background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, DECEMBER 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

doi: 10.1515/geoca-2017-0036

www.geologicacarpathica.com

Sedimentary record of subsidence pulse at the  

Triassic/Jurassic boundary interval in the  

Slovenian Basin (eastern Southern Alps)

BOŠTJAN ROŽIČ

1

, TEA KOLAR JURKOVŠEK

2

, PETRA ŽVAB ROŽIČ

1

 and LUKA GALE

1,2

1

 Department of Geology, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Aškerčeva 12, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia;  

bostjan.rozic@ntf.uni-lj.si

2

 Geological Survey of Slovenia, Dimičeva 14, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

(Manuscript received January 19, 2017; accepted in revised form September 28, 2017)

Abstract: In the Alpine Realm the Early Jurassic is characterized by the disintegration and partial drowning of vast  

platform areas. In the eastern part of the Southern Alps (present-day NW Slovenia), the Julian Carbonate Platform and 

the  adjacent,  E–W  extending  Slovenian  Basin  underwent  partial  disintegration,  drowning  and  deepening  from   

the Pliensbachian on, whereas only nominal environmental changes developed on the large Dinaric (Friuli, Adriatic) 

Carbonate Platform to the south (structurally part of the Dinarides). These events, however, were preceded by an earlier 

— and as yet undocumented extensional event — that took place near the Triassic/Jurassic boundary. This paper provides 

evidence  of  an  accelerated  subsidence  from  four  selected  areas  within  the  Slovenian  Basin,  which  show  a  trend  of   

eastwardly-decreasing deformation. In the westernmost (Mrzli vrh) section — the Upper Triassic platform-margin — 

massive  dolomite  is  overlain  by  the  earliest  Jurassic  toe-of-slope  carbonate  resediments  and  further,  by  basin-plain   

micritic  limestone.  Further  east  (Perbla  and  Liščak  sections)  the  Triassic–Jurassic  transition  interval  is  marked  by   

an increase in resedimented carbonates. We relate this to the increasing inclination and segmentation of the slope and 

adjacent  basin  floor.  The  easternmost  (Mt.  Porezen)  area  shows  a  rather  monotonous,  latest  Triassic–Early  Jurassic   

basinal sedimentation. However, changes in the thickness of the Hettangian–Pliensbachian Krikov Formation point to 

a tilting of tectonic blocks within the basin area. Lateral facies changes at the base of the formation indicate that the tilting 

occurred at and/or shortly after the Triassic/Jurassic boundary.  

Keywords: Southern Alps, Slovenian Basin, rifting, Triassic/Jurassic boundary, Sinnemurian, resedimented limestones, 

block tilting. 

 Introduction

The opening of the Central Atlantic and the related marginal 

oceanic basins (e.g., Piemont–Liguria Ocean) brought about 

a major reorganization of paleogeographic units in the western 

Neotethys area (Schmid et al. 2008; de Graciansky et al. 2011; 

Masini  et  al.  2013).  Although  crustal  extension  has  been 

 documented for the interval extending from the Late Triassic 

to the Middle Jurassic, the main paleogeographic changes tend 

to be concentrated in a relatively short period postdating the 

Triassic–Jurassic  boundary.  On  the  European  rifted  margin, 

the extension resulted in an intense block-tilting along listric 

faults, which is reflected in pronounced lateral changes within 

Lower Jurassic deposits (Lemoine et al. 2000; Chevalier et al. 

2003; de Graciansky et al. 2011). The entire southern Tethian 

rifted margin, situated on the Apulian (Adriatic) microplate, is 

likewise marked by the disintegration and partial drowning of 

the  vast  Late  Triassic/earliest  Jurassic  carbonate  platform.  

In  the  Austroalpine  domain  this  resulted  in  a  significantly 

 reduced  extension  of  the  Hauptdolomit–Dachstein  Platform 

(Mandl 2000; Böhm 2003; Gawlick et al. 2009, 2012), which 

was followed by the formation of horst and graben structure 

(Bernoulli & Jenkyns 1974; Eberli 1988; Krainer et al. 1994). 

Prominent, latest Triassic–early Lower Jurassic differentiation 

of  the  sedimentary  environments  is  reported  also  from  the 

Central  and  Inner  Carpathian  units  and  the  Transdanubian 

Range  unit  (Vörös  &  Galácz  1998;  Plašienka  2002,  2003; 

Haas et al. 2014). 

In the Southern Alps, the earliest Jurassic (Late Hettangian–

Sinemurian) was influenced by a diffuse rifting phase (Berra 

et al. 2009), with the extension resulting in the formation of 

four  large-scale  sedimentary  units  (Fig.  1):  the  internally 

 highly-dissected  Lombardian  Basin  to  the  west,  the  inter-

mediate  Trento  Platform,  the  Belluno  Basin,  and  the  Friuli 

Platform to the east (Winterer & Bosellini 1981; Bertotti et al. 

1993; Sarti et al. 1993). The latter continues to the SE as the 

vast  Dinaric  (Adriatic)  Carbonate  Platform  (Vlahović  et  al. 

2005). In the easternmost part of the Southern Alps (present -

day  northern  Slovenia),  however,  a  prominent  pre-Jurassic 

paleotopography  existed.  This  originated  in  the  Middle 

Triassic  (Buser  1989,  1996;  Šmuc  &  Čar  2002)  and  was 

related to the opening of the Neotethys Ocean (Vrabec et al. 

2009).  The  central  paleogeographic  unit  was  the  Slovenian 

Basin (SB), bounded by the Julian Carbonate Platform (JCP) 

background image

544

ROŽIČ, KOLAR JURKOVŠEK, ŽVAB ROŽIČ and GALE

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

Eurasian Mesozoic continental margin

Austroalpine units

Oceanic remnants

Dinarides
Adriatic foreland

Southern Alps - Early Jurassic basins 

Southern Alps - Early Jurassic platfroms  

P o   V a l l e y

Milan

Venice

Ljubljana

a

Adriatic sea

Lombardian Basin

BellunoBasi

n

area of future 

focused rifting

pre-Jurassic basement

Lombardian 

Basin

Trento

Platfrom

Dinaric/Friuli

Platfrom

Belluno

Basin

Slovenian

Basin

POST-SINNEMURIAN RIFTED MARGIN OF ADRIA

Fig.9 

sea level

Medite

rra

nea

n Sea

At

la

nti

c O

cea

n

towards

Neotethys

Pannonian Basi

n

Trento

Platfrom

Friuli

Platfrom

Dinaric (Adriatic)

Platfrom

Julian Platfrom

b

Adriatic Mesozoic continental margin:

Fig.2 

Slovenian Basin

to  the  present  north,  and  the  Dinaric  Carbonate  Platform 

(DCP) to the present south (Cousin 1981; Buser 1989, 1996; 

Rožič  2016).  Because  this  region  was  paleogeographically 

quite  distant  from  the  main  rifting  center  of  the  Piemont-

Liguria Ocean, and owing to the inherited pre-Jurassic relief, 

the  aforementioned  large-scale  earliest  Jurassic  paleogeo-

graphic  perturbations  are  not  observed  in  the  eastern  sector  

of the Southern Alps. However, all of the previously described 

structural  and  paleogeographic  changes  can  be  recognized  

on a smaller scale. This paper presents the evidence of such 

events as recorded in the successions of the SB. Four areas 

were selected where sedimentary reflection of crustal defor-

mation  is  best  recognized: A)  the  Mrzli  vrh  section  docu-

ments  the  drowning  of  the  carbonate  platform  margins,  

B) the internal deformation of the basin floor is recorded at 

Perbla Village and Liščak Gorge, and C) the block tilting is 

evident  from  the  Mt.  Porezen  sections.  The  paper  presents  

new  data  related  to  bed-to-bed  section-logging,  microfacies 

and  lithoclast  ana lysis,  and  foraminiferal  and  conodont 

bio   strati graphy. 

Geological setting

General overview

Structure: The studied sections are located in the foothills of 

the Julian Alps in NW Slovenia, from the town of Tolmin in 

the west to the town of Cerkno in the east. The rocks of the 

three  main  paleogeographic  units,  namely  the  JCP,  SB  and 

DCP,  are  in  thrust  contacts  (Fig.  2a). The  DCP  successions 

belong  structurally  to  the  External  Dinarides,  which  were 

affected  by  post-Eocene  SW-directed  thrusting,  whereas 

 successions  of  the  JCP  and  the  SB  belong  to  the  Southern  

Alps and are characterized by the Miocene S-directed thrus-

ting (Placer 1999, 2008; Vrabec & Fodor 2006). Within the 

Southern Alps, the Julian Nappe is made up of the formations 

of the JCP. It is in thrust contact with the structurally-lower 

Tolmin  Nappe  of  the  Southern  Alps,  comprising  the  SB 

 successions  (Placer  1999).  The  Tolmin  Nappe  is  further 

divided  into  three  lower-order  thrust  units:  the  lowest 

Podmelec Nappe, the middle Rut Nappe, and the upper Kobla 

Fig. 1. a — Position in Europe (boxed area marks part of Alpine chain presented in Fig. 1b); b — Present-day position of Early Jurassic basins 

of the Southern Alps within the general structure of the Alps (please note that partly emerged areas west of the Lombardian Basin are not out-

lined) and schematic cross-section across the Southern Alps rifted margin of Adria after the first Early Jurassic extensional stage (modified 

from Bosellini et al. 1981; Channell & Kozur 1997; Placer 2008; Berra et al. 2009; Rožič 2016).

background image

545

SEDIMENTARY RECORD AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY INTERVAL IN THE SLOVENIAN BASIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

30

30

30

30

20

30

40

30

35

40

30

30

60

55

85

50

20

Jelovš

če

k

Zadlaš

čica

500m

Cerkno

5km

TRNOVO NAPPE

JULIAN NAPPE

RUT  NAPPE

KOBLA NAPPE

roads

Bohinj lake

Bohinjska

Bistrica

N

Tolmin

railway with stations

railway tunnel

lake

Fig 2c

Fig 4

GEOGRAPHICAL MARKS

RIVER

ROAD

FAULT

ANTICLINE

STRIKE & DIP OF BEDS

50

STRUCTURE:

fault

southalpine thrust

position of studied section

QUATERNARY:

MESOZOIC:

TILLITE

SCREE

CONGLOMERATE

 MEGABRECCIA

LIMESTONE BRECCIA

MARL

RADIOLARIAN CHERT

CARBONATES

DOMINANT LITHOLOGY:

BAČA DOLOMITE FM

& MASSIVE DOLOMITE

KRIKOV FM

PERBLA FM

TOLMIN FM 

BIANCONE 

LIMEST. FM

LOWER FLYSCHOID FM

J,K

J

1

4

J

2

-J

3

K

2

3-5

J

1

1-3

T

3

AMFICLINA BEDS

2+3

MAIN DOLOMITE  FM

& DACHSTEIN LIMEST. FM

T

3

2+3

T

3

1

VOLČE LIMESTONE FM

K

2

6

UPPER FLYSCHOID FM

K

1

5

-K

2

2

LITHOSTRATIGRAPHY:

85

STRIKE & INVERSE DIP OF BEDS

Tolmin

Tolminske 

     Ravne

PODMELEC NAPPE

TOLMIN NAPPE

Liš

čak

Kn

eža

N

500m

40

40

55

50

40

40

30

Fig

2d

Fig

2b

Kneške

     Ravne

Kneža 

N

20

25

25

35

30

20

20

40

50

40  

40

20

10

500m

N

So

po

tn

ic

a

Soča

Kobarid

Tolmin

Zatolmin

Mt Grmuč

1196m.a.s.l.

Mt Vodel

1053m.a.s.l.

Mt Na vrhu

1030m.a.s.l.

a

b

c

d

Nappe  (Buser  1987).  In  the  transitional  zone  between  the 

Dinarides and the Southern Alps older NW–SE-oriented struc-

tures are overprinted by W–E-oriented South Alpine deforma-

tions (Placer & Čar 1998). The thrusts are further displaced by 

Pliocene to recent strike-slip faults (Placer 1999, 2008; Vrabec 

& Fodor 2006; Kastelic et al. 2008; Šmuc & Rožič 2010). This 

structural history, in combination with the highly deformable 

basinal rocks of the Tolmin Nappe, resulted in a fragmented 

Fig. 2. a — Structural subdivision of NW Slovenia (generalized after Buser 1987). The Trnovo Nappe is the highest thrust unit of the External 

Dinarides composed of the DCP successions. The Tolmin Nappe forms the base of the Southern Alps, is composed of SB succession, and is 

divided into three lower-order thrusts. The Julian Nappe forms the upper portion of the Southern Alps and is composed of JCP successions.  

