background image

www.geologicacarpathica.com

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

, APRIL 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

doi: 10.1515/geoca-2016-0013

Testing of multidimensional tectonomagmatic discrimination

diagrams on fresh and altered rocks

M. ABDELALY RIVERA-GÓMEZ

1

 and SURENDRA P. VERMA

2

1

Posgrado en Ingeniería, Instituto de Energías Renovables, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Temixco, Mor., 62580, Mexico;

marig@ier.unam.mx

2

Departamento de Sistemas Energéticos, Instituto de Energías Renovables, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Temixco,

Mor. 62580, Mexico;  spv@ier.unam.mx

(Manuscript received January 18, 2015; accepted in revised form March 10, 2016)

Abstract: We evaluated 55 multidimensional diagrams proposed during 2004—2013 for the tectonic discrimination of
ultrabasic, basic, intermediate, and acid magmas. The Miocene to Recent rock samples for testing the diagrams had not
been used for constructing them. Eighteen test studies (2 from ocean island; 2 from ocean island/continental rift; 6 from
continental rift; 4 from continental arc; 2 from island arc; 1 from mid-ocean ridge, and 1 from collision) of relatively
fresh rocks fully confirmed the satisfactory functioning of these diagrams for all tectonic fields for which they were
proposed. Eight additional case studies on hydrothermally altered or moderately to highly weathered rocks were also
presented to achieve further understanding of the functioning of these diagrams. For these rocks as well, the diagrams
indicated  the  expected  tectonic  setting.  We  also  show  that  for  testing  or  using  these  diagrams  the  freely-available
geochemistry databases should be used with caution but certainly after ascertaining the correct magma types to select
the appropriate diagram sets. The results encourage us to recommend these diagrams for deciphering the tectonic setting
of older terranes or areas with complex or transitional tectonic settings.

Key words: tectonic setting, discriminant function diagrams, arc, within-plate, rift, collision.

Introduction

The  idea  of  trying  to  chemically  fingerprint  magmas  from
different  tectonic  settings  is  probably  best  attributed  to  the
pioneer  work  of  Pearce  &  Cann  (1971,  1973).  In  these  pa-
pers,  the  authors  identified  differences  in  the  geochemical
signature of rocks from volcanic arc, ocean floor, and within-
plate settings. Since then, numerous bivariate (x-y-type; e.g.
Pearce  &  Gale  1977;  Pearce  &  Norry  1979;  Pearce  1982;
Shervais 1982), ternary (e.g. Pearce et al. 1977; Wood 1980;
Mullen  1983;  Meschede  1986;  Cabanis  &  Lecolle  1989),
and  old  multivariate  tectonomagmatic  discrimination  dia-
grams (Pearce 1976; Butler & Woronow 1986), as well as 20
new multidimensional diagrams (Agrawal et al. 2004, 2008;
Verma et al. 2006; Verma & Agrawal 2011) have appeared
in the literature for basic and ultrabasic igneous rocks (with
(SiO

2

)

adj

<52 %; where the subscript 

adj

 refers to the adjusted

data  on  an  anhydrous  100 %  adjusted  basis;  Le  Bas  et  al.
1986; Verma et al. 2002). The diagrams of the older bivariate
or  ternary  types  for  the  tectonic  discrimination  of  magmas
with  higher  silica  (with  (SiO

2

)

adj

>52 %)  are  less  numerous

(Bailey  1981;  Pearce  et  al.  1984;  Gorton  &  Schandl  2000)
although,  more  recently,  35  diagrams  have  now  been  pro-
posed (three sets of five diagrams each, i.e., 15 for interme-
diate magmas by Verma & Verma 2013; and four sets of five
diagrams each, i.e., 20 for acid or felsic magmas by Verma et
al. 2012, 2013).

From  an  extensive  database  of  samples  from  known  tec-

tonic settings, Verma (2010) evaluated most of the tectono-
magmatic  discrimination  diagrams  for  basic  and  ultrabasic
rocks  and  concluded  that  only  the  multidimensional  dia-

grams,  particularly  the  newer  ones,  worked  satisfactorily
with high percent success (Agrawal et al. 2004, 2008; Verma
et  al.  2006).  Similarly,  Verma  et  al.  (2012)  evaluated  the
highly  used  Pearce  et  al.  (1984)  diagrams  for  acid  or  felsic
magmas and found them to perform unsatisfactorily, particu-
larly for the collision setting.

Although most of the older bivariate and ternary diagrams

have  already  been  extensively  evaluated,  especially  by
Verma (2010), this is not the case of the newer multidimen-
sional  diagrams,  particularly  those  published  after  2010
(Verma & Agrawal 2011; Verma et al. 2012, 2013; Verma &
Verma 2013). It is, therefore, worthwhile to evaluate all 55
such  diagrams  (Agrawal  et  al.  2004,  2008;  Verma  et  al.
2006, 2012, 2013; Verma & Agrawal 2011; Verma & Verma
2013)  using  geochemical  data  from  fresh  as  well  as  hydro-
thermally altered or highly weathered rocks from known tec-
tonic  settings.  The  evaluation  from  fresh  rock  data  will
provide an independent test on the functioning of these dia-
grams. The use of hydrothermally altered or weathered rocks
for  such  an  independent  evaluation  will  likely  render  these
diagrams  appropriate  for  older  terrains.  Recently,  Pandari-
nath (2014a) showed good functioning of these diagrams for
hydrothermally  altered  rocks  from  seven  geothermal  wells.
We  will  not  present  here  the  application  to  older  terrains
such as Precambrian belts; this has been extensively reported
recently  by  Verma  &  Oliveira  (2013,  2015),  Pandarinath
(2014b), Armstrong (2015), Bora & Kumar (2015), Kaur et
al.  (2015),  Rahman  &  Mondal  (2015),  Srivastava  et  al.
(2015), and Verma et al. (2015a,b).

This testing exercise is not trivial for at least four reasons:

(1)  such  an  evaluation  of  the  older  x-y  (where  x  and  y  are

background image

196

RIVERA-GÓMEZ and VERMA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

simple  concentration  or  element  ratio  variables)  or  ternary
(generally  of  three  concentration  variables)  types  of  dia-
grams  has  shown  them  to  perform  unsatisfactorily  in  both
igneous  and  sedimentary  rock  geochemistry  (Armstrong-
Altrin  &  Verma  2005;  Verma  2010,  2015a;  Verma  et  al.
2012,  2016;  Verma  &  Armstrong-Altrin  2013,  2016;  Arm-
strong,  2015);  (2)  the  evaluation  of  the  newer  multidimen-
sional  diagrams  can  provide  statistical  information  on
percent  success  for  the  relatively  older  diagrams  (proposed
during  2004—2011)  and  total  percent  probability  values  for
the newer ones (proposed during 2012—2013); and (3) a rou-
tine  use  of  well-known  databases,  such  as  GERM,
GEOROC-Mainz, and EGDB-USGS, for testing of our dia-
grams is to be viewed with caution.

Available multidimensional diagrams

These diagrams were proposed from statistical analysis of

a large number of Miocene to Recent igneous rock samples
from  known  tectonic  settings.  Thus,  for  the  tectonic  discri-
mination of basic and ultrabasic rocks from island arc, conti-
nental  rift,  ocean  island,  and  mid-ocean  ridge  settings,
Agrawal et al. (2004, 2008), Verma et al. (2006), and Verma
&  Agrawal  (2011)  used  geochemical  data  for  1159,  1645,
2732,  and  1877  samples,  respectively,  and  proposed  5  dia-
grams  in  each  paper.  Verma  et  al.  (2012)  proposed  5  dia-
grams for the discrimination of four tectonic settings (island
arc, continental arc, combined continental rift and ocean is-
land  as  within-plate,  and  collision)  from  a  compilation  of
1132 acid rock samples. Similarly, for the proposal of the 15
diagrams  each,  Verma  et  al.  (2013)  and  Verma  &  Verma
(2013) employed compositional data for 3056 acid and 3664
intermediate  rock  samples,  respectively,  from  island  arc,
continental  arc,  continental  rift,  ocean  island,  and  collision
tectonic settings.

The  diagrams  require  prior  calculations  of  complex  dis-

criminant  functions  DF1-DF2,  whose  equations  were  pre-
sented  by  the  respective  original  authors  (Agrawal  et  al.
2004,  2008;  Verma  et  al.  2006,  2012,  2013;  Verma  &
Agrawal  2011;  Verma  &  Verma  2013).  All  these  equations
were  also  summarized  recently  by  Verma  et  al.  (2015b),
which  are  reproduced  here  for  easy  reference  as  Tables S1-
S11  in  the  Supplementary  Material  file*  (Table  S1  for  five
diagrams of Agrawal et al. 2004; Table S2 for five diagrams
of Verma et al. 2006; Table S3 for five diagrams of Agrawal
et al. 2008; Table S4 for five diagrams of Verma & Agrawal
2011;  Tables  S5-S7  for  15  diagrams  of  Verma  &  Verma
2013; Table S8 for five diagrams of Verma et al. 2012; and
Tables  S9-S11  for  15  diagrams  of  Verma  et  al.  2013).  The
computer program SINCLAS (Verma et al. 2002) or IgRoCS
(Verma  &  Rivera-Gómez  2013a)  can  be  used  for  obtaining
the adjusted data referred to in these equations (see the sub-
script 

adj

)  and  deciding  the  magma  types  (basic,  ultrabasic,

intermediate, and acid; Le Bas et al. 1986).

We also note that these different sets of diagrams are inde-

pendent  of  each  other  although  they  require  complete
datasets  for  all  elements  in  the  respective  DF1-DF2  func-
tions. For example, the major element based diagrams would

require that concentrations of all major elements be available
in a given sample; if an element is missing from the data, the
set of major-element diagrams cannot be used. Unfortunately,
sometimes only major elements are available from a particu-
lar area, so the inference can be drawn only from one set of
diagrams.  Thus,  any  set  of  diagrams  can  be  used  indepen-
dently of the other sets.

Database and procedures

The geochemical data were compiled for 1034 samples of

Miocene  to  Holocene  relatively  fresh  as  well  as  hydrother-
mally altered or weathered igneous rocks from different areas
of known, uncontroversial tectonic settings from all over the
world (Fig. S1 in the Supplementary Material file; compiled
references  are  in  Tables  S12  and  S13).  A  synthesis  of  this
compilation for 18 test studies (1 to 18) from fresh rocks is
presented  in  Table  S12  and  for  hydrothermally  altered  or
weathered rocks for 8 application studies (A1 to A8) is pro-
vided in Table S13. The cases are arranged according to the
expected tectonic setting. The original authors’ descriptions
of  alteration  were  used  to  group  the  samples  in  application
studies as fresh and altered rocks; more details are provided
in the relevant sections.

The  geochemical  data  were  also  examined  for  the  Tonga

arc  compiled  in  a  freely-available  geochemistry  database
GEOROC-Mainz,  which  enabled  us  to  show  the  need  for
caution in the indiscriminate use of such databases.

We  will  describe  in  detail  the  first  Test  study  under  the

general  heading  of  “Ocean  Island  tectonic  setting”.  This
(Test  study  1)  is  for  the  region  of  the  Hawaiian  Islands,  in
which four sub-regions (1a—1d) are separately considered be-
cause we wanted to show that these diagrams can be applied
and  tested  with  individual  datasets.  Obviously,  if  the  main
objective was to decipher the tectonic setting of a given area
or region, all pertinent rock data or evidence should be used.
This obviously includes the geological reconstruction of ter-
ranes. The approximate coordinates (longitude and latitude)
of sample locations are then presented in two columns. The
next columns present a subdivision of the compiled samples
in  terms  of  basic  (B)+ultrabasic  (U),  intermediate  (I),  and
acid  (A)  magmas,  which  allowed  the  application  of  appro-
priate sets of discrimination diagrams (Agrawal et al. 2004,
2008;  Verma  et  al.  2006;  Verma  &  Agrawal  2011  –  all
these four papers for basic and ultrabasic magmas; Verma &
Verma  2013  –  for  intermediate  magmas;  and  Verma  et  al.
2012,  2013  –  for  acid  magmas).  Thus,  for  the  Mauna  Kea
area  (Test  study  1a),  complete  data  were  available  for  303
basic and 3 ultrabasic rock samples only; no sample proved
to  be  of  intermediate  or  acid  magma.  Therefore,  only  dia-
grams for basic and ultrabasic rocks can be applied and that
too for major element based (symbol m1 for Agrawal et al.
2004 and m2 for Verma et al. 2006) and immobile trace ele-
ment  based  (symbol  t2  for  Verma  and  Agrawal  2011)  dia-
grams;  complete  data  were  not  available  for  the  other
immobile  element  based  diagram  set  (t1  for  Agrawal  et  al.
2008). Note the table is or tables are also defined where the
results of the discrimination diagrams are presented (in this

* Supplementary Material (Tables S1—S54 and Figs. S1—S52) only in an

electronical version on www.geologicacarpathica.com

background image

197

MULTIDIMENSIONAL TECTONOMAGMATIC ROCK DISCRIMINATION DIAGRAMS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

case, Table 1). The next columns show the approximate ages
in  Ma  (or  geological  epoch  or  period)  and  rock  types  as-
signed by the original authors (in this case, 0.1—0.4 Ma). The
next column synthesizes the tectonic setting indicated by the
diagrams (in this case, OIB). The final column lists the refe-
rences  from  which  the  data  were  compiled  (in  this  case,
Rhodes & Vollinger 2004; Rhodes 2012).

