 

Western Carpathians). Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae 

84, 131–141. 

Vašíček Z. & Skupien P. 2016: Tithonian–early Berriasian perisphinc-

toid ammonites from the Štramberk Limestone at Kotouč Quarry 

near Štramberk, Outer Western Carpathians (Czech Republic). 

Cretaceous Res. 64, 12–29. 

Vašíček Z., Reháková D. & Skupien P. 2016: Microfossils accompa-

nying  some  Perisphinctoid  Ammonites  from  the  Štramberk 

Limestone (Tithonian to Early Berriasian from the Silesian Unit, 

Czech Republic). In: Šunaj M. (Ed): Environmental, Structural 

and  Stratigraphical  Evolution  of  the  Western  Carpathians, 

 Abstract Book, Bratislava, 1.-2. December 2016, 113–114. 

Vašíček Z., Skupien P. &Jirásek, J. 2013: The northernmost occur-

rence  of  the  Lower  Berriasian  ammonite  Pseudosubplanites 

grandis  (Štramberk  Limestone,  Outer  Western  Carpathians, 

Czech Republic). Geol. Carpath. 64, 461–466.

Vígh  G.  1984:  Die  biostratigraphische Auswertung  einiger Ammo-

niten-Faunen  aus  dem  Tithon  des  Bakonygebirges.  Annales 

 Instituti Geologici Hungarici 67, 1–210.

Wilson  J.  L.  1975:  Carbonate  facies  in  geologic  history.  Springer, 

Berlin, 1–471.

Wimbledon W. A. P., Reháková D., Pszcólkowski A., Casellato C. E., 

Halásová  E.,  Frau  C.,  Bulot  L.  G.,  Grabowski  J.,  Sobień  K., 

Pruner P., Schnabl P. & Čížková K. 2013: An account of the bio- 

and magnetostratigraphy of the Upper Tithonian–Lower Berria-

sian interval at Le Chouet, Drôme (SE France). Geol. Carpath. 

64, 437–460. 

Zeiss A. 1968: Untersuchungen zur Paläontologie der Cephalo poden 

des Unter-Tithon des Südlichen Frankenalb. Abhand lungen  der 

Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 

mathematisch­

naturwissenschaftliche Klasse, Neue Folge 132, 1–191.

Zeiss A.  2001:  Die Ammonitenfauna  der Tithonklippen  von  Ernst-

brunn,  Niederösterreich.  Neue Denkschriften des Naturhis­

torischen Museums in Wien 6, 1–115.

Zeiss A. 2003: The Upper Jurassic of Europe. Its subdivision and cor-

relation. Geological Society of Denmark and Greenland, Bulle­

tin 1, 75–114.

Zeiss A., Schweigert G. & Scherzinger A. 1996: Hegovisphinctes n. 

gen. eine neue Ammonitengattung aus dem Unter-Tithonium des 

nördliches Hegaus und einige Bemerkungen zur Taxonomie der 

Lithacoceratinae.  Geologische Blätter für Nordost­Bayern 46, 

127–144.

Zittel  K.A.  1868:  Die  Cephalopoden  der  Stramberger  Schichten. 

Paläontologische Mittheilungen aus dem Museum des königlich 

Bayerischen Staates 2/1, 33–118. 

Zittel  K.A.  1870:  Die  Fauna  der  aeltern  cephalopodenführenden 

 Tithonbildungen. Palaeontographica Supplement 1, 1–192.