The boxed areas indicate the position of the detailed geological maps of: b — Mt. Mrzli vrh area, c — Perbla area, d — Liščak area, whereas 

the geological map of the Mt. Porezen area is represented in Figure 4.

background image

546

ROŽIČ, KOLAR JURKOVŠEK, ŽVAB ROŽIČ and GALE

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

and  complex  geological  setting  and  led  to  the  eradication  

of  the  original  spatial  relationships  between  the  JCP,  SB  

and DCP. 

Stratigraphy: The Norian and Rhaetian stages of the SB are 

dominated by the Bača Dolomite, which is largely made up of 

bedded dolomite with chert nodules and dolomite-chert brec-

cias, the latter being common in the middle part of the forma-

tion  (Gale  2010).  In  the  westernmost  part  of  the  Podmelec 

Nappe, the Bača Dolomite passes upwards into massive dolo-

mite (partly logged in this study). In the northern part of the 

basin the Late Norian and Rhaetian Slatnik Formation, com-

posed  of  alternating  hemipelagic  limestones  and  calciturbi-

dites,  overlies  the  Bača  Dolomite  (Rožič  et  al.  2009,  2013; 

Gale et al. 2012). 

During  the  Hettangian  and  Pliensbachian,  the  limestone- 

dominated Krikov Formation became deposited. It is charac-

terized by alternating hemipelagic limestone and calci  turbidites. 

The latter are predominant in the northern part of the basin 

(Kobla Nappe), but become rarer towards the central part of 

the basin (Rut Nappe), and are almost entirely absent (diluted) 

in  the  southern  part  of  the  basin  (Podmelec  Nappe)  (Rožič 

2009; Goričan et al. 2012). In the westernmost outskirts of the 

basin, the base of the formation is dominated by a thick lime-

stone breccia (also presented in this paper). The contact of the 

Krikov  Formation  with  the  overlying  Toarcian,  marl/shale- 

dominated Perbla Formation is sharp (Rožič 2009; Rožič & 

Šmuc 2011). 

Location and tectono­stratigraphic setting of studied 

 

 

sections

As  a  result  of  intense  tectonic  deformation,  areas  appro-

priate for detailed studies are rare. Detailed geological map-

ping was performed for each selected area and the results are 

summarized herein.

The  westernmost  outcrops  of  the  SB  can  be  found  on 

Mt. Mrzli  vrh,  which  structurally  belongs  to  the  Podmelec 

Nappe (Fig. 2b) (Buser 1987). The succession is characterized 

by  an  Upper  Triassic  to  Cretaceous  succession  of  basinal 

facies, with the exception of a several hundred meters thick 

(?Norian–Rhaetian) massive dolomite. In the northern part of 

the  mapped  area  the  massive  dolomite  is  overlain  by  the 

basinal Jurassic Krikov Formation. South of the E–W trending 

fault, however, the massive dolomite is followed by the late 

Early  Cretaceous  Lower  Flyschoid  Formation.  This  fault  is 

interpreted  as  a  reactivated  Mesozoic  fault  (Rožič  2005).  

The  studied  section  is  located  on  the  southern  ridge  of 

Mt. Mrzli  vrh,  between  the  Sopotnica  gorge  and  the  Soča 

Valley at an altitude of 800 m, along the trenches remaining 

from the First World War (E 13°42’12”, N 46°12’34”).

The  Perbla  area  is  situated  within  the  Rut  Nappe  (Buser 

1987),  which  in  this  area  contains  an  entire  Norian  to  end- 

Cretaceous succession. It is exposed in a large fold (Fig. 2c) 

displaced by an E–W-trending fault along its core. The dis-

placement could not be recognized in the Toarcian and younger 

rocks, therefore it is presumed to be a paleofault. The section 

was logged in the Jelovšček gorge in the core of the anticline 

(E 13°45’28”, N 46°13’13”).

The Liščak area lies structurally within the Podmelec Nappe 

(Buser 1987). In the mapped area an undisturbed Late Triassic 

to  Lower  Cretaceous  basinal  succession  was  documented.  

The  Triassic–Jurassic  transition  was  logged  in  two  sections 

close  to  one  another  (Fig.  2d).  The  stratigraphically  lower 

 section  is  located  in  a  tributary  stream  of  the  Kneža  River  

(E 13°50’29”, N 46°11’21”). It ends with a characteristic brec-

cia megabed, which was laterally followed to the base of the 

second section, which is situated at the entrance to the Liščak 

stream gorge (E 13°50’18”, N 46°11’24”). Above the logged 

section, part of the Krikov Formation is dolomitized.

Mt.  Porezen  structurally  belongs  to  the  Podmelec  Nappe 

(Buser 1987), and exhibits what is probably the most complete 

Late Triassic (maybe even Ladinian) to Cretaceous succession. 

Three  sections  were  logged  near  the  Otavnik  peak  at  the 

mountain’s  southwestern  ridge.  The  northwestern  section  is 

located  along  the  Porezen  stream  in  the  Zakojška  grapa  

gorge and along the tributary stream towards the Vasaje farm 

(E 13°56’54”, N 46°10’7”). The southern section was mea-

sured in a gorge that cuts the southern slopes of the Ritovščica 

peak (E 13°58’2”, N 46°9’21”). The eastern section was logged 

in the Zapoškar stream gorge (E 13°58’34”, N 46°9’36”) and 

was logged in two, closely situated, stratigraphically succes-

sive sections.

Description, biostratigraphy and sedimentological 

interpretation of studied sections

Mrzli vrh section

Description: The base of the studied section is made up of 

bedded dolomite with chert nodules that is overlain by thick 

massive dolomite several hundred meters thick. The topmost 

13  m  of  the  massive  dolomite  was  logged  in  the  section  

(Fig.  3),  where  it  starts  to  exhibits  indistinct  bedding.  It  is 

overlain by 6 m of alternating bedded (5 to 35 cm) dolomite 

and  partially  dolomitized  calcarenite.  This  interval  contains 

chert  nodules.  Dolomite  is  coarsely  crystalline  with  sub-  to 

euhedral crystals up to 500 µm large, and texture-obliterating. 

Calcarenite  is  fine-  to  coarse-grained  and  partially  dolomi-

tized, with a still recognizable primary composition that shows 

characteristics of the overlying calcarenite.

The section continues with a 35 m-thick interval composed 

of  occasionally  channelized  beds  of  limestone  breccia  and 

calc arenite  that  alternate  with  intervals  of  very  thin-bedded 

calcarenite and micritic limestone. Limestone breccia is gene-

rally thick-bedded (up to 250 cm) and often grades to calc-

arenite.  Clasts  are  up  to  20  cm  large,  subangular  to  well 

rounded,  elongated,  and  oriented  parallel  to  the  bedding 

planes. Calcarenite-supported breccia prevails, whereas clast- 

supported breccia occurs in lower portions of beds exhibiting 

inverse grading, locally. Breccia is rudstone with calcarenite 

matrix  that  is  identical  in  composition  to  the  surrounding 

background image

547

SEDIMENTARY RECORD AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY INTERVAL IN THE SLOVENIAN BASIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

Om

5m

10m

15m

20m

25m

X

X

45m

30m

35m

40m

50m

X

X

X

55m

10m

15m

20m

25m

X

X

Om

5m

X

30m

35m

40m

LIŠČAK 2

PERBLA

clay silt

vf f m c

MUD SAND

GRAVEL

vc

gr

an

pe

b

co

b

bo

ul

MRZLI VRH

SLUMP

SLUMP

Om

5m

10m

15m

20m

Om

5m

10m

15m

20m

25m

30m

35m

40m

Involutina liassica

Involutina liassica

Involutina liassica

Meandrovoluta asiagoensis

Meandrovoluta asiagoensis

Meandrovoluta asiagoensis

Ophthalmidium martanum

O. martanum

Involutina liassica

O. martanum

Involutina liassica

O. martanum

Involutina liassica

Involutina liassica

O. martanum

Siphovalvulina gibraltarensis

Siphovalvulina sp.

Siphovalvulina sp.

Siphovalvulina sp.

Meandrovoluta asiagoensis

Involutina liassica

Meandrovoluta asiagoensis

LIŠČAK 1

Epigondolella 

ex gr

.  E. bidentata

Misikella hernsteini 

Misikella posthernsteini

Oncodella paucidentat

a

45m

50m

55m

 bedded dolomite

 massive dolomite

chert

dolomite - cherty breccia

limestone breccia

partly dolomitized 

limestone

biomicritic limestone

partly dolomitized

limestone breccia

pebbly calcarenite

calcarenite

LITHOLOGY:

 conodont fragments

 A

 

D   E

Gb

C

 B

 Ga

 A

 

D   E GaGb

C

Meandrovoluta asiagoensis

ABUNDANCE OF MOST COMMON

LITHOCLAST (in %)

ABUNDANCE OF MOST COMMON

LITHOCLAST (in %)

 A

 

D   E   Ga I

B

ABUNDANCE OF MOST COMMON

LITHOCLAST (in %)

clay silt

vf f m c

MUD SAND

GRAVEL

vc

gr

an

pe

b

co

b

bo

ul

clay silt

vf f m c

MUD SAND

GRAVEL

vc

gr

an

pe

b

co

b

bo

ul

clay silt

vf f m c

MUD SAND

GRAVEL

vc

gr

an

pe

b

co

b

bo

ul

Fig. 3. Studied sections with positions of biostratigraphic markers and the abundance (in %) of common lithoclasts in limestone breccia.

background image

548

ROŽIČ, KOLAR JURKOVŠEK, ŽVAB ROŽIČ and GALE

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

a

b

c

d

A

B

Gb

E

calcarenites (see description below), whereas lithoclasts origi-

nated from platform, slope and basin carbonates (Fig. 4c, d; for 

details see Tables 1 and 2). 

Calcarenite is gray to light gray and bedded (up to 90 cm), 

often graded and horizontally laminated, but textureless ver-

sions also occur. When alternating with micritic limestone, it 

displays similar characteristics, but beds are very thin (mm- or 

cm-sized) and contain load casts. In the upper part of the unit 

(from 44

th

 to 47

th

 m of the section) calcarenite is indistinctly 

bedded, comprised of a few thick beds (up to 180 cm) that 

laterally  disintegrate  into  a  larger  number  of  thinner  beds, 

which could also be fractures along the horizontal lamination. 

Coarse-  to  medium-grained  calcarenite  is  grain/packstone 

com  posed predominantly of crinoids, peloids, intraclasts and 

lithoclasts, whereas with grading into fine-grained calcarenite 

it turns into packstone composed of pellets, crinoids (echino-

derms) and occasional sponge spicules (Fig. 4a, b; for details 

see Table 1).

Micritic limestone is gray and dark gray, and occasionally 

horizontally laminated wackestone with pellets, radiolarians, 

filaments and sponge spicules. In the lower part of the interval, 

it is still partially dolomitized and slightly marly (for details se 

Table 1). 

The succession ends with thin-bedded black cherts that pass 

upwards  into  thin-bedded  silicified  dark  gray  micritic  lime-

stone that is identical in composition to the underlying facies 

equivalent.   

Age: The massive dolomite is presumably Norian–Rhaetian 

in age (Buser 1986). In the lower part of the overlying lime-

stones  Meandrovoluta asiagoensis  Fugagnoli  &  Rettori  in 

association  with  Ophthalmidium? martanum  Farinacci  were 

encountered in micritic limestone. Above this level, Involutina 

liassica  (Jones)  predominates  in  calcarenites  and  a  calcare-

nitic  matrix  of  breccias,  occasionally  in  association  with  

O.? martanum and Siphovalvulina sp.