For a correct application of the tectonomagmatic discrimi-

nation  diagrams,  the  IgRoCS  program  (Verma  &  Rivera-
Gómez 2013a) was used to obtain the magma types as basic
or  ultrabasic,  intermediate,  and  acid,  following  the  recom-
mendations  of  the  IUGS  (Le  Bas  et  al.  1986;  Le  Bas  &
Streckeisen  1991;  Le  Maitre  et  al.  2002).  It  is  important  to
strictly follow the procedure used by the original authors of
the  diagrams,  for  example,  note  the  subscript  adj  in  nume-
rous equations listed in Tables S1—S11. These magma names
could as well be mafic or ultramafic, intermediate, and felsic,
respectively, but because we are using the chemical criterion
of adjusted SiO

2

 for this distinction and not the contents of

Mg, Fe, and Si, we continue to use the nomenclature of the
IUGS.  Depending  on  the  magma  types,  appropriate  sets  of
diagrams were used to test if they provided the expected re-
sults of the tectonic setting.

To infer the tectonic setting for basic and ultrabasic mag-

mas,  we  used  the  software  TecD  (Verma  &  Rivera-Gómez
2013b),  which  allows  the  application  of  the  diagrams  by

Agrawal et al. (2004, 2008), Verma et al. (2006), and Verma
& Agrawal (2011). The four tectonic settings that can be dis-
criminated from the diagrams contained in this software are
as  follows:  IAB  (island  arc  basic  rocks),  CRB  (continental
rift basic rocks), OIB (ocean-island basic rocks), and MORB
(mid-ocean  ridge  basic  rocks).  TecD  automatically  counts
the samples that plot in a given tectonic setting and provides
a  synthesis  of  the  counting  results  of  all  five  diagrams  of
a given set, both as the number of samples as well as the cor-
responding percentage values (called percent success for the
expected  or  inferred  tectonic  setting).  Because  a  given  tec-
tonic setting will be missing from one of the five diagrams in
any set, the total percentage for any of the four settings will
never be 100 %; it will be around 80 % as a maximum value.
Further, because of this automatic procedure programmed in
TecD,  it  is  not  necessary  to  actually  plot  the  samples  in
diagrams. Nevertheless, following the suggestion of reviewers
we  provided  the  corresponding  diagrams  for  almost  all  stud-
ies, so one can better understand the functioning of TecD.

Another program TecDIA (Verma et al. 2015c) was used

for  the  application  of  all  diagrams  for  intermediate  (Verma
& Verma 2013) and acid magmas (Verma et al. 2012, 2013).
TecDIA  also  computes  the  probabilities  of  samples  for  the
different  tectonic  settings  and  provides  a  synthesis  of  these
probability values. The tectonic settings that can be discrimi-
nated  from  the  diagrams  for  intermediate  and  acid  magmas

Table 1: Testing of multidimensional diagrams from Quaternary (0.1-0.4 Ma) basic and ultrabasic rocks of Mauna Kea, Hawaii (Rhodes
and Vollinger, 2004; Rhodes et al. 2012; Test study 1a).

 

Figure reference; figure type 

Discrimination diagram 

Total no. of 

samples (%) 

Predicted tectonic affinity and number of discriminated samples (%) 

IAB CRB+OIB  CRB 

OIB 

MORB 

Agrawal et al. (2004); adjusted 

major element concentrations 

IAB-CRB-OIB-MORB 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

0 (0) 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

IAB-CRB-OIB 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

0 (0) 

306 (100) 

--- 

IAB-CRB-MORB 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

217 (70.9) 

--- 

89 (29.1) 

IAB-OIB-MORB 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

--- 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

CRB-OIB-MORB 

306 (100) 

--- 

--- 

0 (0) 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

Test study 1a. Synthesis of all five diagrams of Agrawal 
et al. (2004) 

1530 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

217 (14.2) 

1224 (80.0) 

89 (5.8) 

Verma et al. (2006); log-ratios of 

major elements 

IAB-CRB-OIB-MORB 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

4 (1.3) 

300 (98) 

2 (0.7) 

IAB-CRB-OIB 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

0 (0) 

306 (100) 

--- 

IAB-CRB-MORB 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

36 (11.8) 

--- 

270 (88.2) 

IAB-OIB-MORB 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

--- 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

CRB-OIB-MORB 

306 (100) 

--- 

--- 

0 (0) 

306 (100) 

0 (0) 

Test study 1a. Synthesis of all five diagrams of Verma et al. 
(2006) 

1530 (100) 

0 (0) 

--- 

40 (2.6) 

1218 (79.6) 

272 (17.8) 

Verma and Agrawal (2011); log-

ratios of immobile major and 

trace elements 

IAB-CRB+OIB-MORB

 

306 (100) 

2 (0.7) 

303 (99) 

--- 

--- 

1 (0.3) 

IAB-CRB-OIB

 

306 (100) 

3 (1) 

--- 

1 (0.3) 

302 (98.7) 

--- 

IAB-CRB-MORB

 

306 (100) 

2 (0.7) 

--- 

303 (99) 

--- 

1 (0.3) 

IAB-OIB-MORB

 

306 (100) 

2 (0.7) 

--- 

--- 

303 (99) 

1 (0.3) 

CRB-OIB-MORB 

 

306 (100) 

--- 

--- 

1 (0.3) 

303 (99) 

2 (0.7) 

Test study 1a. Synthesis of all five diagrams of Verma 
and Agrawal (2011) 

1530 (100) 

9 (0.6) 

303 (---) 

381 (24.9) 

1135 (74.2) 

5(0.3) 

 

IAB- island (or continental) arc basic rock; CRB- continental rift basic rock; OIB- ocean island basic rock; MORB- mid-ocean ridge basic rock; 
CRB+OIB- combined continental rift and ocean island, i.e., within-plate (WP) basic rocks; IA, CR,, OI, and MOR will be the corresponding tectonic 
settings; --- means no samples; the numbers within the parentheses refer to the percent values for the corresponding number of samples; note, for the 
calculations of percent synthesis values, the samples plotting in the combined CR+OI field (CRB+OIB column) are proportionately distributed 
between the CR and OI settings. 

background image

198

RIVERA-GÓMEZ and VERMA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

are  as  follows:  IA  (island  arc),  CA  (continental  Arc),  CR
(continental  rift)  and  OI  (Ocean  Island)  together  as  within-
plate,  and  Col  (collision).  As  for  TecD,  TecDIA  also  pro-
vides a complete synthesis of the results of all five diagrams
in a given set. In fact, TecDIA additionally gives a synthesis
of the probability estimates for each tectonic setting in all dia-
grams as well as the overall percent probability estimates of
each  diagram  set.  Therefore,  actual  plotting  of  samples  in
any  diagram  is  really  not  required.  Nevertheless,  we  also
present  one  example  of  all  diagram  types  for  intermediate
and  acid  magmas  (Verma  &  Verma  2013;  Verma  et  al.
2012, 2013).

Results and discussion

The results of the evaluation are presented in two subsec-

tions.  The  first  part  corresponds  to  relatively  fresh  rocks
from known tectonic settings, whereas the second part shows
the  results  for  hydrothermally  altered  and  weathered  rocks.
A lower limit of five samples with complete data for a given
diagram  set  was  arbitrarily  established  for  using  them  for
testing  or  application  purposes.  Similarly,  results  are  also
presented even if the data were available for only one or two
sets  of  diagrams  because  the  evaluation  is  independently
achieved for all diagram sets.

Testing  of  the  diagrams  from  “fresh”  volcanic  rocks  of
ocean island tectonic settings

The  first  test  study  of  the  Hawaiian  Islands  will  be  de-

scribed  in  greater  detail.  All  other  studies  will  simply  be
mentioned  with  the  statistical  information  in  order  to  keep
the paper short and avoid excessive repetition.

Test study 1a: Mauna Kea

For the Mauna Kea area, 303 samples of basic and 3 ultra-

basic rocks (Table S12; Rhodes and Vollinger 2004; Rhodes
2012)  had  complete  dataset  for  major-element  based  dia-
grams of Agrawal et al. (2004) and Verma et al. (2006) and
for  only  one  set  of  immobile  trace  element  based  diagrams
(Verma & Agrawal 2011). No samples had complete data for
the  other  set  of  immobile  trace  element  based  diagrams
(Agrawal  et  al.  2008),  which  could  not  be  used.  Similarly,
none of the diagrams for intermediate and acid rocks (Verma
& Verma 2013; Verma et al. 2012, 2013) could be used for
this  case  because  no  samples  proved  to  be  of  these  types
(missing  data  shown  by  –  in  the  “I”  and  “A”  columns  in
Table S12).

Thus, three sets of diagrams (Agrawal et al. 2004; Verma

et  al.  2006;  Verma  &  Agrawal  2011)  could  be  tested  from
the  Mauna  Kea  data;  and  the  results  are  shown  in  Table  1.
The actual diagrams of Agrawal et al. (2004) for the Mauna
Kea  samples  do  not  really  need  to  be  shown  for  three  rea-
sons:  (i)  these  diagrams  are  based  on  only  major  element
concentrations  and  not  on  log-ratios;  (ii)  TecD  provides
complete summary of all the plots (the first part of Table 1);
and (iii) we wanted to conserve journal space by presenting
only one set of diagrams based on log-ratios (Fig. 1) in the

main  part  of  the  paper.  Nevertheless,  for  the  sake  of  com-
pleteness  and  considering  that  most  readers  of  the  journal
would like to see the diagrams along with the synthesis in ta-
bles, we have added these diagrams (Figs. S2 and S3 for this
case study as well as in other figures for other case studies)
in the Supplementary file.

In  the  first  set  of  five  diagrams  (Fig.  S2),  all  Mauna  Kea

samples plotted in the OIB fields in four of the five diagrams
in  which  this  setting  is  present.  In  the  diagram  (IAB-CRB-
MORB) from which OIB is absent, the samples will plot in
any  other  fields;  in  this  case,  most  of  them  plotted  in  the
CRB field, followed by the MORB field (Table 1). The syn-
thesis  of  all  diagrams  is  then  presented  in  Table  1,  which
shows that the overall percent success for the OIB setting is
80.0 %  being  the  maximum  value  for  such  a  synthesis  pro-
vided  by  TecD.  Therefore,  these  diagrams  clearly  showed
the expected OIB setting for the Mauna Kea samples.

In  the  other  set  of  diagrams  based  on  log-ratios  of  major

elements  (Verma  et  al.  2006),  the  Mauna  Kea  samples  are
actually  plotted  in  Fig.  1a—e  (DF1—DF2  equations  from
Table S2 were used for the calculations of the x and y coor-
dinates in each diagram) and the results from TecD are also
summarized  in  Table  1.  In  the  first  diagram  (Fig.  1a),  300
(out of 306) samples plotted in the OIB field, whereas in the
other three diagrams (Fig. 1b,d,e) all samples plotted in the
OIB field. In the diagram from which the OIB field is missing
(Fig. 1c), the samples plotted in the MORB and CRB fields.
The  overall  synthesis  of  all  five  diagrams  of  Verma  et  al.
(2006) also showed a clear result of the OIB tectonic setting
with  the  percent  success  of  79.6  %  (Table  1),  very  close  to
the maximum value of 80 %.

Finally, the set of diagrams based on log-ratios of immo-

bile elements (Verma & Agrawal 2011) also showed an OIB
setting for the Mauna Kea samples with the percent success
of about 74.2 % (Fig. S3; Table 1). In this diagram set, the
first  diagram  has  a  combined  CRB+OIB  setting,  only  three
diagrams  have  an  OIB  setting,  and  from  one  diagram  this
setting is totally missing. Therefore, the percent success for
the OIB can seldom reach the maximum value of 80 %.

Thus,  a  satisfactory  functioning  of  all  three  diagram  sets

for the OIB setting was confirmed from the Mauna Kea data
(Test study 1a).

Test study 1b: Mauna Loa

Forty-five (43 basic and 2 ultrabasic) samples from Mauna

Loa (Table S12; Rhodes & Vollinger 2004) allowed the tes-
ting of three sets of diagrams. Most of the samples plotted in
the  OIB  field  in  the  three  sets  for  major  elements  (two  sets
for basic rocks as Figs. S4 and S5 and one set for acid rocks
as  Fig. S6;  percent  success  amounting  to  about  75—76 %;
Table S14), thus confirming the good functioning of all three
sets of diagrams for the OIB setting.

Test study 1c: Maui Island

Only 10 basic rock samples available from the Maui Island

(Table S12; Sherrod et al. 2007) allowed the testing of three
sets  of  diagrams.  Most  of  the  samples  plotted  in  the  OIB
field  in  the  three  sets  (overall  percent  success  of  about

background image

199

MULTIDIMENSIONAL TECTONOMAGMATIC ROCK DISCRIMINATION DIAGRAMS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

Fig. 1. Application of the set of five major element-based discrimi-
nant-function DF1—DF2 discrimination diagrams (see the subscript
m2 in all these diagrams; Verma et al. 2006) for basic and ultrabasic
rock  samples  from  Maui  (Hawaiian  Islands).  The  total  number  of
samples and their % success values are given in Table S12 for the
tectonic settings of island arc (IA), continental rift (CR), ocean is-
land (OI), and mid-ocean ridge (MOR). The letter B after the name
of  the  tectonic  field  represents  basic  (and  also  ultrabasic)  magma.
The symbols are shown as an inset in (a). a – four tectonic settings
IA—CR—OI—MOR;  b  –  three  tectonic  settings  IA—CR—OI;
c – three tectonic settings IA—CR—MOR;  d – three tectonic set-
tings IA—OI—MOR; and e – three tectonic settings CR—OI—MOR.

background image

200

RIVERA-GÓMEZ and VERMA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

62—80 %;  Figs.  S7—S9;  Table  S15)  and  confirmed  good
functioning of all three sets of diagrams for the OIB setting.