Meandrovoluta asiagoensis is a relatively recently described 

species, although it has commonly been figured under diffe-

rent names (Fugagnoli et al. 2003). Its stratigraphic range is 

currently determined as Sinemurian to Toarcian (Fugagnoli et 

al. 2003; Velić 2007), but it occurs on the Dinaric Carbonate 

Fig. 4. Microfacies of the resedimented limestones from Mt. Mrzli vrh section: a — coarse grainstone with echinoderms, intraclasts and large 

brachiopod; b — fine packstone with small intraclasts/peloids and bioclasts (echinoderms, calcified sponge spicules, radiolarians); c — diverse 

lithoclasts  of  the  limestone  breccia:  ooidal  grainstone  (type  Gb),  bioclastic  wackestone  (type-B)  and  basinal  litho/intraclasts  (type-A);  

d — packstone lithoclast (type-E) in coarse packstone.

background image

549

SEDIMENTARY RECORD AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY INTERVAL IN THE SLOVENIAN BASIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

Platform from at least the late Hettangian (Gale & Kelemen 

2017). It is abundant in low-diversity assemblages, in various 

lagoonal environments (Fugagnoli 2004 and pers. obser. of the 

author)  and  its  variable  morphology  corresponds  to  that  of 

an  opportunistic  species  (Dodd  &  Stanton  1990,  p.  288). 

Ophthalmidium? martanum (determination of this species is 

still considered ambiguous) first appears in upper Sinemurian, 

lasting  until  Toarcian  (Velić  2007),  but  earlier  occurrences 

cannot  be  excluded.  Involutina liassica  ranges  from  the 

Hettan gian to the Toarcian, but is restricted to platform mar-

gins and slopes (Velić 2007). Siphovalvulina first appears in 

the Hettangian, but continues to be present into the Cretaceous 

(BouDagher-Fadel 2008). Based on the foraminiferal associa-

tion the succession above the massive dolomite is Sinemurian 

or Hettangian in age.  

Sedimentological interpretation: The  original  sedimentary 

environment of massive dolomite is uncertain. Massive inter-

vals within the Bača Dolomite were previously documented at 

other locations, and due to their sedimentary breccia structure 

they were interpreted as debris-flow deposits (Gale 2010). But 

the  Mrzli  vrh  massive  dolomite  differs  from  those  in  its 

remarkable  thickness,  its  lack  of  chert  clasts  and  lack  of 

 primary sedimentary breccia composition. Consequently, we 

interpret it as dolomitized platform limestone. It was probably 

reef limestone, which rimmed the carbonate platform after it’s 

progradation over marginal basinal strata, represented today 

by  bedded  dolomites  with  chert  at  the  base  of  massive 

 dolomite.  Prograding  platforms  characterized  by  massive 

Dachstein reef limestone are typical for the Norian–Rheatian 

successions in the entire region (Reijmer et al. 1991; Mandl 

2000;  Gianolla  et  al.  2003;  Krystyn  et  al.  2009;  Gale  et  al. 

2014, 2015). An overlying thin interval of bedded dolomites 

with chert nodules (still below coarse resediments) could point 

to an initial deepening of the platform in the earliest Jurassic. 

The  textures  (Ta-b  parts  of  the  Bouma  sequence)  of  the 

overlying  calcarenites  indicate  sedimentation  dominated  by 

turbidites. Calcarenites that lack gradation can be interpreted 

as modified grain-flow deposits or highly concentrated sandy 

debris  flows  (Stow  &  Johansson  2000;  Shanmugam  2000). 

Thick, inversely-graded limestone breccia at the 22 m-mark of 

the  section  is  interpreted  as  a  debris  flow  deposit  (debrite). 

Crinoid-dominated  sand-sized  material  in  resediments  indi-

cates that bioclasts originated from a relatively shallow pelagic 

environment.  Such  (Hierlatz)  facies  are  reported  from  the 

Austroalpine shelf above the Dachstein-type platform or the 

adjacent slope (Böhm et al. 1999; Gawlick et al. 2009), and is 

known also from the Lower Jurassic of the Julian Alps (Buser 

1986; Šmuc & Goričan 2005; Kukoč et al. 2012; Rožič et al. 

2014). Clasts in limestone breccia indicate erosion of the plat-

form-margin,  the  slope,  and  subordinately  also  affected  the 

basinal  carbonates,  which  corresponds  to  the  toe-of-slope 

 sedimentary environment. Jurassic (types B, Gb, D, ?C litho-

clasts) as well as Triassic (types E and ?Ga lithoclasts) strata 

were  eroded.  An  upward-growing  abundance  of  platform- 

derived lithoclasts (Fig. 3) indicates the increasing exposure 

of platform limestones. This effect could have been enhanced 

by their exposure on a fault-dissected slope similar to the step-

like,  i.e.  terraced  slope  reported  from  the  Transdanubian 

Range  (Galácz  1988;  Haas  et  al.  1997,  2014).  Subordinate 

micritic  limestone  was  deposited  by  hemipelagic  sedimen-

tation. Sporadic lamination in these beds indicates resedimen-

tation by low-density turbidity currents. 

Facies association of the entire limestone interval indicates 

sedimentation  at  the  toe-of-slope.  The  overlying  strata, 

Lithotype

Texture

Composition

Diagenesis

Micritic limestone

Wackestone

Pellets, calcified radiolarians, sponge spicules, foraminifera, 

thin-shelled bivalves, fine bioclasts – echinoderm debris.

Partly dolomitized in lower part; minor 

recrystallization and silicification of matrix,  laminae 

with abundant framboidal to subhedral pyrite. 

Calcarenite

Coarse- to 

medium-

grained:

Grainstone or 

packstone 

Fossils, lithoclasts (the same as in limestone breccia – see 

description below), peloids, intraclasts, rare and strongly 

micritized ooids.

Predominating fossils: echinoderms (crinoids) and, in the upper 

part of the unit, also brachiopods (Fig. 4a).

Other fossils: calcisponges and foraminifera (common lagenids 

and textulariids), ostracods and gastropods.

Non-carbonate grains are biotite,  in the uppermost bed also 

glauconite.

Cements: Mosaic cement in the intergranular space. 

Syntaxial cement overgrows echinoderms. 

Silicification: rare and selective to bioclasts, mostly 

brachiopods and calcisponges. 

Pyrite: fine-grained between grains; framboidal pyrite 

inside micritic grains. Some grains show strong 

replacement or encrustation.

Dolomitisation: intense in the lower part of the 

section, decreases upwards; selective to matrix and 

micritic grains.

Fine grained

Packstone or 

occasionally 

grainstone 

Pellets and/or fine intraclasts and bioclasts, mainly 

echinoderms. 

Other fossils: calcified radiolarians and sponge spicules (Fig. 

4b), foraminifera, mostly textulariids and Lenticulina. 

Microfaulting was detected.

Limestone breccia

Rudstone

Matrix of the breccia is coarse-grained calcarenite, equal to 

calcarenite described above. 

Most common and largest lithoclasts (described in Table 2) are 

type-B (Fig. 4c). Other common lithoclasts are type-D and 

similar to them, but rarer type-C clasts. Platform derived types 

E (Fig. 4d), and Ga, Gb (Fig. 4c) lithoclasts occur regularly and 

become more abundant upsection (see Fig. 3.). Basinal (intra)

clasts (type-A; Fig. 4c) occur sporadically and types F and H 

lithoclasts occur very rarely. Apart from lithoclasts, large 

bioclasts occur: brachiopods, inozoan calcisponges, and 

strongly recrystallized or silicified chaetetids.

Corresponds to those from calcarenite described 

above. 

Table 1: Summarized microfacies characteristics of Mt. Mrzli vrh section limestone lithotypes.

background image

550

ROŽIČ, KOLAR JURKOVŠEK, ŽVAB ROŽIČ and GALE

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

dominated by micritic (hemipelagic), strongly silicified thin- 

bedded limestone, are characteristic for a basin-plain sedimen-

tary environment (Mullins & Cook 1986). 

The Perbla section

Description: The section was logged for 55 m. The under-

lying Bača Dolomite, i.e. bedded dolomite with chert nodules, 

is not exposed in the logged section, but according to observa-

tions  during  the  detailed  geological  mapping,  the  contact  is 

sharp. The  base  of  the  Krikov  Formation  (lower  36.5  m  of 

logged  section;  Fig.  3)  is  dominated  by  thick-bedded  and 

coarse-grained  resedimented  carbonates:  dolomitized  cherty 

breccia (some beds are channelized), partly dolomitized lime-

stone breccia and calcarenite, and subordinate micritic lime-

stone  (Fig. 5a).  With  a  sharp  contact  this  coarse-grained 

interval passes into 200 m of alternating thin/medium-bedded 

micritic limestone and calcarenite (calciturbidites). 19.5 m of 

this  succession  were  logged,  and  above  the  logged  section 

begins to be strongly silicified in the form of chert nodules in 

micritic limestone and intense, often complete silicifation in 

calcarenite.  

In the logged section, micritic limestone occurs in two  levels 

within coarse resediments (40 and 160 cm thick, between the 

17

th

 and 19.6

th

 m of the section, respectively) and shows indis-

tinct internal bedding. Above the coarse resediments (above 

the 37.5

th

 m of the section) it is gray to dark gray, thin-bedded 

and  horizontally  laminated.  The  microfacies  of  the  micritic 

limestone correspond to those from Mt. Mrzli vrh.

Calcarenite is usually coarse- to medium-grained, sometimes 

pebbly, bedded (4–100 cm) and normally graded. It often forms 

the upper parts of graded limestone-breccia beds, but the tran-

sition between the two facies is usually sharp. At the 26

th

 m of 

the section, a 1 m-thick package of thin-bedded (7–12 cm), 

inversely-graded  pebbly  calcarenite  is  present.  In  the  upper 

part of the section (above the 39

th

 m), it is thin-bedded and 

horizontally laminated. The composition of coarse- to medium- 

grained calcarenite differs from that of the Mrzli vrh section, 

as these beds in the Perbla section are mainly grainstone com-

posed of ooids, peloids intraclasts, whereas bioclasts are rare 

Occurrence

Texture

Composition

Diagenesis

SMF, sedimentation and age

Type A:

Mrzli vrh

Perbla

Liščak

Wackestone,  rarely 

mudstone

Radiolarians, sponge spicules and rare foraminifera, 

echinoderms, ostracods, thin-shelled bivalves (Fig. 4c).
Pellets occur in some clasts.

Some are strongly 

dolomitized.

SMF3 
Deep-water limestones (mud-chips). 

Age: ?syndepositional.

Type B:

Mrzli vrh

Perbla

Liščak

Wackestone to 

packstone; up to 

few mm large 

grains

Peloids, intraclasts and fossils: echinoderms, brachiopods, 

bivalves, benthic foraminifera, and sponge spicules (Fig. 4c). 

Shells are often fragmented.
Foraminifera: Trocholina umbo, common Ophthalmidium 

sp. and/or Vidalina sp.

Occasional 

recrystallization of 

matrix to microsparite.

SMF8 
Fossils assemblage indicates sedimentation 

on outer shelf or slope.

Age: ?Lower Jurassic (syndepositional).

Type C:

Mrzli vrh 

Perbla

Liščak

Wackestone

Pellets, rare unrecognizable small bioclasts and small 

benthic foraminifera:  Earlandia sp.

Occasional 

recrystallization of 

matrix to microsparite.

SMF?
Either of a shallow-water or open marine 

origin.

Age: ?Lower Jurassic.

Type D:

Mrzli vrh

Perbla

Liščak

Packstone, rarely 

grainstone

Pellets, rare foraminifera (Fig. 5e ):  Meandrovoluta 

asiagoensis, Earlandia sp. (Fig. 6c), Vidalina sp. 

Some clasts are 

recrystallized.

SMF16  or SMF 2
Either of a shallow-water or open marine 

origin.

Age: Lower Jurassic. 

Type E:

Mrzli vrh

Perbla

Liščak

Packstone;

poorly sorted

Dominant pellets, but with additional larger grains, 

mostly foraminifera or intraclasts (Fig. 4d). In some clasts 

micristised ooids, echinoderms, and shells, encrusted by 

foraminifera.
Foraminifera ?Galeanella tollmanni 

Common 

recrystallization of 

matrix to microsparite.

SMF16
Most probably of a shallow-water, inner 

platform origin.

Age: Norian-Rhaetian.

Type F:

Mrzli vrh

Perbla

Wackestone

Micritisized ooids, intraclasts, echinoderms, small benthic 

foraminifera and unrecognizable bioclasts.

Intense micritic rims 

around bioclasts.

SMF ?
Low-energy environment close to ooidal 

shoals. 

Age: not determined.

Type G:

Mrzli vrh

Perbla

Liščak

Grainstone;

mostly well sorted, 

and usually up to 

700 µm in size

Intraclasts, peloids, ooids and rare fossils, mostly 

echinoderms and foraminifera. The content of individual 

grains is variable; most commonly dominated by peloids 

and intraclasts (sub-type Ga), or by ooids (sub-type Gb; 

Fig. 4c).

Cements are 

circumgranular fibrous 

and mosaic.
Rare corrosive voids 

filled with micrite.

SMF15 and ?11-16 
Shallow-water, high energy limestones (sand 

shoals). 

Age: not determined; sub-type Gb  ?Lower 

Jurassic.

Type H:

Perbla

Grainstone

Intraclasts and cortoids, probably also foraminifera  

(Fig. 5e). 

Recrystallization 

(probably prior to 

resedimentation).

SMF11 
Platform margin shoals.

Age: not determined.

Type I:

Perbla Liščak Boundstone

Inozoan calcisponges, gastropod and bivalve shells, rare 

dasycladacean algae, and an intergranular space filled 

with micrite (Fig. 5d). In Liščak section occur corrosive 

voids filled by rimming bladed and mosaic cements  

(Fig. 6c). Large bioclasts can be encrusted by 

calcimicrobes and foraminifera.

Primary corrosion-

voids. 
Partial recrystallization 

of matrix to 

microsparite. 

SMF7 

Platform margin reefs.

Age: ?Norian -Rhaetian.

Table 2: Clast types from limestone breccia beds from Mt. Mrzli Vrh, Perbla and Liščak sections. Clast types are compared to Standard 

Microfacies Types (SMF; Wilson 1975; revised in Flügel & Munnecke 2010) with the goal to define their original sedimentary environments 

(clasts are arranged due to increasing environmental energy).

background image

551

SEDIMENTARY RECORD AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY INTERVAL IN THE SLOVENIAN BASIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

a

b

c

e

d

D

H

D

(Fig. 5b). With fining, differences from the Mrzli vrh section 

gradually disappear (Fig. 5c; for details compare Tables 1 and 3). 

Limestone breccia in the lower part of the section is very 

thick bedded (1–4 m), structure-less, and strongly dolomitized. 

Upwards, it is graded and occasionally deposited in erosional 

channels,  or  forms  the  lower  parts  of  two-component  beds;  

i.e. it passes upwards with a sharp contact into coarse-grained 

calcarenite. The matrix of the breccia beds is grain/packstone 

akin to the surrounding calcarenite beds. The lower part of the 

section was affected by intense dolomitization (Fig. 5e).

Lithoclasts  in  breccia  generally  correspond  to  those  from 

the Mrzli vrh section, but basin litho/intraclasts (type A) are 

Fig. 5. Resedimented limestones from the Perbla section: a — thick limestone breccia beds from the middle part of the section; b — micro-

facies of coarse grainstone dominated by ooids; c — fine, partly dolomitized packstone composed of fine intraclasts/pellets and bioclasts 

(mainly echinoderms); d — boundstone lithoclast (type-I) from limestone breccia; e — limestone breccia with dolomitized matrix and cortoid 

grainstone (type-H) lithoclast and pelletal packstone (type-D) lithoclasts; arrow points to Earlandia sp. foraminifera.

background image

552

ROŽIČ, KOLAR JURKOVŠEK, ŽVAB ROŽIČ and GALE

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

more abundant (Fig. 3), and boundstone (type I) and cortoid 

grainstone  (type  H)  lithoclasts  were  additionally recognized 

(Fig. 5d, e; for details see Table 2)  

AgeSiphovalvulina sp. is first encountered in thin-bedded 

breccia  at  26  m  in  the  Perbla  section.  Nine  meters  higher, 

Siphovalvulina gibraltarensis BouDagher-Fadel et al. in asso-

ciation with Meandrovoluta asiagoensis Fugagnoli & Rettori 

were encountered. The latter species is present in large abun-

dance in the micritic limestone and fine-grained calcarenite, 

forming  monospecific  assemblages.  The  first  appearance  of  

S. gibraltarensis is reported from the early Sinemurian (Velić 

2007;  BouDagher-Fadel  2008),  or  Hettangian  (BouDagher-

Fadel  &  Bosence  2007). Accordingly,  the  Perbla  section  is 

probably early Sinemurian in age, but may also be Hettangian 

considering  the  poorly  known  stratigraphic  ranges  of  the 

determined foraminifera. 

Sedimentological interpretation:  Thick-bedded,  coarse 

limestone  breccia  were  deposited  by  debris-flows,  whereas 

graded and horizontally laminated calcarenites are attributed 

to turbiditic flows (Ta-b Bouma sequences). Inversely graded, 

thin-bedded  pebbly  calcarenite  was  probably  deposited  by 

grain-flows (Stow et al. 1996). Several composite beds occur. 

Their base is non-graded or slightly graded breccia deposited 

by debris-flows. It is followed with sharp contact by graded 

(occasionally  pebbly)  calcarenites  that  originated  from 

 turbi dity-flows.  Similar  two-component  gravity  flows  were 

reported from the lower slope of the Bahamas carbonate plat-

form  (Mullins  &  Cook  1986). The  lower  part  of  the  Perbla 

section was deposited in toe-of-slope and/or proximal basin-

plain environments. 

The  section  ends  with  alternating  hemipelagic  limestone 

and calciturbidites. Such alternation points to sedimentation 

on  a  basin-plain  and  a  shift  towards  more  distal  facies  is 

recorded at the top of the logged section.   

Lithoclasts  in  breccia  from  the  Perbla  section  generally 

 correspond to those of the Mrzli vrh section and therefore indi-

cate erosion of similar parts of the platform. The more distal 

location  of  the  Perbla  section  with  respect  to  the  Mrzli  vrh 

section is reflected in the increased rate of basinal litho/intra-

clasts  (type  A)  and  a  decrease  in  the  amount  of  the  outer 

 platfrom/slope lithoclasts (type B). Otherwise, the content of 

particular lithoclasts shows no significant up-section alterna-

tion (Fig. 3). As reef limestone (type I) lithoclasts, likely of 

Late Triassic age, were documented solely in the upper part of 

the coarse-grained interval, we suppose a progressive down- 

cutting of erosion into the platform margin carbonates. 

The major difference, when compared to the Mrzli vrh sec-

tion, lies in the composition of the sand-sized material, which 

indicates  that  the  source  area  for  resediments  in  the  Perbla 

section  were  ooidal  shoals. Accordingly,  different  platform- 

basin  architecture  can  be  supposed  for  the  two  studied  sec-

tions. Alternatively, the different composition can be attributed 

to the heterochrony of the sections. Although the foraminiferal 

specimens occur  in turbidites, they can be considered to be 

contemporaneous with the studied strata, as they are present in 

the matrix and not in clasts, but sorting by size during down-

slope  transport  is  likely.  On  the  basis  of  the  known  strati-

graphic  ranges  of  determined  foraminifera,  both  studied 

successions are probably Sinemurian in age. The Sinemurian 

(or younger) age of the studied sections is also supported by  

O. martanum and S. gibraltarensis. The  difference  between 

Meandrovoluta-dominated assemblages of the Perbla section 

and  the  Involutina-dominated  Mrzli  vrh  section  is  probably 

related  to  the  different  lithology,  i.e.  I. liassica  appears  in 

coarse-grained calcarenite in the Mrzli vrh section, whereas 

M. asiagoensis  is  present  in  micritic  limestone  and  fine-

grained  calcarenite.  Both  assemblages  could  well  originate 

from different parts of the platform, e.g., Meandrovoluta from 

Lithotype

Texture

Composition

Diagenesis

Calcarenite

Coarse- to 

medium-

grained:

Grainstone;  

in thin beds

occasionally 

packstone

Radial and tangential ooids (30% of all grains), peloids (?micritised 

ooids), intraclasts and rare bioclasts (up to 10% of all grains in lower part 

and slightly more abundant in upper part of the section) (Fig. 5b). 
Bioclasts:  predominated by echinoderms and codiaceans. Others are 

fragmented brachiopods, bivalves, benthic foraminifera, such as 

Lenticulina and biserial textulariids, and very rare bryozoans. 
In upper part of the section gastropods appear and Meandrovoluta 

asiagoensis foraminifera are numerous.
Lithoclasts additionally occur in coarser beds. Their composition is the 

same as in the limestone breccia.  Rare small grains of biotite and 

phosphatic minerals.       

Cements: Mosaic cement in the 

intergranular space, syntaxial cement 

around echinoderms. 
Silicification: rare and selective to 

bioclasts, mostly as microcrystalline 

quartz replacing brachiopods. Large quartz 

crystals (up to 2 mm) are observed in 

intergranular space or as replacement of 

large echinoderms and brachiopods.
Pyrite: fine-crystals in intergranular 

spaces; framboidal pyrite inside micritic 

grains. 
Dolomitisation: strong in the lower part of 

the section; upwards selective to matrix 

and micritic grains.

Fine 

grained

Grainstone and 

packstone

Pellets, small intraclasts and bioclasts: predominant echinoderms, rare 

benthic foraminifera (Fig. 5c).  

Limestone breccia

Rudstone

Matrix of the breccia is coarse-grained calcarenite, equal to calcarenite of 

surrounding beds. 
Most common lithoclasts (described in Table 2) are types A, C, D  

(Fig. 5e), E and also Ga and Gb. Type-B (dominant in Mt. Mrzli vrh 

section) occurs sporadically. Very rarely occur type- H (Fig. 5e) and type-I 

(Fig. 5d) lithoclasts, the later only in the upper part of the coarse-grained 

interval.    
Large bioclasts are similar to those from Mt. Mrzli vrh section. 

Additionally calcimicrobes frequently occur. 

Dolomitisation: strong in the lower part of 

the section (Fig. 5e), gradually decreases 

upwards. 
Silicification: selective and bound mostly 

to bioclasts.   

Table 3: Summarized microfacies characteristics of the Perbla section.

background image

553

SEDIMENTARY RECORD AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY INTERVAL IN THE SLOVENIAN BASIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

a

b

c

d

D

I

the inner part of the platform (see Fugagnoli et al. 2003), and 

Involutina from a more agitated environment (see Piller 1978). 

Alternatively, the two sections might be slightly different in 

age, but at some sub-stage level (the current accuracy of deter-

mined foraminifera being at the stage level). 

Liščak sections 

Description:  The  succession  was  logged  in  two  closely 

 situated and correlated sections (Figs. 2d, 3). The uppermost 

40  m  of  the  Bača  Dolomite  consists  of  grey  to  dark  grey 

 medium-bedded dolomite with or without chert. Despite dolo-

mitization, primary sedimentary fabric is locally still preser-

ved, and horizontal and convolute laminations, scour struc tures, 

load casts, normal and inverse grading were all recognized. 

Macroscopically visible lamination reflects the difference in 

the  size  of  the  dolomite  crystals  (euhedral  crystals  50  to  

200 μm in size). 

A single, 15 m-thick breccia megabed, which is composed 

of dolomite and chert clasts, occurs at the base of the Krikov 

Formation. The  chert  clasts  are  angular,  while  the  dolomite 

clasts (up to 1 m large) are often plastically deformed. In the 

Liščak 2 section, the breccia is overlain by thin-bedded hori-

zontally laminated clayey dolomite, and after 2 m by micritic 

limestone. An overlying mud-supported limestone breccia bed 

of  1  m  thickness  grades  into  strongly  silicified  calcarenite 

(Fig. 6a, b). Above, thin-bedded micritic limestone and subor-

dinate dolomite was logged for 10 m. This interval includes 

two small-scale slumps. The microstructure of micritic lime-

stone is identical to the micritic limestone described before. 

The  calcarenite  is  packstone  composed  of  ooids/micritized 

ooids, intraclasts and bioclasts (Fig. 6d), whereas the breccia 

is  floatstone  with  lithoclasts  observed  also  in  previously 

described sections (Fig. 6c; for details see Tables 2 and 4).