Test study 1d: Oahu Island

Twenty-four samples from the Oahu Island were used (Ta-

ble  S12;  Jackson  et  al.  1999).  Nine  samples  of  basic  rocks
had complete datasets for Agrawal et al. (2004), Verma et al.
(2006) and Verma and Agrawal (2011). The set of trace ele-
ment based diagram (Agrawal et al. 2008) were not used, be-
cause the samples with complete data were only four (Table
S12) and we had decided to report only the results of at least
five samples. The nine basic rock samples indicated the OIB
setting  in  the  three  sets  of  diagrams  with  percent  success
from 67 % to 78 % (Figs. S10—S12; Table S16).

Complete  data  for  15  intermediate  rock  samples  were

available for two diagram sets (Verma & Verma 2013). For
both  sets,  these  samples  indicated  a  within-plate  (CR+OI)
setting, with about 81 % and 87 % percent probability values
(for explanation of probability estimates, see Verma & Verma
2013), respectively, for the complete major and selected im-
mobile  element  based  diagrams  (Figs.  S13  and  S14;
Table S17). This inference can be considered consistent with
that  of  the  basic  rock  diagrams,  because  those  for  inter-
mediate rocks are incapable of discriminating these two very
similar tectonic settings; the distinction between continental
rift  and  ocean  island  settings  can  only  be  made  at  present
from basic and ultrabasic rocks. The testing of the third set is
not reported because only three samples with complete data
were available (Table S12).

Test study 2: Trindade Island

The compiled rocks from the Trindade Island (Table S12;

Marques et al. 1999) included 14 (2 basic and 12 ultrabasic)
samples for testing of three sets of diagrams (Agrawal et al.
2004,  2008;  Verma  et  al.  2006)  and  24  intermediate  rock
samples for two sets of diagrams (24 for the major element
based  and  13  for  immobile  trace  element  based  diagrams;
Verma & Verma 2013).

The testing of the diagrams for basic and ultrabasic rocks

was  satisfactory  because  most  of  the  14  samples  plotted  in
the OIB field, with percent success of 70 %, 70 %, and 62 %,
respectively, for Agrawal et al. (2004), Verma et al. (2006),
and  Agrawal  et  al.  (2008)  diagrams  (Figs.  S15—S17;  Table
S18).  Similarly,  the  two  sets  of  diagrams  for  intermediate
rocks  (major  elements  and  immobile  trace  elements)  were
also  satisfactorily  tested  for  the  within-plate  setting,  with
percent probability values of about 76 % and 80 %, respec-
tively (Figs. S18 and S19; Table S19).

Testing  of  the  diagrams  from  “fresh”  volcanic  rocks  of
ocean island or continental rift tectonic setting

Test study 3: White Island, Ross Sea, Antarctica

Cooper et al. (2007) suggested that rocks from the White

Island resulted from rift-related decompression melting rather
than the action of a mantle plume earlier suggested by   Be-
hrendt et al. (1991, 1992). Therefore, either a CRB or an OIB

setting could be the expected tectonic setting. We compiled
data  for  22  basic  rock  samples  (Table  S12),  which  enabled
us  to  test  all  four  sets  of  diagrams  for  basic  and  ultrabasic
magmas.  In  the  major  element  based  diagrams  all  samples
plotted only in the CRB and OIB fields (Figs. S20 and S21;
Table  S20).  The  percent  success  values  for  Agrawal  et  al.
(2004)  diagrams  were  about  44  %  and  56  %,  respectively,
for the CRB and OIB settings, whereas those for the Verma
et al. (2006) diagrams these were about 48 % and 52 %, respec-
tively  (Table  S20).  The  trace  element  based  diagrams  of
Agrawal  et  al.  (2008)  indicated  a  CRB  setting  with  percent
success of about 64 %, whereas those of Verma & Agrawal
(2011) indicated an OIB setting with the corresponding per-
cent success of about 68 % (Figs. S22 and S23; Table S20).
Thus, the diagrams indicate either a CRB or an OIB setting
for  these  rocks.  Unfortunately,  no  clear  distinction  between
these  two  very  similar  tectonic  settings  was  achieved  from
these diagram sets. The geological history and crustal thick-
ness  of  the  White  Island  might  resolve  this  controversy
(Behrendt et al. 1991, 1992; Cooper et al. 2007).

The continental rift and ocean island tectonic settings are

very similar, which makes their discrimination a rather diffi-
cult  task.  The  four  sets  of  multidimensional  discrimination
diagrams  (Agrawal  et  al.  2004,  2008;  Verma  et  al.  2006;
Verma & Agrawal 2011) available as geochemical discrimi-
nation  diagrams  provided  mutually  inconsistent  results.
A combination  technique  of  multidimensional  discrimina-
tion and petrogenetic processes yet to be proposed and prac-
ticed  might  eventually  throw  further  light  on  this  complex
problem  because  the  discrimination  diagrams  have  certain
limitations as discussed recently by Verma et al. (2015b) and
Verma (2015b, 2015c).

Test study 4:  McMurdo area, Antarctica

Drill  core  basic  volcanic  glass  samples  of  Miocene  age

(15.9—18.4  Ma;  Table  S12;  Nyland  et  al.  2013)  were
recovered  from  the  McMurdo  Sound  area,  Antarctica.
The tectonic setting of the area was not reported by Nyland
et  al.  (2013),  but  it  may  well  be  either  a  continental  rift  or
an  ocean  island.  The  basic  rock  diagrams  might  help  us  to
distinguish  between  them.  Fairly  complete  geochemical
data,  including  alteration  information,  for  24  glass  samples
were reported by Nyland et al. (2013). Complete data (Table
S12)  for  24  samples  were  thus  available  for  three  sets  of
diagrams (Agrawal et al. 2004; Verma et al. 2006; Verma &
Agrawal  2011)  and  data  for  20  (out  of  24)  samples  were
complete  for  the  diagrams  of  Agrawal  et  al.  (2008).  The
major element based diagram sets indicated an ocean island
setting, with about 63 % or 64 % percent success (Figs. S24
and  S25;  Table  S21).  The  immobile  trace  element  based
diagrams of Agrawal et al. (2008) showed percent values of
55 % for the CRB and 45 % for the OIB setting; so they did
not provide a clear answer (Fig. S26; Table S21). The other
immobile  element  based  diagrams  (Verma  &  Agrawal
2011),  however,  suggested  an  OIB  setting  for  these  glass
samples,  with  percent  success  of  about  72  %  (Fig.  S27;
Table S21). Therefore, an OIB setting could be inferred for
the McMurdo Sound area during the Miocene.

background image

201

MULTIDIMENSIONAL TECTONOMAGMATIC ROCK DISCRIMINATION DIAGRAMS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

Testing  of  the  diagrams  for  “fresh”  volcanic  rocks  from
continental rift tectonic setting

Test study 5: Garrotxa, Spain

Geochemical data for 16 samples of Quaternary basic and

ultrabasic  rocks  from  the  NE  Volcanic  Province  of  Spain
(Garrotxa  area)  were  reported  by  Cebriá  et  al.  (2000).  The
use  of  all  four  sets  of  diagrams  was  possible  (Table  S12).
These diagrams consistently confirmed a continental rift set-
ting for these samples, with percent success values of 60 %
to 80 % (Figs. S28—S31; Table S22).

Test study 6: Styrian basin, Austria

Geochemical data for 39 (9 basic and 30 ultrabasic) Qua-

ternary  rock  samples  from  this  area  (Table  S12;  Ali  et  al.
2013)  clearly  indicated  a  continental  rift  setting  in  all  four
sets of diagrams, with percent success of about 71 % to 80 %
(Figs. S32—S35; Table S23).

Test study 7: Cameroon Mountains, Cameroon

Fourteen  samples  of  basic  rocks  from  the  year  1999  and

2000  (recent)  eruptions  (Table  S12;  Suh  et  al.  2003)  had
complete  data  for  three  sets  of  diagrams,  all  of  which  were
consistent  with  a  continental  rift  setting,  with  percent  suc-
cess values of 56 % to 74 % (Figs. S36—S38; Table S24).

Test study 8: Nosy Be Archipelago, Madagascar

Melluso  &  Morra  (2000)  reported  geochemical  data  for

27 samples of Miocene mafic alkaline rocks from the Nosy
Be  Island  (Table  S12).  Three  sets  of  diagrams  could  be
applied, all of which indicated a continental rift setting, with
percent  success  values  of  about  56 %  to  73 %  (Figs.  S39—
S41; Table S25).

Test study 9: Tianheyong, Inner Mongolia, China

Geochemical data for only eight samples of early Miocene

were  reported  by  Yang  et  al.  (2009).  These  samples  had
complete  data  for  three  sets  of  diagrams  (Table  S12).  The
two sets based on major elements (Agrawal et al. 2004; Ver-
ma et al. 2006) indicated a continental rift setting, with per-
cent success of about 73 % for both of them (Figs. S42 and
S43;  Table  S26).  However,  the  set  based  on  immobile  ele-
ments  (Agrawal  et  al.  2008)  suggested  an  ocean  island  set-
ting  for  these  samples  (percent  success  of  75  %;  Fig.  S44;
Table S26).

Test  study  10:  Halaha  volcanic  field,  Central  Great

Xing‘an Range, China

Fourteen  samples  of  Quaternary  basic  rocks  (Table  S12;

Ho et al. 2013) from the Halaha volcanic field, NE China, in-
dicated a continental rift setting (Table S27). Both sets of the
major  element  based  diagrams  showed  higher  percent  suc-
cess values of 67 % and 71 % than both sets of immobile ele-
ment based diagrams (44 % and 49 % only; Figs. S45—S48;
Table S27). Nevertheless, the expected CRB tectonic setting
was confirmed from all diagram sets.

Testing  of  the  diagrams  for  “fresh”  volcanic  rocks  from
continental arc tectonic settings

Test study 11: Aniakchak ignimbrite, Alaska

Geochemical data for 9 samples from about 3400 years old

ignimbrite  (Table  S12;  Dreher  et  al.  2005)  from  the
Aniakchak caldera, Aleutian Peninsula, were used to test all
multidimensional  diagrams  for  acid  rocks  (Verma  et  al.
2012, 2013). Both sets based on log-ratios of major elements
(Figs.  S49  and  S50)  showed  a  continental  arc  setting,  with
percent  probability  values  of  85  %  and  56  %  (Table  S28).
The two sets based on log-ratios of immobile elements also
indicated  the  same  tectonic  setting  with  percent  probability
values  of  70  %  and  77  %  (Figs.  S51  and  S52;  Table  S28).
This  inference  seems  to  be  consistent  with  the  continental
arc setting for this peninsular part of the Aleutian arc and in-
volvement of crustal material in the genesis of the ignimbri-
tic magma (Dreher et al. 2005).

We  will  not  present  more  diagrams  because  the  reader

should have ascertained from our presentation so far that the
diagrams serve the purpose of visualization only and are not
really required for the interpretation. TecD and TecDIA pro-
vide  all  necessary  information  to  understand  the  results  of
the  multidimensional  diagrams.  Furthermore,  for  interme-
diate and acid rocks TecDIA provides probability estimates
which  cannot  be  obtained  directly  from  the  examination  of
the respective diagrams.

Test study 12a—12c: Guatemala, Central America

Nine  samples  of  intermediate  volcanic  rocks  from  recent

eruptions  of  the  Fuego  volcanic  complex  (Test  study  12a;
Table S12; Chesner & Rose Jr. 1984) allowed the evaluation
of  the  major  element  based  diagram  set  (Verma  &  Verma
2013),  which  indicated  the  expected  continental  arc  setting
for these samples, with the total percent probability value of
65 % (Table S29).

Geochemical data for 40 samples of lava from the Meseta

volcano  (Test  study  12b;  Table  S12;  Chesner  &  Halsore
1997) also allowed the application of only one set of major
element  based  diagrams  (Verma  &  Verma  2013),  which
confirmed  the  expected  continental  arc  setting  for  these
samples,  with  the  total  percent  probability  value  of  72 %
(Table S30).

The final Test study (12c) from this group was for Quater-

nary  volcanic  rocks  from  the  Santiaguito  volcanic  complex
(Table S12; Scott et al. 2013). Eighteen samples of interme-
diate  rocks  had  complete  data  for  two  sets  of  diagrams,
which showed a continental arc setting (total percent proba-
bility  values  of  74 %  and  55 %;  Table  S31).  Only  five  of
these samples had complete data for the remaining set of dia-
grams,  which  also  indicated  a  continental  arc  setting  for
these samples (Table S31). Additionally, 17 samples of acid
rocks  allowed  the  application  of  all  four  sets  of  diagrams
(Table S32). One set of major element based diagrams indi-
cated  an  island  arc  setting  for  these  samples,  whereas  the
other set a continental arc setting. One set of immobile ele-
ment based diagrams did not provide a consistent answer, in-
dicating,  in  fact,  a  transitional  continental  arc  to  collision

background image

202

RIVERA-GÓMEZ and VERMA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

setting. The final set of diagrams also based on immobile ele-
ments,  on  the  other  hand,  provided  a  consistent  answer  of
a continental  arc  setting,  with  total  percent  probability  of
77 % (Table S32). These inconsistencies seem to be a natural
consequence  of  crustal  involvement  in  the  genesis  of  these
magmas  as  suggested  by  the  original  authors  (Scott  et  al.
2013).

Test study 13: Huequi volcano, Chile

Nine  intermediate  rock  samples  of  historic  activity  from

this volcanic dome complex in the Andean southern volcanic
zone (Table S12, Watt et al. 2011) had complete data for two
of  the  three  sets  of  diagrams,  which  showed  the  expected
continental  arc  setting  with  total  percent  probability  values
of about 70 % (Table S33).