Age:  Conodont  species  Epigodonella  ex  gr.  bidentata 

Mosher,  Misikella hernsteini  (Mostler),  Misikella posthern­

steini Kozur & Mock, and Oncodella paucidentata (Mostler) 

were recovered from the lower 7 m of logged Bača Dolomite, 

confirming the Rhaetian age of this interval (e.g., Krystyn et 

al. 2009; Buser et al. 2008; Gale et al. 2012). Only fragments 

of conodonts were found from the overlying bedded part of the 

Bača  Dolomite,  up  to  the  megabreccia.  The  marly  and 

Fig. 6.  a  —  1  m-thick  limestone  breccia/silicified  calcarenite  bed  within  thin-bedded  hemipelagic  limestone  of  the  Liščak  section;  

b — weathered surface of the limestone breccia with silicified brachiopods; c — floatstone microfacies of the limestone breccia with bound-

stone (type-I) and pelletal packstone (type-D) lithoclasts; d — silicified packstone with ooids, intraclasts, brachiopods and echinoderms.

background image

554

ROŽIČ, KOLAR JURKOVŠEK, ŽVAB ROŽIČ and GALE

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

laminated thin-bedded dolomite and micritic limestone of the 

lowermost part of the Krikov Formation are devoid of micro-

fauna. From the 1 m-thick breccia bed, shark teeth Synechodus 

sp.  and  Paraorthacodus  sp.  were  determined,  which  first 

appear  in  the  Early  Jurassic  (Paleobiology  Database  2016). 

The  Early  Jurassic  age  is  confirmed  by  the  finding  of 

 fora minifera  Meandrovoluta asiagoensis  Fugagnoli  &  

Rettori,  whereas  Cousin  (1973,  1981)  determined  Lower 

Jurassic  Involutina liassica  (Jones)  at  the  confluence  of  the 

Liščak and Kneža rivers, which corresponds to the Liščak 2 

section. 

Sedimentological interpretation:  The  sedimentary  struc-

tures of  the Bača Dolomite are strongly obliterated, but the 

formation  is  interpreted  to  have  been  deposited  in  a  basin-

plain  environment  (Mullins  &  Cook  1986). The  thick  dolo-

mite/cherty  breccia  megabed  that  lies  at  the  top  of  the 

formation  was  formed  by  debris-flow.  As  it  contains  large 

clasts  of  plastically  deformed  dolomite,  it  developed  from 

slumping of the basinal strata. This different deformation of 

chert and dolomite clasts indicates that the mass movement 

occurred after the formation of chert nodules and prior to the 

lithification of the carbonate sediment, which at the time of 

redeposition could still have been calcareous. 

The thin-bedded dolomite and the micritic limestone above 

the  breccia  megabed  are  interpreted  to  be  hemipelagic  in 

 origin. The lamination might indicate their partial redeposition 

by  low-density  turbiditic  flows.  The  breccia  with  silicified 

brachiopods was deposited by two-component gravity-flow: 

the  lower  part  of  the  bed  was  formed  by  a  debris-flow,  the 

overlying  calcarenite  was  deposited  by  a  turbidity  current.  

The  composition  of  the  debrite  indicates  the  erosion  of 

Triassic–Jurassic  carbonates  of  basinal,  slope  and  platform 

facies, whereas the turbidite carried material from a shallow 

water  environment.  In  the  upper  part  of  the  logged  section, 

two  additional  slump  intervals  were  recognized  within  the 

hemipelagic  limestone  and  dolomite.  Debris-flow  deposits 

and slumps indicate agitated paleotopography within the basin 

during the Triassic–Jurassic interval.

Mt. Porezen sections

Description:  On  Mt.  Porezen  three  sections  were  logged 

within  the  continuous,  i.e.  laterally  undisturbed  facies  belt 

(Fig. 7). Some thick-bedded dolomite-cherty breccia beds are 

present in the underlying Bača Dolomite (not included in sec-

tions). These suggest that the fault activity started already in 

the latest Triassic. A Norian tectonic pulse was documented 

within SB (Gale 2010; Oprčkal et al. 2012) as well as in the 

rest  of  the  Southern Alps  (Jadoul  et  al.  1992;  Cozzi  2000, 

2002). 

No  dolomite-chert  breccia,  however,  occur  between  the 

Bača Dolomite and the Krikov Formation, as is the case in the 

Liščak  section.  Instead,  the  top  of  the  Bača  Dolomite  is 

 characterized  by  bedded  dolomite,  which  is  followed  by 

a cherty interval some several meters thick. In the Zakojška 

grapa (northwestern) section black chert beds alternate with 

strongly silicified dolomite and subordinate dolomitic marl in 

an  interval  14  m  thick.  One  of  the  chert  beds  is  silicified 

 calc arenite  with  a  preserved  sedimentary  fabric. The  cherty 

 interval is represented in the other two sections largely as thin- 

bedded, pure black chert, some 4.5 m and 5 m thick in the 

southern  (Ritovščica)  and  northeastern  (Zapoškar)  sections, 

respectively.  In  the  Ritovščica  section,  it  starts  with  an  

80 cm-thick bed that reveals its primary calcarenite fabrics, 

with grain-ghosts within completely silicified parts and some 

locally preserved carbonate (Fig. 8c). A similar but thinner bed 

was recognized a few meters up-section. Bivalves of the genus 

Halobia were found in the lower part of this interval a few tens 

of meters laterally from the section (Fig. 8b). 

The overlying Krikov Formation is dominated by thin-, and 

exceptionally  medium-bedded,  grey  to  dark  grey,  wavy  and 

parallel  laminated  micritic  limestone  (Fig.  8a).  The  micro-

facies corresponds to that recorded in the previously described 

sections, but is commonly strongly recrystallized and silici-

fied.  In  the  Zakojška  grapa  section,  water-escape  structures 

were recognized in thin sections. Chert nodules occur in all 

sections. Marlstone is subordinate, except for the base of the 

Table 4: Summarized microfacies characteristics of limestone in the Liščak section.

Lithotype

Texture

Composition

Diagenesis

Calcarenite

Partly washed-out 
packstone 

Brachiopod shells, intraclasts (often mud-chips), peloids, echinoderms, 
micritized ooids and rare foraminifera (Fig. 6d). 

Cements: recrystallization of matrix to 
microsparite, mosaic cement in washed-
out intergranular spaces, syntaxial cement 
around echinoderms. 
Silicification: strong and replaces grains 
as well as matrix. 

Limestone breccia

Floatstone

The matrix between large grains is wackestone with small fragments of 
brachiopod shells, ostracods, echinoderms, thin-shelled bivalves, radiolarians, 
pellets, rare sponge spicules, and foraminifera (Fig. 6c). 
Predominant large grains are brachiopod shells and large A-type litho/intraclasts 
(30 %) which can contain non-calcified (siliceous) radiolarians and sponge 
spicules. Other lithoclasts are rarer and belong to types B (13 %), C (2 %),  
D (16 %), E (21 %), Ga (8 %), Gb (3 %) and I (7 %). These lithoclasts are 
smaller in respect to predominant A-type clasts.  

Dissolution seams.
Strong silicification of bioclasts (mostly 
brachiopod shells) with chalcedony and 
lithoclasts with microcrystalline quartz.
Sporadic pyrite as framboids or small 
subhedral crystals in micrite and along 
dissolution seams.

background image

555

SEDIMENTARY RECORD AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY INTERVAL IN THE SLOVENIAN BASIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

Ritovščica

BAČ

DOLOMITE FM

NORIAN-RHAETIAN

PERBLA

 FM

TO

ARCIAN

KRIKOV FM

HETT

ANGAN - PLIENSBACHIAN

dolomite

hemipelagic

limestone

marl/marly

limestone

silicous

calcarenite

chert

calcarenite

dolomite

chert breccia

Zakojška grapa

Ritovščica

Zapoškar

2

1

50m

marl/shale

N

500m

Ritovščica

1156m.a.s.l.

Mt Črni vrh

1032m.a.s.l.

Porez

en

Otavnik

Zapošk

a

Kladnik

25

50

35

70

25

50

30

30

30

35

30

Cerkno

Jesenica

20

40

30

FOR LEGEND 

SEE FIGURE 2

Otavnik

1309m.a.s.l.

Zakojška grapa section, where it forms a laminated interval 

that spans the 12

th

 to 25

th

 m section of the formation. 

As in other sections from the SB (Rožič 2009), the upper 

boundary with the marl-dominated Perbla Formation is sharp. 

The thickness of the Krikov Formation (between the cherty 

interval  and  the  upper  boundary),  however,  varies  signifi-

cantly  on  Mt.  Porezen.  In  the  Zakojška  grapa  section,  it  is 

135 m thick, in the Zapoškar section it reaches a thickness of 

approximately  115  m.  In  the  Ritovščica  section,  the  upper 

boundary is poorly exposed, but it is clear that the formation 

thickness does not exceed 65 m.

Age:  The  age  of  the  Mt.  Porezen 

sections  remains  poorly  constrained 

and  is  based  on  scarce  biostrati-

graphic  markers  and  correlation  (no 

conodonts  and  radiolarians  were 

found). Halobia sp. bivalves found in 

the black chert interval during geolo-

gical  mapping  indicate  that  it  is,  at 

least partly, Triassic in age. A similar 

and contemporaneous lithologic change 

from   carbonate  to  siliceous  pelagic 

sedi men  tation was reported also from 

the  Budva  Basin  in  the  southern 

Dinarides (Črne et al. 2011). Based on 

the  superposition, the Krikov For ma-

tion may represent an interval from the 

Hettangian to Pliensbachian. Its upper 

boundary  is  marked  by  the  Toarcian 

Oceanic Anoxic Event at the base of 

the overlying marly Perbla Formation 

(Rožič  2009;  Rožič  &  Šmuc  2011; 

Goričan et al. 2012).

Sedimentological interpretation

The Mt. Porezen sections encompass 

a  longer  time-interval  than  the  pre-

viously described sections. In the lower 

part  of  the  cherty  interval  in  the 

Zakojška  grapa  and  Ritovščica  sec-

tions,  a  few  beds  of  coarse-grained, 

almost  completely  silicified  calcare-

nite are the only coarse grained beds 

derived  from  high-density  turbidity 

currents  during  the  Triassic-Jurassic 

transition period. Horizontal and wavy 

laminations  in  micritic  limestone 

above  the  cherty  interval  indicate 

 partial  redeposition  of  hemipelagic 

sediments. The entire latest Triassic to 

Early  Jurassic  succession  therefore 

shows  a  very  monotonous,  distal 

basin-plain  sedimentation.  However, 

the significantly variable thickness of 

the  Krikov  Formation  in  closely 

located  sections  can  be  attributed  to 

a  tilting  of  the  tectonic  block  within 

the basin. A present-day 4° of block tilting in NW (azimuth 

296°) directions was calculated for the virtual plane connec-

ting  the  base  of  the  Krikov  Formation  in  the  three  logged 

 sections  (after  rotating  the  formation’s  upper  boundary  to 

 horizontal level). Since we did not calculate with compaction, 

the original inclination was steeper. 

As  mentioned  above,  the  entire  studied  succession  repre-

sents  a  greater  time  span,  and  due  to  poor  datation  it  is 

 impossible to specify the exact period of more intense sub-

sidence  within  the  Lower  Jurassic  strata.  Some  tectonic 

 activity  can  be  attributed  also  to  the  Pliensbachian–early 

Fig. 7. Geological map and schematic sections (simplified from 1:100 logs) of Mt. Porezen: 

variable thickness of Krikov Formation indicates block tilting, whereas lateral facies changes  

at  the  base  of  the  formation  indicate  it  occurred,  at  least  partly,  at  (and  shortly  after)  

the Triassic/Jurassic boundary.

background image

556

ROŽIČ, KOLAR JURKOVŠEK, ŽVAB ROŽIČ and GALE

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

Toarcian  subsidence  pulse  (Berra  et  al.  2009),  which  was  

well  recognized  in  the  eastern  Southern Alps  (Šmuc  2005; 

Rožič  2009;  Rožič  &  Šmuc  2011,  Goričan  et  al.  2012;  

Rožič et al. 2014), but lateral lithological variations described 

at  the  base  of  the  Krikov  Formation  indicate  that  tilting  

(at  least  partly)  occurred  at  the  Triassic/Jurassic  boundary 

interval:  firstly,  in  the  Ritovščica  and  Zapoškar  sections,  

the transition from the Bača Dolomite to the Krikov Formation 

is  marked  by  pure  cherts,  whereas  in  the  Zakojška  grapa  

the  chert-rich  interval  is  generally  thicker  and  pure  chert 

 alternates  with  dolomite  beds.  Secondly,  above  the  

chert-rich interval in the Zakojška grapa section the succes-

sion  is  marked  by  the  marly  interval,  which  was  not  docu-

mented  in  the  other  two  sections.  Both  variations  can  be 

attributed to  higher  latest Triassic-earliest Jurassic  sedimen-

tation  rates  in  the  Zakojška  grapa  section  at  the  paleotopo-

graphically  deepest  part  of  the  tilted  block,  which  is  in 

accordance with the largest thickness of the Krikov Formation 

in this section. 

Discussion

The  most  prominent  facies  change  is  recorded  in  the  

Mt. Mrzli vrh area, where it is interpreted as the drowning of 

the platform margin. Here, we notice that the massive dolo-

mite,  i.e.  dolomitized  reef  limestone,  is  underlain  by  the 

Amphiclina  beds  and  the  Bača  Dolomite  (Fig.  2),  both  of 

which formations are characteristic for the SB (Buser 1986, 

1989;  Gale  2010).  The  overlying  Jurassic  and  Cretaceous 

strata are represented entirely by basin facies as well (Buser 

1986; Rožič 2005). The differential sea floor paleotopography 

resulting  in  different  sedimentary  environments  is  probably 

related to discontinuously active syndepositional faults at the 

SB’s westernmost margin. During the tectonically quiet Late 

Triassic, intense carbonate production led to platform progra-

dation,  which  is  in  accordance  with  regionally  recognized 

platform  progradations  (Gianolla  et  al.  2003;  Krystyn  et  al. 

2009; Gale et al. 2014, 2015). The progradation process was 

interrupted by a reef crisis at the Triassic/Jurassic boundary 

a

b

c

5 mm

Fig. 8. Mt. Porezen sections: a — micritic limestone of the Krikov Formation from the Zapoškar section; b — Halobia sp. from the base of the 

cherty interval found close to the Ritovščica section (determination by B. Jurkovšek); c — microfacies of silicified calcarenite from the base 

of the cherty interval of the Ritovščica section (under cross-polarized light).

background image

557

SEDIMENTARY RECORD AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY INTERVAL IN THE SLOVENIAN BASIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

Dinaric (Friuli)

Carbonate

Platform

Dinaric (Friuli) Platform

Belluno

Basin

Slovenian Basin

Belluno

Basin

A

A

A`

Julian Carbonate

Platform

Slovenian Basin

A`

Triassic platform 

this study

Jurassic platform 

Triassic basin

Jurassic basin

not exposed due to thrusting and eros

ion

not exposed     due to thrusting and erosion

not exposed...

not exposed...

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

1

2

3

4

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

1

2

3

4

5

1

2

3

GAP

?GAP

Mrzli vrh

Perbla

Liščak

Porezen

Kobla (Rožič et al., 2009, 2012)

Banjščice (Ogorelec & Rothe, 1993)

PL

AT

FORM

S

Krim (Dozet, 2009)

Batognica (Buser, 1987)

SLOVENIAN BASI

N

bedded

dolomite

massive

dolomite

hemipelagic

limestone

marl

chert

calcarenite

dolomitized

limestones

ooidal

calcarenite

dolomite

chert breccia

Tr

iassic

Jurassic

limestone

breccia

loferitic

limestone

lagoonal

limestone

bedded

dolomite

ooidal

limestone

limestone

breccia

loferitic

dolomite

massive

oolite

dolomite

breccia

platfrom resediments

-western source

platfrom resediments

-northern source

?GAP

MAP AND CROSS-SECTION FACIES

(Flügel  2002;  Kiessling  et  al.  2007),  which,  combined  with 

an  intensification  of  tectonic  activity,  resulted  in  renewed 

deepening along the westernmost basin margin. In suggesting 

an analogy with the western and central Southern Alps (Jadoul 

et al. 1992), we assume the reactivation of pre-existing faults 

at the western margin of the SB (Fig. 9).

The Perbla section is marked by a carbonate breccia interval 

at the Triassic/Jurassic boundary, which indicates a prominent 

intensification of resedimentation. Although various processes 

can  trigger  the  formation  of  breccia  megabeds  (Spence  & 

Tucker 1997), we attribute this to an increase in slope inclina-

tion as a consequence of accelerated subsidence of the basin 

floor. As the composition of calcarenites in the breccia-matrix 

and the interstratified calciturbidites differs from those of the 

Mrzli vrh section, a different source area can be inferred for 

these beds. Because the Perbla section is located in the struc-

turally higher Rut Nappe (Fig. 2a), it may have been located 

not  only  to  the  east,  but  also  to  the  north  of  the  Mrzli  vrh 

 section, which lies in the structurally lower Podmelec Nappe 

(Buser  1987).  Consequently,  a  north-lying  Julian  Carbonate 

Platform,  which  was  covered  by  ooid  shoals  in  the  Early 

Jurassic (Buser 1986), seems the most probable source area of 

the carbonate resediments.

The composition of the lithoclasts points to a slightly diverse 

architecture of platform-basin transition along the transporta-

tion paths of gravity flows. In the Perbla section the resedi-

mentation events were sourced by ooid shoals but they also 

contain lithoclasts derived from the eroded underlying succes-

sion, including (Late Triassic) marginal reefs (type I, also H). 

Outer  platform/slope  carbonates  (type  B)  are  subordinate, 

Fig. 9. Schematic paleogeographic map and cross-section of the eastern Southern Alps and north-western External Dinarids at the beginning of 

the Early Jurassic with predicted locations and simplified logs of studied and discussed successions of the Slovenian Basin and the surrounding 

platforms; arrows on map indicate proposed directions of carbonate gravity flows.

background image

558

ROŽIČ, KOLAR JURKOVŠEK, ŽVAB ROŽIČ and GALE

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

while  basinal  litho/intraclasts  (type A)  are  common,  which 

points to a more basin-ward location of the Perbla section with 

respect to the Mt. Mrzli vrh section. In the Mt. Mrzli vrh area, 

the resediments originated from the shallow pelagic environ-

ment, whereas typical lithoclasts indicate the erosion of mostly 

outer platform/slope carbonates (type B) and Triassic–Jurassic 

platform  carbonates,  whereas  lithoclasts  of  marginal  reef 

limestone  (type  I)  were  not  detected.  This  is  in  accordance 

with  our  interpretation,  namely  that  Late  Triassic  marginal 

reef limestone (completely dolomitized) lies below the resedi-

ments  in  the  Mt.  Mrzli  vrh  section,  and  that  only  more 

inner-platform Late Triassic carbonates (type E and ?Ga) were 

exposed on the newly developed slope. 

The  Liščak  section  also  records  resedimentation  at  the 

Triassic/Jurassic  boundary,  which  can  be  explained  by  the 

increasingly  agitated  paleotopography  within  the  basin,  but 

the intensity of resedimentation (and also tectonic deforma-

tion) is far smaller than in the western sections. The lack of 

coarse-grained platform-derived resediments (with the excep-

tion of a singe 1 m-thick bed) is attributed to the larger dis-

tance from the main subsidence area at the western margins of 

the SB, and regionally from the rifting center further to the 

west.  The  easternmost  sections,  recorded  on  Mt.  Porezen, 

indicate that a minor Lower Jurassic tectonic block tilting was 

present in this area, and lateral facies changes at the base of the 

Krikov Formation (see previous chapter) indicate that tilting 

intensified at the Triassic/Jurassic boundary interval. 

The exact timing of the subsidence pulse cannot be speci-

fied due to rather poor biostratigraphic datations. It is clear, 

however,  that  it  starts  at,  or  slightly  postdates  the  Triassic/

Jurassic  boundary.  Foraminiferal  assemblages  from  resedi-

mented limestones from the Mt. Mrzli vrh and Perbla sections 

indicate that the subsidence intensified in the Sinemurian. This 

is in accordance with datations of an early rifting pulse in the 

western  and  central  Southern  Alps  (Bertotti  et  al.  1993), 

Transdanubian Range (Haas et al. 2014), Austroalpine domain 

(Froitzheim  &  Manatschal  1996),  as  well  as  Western  Alps 

(Chevalier et al. 2003). This extensional episode was governed 

by diffuse rifting and controlled by older discontinuities (Berra 

et al. 2009).      

Another, previously studied SB location indicates the tec-

tonic pulse discussed herein. It is situated north of Mt. Porezen 

in the Kobla Nappe, which is composed of the northernmost 

outcrops  of  the  SB.  In  these  sections  the  Triassic–Jurassic 

transition  is  marked  by  a  continuous  limestone  succession 

from  the  Upper  Norian/Rhaetian  Slatnik  Formation  to  the 

Krikov Formation (Rožič et al. 2009; Gale et al. 2012). Both 

formations are marked by alternating hemipelagic limestones 

and carbonate turbidites and debrites characteristic of proxi-

mal  basin  plain  —  lower  slope  environments.  An  interval 

 several  meters  thick  and  dominated  by  distinct  thin-bedded 

limestones occurs just above the Triassic/Jurassic boundary, 

but general succession shows no prominent facies alternations, 

which  is  in  accordance  with  the  previously  described  

eastward  decrease  in  subsidence.  However,  a  combined 

 carbon-isotope  study  and  biostratigraphic  analysis  indicates 

a gap at the Triassic/Jurassic boundary (Gale et al. 2012; Rožič 

et al. 2012), which again can be attributed to the increasing slope 

inclination that resulted in erosion or by-pass of the slope area.  

In the surrounding platform areas an intensified subsidence 

at  the  Triassic/Jurassic  boundary  is  not  clearly  evident,  but 

some sedimentary changes could be linked to it. On the JCP, 

the  peritidal  Norian–Rhaetian  Dachstein  Limestone  is  over-

lain  by  Lower  Jurassic  ooidal  limestone  (Buser  1986).  

The facies change described indicates a change from an inter-

tidal environment to one of marginal ooid shoals, i.e. a general 

deepening  of  the  sedimentary  environment,  which  could  be 

related to accelerated subsidence. Simultaneously, on the DCP 

the  Triassic/Jurassic  boundary  transition  is  largely  dolo-

mitized, but the litho(chrono)stratigraphic boundary lies at the 

point  where  stromatolitic  laminae,  typical  for  the  Norian–

Rhaetian Main Dolomite, disappear (Buser 1989, 1996), and 

similar sedimentary change as described for the JCP can be 

predicted also for this interval. Furthermore, in the northern-

most DCP outcrops, local appearances of rather thick carbo-

nate  breccia  intervals  were  reported  at  the  Triassic/Jurassic 

boundary  at  several  locations:  at  Banjška  planota  located 

south  of  the  herein  presented  sections  (Ogorelec  &  Rothe 

1993), at Mt. Krim near Ljubljana (Dozet 2009), and further to 

the east near the town of Trebnje (Buser 1965). No detailed 

studies of these breccias have been done, yet, but we propose 

that their origin is connected with the tectonic event discussed 

herein, as their local appearance (rapid lateral disappearance) 

could  indicate  sedimentation  in  a  paletopographicaly  seg-

mented (fault-dissected) environment.  

Conclusions

The  extensional  pulse  that  started  at  the  Triassic/Jurassic 

boundary  or  slightly  later  and  affected  the  entire  western 

Neotethys  margin  is  recorded  also  in  the  succession  of  the 

Slovenian Basin. In the Southern Alps, the structural unit of 

the Slovenian Basin, major crustal deformations are reported 

in their western segment, which was located close to the  rifting 

center, i.e. a precursor of the Middle Jurassic Piemont–Liguria 

Ocean.  Consequently,  the  tectonostratigraphic  reflection  of 

this  event  in  the  east-located  Slovenian  Basin  succession  is 

less  dramatic,  but  can  be  still  recognized. The  westernmost 

Mrzli vrh section records the change from the Late Triassic 

massive  dolomite,  which  is  interpreted  as  dolomitized  mar-

ginal reef, to the toe-of-slope carbonate resediments and there-

fore records a downfaulting-related drowning of the platform 

margin. The Perbla and Liščak sections record an intensified 

resedimentation  related  to  the  development  of  a  segmented 

paleotopography, which is indicated by the presence of car-

bonate lithoclasts derived from the platform margin, slope and 

basin facies. The source areas of resediments proved diverse. 

The  resediments  in  the  Mrzli  vrh  section  originated  from 

 crinoid-dominated  shallow  pelagic  environment,  whereas 

those  from  the  Perbla  section  were  shed  from  ooid  shoals.  