Test study 14: Nisyros Island, Dodecanese, Greece

Only the major element based diagram set could be tested

from  Quaternary  volcanic  rocks  of  Nisyros  Island,  Greece
(Table S12; Di Paola 1974). Sixteen samples of intermediate
rocks indicated a continental arc setting but with a rather low
percent probability value of 49 % or a continental arc to col-
lision  transitional  setting,  with  the  respective  probability
values of 49 % and 40 %, respectively (Table S34). The acid
rocks  (11  samples)  were  also  consistent  with  a  continental
arc  setting  and  showed  much  higher  percent  probability
values  of  71  %  and  75  %  (Table  S35).  These  different  in-
ferences  may  be  related  to  different  petrogenetic  processes
for these two magma types.

Testing  of  the  diagrams  from  “fresh”  volcanic  rocks  of
island arc tectonic setting

Test study 15: Augustine Island

One set of diagrams based on major elements in interme-

diate  rocks  was  tested  from  the  geochemical  data  for  Pleis-
tocene-Holocene volcanic rocks from this small island in the
Aleutian  arc  (Table  S12;  Johnson  et  al.  1996).  Twenty-one
samples  consistently  plotted  in  the  arc  setting,  with  the
island arc predominating over the continental arc (total per-
cent probability of 59 % and 41 %, respectively; Table S36).
Thus, the expected tectonic setting of an island arc seems to
be confirmed.

Test study 16a: Barren Island, Andaman-Nicobar Islands

Data  for  25  samples  of  Quaternary  basic  volcanic  rocks

from the Barren Island were compiled (Test study 16a; Table
S12; Chandrasekharam et al. 2009; Streck et al. 2011). In the
major  element  based  diagrams  these  island  arc  samples
showed  percent  success  of  about  73 %  and  80 %  for  the
Agrawal et al. (2004) and Verma et al. (2006) diagrams, re-
spectively (Table S37). Only 11 samples had complete data
for  immobile  element  based  diagrams  of  Agrawal  et  al.
(2008), whereas 24 of them had complete data for Verma &
Agrawal  (2011)  diagrams.  Both  sets  also  indicated  an  arc
setting, with high percent success of 80 % (Table S37). Simi-
larly, 21 samples from the Barren Island proved to be from

intermediate magma, which, in the major element based dia-
grams (Verma & Verma 2013) showed an island arc setting
with  total  percent  probability  of  52  %,  followed  by  about
42 %  for  the  continental  arc  setting  (Table  S38).  The  two
sets of immobile element based diagrams confirmed the island
arc  setting  for  intermediate  rocks,  with  higher  total  percent
probability  of  about  74 %  (Table  S38).  Thus,  the  expected
tectonic setting of an island arc seems to be confirmed.

Test  study  16b:  Narcondam  Island,  Andaman-Nicobar

Islands

For  the  Narcondam  Island,  only  10  samples  of  interme-

diate  and  8  of  acid  rocks  were  available  (Test  study  16b;
Table S12; Pal et al. 2007; Streck et al. 2011). Although for
intermediate  rocks  the  major  element  based  diagrams  indi-
cated an island arc setting, the total percent probability was
very low (only about 41 %; Table S39). Eight of these sam-
ples with complete data for the two sets of immobile element
based  diagrams,  however,  confirmed  the  island  arc  setting
with total percent probability values of 71 % and 58 % (Ta-
ble  S39).  The  major  element  based  diagrams  for  acid  rocks
also confirmed the island arc setting with total percent proba-
bility of about 72 % (Table S40). However, one set of immo-
bile trace element based diagrams indicated a continental arc
(total  percent  probability  of  about  58  %)  rather  than  an  is-
land arc (total percent probability of about 42 %; Table S40).
The  reasons  for  this  discrepancy  will  have  to  be  evaluated,
but  one  of  them  is  probably  related  to  the  data  quality  of
trace elements (larger analytical errors for trace than for ma-
jor elements).

Testing  of  the  diagrams  for  “fresh”  volcanic  rocks  from
mid-ocean ridge tectonic settings

Test study 17: Central Indian Ridge

Yi et al. (2014) reported geochemical data for axial posi-

tions of the Indian Ridge (Table S12). Thirty-three samples
proved to be of basic magma types, whereas 14 turned out to
be  intermediate  rocks.  The  latter  were  not  used  for  testing
because the mid-ocean ridge setting is missing from the dia-
grams for intermediate rocks (Verma & Verma 2013). There-
fore, the Supplementary file does not have the corresponding
report table. Nevertheless, this setting can be included in the
future versions of these diagrams. The basic rocks confirmed
the  mid-ocean  ridge  tectonic  setting  in  all  four  sets  of  dia-
grams,  with  high  percent  success  values  of  65 %  to  76 %
(Table S41).

Testing of the diagrams for “fresh” volcanic rocks from

collision tectonic settings

Test study 18: Shirak area, NW Armenia

The  Pliocene-Pleistocene  volcanic  rocks  of  Armenia  are

considered a key component of the Arabia-Eurasia collision
(Neill  et  al.  2013).  Thirteen  samples  of  intermediate  rocks
had complete data for two sets of diagrams; 9 of these sam-
ples could be used for the remaining set of diagrams (Table
S12). All diagram sets consistently indicated a collision set-

background image

203

MULTIDIMENSIONAL TECTONOMAGMATIC ROCK DISCRIMINATION DIAGRAMS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

ting for these samples; the corresponding percent probability
values varied from a low 43 % to a considerably high 67 %
(Table S42).

Evaluation  of  the  diagrams  for  “hydrothermally

altered”  or  “weathered”  volcanic  rocks  from  different
tectonic settings

Test  study  A1:  Eaio  Island,  Maquesas  Islands,  French

Polynesia

Twenty-five (24 basic and 1 ultrabasic; Caroff et al. 1999;

Table  S13)  hydrothermally  altered  samples  from  three  drill
holes  in  the  Eaio  Island  were  used  to  evaluate  three  of  the
four sets of diagrams, which affirmed an ocean island tecto-
nic  setting  in  all  diagram  sets  (Table  S43).  In  spite  of  the
alteration indicated by high-temperature iddingsite and low-
temperature  zeolites,  gypsum,  calcite,  and  clay  minerals
(Caroff et al. 1999), most of the compiled samples plotted in
the  OIB  field  and  showed  high  percent  success  values  of
75 % to 78 % (Table S43).

Test study A2: Koolau, Haleakala, and Kohala, Hawaiian

Islands

Moderately to highly altered rocks (exfoliated shell, core-

stone, rind, and shell samples) affected by spheroidal weathe-
ring  from  three  volcanoes  (Koolau,  Haleakala,  and  Kohala)
of the Hawaiian Islands, were sampled and analysed by Pati-
no et al. (2003). A sample from a corestone-shell set was di-
vided  into  three  subsuites  (corestone,  exfoliated  shell,
andrind)  with  different  degrees  of  alteration  (Patino  et  al.
2003). The approximate ages of these samples as reported by
Patino et al. (2003) were about 2—4 Ma for Koolau (Oahu Is-
land), 0.35—0.4 Ma for Haleakala (Maui Island), and 0.35 Ma
for  Kohala  (Hawaii).  For  9  samples  of  basic  and  ultrabasic
rocks,  unfortunately,  only  major  element  based  diagrams
could be tested; complete data for none of the immobile ele-
ment based diagrams were available. Both sets of major ele-
ment based diagrams indicated a continental rift setting with
62 %  and  71 %  percent  success;  the  ocean  island  setting
showed  the  next  setting  with  36 %  and  25 %  (Table  S44).
Thus, although the expected ocean island setting was not in-
ferred for these moderately to intensely weathered rocks, the
inferred continental rift setting is very similar to the expected
setting; both of them belong to the within-plate setting.

Test study A3: Hainan Island, China

The  geochemistry  of  basaltic  lavas  from  Hainan  Island

near the northern edge of the South China Sea (Miocene to
Holocene;  Table  S13)  was  reported  by  Wang  et  al.  (2012).
The  alteration  was  indicated  by  high  loss  on  ignition  (LOI)
values  (Wang  et  al.  2012).  We  selected  13  slightly  to  in-
tensely  altered  basic  and  10  intermediate  rock  samples  for
this  evaluation.  The  basic  rock  samples  had  complete
datasets for only the major element based diagrams; for im-
mobile trace element diagrams only four samples had com-
plete  data,  which  were  not  considered  (Table  S13).  Both
major  element  based  diagrams  indicated  a  continental  rift
setting  with  percent  success  of  about  69 %  and 74 %

(Table S45).  The  10  intermediate  rock  samples  also  had
complete  data  for  major  elements  only;  for  immobile  ele-
ments only three samples had complete data. The major ele-
ment based diagrams showed a within-plate (CR+OI) setting
for  them,  with  a  high  total  percent  probability  of  83 %
(Table S46). Thus, in spite of alteration, a consistent result of
a continental rift or a within-plate setting was obtained from
basic and intermediate rocks, respectively.

Test study A4: Moyuta and Tecuamburro volcanoes, Gua-

temala

Highly altered rocks (exfoliated shell, corestone, rind, and

columnar joint block samples; see also Test study A2 above)
affected  by  spheroidal  weathering  from  two  volcanoes
(Moyuta and Tecuamburro) of Guatemala, were sampled and
analysed  by  Patino  et  al.  (2003).  The  ages  of  the  samples
from  Moyuta  were  not  reported  by  Patino  et  al.  (2003),  al-
though an approximate age of Pliocene—Pleistocene was in-
dicated for the Tecuamburro volcano. As for the earlier Test
study), only the major element based diagrams for interme-
diate rocks could be tested from 7 samples. This diagram set
indicated a continental arc setting with about 53 % total per-
cent  probability  value  (Table  S47).  Thus,  the  expected  tec-
tonic  setting  was  inferred  in  spite  of  the  intense  spheroidal
weathering that affected these rock samples.

Test study A5: Sarapiquí Miocene arc, Costa Rica

Gazel  et  al.  (2005)  reported  geochemical  data  for  rocks

from  the  Sarapiquí  Miocene  (11.4—22.2  Ma)  arc  (or  paleo-
arc),  northern  Costa  Rica  (Table  S13).  Gazel  et  al.  (2005)
stated that pyroclasts in their samples were altered; additio-
nally, H

2

O

+

 contents in three of the four samples showed rel-

atively  high  values  (1.70—7.00 %).  Ten  samples  of  basic
rocks  (probably  of  ages  15—22  Ma;  Gazel  et  al.  2005)  had
complete data for the two major element based diagram sets
and  one  immobile  element  set  and  suggested  an  arc  setting
for them (Table S48). From the basic rock diagrams, the dis-
tinction between an island and a continental arc is at present
not possible, because the continental arc setting was not rep-
resented in the databases used for proposing these diagrams
(Agrawal  et  al.  2004,  2008;  Verma  et  al.  2006;  Verma  &
Agrawal 2011). However, 14 samples of intermediate rocks
(probably of ages 11—15 Ma, somewhat younger than the ba-
sic rocks; Gazel et al. 2005) from this paleoarc had complete
data for two sets of diagrams, which clearly confirmed an is-
land arc setting, with percent probability values of 67 % for
the  major  element  based  diagrams  and  57 %  for  one  set  of
immobile element based diagrams (Table S49). It is not clear
if this Miocene arc represents an island or a continental arc
setting. Nevertheless, because these two tectonic settings are
very similar, this inference could be interpreted as a valid re-
sult. Finally, only four rock samples proved to be of acid type,
which were not used for testing the respective diagrams.

Test study A6: Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

From the Rotokawa and Ngatamariki geothermal systems,

Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, hydrothermally altered
intermediate  rocks  were  sampled  from  deep  drill  holes  and

background image

204

RIVERA-GÓMEZ and VERMA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

analysed for their major and trace elements by Browne et al.
(1992).  These  authors  did  not  report  the  tectonic  setting  of
their geothermal area with temperatures above 300 °C. Prac-
tically no samples escaped the alteration indicated by altered
psudomorph  (altered  hypersthene,  titanomagnetite  to  leuco-
xene,  high  LOI  up  to  6.2 %,  and  high  volatile  contents;
Browne et al. 1992). The present-day tectonic setting seems
to  be  an  active  rifting  of  an  arc  (Deering  et  al.  2011).
Twenty-eight  samples  had  complete  data  for  the  major  ele-
ment  based  diagrams,  which  indicated  an  island  arc  setting
with a relatively low total percent probability value of about
44 %, followed by about 36 % for the continental arc setting
(Table  S50).  The  diagram  set  based  on  immobile  major  and
trace elements could be tested from only five samples. It also
indicated  an  island  arc  setting  but  with  higher  probability
of  about  63 %  followed  by  37 %  for  the  continental  arc
(Table S50).

Test study A7a: SE Indian and SW Pacific seafloor, Indian

and Pacific Oceans

Pyle et al. (1995) reported geochemical data from fresh as

well as altered seafloor rocks (dredged and drilled) of different
ages (0—4 and 15—23 Ma; Table S13). The presence of mica-
ceous  alteration  minerals,  low  CaO/Al

2

O

3

  reflecting  perva-

sive alteration, unusually high Rb contents, and contamination
from seawater alteration were suggested by Pyle et al. (1995)
as the symptoms of alteration for most samples. The authors
used  an  intense  leaching  procedure  before  sample  prepara-
tion  for  geochemical  data  acquisition.  Complete  major  ele-
ment  data  were  available  for  9  samples,  of  which  7  samples
had  complete  immobile  element  data  as  well.  Therefore,  all
four diagram sets could be tested from these data. The applica-
tion showed a mid-ocean ridge setting from all diagrams, with
a high percent success of about 72—80 % (Table S51).

Test study A7b: central Indian Ridge, Indian Ocean

Geochemical data for mafic and ultramafic rocks were re-

ported for the central part of the Indian Ridge (Yi et al. 2014;
Table S13). Most samples are characterized by moderate to
intense alteration of primary minerals. In highly altered gab-
broic  rocks,  clinopyroxene  is  replaced  by  amphibole  and
chlorite,  plagioclase  changed  to  aggregates  of  prehnite  or
cryptocrystalline  secondary  minerals,  and  altered  veins  of
Fe-Ti oxide and minor chlorite are present (Yi et al. 2014).
In other samples, olivine is altered to aggregates of serpen-
tine,  iron  oxide,  and  iron  hydroxide;  most  harzburgites  are
strongly  serpentinized  (Yi  et  al.  2014).  Twenty-eight  sam-
ples  with  complete  major  element  data  indicated  a  mid-
ocean  ridge  setting  with  64 %  and  55 %  percent  success
values (Table S52). A lesser number of samples (17 and 20)
had complete immobile element data for the respective dia-
grams.  They  also  indicated  a  mid-ocean  ridge  setting  for
these  diagrams  with  high  success  rates  of  about  70 %
(Table S52).

Test study A8: Aeolian Island, Italy

Only 17 samples of hydrothermally altered (7 intermediate

and 10 acid) rocks could be compiled from Del Moro et al.

(2011; Table S13) for this final Test study. The volcanic and
subvolcanic rocks underwent alteration processes induced by
acid-sulphate hydrothermal systems (Del Moro et al. 2011).
According to these authors, some rocks showed argillic to si-
licic  alteration  containing  abundant  hydrous  sulphate  and
hydroxyl-sulphate  minerals,  whereas  other  rocks  underwent
pyrometamorphic processes. Two sets of diagrams for inter-
mediate rocks could be tested; in both sets all samples con-
sistently plotted in the collision field and showed high total
percent  probability  values  of  about  83 %  and  84 %
(Table S53). For acid rocks, all four sets of diagrams could
be  applied.  The  first  set  of  major  element  based  diagrams
showed a collision setting but with a low total percent proba-
bility of 42 %, whereas the other set indicated a transitional
arc  to  collision  setting  (Table  S54).  However,  both  sets  of
immobile  element  based  diagrams  were  consistent  with
a collision setting for these samples (total percent probability
values of about 82 % and 60 %; Table S54).

Use of freely-available geochemical databases for tectonic
discrimination

Agrawal & Verma (2007) were the first to show that freely-

available  geochemical  databases  should  not  be  indiscrimi-
nately  used  for  tectonic  discrimination.  Here,  we  use  the
example  of  GEOROC-Mainz  to  confirm  the  difficulties  in
using  compiled  data  without  critically  examining  the  origi-
nal papers from which the data were compiled.

Tongan  arc  data  were  downloaded  as  an  excel  file  on

May 27, 2015. This file contains 222 rows of samples com-
piled  from  29  references.  However,  only  151  samples  have
complete  major  element  data  compiled  from  19  references.
There  may  also  be  discrepancies  regarding  the  information
on age or alteration parameters and references listed but we
will  point  out  only  the  discrepancies  between  the  database
and  the  data  presented  in  the  corresponding  literature  refe-
rences. One problem with the database is that it contains zero
(0) concentration values for numerous elements; zero values
are not possible because this means that either the element of
interest was not measured or it was not determinable by the
analytical technique used. Therefore, the zero values should
simply be blank cells.

Haase et al. (2002) reported data for 27 samples from the

arc  setting  (Havre,  Monowai,  Rauol,  Vulcanolog,  Brothers,
and Clark) whereas the GEOROC database has only 5 sam-
ples.  Similarly,  Hergt  and  Woodhead  (2007)  reported  data
for 8 samples from Eua Island whereas the database has only
4  samples  from  this  paper.  Furthermore,  these  two  papers
(Haase et al. 2002; Hergt and Woodhead 2007) were already
compiled and used by the proponents of the multidimensional
diagrams; these data therefore should not be used for testing
of diagrams. For the data from Pearce et al. (2007), the data-
base  shows  one  sample  (s16-95-2)  listed  as  of  Tongan  arc,
but  this  sample  with  TiO

2

  contents  of  3.54 %  and  Nb  of

74.07 ppm is listed in the original paper as an ocean island
basalt. Furthermore, in this paper (Pearce et al. 2007), 16 sam-
ples  listed  as  Tongan  arc  are  not  present  in  the  database.
Similar discrepancies are also observed between the database
and the original work of Hawkins et al. (1977). The database

background image

205

MULTIDIMENSIONAL TECTONOMAGMATIC ROCK DISCRIMINATION DIAGRAMS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

reports  5  samples  which  were  not  found  in  Hawkins  et  al.
(1977); these authors did not report any new data rather than
average values from earlier papers. Therefore, it is not clear
from  where  these  samples  were  compiled.  Fallon  et  al.
(2007)  reported  data  for  numerous  samples  from  forearc,
ridge, and backarc regions; however, the database contains
data  for  3  samples  from  the  Melville  ridge  registered  as
from  the  Tongan  arc.  Thus,  it  will  not  be  advisable  to  use
the  database  without  prior  examination  of  the  original
references.

Even  if  we  ignore  all  the  above  problems,  for  five  major

element-based  diagram  sets  (two  for  basic  and  ultrabasic
rocks,  Tables  S1  and  S2;  one  for  intermediate  rocks,  Table
S5; and two for acid rocks, Tables S8 and S9), a total of 151
rock  samples  are  available  in  this  database.  The  database
also indicates that in terms of the three main subdivisions for
diagram  sets,  these  samples  are  distributed  as  follows:  91
samples of basic and ultrabasic rocks (65 basalts, 22 tholeii-
tes,  and  4  more  basalts  listed  as  basalt/not  given);  48  inter-
mediate  (9  andesite,  34  basaltic  andesite,  and  5  boninite);
and  7  acid  (4  dacite  and  3  rhyolite);  5  rock  type  not  given.
This subdivision for the use of multidimensional discrimina-
tion  diagrams  would  simply  not  match  that  obtained  from
the  application  of  IgRoCS  strictly  following  the  IUGS  re-
commendations.  When  major  element  data  for  151  samples
in this database are processed in IgRoCS, the following sub-
division  was  obtained:  84  samples  of  basic  (1  alkali  basalt,
1 picrite,  1  potassic  trachybasalt,  and  81  subalkali  basalt)
and  2  of  ultrabasic  rocks  (basanite);  52  intermediate
(11 andesite,  37  basaltic  andesite,  and  4  boninite);  and
13 acid (9 dacite and 4 rhyolite). Because of these discrepan-
cies,  the  user  will  have  to  process  the  database  in  IgRoCS
before using the multidimensional diagrams.

Further considerations of the Tongan arc datafile from the

GEOROC-Mainz  compilation  are  concerned  with  the  num-
ber of samples with valid concentration values for the major-
trace  or  trace  element-based  diagrams.  For  basic  and
ultrabasic rocks, out of 86 samples only 29 and 22 samples
are  available  for  the  diagram  sets  of  Agrawal  et  al.  (2008;
complete data required for La, Sm, Yb, Nb, and Th) and Ver-
ma & Agrawal (2011; complete data required for Nb, V, Y,
Zr, and TiO

2

), respectively.

For the combined major and trace element-based diagram

set  for  intermediate  rocks,  the  required  elements  with  com-
plete  data  are  TiO

2

,  MgO,  P

2

O

5

,  Nb,  Ni,  V,  Y,  and  Zr

(Table S6). Out of 52 samples in the database only 22 sam-
ples  had  complete  data  for  use  of  this  diagram  set  (in  fact,
5 more samples had a 0 value for Nb, which were not counted
as valid samples). Similarly, for the trace element-based dia-
gram  set  for  intermediate  rocks,  23  samples  had  complete
data for the required elements (La, Ce, Sm, Yb, Nb, Th, Y,
and Zr; Table S7). Finally, for the major-trace and trace ele-
ment-based  diagram  sets  for  acid  rocks  (Tables  S10  and
S11),  complete  data  were  available  for  only  3  samples  and
1 sample, respectively (4 out of 13 samples).

Because of all these difficulties, the multidimensional dia-

grams were not used for testing these Tongan data. We con-
clude that the freely-available databases should be used with
caution.

Additional  explanation  on  the  performance  of  multidi-

mensional diagrams

We  finally  mention  the  possible  reasons  for  obtaining

varying percent success values in different diagram sets. Oc-
casionally,  the  total  percent  success  values  are  much  lower
than the highest value of about 80 % for basic and ultrabasic
rocks (Agrawal et al. 2004, 2008; Verma et al. 2006; Verma
& Agrawal 2011). This highest percent success value could
be  even  somewhat  higher  for  probability-based  counting  in
the  diagram  sets  for  intermediate  and  acid  rocks  (Verma  et
al. 2012, 2013; Verma & Verma 2013). When the total per-
cent  success  values  are  relatively  small  (much  less  than
80 %), we must first resort to the by-chance probability values
for  a  given  diagram  set.  Because  the  total  probabilities  are
divided  into  four  tectonic  settings  in  the  final  synthesis  of
a  diagram  set,  the  total  by-chance  percent  probability  for
a given tectonic setting will be around 25 %. Therefore, this
by-chance probability serves the purpose of better interpreting
our inferences.

Although  the  statistical  problems  associated  with  the  use

of  crude  compositional  data  (e.g.,  Pearson  1897;  Chayes
1960, 1971; Butler 1979) have been overcome by the log-ratio
transformation  technique  in  the  new  multidimensional  dia-
grams  (e.g.,  Aitchison  1984,  1986,  1999;  Egozcue  et  al.
2003;  Thomas  &  Aitchison  2005;  Pawlowsky-Glahn  &
Egozcue  2006;  Buccianti  2013;  Verma  2015a),  other  prob-
lems still prevail. Some of them can be summarized as fol-
lows:  (i)  the  data  quality  plays  an  important  role,  but  the
appropriate information is seldom available in the published
geochemical  literature  (only  indications  are  sometimes  pro-
vided  as  overall  percent  errors  and  not  for  individual
geochemical  data);  (ii)  post-emplacement  changes  are  rela-
tively common in older terrains, which may move the sam-
ples  from  one  tectonic  setting  to  another  although  the
multidimensional diagrams are shown to be relatively robust
against small concentration changes of a few tens of percent;
(iii) age data are seldom available for individual geochemi-
cally  analysed  samples,  which  renders  the  sample  grouping
difficult;  (iv)  even  when  age  data  are  available,  the  corre-
sponding  uncertainty  may  span  tens  of  millions  of  years,
a period  relatively  large  to  have  caused  significant  changes
in  the  tectonic  setting  of  a  given  area;  and  (v)  the  different
types of magmas in a given region may have originated from
different  sources  (mantle  or  crustal  or  both),  which  is  not
taken into account in the multidimensional diagrams but will
also cause dispersion in such diagrams.

Conclusions

Satisfactory application of the new multidimensional dia-

grams has been demonstrated for 18 test studies of relatively
fresh  rocks  and  8  application  studies  of  hydrothermally  al-
tered or weathered rocks. In most cases studies, the expected
tectonic  setting  was  indicated  by  the  respective  applicable
diagrams. The importance of petrogenetic processes and data
quality is highlighted, especially, for cases where the expected
tectonic setting was not inferred from the diagrams.

background image

206

RIVERA-GÓMEZ and VERMA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

Acknowledgements:  This  work  was  partly  supported  by
DGAPA-PAPIIT  grant  IN104813.  M.A.  Rivera-Gómez  is
grateful  to  Conacyt  for  her  doctoral  fellowship.  We  are
grateful to the journal Editor handling our manuscript, three
anonymous  reviewers,  and  the  managing  editor  of  the  jour-
nal, for numerous suggestions which helped us improve our
presentation.

References

Agrawal S. & Verma S.P. 2007: Comment on “Tectonic classifica-

tion  of  basalts  with  classification  trees”  by  Pieter  Vermeesch
(2006). Geochim Cosmochim Acta 71, 3388-3390.

Agrawal S., Guevara M. & Verma S.P. 2004: Discriminant analysis

applied to establish major-element field boundaries for tectonic
varieties of basic rocks. Int. Geol. Rev. 46, 575—594.

Agrawal S., Guevara M. & Verma S.P. 2008: Tectonic discrimina-

tion of basic and ultrabasic rocks through log-transformed ra-
tios  of  immobile  trace  elements.  Int.  Geol.  Rev.  50,
1057—1079.

Aitchison J. 1984: Statistical analysis of geochemical compositions.

Math. Geol. 16, 531—564.

Aitchison  J.  1986:  The  statistical  analysis  of  compositional  data.

Chapman and Hall, London, UK, 1—416.

Aitchison J. 1999: Logratios and natural laws in compositional data

analysis. Math. Geol.  31, 563—580.

Ali  S.,  Ntaflos  T.  &  Upton  B.G.J.  2013:  Petrogenesis  and  mantle

source characteristics of Quaternary alkaline mafic lavas in the
western Carpathian—Pannonian Region, Styria, Austria. Chem.
Geol.
 337-338, 99—113.

Armstrong-Altrin  J.S.  2015:  Evaluation  of  two  multidimensional

discrimination  diagrams  from  beach  and  deep-sea  sediments
from the Gulf of Mexico and their application to Precambrian
clastic sedimentary rocks. Int. Geol. Rev. 57, 1446-1461.

Armstrong-Altrin  J.S.  &  Verma  S.P.  2005:  Critical  evaluation  of

six tectonic setting discrimination diagrams using geochemical
data of Neogene sediments from known tectonic settings. Sed.
Geol.
 177, 115—129.

Bailey  J.C.  1981:  Geochemical  criteria  for  a  refined  tectonic  dis-

crimination of orogenic andesites. Chem. Geol. 32, 139—154.

Behrendt  J.C.,  LeMasurier  W.E.,  Cooper  A.K.,  Tessensohn  F.,

Trehu  A.  &  Damaske  D.  1991:  Geophysical  studies  of  the
West Antarctic Rift System. Tectonics 10, 1257—1273.