The  easternmost  Mt.  Porezen  sections  show  a  rather 

background image

559

SEDIMENTARY RECORD AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY INTERVAL IN THE SLOVENIAN BASIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

monotonous  latest  Triassic–Early  Jurassic  distal  basin-plain 

succession, which is with accordance with eastward-declining 

tectonic deformation. However, the highly variable thickness 

of the Hettangian–Pliensbachian Krikov Formation points to 

block  tilting  and  lateral  facies  changes  concentrated  at  the 

base of the formation indicate that tilting occurred close to the 

Triassic/Jurassic  boundary.  Timing  of  the  recorded  tectonic 

event is loosely determined, but we relate it to an episode of 

diffuse  rifting,  the  maximum  subsidence  of  which  is  docu-

mented in the latest Hettangian–Sinemurian of the entire Adria 

as well as European rifted margins. 

Acknowledgments: The study was sponsored by the Slove-

nian Research Agency (project number Z1-9759 and financed 

by funds for the Geochemical and Structural Processes, and 

Regional  Geology  research  groups).  Anonymous  reviewers 

are acknowledged for their thorough review of the manuscript. 

We would like to thank Gilles Cunyju from the Natural  History 

Museum of Denmark, Copenhagen, for a view on shark teeth, 

Bogdan Jurkovšek from the Slovenian Geological Survey for 

bivalves, and Špela Goričan for radiolarian probes. Numerous 

students from the Geological department of the Univerity of 

Ljubljana  are  sencirely  thanked  for  their  help  and  company 

during  the  geological  mapping  and  section  logging.  Miran 

Udovč  and  Ema  Hrovatin  are  acknowledged  for  the  prepa-

ration of thin-sections.  

References

Bernoulli  D.  &  Jenkyns  H.C.  1974:  Alpine,  Mediterranean  and 

 Central  Atlantic  Mesozoic  facies  in  relation  to  the  early 

evolution of the Tethys. SEPM, Spec. Publ. 19, 129–160.

Berra  F.,  Galli  M.,  Reghellin  F.,  Torricelli  S.  &  Fantoni  R.  2009: 

Stratigraphic  evolution  of  the  Triassic–Jurassic  succession  in  

the western Southern Alps (Italy): the record of the two-stage 

rifting on the distal passive margin of Adria. Basin Res. 21, 3, 

335–353. 

Bertotti  G.,  Picotti  V.,  Bernoulli  D.  &  Castellarin  A.  1993:  From 

 rifting to drifting: tectonic evolution of the Southalpine upper 

crust from the Triassic to the early Cretaceous. Sediment. Geol. 

86, 1–2, 53–76.

Böhm  F.  2003:  Lithostratigraphy  of  the  Adnet  Group  (Lower  to 

 Middle Jurassic, Salzburg, Austria). In: Piller W.E. (Ed.): Strati-

graphia Austriaca. Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften. 

Schriftenreihe der Erdwissenschaftlichen Kommissionen  16

Wien, 231–268.

Böhm F., Ebli O., Krystyn L., Lobitzer H., Rakús M. & Siblik M. 

1991: Fauna, Stratigraphy and Depositional Environment of the 

Hettangian–Sinemurian  (Early  Jurassic)  of  Adnet  (Salzburg, 

Austria) . Abhandlungen der Geologiscgen Bundesanstalt 56, 2, 

143–271.

Bosellini A., Masetti D. & Sarti M. 1981: A Jurassic “Tongue of the 

ocean” infilled with oolitic sands: the Belluno Trough, Venetian 

Alps, Italy. Mar. Geol. 44, 59–95.

BouDagher-Fadel M.K. 2008: Evolution and geological significance 

of larger benthic foraminifera. In: Developments in Palaeonto-

logy and Stratigraphy. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1–540.

BouDagher-Fadel M. & Bosence D.W.J. 2007: Early Jurassic benthic 

foraminiferal diversification and biozones in shallow-marine car-

bonates of western Tethys. Senckenbergiana Lethaea 87, 1, 1–39.

Buser  S.  1965:  Stratigraphic  evolution  of  Jurassic  beds  in  South 

 Primorska,  Notranjska  and  Western  Dolenjska.  Dissertation, 

University of Ljubljana, 1–101 (in Slovenian).

Buser S. 1986: Explanatory book for Basic Geological Map SFRJ. 

L33-64. Sheet Tolmin and Videm (Udine). Zvezni geološki zavod 

Jugoslavije,  Beograd, 1–103 (in Slovenian).

Buser S. 1987: Basic Geological Map of SFRJ. L33-64. Sheet Tolmin 

and Videm (Udine). 1:100,000. Zvezni geološki zavod Jugosla­

vije, Beograd (in Slovenian).

Buser S. 1989: Development of the Dinaric and Julian carbonate plat-

forms and the intermediate Slovenian basin (NW Yugoslavia). 

In: Carulli G. B., Cucchi F. & Radrizzani C.P.(Eds): Evolution of 

the  karstic  carbonate  platform:  relation  with  other  periadriatic 

carbonate platforms. Mem. Soc. Geol. Ital. 40, 313–320.

Buser S. 1996: Geology of western Slovenia and its paleogeographic 

evolution.  In:  Drobne  K.,  Goričan  Š.  &  Kotnik  B.  (Eds):  

The  role  of  impact  processes  in  the  geological  and  biological 

evolution  of  planet  Earth.  Inter.  Workshop,  ZRC SAZU,  

Ljubljana, 111–123.

Buser S., Kolar-Jurkovšek T. & Jurkovšek B. 2008: The Slovenian 

Basin  during  the Triassic in the Light of Conodont Data. Boll. 

Soc. Geol. It. (Ital. J. Geosci.) 127, 2, 257–263.

Channell  J.E.T.  &  Kozur  H.W.  1997:  How  many  oceans?  Meliata, 

Vardar, and Pindos oceans in Mesozoic Alpine paleogeography. 

Geology 25, 183–186.

Chevalier F., Guiraud M., Garcia J.P., Dommergues J.L., Quesne D., 

Allemand  P.  &  Dumont  T.  2003:  Calculating  the  long-term 

 displacement  rates  of  a  normal  fault  from  the  high  resolution 

stratigraphic record (early Tethyan rifting, French Alps). Terra 

Nova 15, 410–416.

Cousin M. 1973: Le Sillon  Slovene: les  formations triasiques, juras-

siques et neocomiennes au Nord-Est de Tolmin (Slovenie occ., 

Alpes mer.) et leurs affinites Dinariques. Bull. Soc. Geol. France 

7, 15, 326–339.

Cousin M. 1981: Les repports Alpes–Dinarides. Les confins de I’talie 

et de la Yougoslavie. Soc. Géol. Nord 5, 1, 1–521.

Cozzi A. 2000: Synsedimentary tensional features in Upper Triassic 

shallow-water  platform  carbonates  of  the  Carnian  Prealps 

(Northern Italy) and their importance as palaeostress indicators. 

Basin Res.12, 133–146.

Cozzi  A.  2002:  Facies  patterns  of  a  tectonically-controlled  Upper 

 Triassic platform-slope carbonate depositional system (Carnian 

Prealps, Northeastern Italy). Facies 47, 151–178.

Črne A.E., Weissert H.J., Goričan Š. & Bernasconi S.M.A. 2011: Bio-

calcification crisis at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary recorded in 

the Budva Basin (Dinarides, Montenegro). Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 

123, 40–50.

De  Graciansky  P.C.,  Roberts  D.G.  & Tricart  P.  2011: The Western 

Alps, from Rift to Passive Margin to Orogenic Belt: An Integra-

ted  Geoscience  Overview.  Developments in Earth Surface 

 Processes 14, Elsevir, Amsterdam, 1–432.

Dodd J.R. & Stanton R.J.Jr. 1990: Paleoecology: concepts and appli-

cations. John Wiley & Sons, Toronto, 1–502.

Dozet S. 2009: Lower Jurassic carbonate succession between  Predole 

and Mlačevo, Central Slovenia. RMZ – Materials and Geoenvi­

ronment 56, 2, 164–193.

Eberli G. 1988: The evolution of the southern continental margin of 

the Jurassic Tethys Ocean as recorded in the Allgäu Formation of 

the Austroalpine nappes of Graubünden (Switzerland). Eclogae 

Geol. Helv. 81, 175–214.

Flügel E. 2002: Triassic reef patterns. In: Kiessling W., Flügel E. & 

Golonka J. (Eds): Phanerozoic Reef Patterns. SEPM Spec. Publ. 

72, 391–463.

Flügel  E.  &  Munnecke  A.  2010:  Microfacies  of  carbonate  rocks: 

 analysis,  interpretation  and  application.  Springer,  Berlin, 

1–984.

background image

560

ROŽIČ, KOLAR JURKOVŠEK, ŽVAB ROŽIČ and GALE

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

Froitzheim N. & Manatschal G. 1996: Kinematics of Jurassic rifting, 

mantle  exhumation,  and  passive-margin  formation  in  the 

 Australpine  and  Penninic  nappes  (eastern  Switzerland).  Geol. 

Soc. Am. Bull. 108, 1120–1133. 

Fugagnoli A. 2004: Trophic regimes of benthic foraminiferal assem-

blages in Lower Jurassic shallow water carbonates from north-

eastern Italy (Calcari Grigi, Trento Platform, Venetia Prealps). 

Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 205, 111–130.

Fugagnoli A., Giannetti A. & Rettori R. 2003: A new foraminiferal 

genus (Miliolina) from the Early Jurassic of the Southern Alps 

(Calcari Grigi Formation, Northeastern Italy). Revista Española 

de Micropaleontología 35, 1, 43–50.

Galácz  A.  1988:  Tectonically  controlled  sedimentation  in  the 

 Jurassic  of  the  Bakony  Mountains  (Transdanubian  Central 

Range, Hungary). Acta Geologica Hungarica 31, 313–328.

Gale  L.  2010:  Microfacies  analysis  of  the  Upper Triassic  (Norian) 

“Bača  Dolomite”:  early  evolution  of  the  western  Slovenian 

 Basin (eastern Southern Alps, western Slovenia). Geol. Carpath. 

61, 293–308.

Gale  L.  &  Kelemen  M.  2017:  Early  Jurassic  foraminiferal  assem-

blages  in  platform  carbonates  of  Mt.  Krim,  central  Slovenia. 

 Geologija 60, 1, 99–115.

Gale L., Kolar-Jurkovšek T., Šmuc A. & Rožič B. 2012: Integrated 

Rhaetian  foraminiferal  and  conodont  biostratigraphy  from  the 

Slovenian Basin, Eastern Southern Alps. Swiss J. Geosci. 105, 3, 

435–462.

Gale  L.,  Rožič  B.,  Mencin  E.,  Kolar-Jurkovšek T.  2014:  First  evi-

dence for Late Norian progradation of Julian Platform towards 

Slovenian  Basin,  Eastern  Southern  Alps.  Rivista Italiana di 

 Paleontologia e Stratigrafia 120, 2, 191–214.

Gale L., Celarc B., Caggiati M., Kolar-Jurkovšek T., Jurkovšek,B. & 

Gianolla P. 2015: Paleogeographic significance of Upper Trias-

sic basinal succession of the Tamar Valley, Northern Julian Alps 

(Slovenia). Geol. Carpath. 66, 4, 269–283.

Gawlick  H.-J.,  Missoni  S.,  Schlagintweit  F.,  Suzuki  H.,  Frisch W., 

Krystyn L., Blau J. & Lein R. 2009: Jurassic Tectonostrati graphy 

of  the  Austroalpine  domain.  Journal of Alpine Geology 50, 

1–152.

Gawlick H.-J., Missoni S., Schlagintweit F. & Suzuki H. 2012: Juras-

sic  active  continental  margin  deep-water  basin  and  carbonate 

platform formation in the North-Western Tethyan realm (Austria, 

Germany). Journal of Alpine Geology 54, 189–291.

Gianolla  P.,  De  Zanche  V.  &  Roghi  G.  2003: An  Upper  Tuvalian 

 (Triassic) platform-basin system in the Julian Alps: the start-up 

of  the  Dolomia  Principale  (Southern  Alps,  Italy). Facies 49, 

125–150.

Goričan  Š.,  Košir  A.,  Rožič  B.,  Šmuc  A.,  Gale  L.,  Kukoč  D.,  

Celarc  B.,  Črne  A.E.,  Kolar-Jurkovšek  T.,  Placer  L.  &  

Skaberne  D. 2012: Mesozoic deep-water basins of the eastern 

Southern Alps (NW Slovenia). In: 29th IAS Meeting of Sedi-

mentology,  10-13  September  2012,  Schladming:  Field  trip 

guides. Journal of Alpine Geology, 54, 101–143.