Behrendt  J.C.,  LeMasurier  W.E.  &  Cooper  A.K.  1992:  The  West

Antarctic Rift System – A propagating rift captured by a man-
tle  plume?  In:  Yoshida  Y.,  Kaminuma  K.  &  Shiraishi  K.
(Eds.):  Recent  Progress  in  Antarctic  Earth  Science.  Terra
Science
, Tokyo, 315—322.

Bora S. & Kumar S. 2015: Geochemistry of biotites and host grani-

toid  plutons  from  the  Proterozoic  Mahakoshal  Belt,  central
India tectonic zone: implication for nature and tectonic setting
of magmatism. Int. Geol. Rev. 57, 1686—1706.

Browne P.R.L., Graham I.J., Parker R.J. & Wood C.P. 1992: Sub-

surface andesite lavas and plutonic rocks in the Rotokawa and
Ngatamariki  geothermal  systems,  Taupo  volcanic  zone,  New
Zealand. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 51, 199—215.

Buccianti  A.  2013:  Is  compositional  data  analysis  a  way  to  see

beyond the illusion? Comput. Geosci. 50, 165—173.

Butler J.C. 1979: Trends in ternary petrologic variation diagrams -

fact or fantasy? Am. Mineral. 64, 1115—1121.

Butler  J.C.  &  Woronow  A.  1986:  Discrimination  among  tectonic

settings using trace element abundances of basalts. J. Geophys.
Res.
 91, 10289—10300.

Cabanis B. & Lecolle M. 1989: Le diagramme La/10-Y/15-Nb/8: un

outil pour la discrimination des séries volcaniques et la mise en
évidence  des  processus  de  mélange  et/ou  de  contamination
crustale. Compte Rendu Acad. Sci. Paris 309, 2023—2029.

Caroff  M.,  Guillou  H.,  Maliaux  M.,  Maury  R.C.,  Guille  G.  &

Cotten  J.  1999:  Assimilation  of  ocean  crust  by  hawaiitic  and
mugearitic  magmas:  an  example  from  Eiao  (Marquesas).
Lithos 46, 235—258.

Cebriá J.M., López-Ruiz J., Doblas M., Oyarzun R., Hertogen J. &

Benito R. 2000: Geochemistry of the Quaternary alkali basalts
of  Garrotxa  (NE  volcanic  province,  Spain):  a  case  of  double
enrichment  of  the  mantle  lithosphere.  J.  Volcanol.  Geotherm.
Res.
 102, 217—235.

Chandrasekharam D., Santo A.P., Capaccioni B., Vaselli O., Alam

M.A., Manetti P. & Tassi F. 2009: Volcanological and petro-
logical  evolution  of  Barren  Island  (Andaman  Sea,  Indian
Ocean). J. Asian Earth Sci. 35, 469—487.

Chayes F. 1960: On correlation between variables of constant sum.

J. Geophys. Res. 65, 4185—4193.

Chayes F. 1971: Ratio correlation. A manual for students of petro-

logy  and  geochemistry.  The  University  of  Chicago  Press,
Chicago and London, 1—99.

Chesner C.A. & Halsor S.P. 1997: Geochemical trends of sequential

lava flows from Meseta volcano, Guatemala. J. Volcanol. Geo-
therm. Res.
 78, 221—237.

Chesner C.A. & Rose Jr. W.I. 1984: Geochemistry and evolution of

the  Fuego  volcanic  complex,  Guatemala.  J.  Volcanol.  Geo-
therm. Res.
 21, 25—44.

Cooper A.F., Adam L.J., Coulter R.F., Eby G.N. & McIntosh W.C.

2007: Geology, geochronology and geochemistry of a basanitic
volcano, White Island, Ross Sea, Antarctica. J. Volcanol. Geo-
therm. Res.
 165, 189—216.

Deering C.D., Bachmann O., Dufek J. & Gravley D.M. 2011: Rift-

related  transition  from  andesite  to  rhyolite  volcanism  in  the-
Taupo  Volcanic  Zone  (New  Zealand)  controlled  by
crystal-melt dynamics in mush zones with variable mineral as-
semblages. J. Petrol. 52, 2243—2263.

Del Moro S., Renzulli A. & Tribaudino M. 2011: Pyrometamorphic

processes  at  the  magma-hydrothermal  system  interface  of  ac-
tive  volcanoes:  evidence  from  buchite  ejecta  of  Stromboli
(Aeolian Islands, Italy). J. Petrol. 52, 541—564.

Di Paola G.M. 1974: Volcanology and petrology of Nisyros Island

(Dodecanese, Greece). Bull. Volcanol. 38, 944—987.

Dreher  S.T.,  Eichelberger  J.C.  &  Larsen  J.F.  2005:  The  petrology

and  geochemistry  of  the  Aniakchak  caldera-forming  ignim-
brite, Aleutian arc, Alaska. J. Petrol. 46, 1747—1768.

Egozcue J.J., Pawlowsky-Glahn V., Mateu-Figueras G. & Barceló-

Vidal C. 2003: Isometric logratio transformations for composi-
tional data analysis. Math. Geol. 35, 279—300.

Fallon  T.J.,  Danyushevsky  L.V.,  Crawford  T.J.,  Maas  R.,  Wood-

head  J.D.,  Eggins  S.M.,  Bloomer  S.H.,  Wright  D.J.,  Zlobin
S.K. & Stacey A.R. 2007: Multiple mantle plume components
involved in the petrogenesis of subuduction-related lavas from
the northern Lau basin: evidence from the geochemistry of arc
and backarc submarine volcanoes. Geochem. Geophys. Geosys.
8, doi:10.1029/2007GC001619.

Gazel E., Alvarado G.E., Obando J. & Alfaro A. 2005: Geología y

evolución  magmática  del  arco  de  Sarapiquí,  Costa  Rica.  Rev.
Geol. Am. Cen.
 32, 13—31.

Gorton M.P. & Schandl E.S. 2000: From continents to island arcs: a

geochemical  index  of  tectonic  setting  for  arc-related  and
within-plate felsic to intermediate volcanic rocks. Can. Mineral.
38, 1065—1073.

Haase  K.M.,  Worthington  T.J.,  Stoffers  P.,  Garbe-Schönberg  D.

&  Wright  I.C.  2002:  Mantle  dynamics,  element  recycling,
and  magma  genesis  beneath  the  Kermadec  arc-Havre
trough.  Geochem.  Geophys.  Geosys.  3,  1071,  doi:10.1029/

background image

207

MULTIDIMENSIONAL TECTONOMAGMATIC ROCK DISCRIMINATION DIAGRAMS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

2002GC00035.

Hawkins J.W. Jr.  1977: Petrological and geochemical characteris-

tics  of  marginal  basin  basalts  island  arcs.  In:  Talwani  M.  &
Pitman W.C.III (Eds.): Deep Sea Trenches and Back-Arc Ba-
sins.  American  Geophysical  Union,  Washington  D.C.
355—365.

Hergt J.M. & Woodhead J.D. 2007: A critical evaluation of recent

models  for  Lau-tonga  arc-backarc  basin  magmatic  evolution.
Chem. Geol. 245, 9—44.

Ho  K.-S.,  Ge  W.-C.,  Chen  J.-C.,  You  C.-F.,  Yang  H.-J.  &  Zhang

Y.-L. 2013: Late Cenozoic magmatic transitions in the central
Great Xing’an Range, Northeast China: Geochemical and iso-
topic constraints on petrogenesis. Chem. Geol. 352, 1—18.

Jackson  M.C.,  Frey  F.A.,  Garcia  M.O.  &  Wilmoth  R.A.  1999:

Geology  and  geochemistry  of  basaltic  lava  flows  and  dikes
from  the  Trans-Koolau  tunnel,  Oahu,  Hawaii.  Bull  Volcanol.
60, 381—401.

Johnson  K.E.,  Harmon  R.S.,  Richardson  J.M.,  Moorbath  S.  &

Strong  D.  1996:  Isotope  and  trace  element  geochemistry  of
Augustine Volcano, Alaska: implications for magmatic evolu-
tion. J. Petrol. 37, 95—115.

Kaur  P.,  Chaudhri  N.  &  Hofmann  A.W.  2015:  New  evidence  for

two sharp replacement fronts during albitization of granitoids
from northern Aravalli orogen, northwest India. Int. Geol. Rev.
57, 1660—1685.

Le Bas M.J., Le Maitre R.W., Streckeisen A. & Zanettin B. 1986:

A chemical classification of volcanic rocks based on the total
alkali-silica diagram. J. Petrol. 27, 745—750.

Le Bas M.J. & Streckeisen A.L. 1991: The IUGS systematics of ig-

neous rocks. J. Geol. Soc. London 148, 825—833.

Le  Maitre  R.W.,  Streckeisen  A.,  Zanettin  B.,  Le  Bas  M.J.,  Bonin

B.,  Bateman  P.,  Bellieni  G.,  Dudek  A.,  Schmid  R.,  Sorensen
H. & Woolley A.R. 2002: Igneous rocks. A classification and
glossary of terms: recommendations of the International Union
of Geological Sciences, Subcommission of the Systematics of
Igneous  Rocks,  ed.  2nd.  Cambridge  University  Press,  Cam-
bridge, 1—236.

Marques L.S., Ulbrich M.N.C., Ruberti E. & Tassinari C.G. 1999:

Petrology,  geochemistry  and  Sr-Nd  isotopes  of  the  Trindade
and  Martin  Vaz  volcanic  rocks  (southern  Atlantic  Ocean).  J.
Volcanol. Geotherm. Res.
 93, 191—216.

Melluso L. & Morra V. 2000: Petrogenesis of Late Cenozoic mafic

alkaline rocks of the Nosy Be archipelago (northern Madagas-
car):  relationships  with  Comorean  magmatism.  J.  Volcanol.
Geotherm. Res.
 96, 129—142.

Meschede M. 1986: A method of discriminating between different

types of mid-ocean ridge basalts and continental tholeiites with
the Nb-Zr-Y diagram. Chem. Geol. 56, 207—218.

Mullen  E.D.  1983:  MnO/TiO

2

/P

2

O

5

:  a  minor  element  discrimina-

tion for basaltic rocks of oceanic environments and its implica-
tions for petrogenesis. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 62, 53—62.

Neill I., Meliksetian K., Allen M.B., Navarsardyan G. & Karapetyan

S. 2013: Pliocene-Quaternary volcanic rocks of NW Armenia:
Magmatism  and  lithospheric  dynamics  within  an  active  oro-
genic plateau. Lithos 180-181, 200—215.

Nyland R.E., Panter K.S., Rocchi S., Di Vincenzo G., Del Carlo P.,

Tiepolo  M.,  Field  B.  &  Gorsevski  P.  2013:  Volcanic  activity
and its link to glaciation cycles: Single-grain age and geoche-
mistry  of  Early  to  Middle  Miocene  volcanic  glass  from  AN-
DRILL AND-2A core, Antarctica. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res.
250, 106—128.

Pal  T.,  Mitra  S.K.,  Sengupta  S.,  Katari  A.,  Bandopadhyay  P.C.  &

Bhattacharya A.K. 2007: Dacite—andesites of Narcondam vol-
cano in the Andaman Sea – an imprint of magma mixing in
the inner arc of the Andaman—Java subduction system. J. Vol-
canol. Geotherm. Res.
 168, 93—113.

Pandarinath  K.  2014a:  Testing  of  the  recently  developed  tectono-

magmatic  discrimination  diagrams  from  hydrothermally  al-
tered igneous rocks of 7 geothermal fields. Turk. J. Earth Sci.
23, 412—426.

Pandarinath  K.  2014b:  Tectonomagmatic  origin  of  Precambrian

rocks of Mexico and Argentina inferred from multi-dimensional
discriminant-function based discrimination diagrams. J. South.
Am. Earth. Sci.
 56, 464—484.

Patino L.C., Velbel M.A., Price J.R. & Wade J.A. 2003: Trace ele-

ment  mobility  during  spheroidal  weathering  of  basalts  and
andesites  in  Hawaii  and  Guatemala.  Chem.  Geol.  202,
343—364.

Pawlowsky-Glahn V. & Egozcue J.J. 2006: Compositional data and

their  analysis:  an  introduction.  In:  A.  Buccianti,  G.  Mateu-
Figueras  &  V.  Pawlowsky-Glahn  (Eds.),  Compositional  data
analysis in the Geosciences: from theory to practice. Geol. Soc.
London Spec. Publ.
, London, 1—10.

Pearce  J.A.  1976:  Statistical  analysis  of  major  element  patterns  in

basalts. J. Petrol. 17, 15—43.

Pearce  J.A.  1982:  Trace  element  characteristics  of  lavas  from  de-

structive  plate  boundaries.  In:  Thorpe  R.S.  (Ed.):  Andesites.
John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, 525—548.

Pearce J.A. & Cann J.R. 1971: Ophiolite origin investigated by dis-

criminant analysis using Ti, Zr and Y. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.
12, 339—349.

Pearce  J.A.  &  Cann  J.R.  1973:  Tectonic  setting  of  basic  volcanic

rocks  determined  using  trace  element  analyses.  Earth  Planet.
Sci. Lett.
 19, 290—300.

Pearce J.A. & Gale G.H. 1977: Identification of ore-deposition en-

vironment  from  trace-element  geochemistry  of  associated  ig-
neous host rocks. Geol. Soc. London Spec. Publ. 7, 14—24.

Pearce J.A. & Norry M.J. 1979: Petrogenetic implications of Ti, Zr,

Y,  and  Nb  variations  in  volcanic  rocks.  Contrib.  Mineral.
Petrol.
 69, 33—47.

Pearce  T.H.,  Gorman  B.E.  &  Birkett  T.C.  1977:  The  relationship

between major element chemistry and tectonic environment of
basic and intermediate volcanic rocks. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.
36, 121—132.

Pearce J.A., Harris N.B.W. & Tindle A.G. 1984: Trace element dis-

crimination diagrams for the tectonic interpretation of granitic
rocks. J. Petrol. 25, 956—983.

Pearce  J.A.,  Kempton  P.D.  &  Gill  J.B.  2007:  Hf-Nd  evidence  for

the origin and distribution of mantle domains in the SW Pacif-
ic. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 260, 98—114

Pearson K. 1897: Mathematical contribution to the theory of evolu-

tion  –  on  a  form  of  spurious  correlation  which  may  arise
when  indices  are  used  in  the  measurement  of  organs.  Proc.
Royal Soc. London
 60, 489—502.

Pyle  D.G.,  Christie  D.M.,  Mahoney  J.J.  &  Duncan  R.A.  1995:

Geochemistry  and  geochronology  of  ancient  southeast  Indian
and southwest Pacific seafloor. J. Geophys. Res. 100, 22261—
22282.

Rahman  M.S.  &  Mondal  M.E.A.  2015:  Evolution  of  continental

crust of the Aravalli craton, NW India, during the Neoarchae-
an—Palaeoproterozoic:  evidence  from  geochemistry  of  grani-
toids. Int. Geol. Rev. 57, 1510—1525.

Rhodes  J.M.  2012:  Compositional  diversity  of  Mauna  Kea  shield

lavas  recovered  by  the  Hawaii  Scientific  Drilling  Project:  In-
ferences  on  source  lithology,  magma  supply,  and  the  role  of
multiple volcanoes. Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 13, 2—28.

Rhodes J.M. & Vollinger M.J. 2004: Composition of basaltic lavas

sampled  by  phase-2  of  the  Hawaii  scientific  drilling  proyect:
Geochemical  stratigraphy  and  magma  types.  Geochem.  Geo-
phys. Geosys.
 5, 1—38.

Scott  J.A.J.,  Pyle  D.M.,  Mather  T.A.  &  Rose  W.I.  2013:  Geoche-

mistry  and  evolution  of  the  Santiaguito  volcanic  dome  com-

background image

208

RIVERA-GÓMEZ and VERMA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 195—208

plex, Guatemala. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 252, 92—107.

Sherrod D.R., Murai T. & Tagami T. 2007: New K—Ar ages for cal-

culating  end-of-shield  extrusion  rates  at  West  Maui  volcano,
Hawaiian island chain. Bull. Volcanol. 69, 627—642.

Shervais J.W. 1982: Ti-V plots and the petrogenesis of modern and

ophiolitic lavas. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 59, 101—118.

Srivastava  R.K.,  Samal  A.K.  &  Gautam  G.C.  2015:  Geochemical

characteristics  and  petrogenesis  of  four  Palaeoproterozoic
mafic  dike  swarms  and  associated  large  igneous  provinces
from  the  eastern  Dharwar  craton,  India.  Int.  Geol.  Rev.  57,
1462—1484.

Streck M.J., Ramos F., Gillam A., Haldar D. & Duncan R.A. 2011:

The intra-oceanic Barren Island and Narcondam arc volcanoes,
Andaman  Sea:  Implications  for  subduction  inputs  and  crustal
overprint  of  a  depleted  mantle  source.  In:  Ray  J.,  Sen  G.  &
Ghosh  B.  (Eds.):  Topics  in  Igneous  Petrology.  Springer
Science+Business Media
, 241—273.

Suh C.E., Sparks R.S.J., Fitton J.G., Ayonghe S.N., Annen C., Nana

R.  &  Luckman  A.  2003:  The  1999  and  2000  eruptions  of
Mount  Cameroon:  eruption  behaviour  and  petrochemistry  of
lava. Bull. Volcanol. 65, 267—281.

Thomas C.W. & Aitchison J. 2005: Compositional data analysis of

geological  variability  and  process:  a  case  study.  Math.  Geol.
37, 753—772.

Verma S.K. & Oliveira E.P. 2013: Application of multi-dimensional

discrimination diagrams and probability calculations to Paleo-
proterozoic acid rocks from Brazilian cratons and provinces to
infer tectonic settings. J. South Am. Earth Sci. 45, 117—146.

Verma S.K. & Oliveira E.P. 2015: Tectonic setting of basic igneous

and  metaigneous  rocks  of  Borborema  Province,  Brazil  using
multi-dimensional  geochemical  discrimination  diagrams.
J. South Am. Earth Sci. 58, 309—317.

Verma  S.P.  2010:  Statistical  evaluation  of  bivariate,  ternary  and

discriminant  function  tectonomagmatic  discrimination  dia-
grams. Turk. J. Earth Sci. 19, 185—238.

Verma S.P. 2015a: Monte Carlo comparison of conventional ternary

diagrams with new log-ratio bivariate diagrams and an exam-
ple of tectonic discrimination. Geochem. J. 49, 393-412.

Verma  S.P.  2015b:  Origin,  evolution,  and  tectonic  setting  of  the

eastern part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt and comparison with
the  Central  American  Volcanic  Arc  from  conventional  multi-
element normalized and new multidimensional discrimination
diagrams and discordancy and significance tests. Turk. J. Earth
Sci.
 24, 111-164.

Verma S.P. 2015c: Present state of knowledge and new geochemi-

cal constraints on the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt
and  comparison  with  the  Central  American  Volcanic  Arc  in
terms of near and far trench magmas. Turk. J. Earth Sci., 24:
399-460.

Verma  S.P.  &  Agrawal  S.  2011:  New  tectonic  discrimination  dia-

grams  for  basic  and  ultrabasic  volcanic  rocks  through  log-
transformed  ratios  of  high  field  strength  elements  and
implications  for  petrogenetic  processes.  Rev.  Mex.  Cienc.
Geol
. 28, 24—44.

Verma S.P. & Armstrong-Altrin J.S. 2013: New multi-dimensional

diagrams  for  tectonic  discrimination  of  siliciclastic  sediments
and their application to Precambrian basins. Chem. Geol. 355,
117—133.

Verma S.P. & Armstrong-Altrin J.S. 2016: Geochemical discrimi-

nation  of  siliciclastic  sediments  from  active  and  passive  mar-
gin settings. Sediment. Geol., 332, 1—12.

Verma S.P. & Rivera-Gómez M.A. 2013a: Computer programs for

the classification and nomenclature of igneous rocks. Episodes
36, 115—124.

Verma S.P. & Rivera-Gómez M.A. 2013b: New computer program

TecD  for  tectonomagmatic  discrimination  from  discriminant
function diagrams for basic and ultrabasic magmas and its ap-
plication to ancient rocks. J. Iber. Geol. 39, 167—179.

Verma S.P. & Verma S.K. 2013: First 15 probability-based multi-

dimensional discrimination diagrams for intermediate magmas
and  their  robustness  against  post-emplacement  compositional
changes  and  petrogenetic  processes.  Turk.  J.  Earth  Sci.  22,
931—995.

Verma  S.P.,  Torres-Alvarado  I.S.  &  Sotelo-Rodríguez  Z.T.  2002:

SINCLAS: standard igneous norm and volcanic rock classifi-
cation system. Comput. Geosci. 28, 711—715.

Verma S.P., Guevara M. & Agrawal S. 2006: Discriminating four

tectonic settings: five new geochemical diagrams for basic and
ultrabasic volcanic rocks based on log-ratio transformation of
major-element data. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 115, 485-528.

Verma S.K., Pandarinath K. & Verma S.P. 2012: Statistical evalua-

tion  of  tectonomagmatic  discrimination  diagrams  for  granitic
rocks and proposal of new discriminant-function-based multi-
dimensional  diagrams  for  acid  rocks.  Int.  Geol.  Rev.  54,
325—347.

Verma  S.P.,  Pandarinath  K.,  Verma  S.K.  &  Agrawal  S.  2013:

Fifteen  new  discriminant-function-based  multi-dimensional
robust diagrams for acid rocks and their application to Precam-
brian rocks. Lithos 168-169, 113—123.

Verma S.K., Oliveira E.P. & Verma S.P. 2015a: Plate tectonic set-

tings for Precambrian basic rocks from Brazil by multi-dimen-
sional  tectonomagmatic  discrimination  diagrams  and  their
limitations. Int. Geol. Rev. 57, 1566-1581.

Verma S.P., Verma S.K. & Oliveira E.P. 2015b: Application of 55

multi-dimensional  tectonomagmatic  discrimination  diagrams
to Precambrian belts. Int. Geol. Rev. 57, 1365-1388.

Verma S.P., Cruz-Huicochea R., Díaz-González L. & Verma S.K.

2015c: A new computer program TecDIA for multidimensional
tectonic  discrimination  of  intermediate  and  acid  magmas  and
its  application  to  the  Bohemian  Massif,  Czech  Republic.
J. Geosci. 60, 203—218.

Verma S.P., Díaz-González L. & Armstrong-Altrin J.S. 2016: Ap-

plication of a new computer program for tectonic discrimina-
tion  of  Cambrian  to  Holocene  clastic  sediments.  Earth  Sci.
Inform
.,  10.1007/s12145-015-0244-0  published  on-line,  in
press.

Wang X.-C., Li Z.-X., Li X.-H., Li J., Liu Y., Long W.-G., Zhou J.-

B. & Wang F. 2012: Temperature, pressure, and composition
of the mantle source region of Late Cenozoic basalts  in Hain-
an Island, SE Asia: a consequence of a young thermal mantle
plume close to subduction zones? J. Petrol. 53, 177—233.

Watt  S.F.L.,  Pyle  D.M.  &  Mather  T.A.  2011:  Geology,  petrology

and  geochemistry  of  the  dome  complex  of  Huequi  volcano,
southern Chile. Andean Geol. 38, 335—348.

Wood D.A. 1980: The application of a Th-Hf-Ta diagram to prob-

lems of tectonomagmatic classification and to establishing the
nature of crustal contamination of basaltic lavas of the British
Tertiary  volcanic  province.  Earth  Planet.  Sci.  Lett.  50,
11—30.

Yang Z., Luo Z., Zhang H., Zhang Y., Huang F., Sun C. & Dai J.

2009:  Petrogenesis  and  Geological  Implications  of  theTian-
heyong  Cenozoic  Basalts,  Inner  Mongolia  China.  Earth  Sci.
Front.
 16, 90—106.

Yi  S.-B.,  Oh  C.-W.,  Pak  S.J.,  Kim  J.  &  Moon  J.-W.  2014:

Geochemistry and petrogenesis of mafic-ultramafic rocks from
the  Central  Indian  Ridge,  latitude  8°—17°  S:  denudation  of
mantle  harzburgites  and  gabbroic  rocks  and  compositional
variation of basalts. Int. Geol. Rev. 56, 691—1719.

background image

 

 

Supplementary Material 

 

The  discriminant  function  DF1-DF2  equations  were  recently  summarized  by  Verma  et  al.  (2015b), 
which are reproduced here in Tables S1-S11 for an easy reference. 
 

Table S1.  
DF1-DF2 equations for the first set of five diagrams proposed by Agrawal et al. (2004) for basic and ultrabasic magmas. 
 

Figure reference; 

figure type 

Discrimination 

diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Agrawal et al. (2004); 
adjusted major 
element 
concentrations  

IAB-CRB-OIB-
MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-OIB-MORB)m1

 = 0.258×(SiO

2

)

adj

 + 2.395×(TiO

2

)

adj

 + 0.106×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 1.019×(Fe

2

O

3

)

adj

 – 

6.778×(MnO)

adj 

+ 0.405×(MgO)

adj

 + 0.119×(CaO)

adj 

+0.071×(Na

2

O)

adj

 – 0.198×(K

2

O)

adj

 + 0.613×(P

2

O

5

)

adj

 – 

24.065 
 
DF2

(IAB-CRB-OIB-MORB)m1

 = 0.730×(SiO

2

)

adj

 + 1.119×(TiO

2

)

adj

 + 0.156×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 1.332×(Fe

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 

4.376×(MnO)

adj 

+ 0.493×(MgO)

adj

 + 0.936×(CaO)

adj 

+0.882×(Na

2

O)

adj

 – 0.291×(K

2

O)

adj

 – 1.572×(P

2

O

5

)

adj

 – 

59.472 

 

IAB-CRB-OIB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-OIB)m1

 = 0.251×(SiO

2

)

adj

 + 2.034×(TiO

2

)

adj

 – 0.100×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 0.573×(Fe

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 0.032×(FeO)

adj

 

– 2.877×(MnO)

adj 

+ 0.260×(MgO)

adj

 + 0.052×(CaO)

adj 

+0.322×(Na

2

O)

adj

 – 0.229×(K

2

O)

adj  

– 18.974 

 
DF2

(IAB-CRB-OIB)m1

 = 2.150×(SiO

2

)

adj

 + 2.711×(TiO

2

)

adj

 + 1.792×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 2.295×(Fe

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 1.484×(FeO)

adj

 

– 8.594×(MnO)

adj 

+ 1.896×(MgO)

adj

 + 2.158×(CaO)

adj 

+ 1.201×(Na

2

O)

adj

  + 1.763×(K

2

O)

adj  

– 200.276 

 

IAB-CRB-MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-MORB)m1

 = 0.435×(SiO

2

)

adj

 – 1.392×(TiO

2

)

adj

 + 0.183×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 0.148×(FeO)

adj

 + 

7.690×(MnO)

adj 

+ 0.021×(MgO)

adj

 + 0.380×(CaO)

adj 

+ 0.036×(Na

2

O)

adj

 + 0.462×(K

2

O)

adj

 – 1.192×(P

2

O

5

)

adj

 – 

29.435 

 