Haas J., Tardi-Filácz E., Oravecz-Scheffer A., Góczán F., Dosztály L. 

1997. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of an Upper Triassic toe-

of-slope  and  basin  succession  at  Csővár.  Acta Geologica 

 Hungarica 40, 111–177

Haas  J.,  Kovacs  S.,  Karamata  S.,  Sudar  M.,  Gawlick  H.-J.,  

Gradinaru  E.,  Mello  J.,  Polak  M.,  Pero  C.,  Ogorelec  B.  &  

Buser S. 2014: Jurassic environments in the Circum-Pannonian 

Region. In: Vozár J. & et al. (Eds): Variscan and Alpine terranes 

of the Circum-Pannonian Region. Slovak Academy of Sciences, 

Geological Institute, Bratislava, 159–204.

Jadoul F., Berra F. & Frisia S. 1992: Stratigraphy and paleogeo graphic 

evolution  of  a  carbonate  platform  in  an  extensional  tectonic 

 regime:  the  example  of  the  Dolomia  Principale  in  Lombardy 

 (Italy). Riv. It. Paleont. Strat. 98, 29–44.

Kastelic  V.,  Vrabec  M.,  Cunningham  D.  &  Gosar  A.  2008:  Neo- 

Alpine structural evolution and present-day tectonic activity of 

the  eastern  Southern Alps:  The  case  of  the  Ravne  Fault,  NW 

 Slovenia. J. Struct. Geol. 30, 963–975.

Kiessling  W.,  Aberhan  M.,  Brenneis  B.,  &  Wagner  P.  J.  2007: 

 Extinction trajectories of benthic organisms across the Triassic–

Jurassic  boundary.  Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 

244, 201–222.

Krainer K., Mostler H. & Haditsch J.G. 1994: Jurassische Becken-

bildung  in  den  Nördlichen  Kalkalpen  bei  Lofer  (Salzburg) 

unter  besonderer  Berücksichtigung  der  Manganerz-Genese. 

Abh. Geol. Bundesanst. 50, 257–293.

Krystyn L., Mandl G.W. & Schauer M. 2009: Growth and termination 

of  the  Upper  Triassic  platform  margin  of  the  Dachstein  area 

(Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria). Austrian J. Earth Sci. 102, 

23–33.

Kukoč D., Goričan Š., Košir A. 2012: Lower Cretaceous carbonate 

gravity-flow  deposits  from  the  Bohinj  area  (NW  Slovenia): 

 evidence of a lost carbonate platform in the Internal Dinarides. 

Bull. Soc. Géol. Fr. 183, 4, 383–392.

Lemoine M., de Graciansky P.C. & Tricart P., 2000: De l’Ocean a la 

Chaine de Montagnes: Tectonique des plaques dans les Alpes. 

Gordon and Breach Publishers, Paris, 1–207.

Mandl G.W. 2000: The Alpine sector of the Tethyan shelf — Examples 

of Triassic to Jurassic sedimentation and deformation from the 

Northern Calcareous Alps. Mitt. Österr. Geol. Gess. 92, 61–77.

Masini E., Manatschal G. & Mohn G. 2013: The Alpine Tethys rifted 

margins: Reconciling old and new ideas to understand the strati-

graphic architecture of magma-poor rifted margins. Sedimento­

logy 60,  174–196.

Mullins H.T. &  Cook H.E. 1986: Carbonate apron models: Alterna-

tives to the submarine fan model for paleoenvironmental analy-

sis and hydrocarbon exploration. Sediment. Geol. 48, 37–79.

Ogorelec B. & Rothe P. 1993: Mikrofazies, Diagenese und Geochemie 

des  Dachsteinkalkes  und  Hauptdolomits  in  Süd-West  Slowe-

nien. Geologija 35, 81–182.

Oprčkal P., Gale L., Kolar-Jurkovšek T. & Rožič B. 2012: Outcrop- 

scale  evidence  for  the  norian-rhaetian  extensional  tectonics  in 

the Slovenian basin (Southern Alps). Geologija 55, 1, 45–56.

Piller W. 1978: Involutinacea (Foraminifera) der Trias und des Lias. 

Beitrage zur Paläontologie der Österreich 5, 1–164.

Placer L. 1999: Contribution to the macrotectonic subdivision of the 

border  region  between  Southern Alps  and  External  Dinarides. 

Geologija 41, 223–255.

Placer  L.  2008:  Principles  of  the  tectonic  subdivision  of  Slovenia. 

Geologija 51, 205–217.

Placer L. & Čar J. 1998: Structure of Mt. Blegoš between the Inner 

and the Outer Dinarides. Geologija 40, 305–323.

Plašienka  D.  2002:  Origin  and  Growth  of  the  West  Carpathian 

 Orogenic  Wedge  during  the  Mesozoic.  Geol. Carpath.  94,  

132–135.

Plašienka D. 2003: Dynamics of Mesozoic pre-orogenic rifting in the 

Western Carpathians. Mitt. Österr. Geol. Ges. 94, 79–98.

Reijmer J.J.G., Tenkate W.G.H.Z., Sprenger A. & Schlager W. 1991: 

Calciturbidite composition related to exposure and flooding of 

a carbonate platform (Triassic, Eastern Alps). Sedimentology 38, 

1059–1074.

Rožič  B.  2005: Albian–Cenomanian resedimented limestone in  the 

Lower flyschoid formation of the Mt. Mrzli Vrh Area (Tolmin 

region, NW Slovenia). Geologija 48, 193–210.

Rožič  B.  2009:  Perbla  and Tolmin  formations:  revised Toarcian  to 

Tithonian stratigraphy of the Tolmin Basin (NW Slovenia) and 

regional correlations. Bull. Soc. Géol. France 180, 411–430.

Rožič  B.  2016:  Paleogeographic  units.  In:  Novak  M.  &  Rman,  N. 

(Eds): Geological atlas of Slovenia. Geološki zavod Slovenije, 

Ljubljana, 14–15.

background image

561

SEDIMENTARY RECORD AT THE TRIASSIC/JURASSIC BOUNDARY INTERVAL IN THE SLOVENIAN BASIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, 2017, 68, 6, 543–561

Rožič  B.  &  Šmuc A.  2011:  Gravity-flow  deposits  in  the  Toarcian 

 Perbla  formation  (Slovenian  Basin,  NW  Slovenia).  Riv. Ital. 

 Paleontol.  Stratigr. 117, 283–294.

Rožič B., Kolar-Jurkovšek T. & Šmuc A.  2009: Late Triassic sedi-

mentary evolution of Slovenian Basin (Eastern Southern Alps): 

description and correlation of the Slatnik Formation. Facies 55, 

1, 137–155.

Rožič B., Črne A.E., Bernasconi S.M., Gale L., Kolar-Jurkovšek T. & 

Šmuc A.  2012:  Integrated  Norian-Rhaetian  conodont,  forami-

niferal and stable C-isotope stratigraphy of the Slovenian Basin 

(Southern Alps, NW Slovenia). In: Missoni S. & Gawlick H.-J. 

(Eds.): Sedimentology in the heart of the Alps, 29

th

 International 

Association  of  Sedimentologists  Meeting  of  Sedimentology, 

10

th

-13

th

  September  2012,  Schladming.  Montanuniversitaet, 

Leoben, 474.

Rožič B., Gale L. & Kolar-Jurkovšek T. 2013: Extent of the Upper 

Norian–Rhaetian Slatnik formation in the Tolmin nappe, Eastern 

Southern Alps. Geologija 56, 2, 175–186.

Rožič B., Venturi F. & Šmuc A. 2014: Ammonites From Mt Kobla 

(Julian Alps,  NW  Slovenia)  and  their  significance  for  precise 

dating  of  Pliensbachian  tectono-sedimentary  event.  RMZ  – 

 Materials and Geoenvironment 61, 2/3, 191–201.

Sarti  M.,  Bosellini A.  &  Winterer  E.L.  1993:  Basin  geometry  and 

 architecture  of  the  a  Tethyan  passive  margin  (Southern Alps, 

 Italy): implications for rifting mechanisms. In: Watkins J.S. et al. 

(Eds): Geology and Geophysics of continental margins. AAPG 

Mem. 53, 241–258.

Schmid S.M., Bernoulli D., Fügenschuh B., Matenco L., Schefer S., 

Schuster R., Tischler M. & Ustaszewski K. 2008: The Alpine– 

Carpathian–Dinaride-orogenic  system:  correlation and evolu-

tion  of  tectonic  units.  Swiss J. Geosci. (Eclogae Geol. Helv.), 

101, 139–183.

Shanmugam  G.  2000:  50  years  of  the  turbidite  paradigm  (1950s  – 

1990s): deep-water processes and facies models — a critical per-

spective. Mar. Petrol. Geol. 17, 235–342. 

Šmuc A. 2005: Jurassic and Cretaceous Stratigraphy and Sedimentary 

Evolution  of  the  Julian  Alps,  NW  Slovenia.  Založba  ZRC

 Ljubljana, 1–98.

Šmuc A. & Čar J. 2002: Upper Ladinian to Lower Carnian Sedimen-

tary Evolution in the Idrija — Cerkno Region, Western Slovenia. 

Facies 46, 205–216. 

Šmuc  A.  &  Goričan  Š.  2005:  Jurassic  sedimentary  evolution  of   

a  carbonate  platform  into  a  deep-water  basin,  Mt.  Mangart 

 (Slovenian-Italian  border).  Riv. Ital. Paleontol. Stratigr. 111, 

 45–70.

Šmuc A. & Rožič B. 2010: The Jurassic Prehodavci Formation of the 

Julian Alps: easternmost outcrops of Rosso Ammonitico in the 

Southern Alps (NW Slovenia). Swiss J. Geosci. 103, 241–255.

Spence  G.H.  &  Tucker  M.E.  1997:  Genesis  of  limestone  mega-

breccias  and  their  significance  in  carbonate  sequence  strati-

graphic models: a review. Sediment. Geol. 112, 163–193.

Stow  D.A.V.  &  Johansson  M.  2000:  Deep-water  massive  sands: 

 nature, origin and hydrocarbon implications. Mar. Petrol. Geol. 

17, 145–174. 

Stow  D.A.V.,  Reading  H.G.  &  Collinson  J.D.  1996:  Deep  seas.  

In: Reading H.G. (Ed): Sedimentary Environments: Processes, 

Facies and Stratigraphy. Blackwell Science, Oxford, 395–453. 

Velić I. 2007: Stratigraphy and palaeobiology of Mesozoic benthic 

foraminifera  of  the  Karst  Dinarides  (SE  Europe).  Geologia 

 Croatica 60, 1, 1–113.

Vlahović I., Tišljar J., Velić I. & Matičec D. 2005: Evolution of the  

Adriatic  Carbonate  Platform:  Palaeogeography,  main events 

and  depositional  dynamics.  Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. 

 Palaeoecol. 220, 333–360.

Vörös  A.  &  Galácz  A.  1998:  Jurassic  palaeogeography  of  the 

 Transdanubian Central Range. Riv. Ital. Paleont. Stratigr. 104, 

69–83.

Vrabec M. & Fodor L. 2006: Late Cenozoic tectonics of Slovenia: 

structural styles at the Northeastern corner of the Adriatic micro-

plate. In: Pinter N., Grenerczy G., Weber J., Stein S. & Medak D. 

(Eds):  The  Adria  microplate:  GPS  geodesy,  tectonics  and 

 hazards.  NATO  Science  Series  IV.  Earth and Environmental 

 Sciences 61, 151–168.

Vrabec M., Šmuc A., Pleničar M. & Buser S. 2009: Geological evolu-

tion of Slovenia — an overview. In: Pleničar M., Ogorelec B. & 

Novak M. (Eds): The Geology of Slovenia. Geological Survey of 

Slovenia, Ljubljana, 23–40.

Wilson  J.L.  1975:  Carbonate  facies  in  geologic  history.  Springer

 Berlin, 1–471.

Winterer E.L. & Bosellini A. 1981: Subsidence and sedimentation on 

a  Jurassic  passive  continental  margin,  Southern  Alps  (Italy).   

Am. Assoc. Petroleum Geol. Bull.65, 394–421.