DF2

(IAB-CRB-MORB)m1

 = 0.601×(SiO

2

)

adj

 – 0.335×(TiO

2

)

adj

 + 1.332×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 1.449×(FeO)

adj

 + 

0.756×(MnO)

adj 

+ 0.893×(MgO)

adj

 + 0.448×(CaO)

adj 

+ 0.525×(Na

2

O)

adj

 + 1.734×(K

2

O)

adj

 + 2.494×(P

2

O

5

)

adj

 – 

78.236 
 

IAB-OIB-MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-OIB-MORB)m1

 = 1.232×(SiO

2

)

adj

 + 4.166×(TiO

2

)

adj

 + 1.085×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 3.522×(Fe

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 

0.500×(FeO)

adj

 – 3.930×(MnO)

adj 

+ 1.334×(MgO)

adj

 + 1.085×(CaO)

adj 

+ 0.416×(Na

2

O)

adj

 + 0.827×(K

2

O)

adj  

– 

119.050 
 
DF2

(IAB-OIB-MORB)m1

 = 1.384×(SiO

2

)

adj

 + 1.091×(TiO

2

)

adj

 + 0.908×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 2.419×(Fe

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 

0.886×(FeO)

adj

 + 5.281×(MnO)

adj 

+ 1.269×(MgO)

adj

 + 1.790×(CaO)

adj 

+ 2.572×(Na

2

O)

adj

 + 0.138×(K

2

O)

adj  

– 

134.295 
 

CRB-OIB-MORB 

 

DF1

(CRB-OIB-MORB)m1

 = 0.310×(SiO

2

)

adj

 + 1.936×(TiO

2

)

adj

 + 0.341×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 0.760×(Fe

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 

0.351×(FeO)

adj

 – 11.315×(MnO)

adj  

+ 0.526×(MgO)

adj

 + 0.084×(CaO)

adj 

+ 0.312×(K

2

O)

adj

 + 1.892×(P

2

O

5

)

adj

 – 

32.909 

 

DF2

(CRB-OIB-MORB)m1

 = 0.703×(SiO

2

)

adj

 + 2.454×(TiO

2

)

adj

 + 0.233×(Al

2

O

3

)

adj

 + 1.943×(Fe

2

O

3

)

adj

 – 

0.182×(FeO)

adj

 – 2.421×(MnO)

adj  

+ 0.618×(MgO)

adj

 + 0.712×(CaO)

adj  

– 0.866×(K

2

O)

adj

 – 1.180×(P

2

O

5

)

adj

 – 

56.455 

 

The tectonic fields are: IAB−island arc basic (or ultrabasic) rocks; CRB−continental rift basic (or ultrabasic) rocks; OIB−ocean island basic (or ultrabasic) 
rocks; and MORB−mid ocean ridge basic (or ultrabasic) rocks. The subscript 

adj

 refers to adjusted data from the SINCLAS (Verma et al. 2002) or IgRoCS 

computer program (Verma and Rivera-Gómez 2013a).

 

 

 
 
 

 

background image

ii 

 

Table S2. 
 DF1-DF2  equations  (approximate  coefficients)  for  the  second  set  of  five  diagrams  proposed  by  Verma  et  al.  (2006)  for  basic  and 
ultrabasic magmas. 
 

Figure reference; 

figure type 

Discrimination 

diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Verma et al. (2006); 
log-ratios of major 
elements 

IAB-CRB-OIB-
MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-OIB-MORB)m2

 = – 4.676×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) + 2.533×ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) – 0.388×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 3.969× 

ln(FeO/SiO

2

)

 

+ 0.898×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) – 0.583×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) – 0.290×ln(CaO/SiO

2

) – 0.270×ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

+ 1.081×ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) + 0.184×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) + 1.544 

 
DF2

(IAB-CRB-OIB-MORB)m2

 = 0.675×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) + 4.590× ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 2.090×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 0.851× 

ln(FeO/SiO

2

)

 

– 0.433×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) + 1.483×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) – 2.363× ln(CaO/SiO

2

) – 1.656× ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

– 0.676× ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) + 0.413×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) + 13.164 

IAB-CRB-OIB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-OIB)m2

 = 4.000×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) – 2.238×ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 0.811×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) – 2.586× 

ln(FeO/SiO

2

)

 

– 1.243×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) + 0.587×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) – 0.315×ln(CaO/SiO

2

) + 0.432×ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

– 1.026×ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) + 0.051×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) – 0.572 

 

DF2

(IAB-CRB-OIB)m2

 = – 1.370×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) + 3.010×ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 0.324×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 1.900× 

ln(FeO/SiO

2

)

 

– 1.975×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) + 1.441×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) – 2.266×ln(CaO/SiO

2

) + 1.866×ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

+ 0.287×ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) + 0.814×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) + 1.820 

IAB-CRB-MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-MORB)m2

 = – 1.574×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) + 6.150×ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 1.554×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 

3.413×ln(FeO/SiO

2

)

 

– 0.009×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) + 1.248×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) – 2.110×ln(CaO/SiO

2

) – 

0.768×ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

) + 1.143×ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) + 0.352×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) + 16.871 

 

DF2

(IAB-CRB-MORB)m2

 = 3.984×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) + 0.220×ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 1.152×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) – 2.204× 

ln(FeO/SiO

2

)

 

– 1.623×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) + 1.429×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) – 1.252×ln(CaO/SiO

2

) + 0.358×ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

– 0.641×ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) + 0.265×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) + 5.051 

IAB-OIB-MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-OIB-MORB)m2

 = 5.340×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) – 1.628×ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 0.834×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) – 

4.736×ln(FeO/SiO

2

)

 

– 0.125×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) + 0.645×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) + 1.515×ln(CaO/SiO

2

) – 

0.815×ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

) – 0.889×ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) – 0.226×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) + 5.776 

 

DF2

(IAB-OIB-MORB)m2

 = 1.180×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) + 5.511×ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 2.774×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) – 0.134× 

ln(FeO/SiO

2

)

 

+ 0.667×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) + 1.104×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) – 1.723×ln(CaO/SiO

2

) – 3.895×ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

+ 0.947×ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) – 0.108×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) + 15.498 

CRB-OIB-MORB 

 

DF1

(CRB-OIB-MORB)m2

 = – 0.518×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) + 4.989×ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 2.220×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 

1.180×ln(FeO/SiO

2

)  – 0.301×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) + 1.330×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) – 2.183×ln(CaO/SiO

2

) – 

1.932×ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

) + 0.698×ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) + 0.900×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) + 13.262 

 

DF2

(CRB-OIB-MORB)m2

 = 5.051×ln(TiO

2

/SiO

2

) – 0.497×ln(Al

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) + 1.005×ln(Fe

2

O

3

/SiO

2

) – 3.385× 

ln(FeO/SiO

2

)

 

+ 0.553×ln(MnO/SiO

2

) + 0.292×ln(MgO/SiO

2

) + 0.401×ln(CaO/SiO

2

) – 2.864×ln(Na

2

O/SiO

2

– 0.219×ln(K

2

O/SiO

2

) – 1.056×ln(P

2

O

5

/SiO

2

) + 2.888 

The tectonic fields are: IAB−island arc basic (or ultrabasic) rocks; CRB−continental rift basic (or ultrabasic) rocks; OIB−ocean island basic (or ultrabasic) 
rocks; and MORB−mid ocean ridge basic (or ultrabasic) rocks. The subscript 

adj

 refers to adjusted data from the SINCLAS (Verma et al. 2002) or IgRoCS 

computer program (Verma and Rivera-Gómez 2013a), but is eliminated from these equations.

 

 
 

 
 

 

background image

iii 

 

 

Table S3.  
DF1-DF2 equations for the set of five diagrams based on trace element ratios proposed by Agrawal et al. (2008) for basic and ultrabasic 
magmas. 
 

Figure reference; 

figure type 

Discrimination 

diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Agrawal et al. (2008); 
log-ratios of 
immobile trace 
elements 

IAB-CRB+OIB-
MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB+OIB-MORB)t1

 = 0.3518×ln(La/Th) + 0.6013×ln(Sm/Th) – 1.3450×ln(Yb/Th) + 2.1056×ln(Nb/Th) – 

5.4763 
 
DF2

(IAB-CRB+OIB-MORB)t1

 = – 0.3050×ln(La/Th) – 1.1801×ln(Sm/Th) + 1.6189×ln(Yb/Th) + 1.2260×ln(Nb/Th) – 

0.9944 
 

IAB-CRB-OIB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-OIB)t1

 = 0.5533×ln(La/Th) + 0.2173×ln(Sm/Th) – 0.0969×ln(Yb/Th) + 2.0454×ln(Nb/Th) – 5.6305 

 
DF2

(IAB-CRB-OIB)t1

 = –2.4498×ln(La/Th) + 4.8562×ln(Sm/Th) – 2.1240×ln(Yb/Th) – 0.1567×ln(Nb/Th) + 

0.9400 
 

IAB-CRB-MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-MORB)t1

 = 0.3305×ln(La/Th) + 0.3484×ln(Sm/Th) – 0.9562×ln(Yb/Th) + 2.0777×ln(Nb/Th) – 

4.5628 
 
DF2

(IAB-CRB-MORB)t1

 = –0.1928×ln(La/Th) – 1.1989×ln(Sm/Th) + 1.7531×ln(Yb/Th) + 0.6607×ln(Nb/Th) – 

0.4384 
 

IAB-OIB-MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-OIB-MORB)t1

 = 1.7517×ln(Sm/Th) – 1.9508×ln(Yb/Th) + 1.9573×ln(Nb/Th) – 5.0928 

 
DF2

(IAB-OIB-MORB)t1

 = –2.2412×ln(Sm/Th) + 2.2060×ln(Yb/Th) + 1.2481×ln(Nb/Th) – 0.8243 

 

CRB-OIB-MORB 

 

DF1

(CRB-OIB-MORB)t1

 = –0.5558×ln(La/Th) – 1.4260×ln(Sm/Th) + 2.2935×ln(Yb/Th) – 0.6890×ln(Nb/Th) + 

4.1422 
 
DF2

(CAB-OIB-MORB)t1

 = –0.9207×ln(La/Th) + 3.6520×ln(Sm/Th) – 1.9866×ln(Yb/Th) + 1.0574×ln(Nb/Th) – 

4.4283 
 

The tectonic fields are: IAB−island arc basic (or ultrabasic) rocks; CRB−continental rift basic (or ultrabasic) rocks; OIB−ocean island basic (or ultrabasic) 
rocks; and MORB−mid ocean ridge basic (or ultrabasic) rocks.

 

 

 

 

 

background image

iv 

 

Table S4.  
DF1-DF2 equations for the set of five diagrams based on major and trace element ratios proposed by Verma and Agrawal (2011) for 
basic and ultrabasic magmas. 
 

Figure reference; 

figure type 

Discrimination 

diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Verma and Agrawal 
(2011); log-ratios of 
immobile major and 
trace elements 

IAB-CRB+OIB-
MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB+OIB-MORB)t2

 = – 0.6611×ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 2.2926×ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 1.6774×ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 

1.0916×ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 21.3603 

 
DF2

(IAB-CRB+OIB-MORB)t2

 = 0.4702×ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 3.7649×ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) – 3.911×ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

+2.2697×ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 4.8487 

 

IAB-CRB-OIB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-OIB)t2

 = –0.6146×ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 2.3510×ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 1.6828×ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 

1.1911×ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 22.7253 

 
DF2

(IAB-CRB-OIB)t2

 = 1.3765×ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) – 0.9452×ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 4.0461×ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

) – 

2.0789×ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 22.2450 

 

IAB-CRB-MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-CRB-MORB)t2

 = –0.6624×ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 2.4498×ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 1.2867×ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 

1.0920×ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 18.7466 

 
DF2

(IAB-CRB-MORB)t2

 = 0.4938 · ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 3.4741 · ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) – 3.8053 · ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 

2.0070 · ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 3.3163 

 

IAB-OIB-MORB

 

DF1

(IAB-OIB-MORB)t2

 = –0.2646×ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 2.0491×ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 3.4565×ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 

0.8573×ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 32.9472 

 
DF2

(IAB-OIB-MORB)t2

 = 0.01874×ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 4.0937×ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) – 4.8550×ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 

2.9900×ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 0.1995 

 

CRB-OIB-MORB 

 

DF1

(CRB-OIB-MORB)t2

 = –0.7829×ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 0.3379×ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 3.3239×ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

) – 

0.51232×ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 16.0941 

 
DF2

(CAB-OIB-MORB)t2

 = 1.7478×ln(Nb/(TiO

2

)

adj

) – 0.0421×ln(V/TiO

2

)

adj

) + 3.5301×ln(Y/TiO

2

)

adj

) – 

1.4503×ln(Zr/(TiO

2

)

adj

) + 28.3592 

 

The tectonic fields are: IAB−island arc basic (or ultrabasic) rocks; CRB−continental rift basic (or ultrabasic) rocks; OIB−ocean island basic (or ultrabasic) 
rocks; and MORB−mid ocean ridge basic (or ultrabasic) rocks. The subscript 

adj

 refers to adjusted data from the SINCLAS (Verma et al. 2002) or IgRoCS 

computer program (Verma and Rivera-Gómez 2013a).

 

 
 

 

 

background image

 

Table S5. 
DF1-DF2 equations (approximate coefficients) for the set of five diagrams based on major element ratios proposed by Verma and Verma (2013) for intermediate magmas. 

Figure reference; 
figure type 

Discrimination 
diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

Verma and Verma 
(2013); log-ratios of 
major elements 
(mint) 

IA+CA-CR+OI-Col 

11.431

 

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.031

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-0.402

         

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-0.284

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(1.291

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.067

        

   

          

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.212

 

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

2.489

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-2.225

         

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(1.120

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-2.456

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

mint

 

 

12.202

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.335

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(0.871

         

        

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-1.792

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(0.816

 

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.305

         

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-1.720

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-1.998

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.691

         

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-0.011

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.578

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

mint

 

 

IA-CA-CR+OI 

 

14.315

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.072

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-0.219

        

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.112

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(1.426

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.177

       

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.363

 

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

3.846

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-3.790

        

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(0.542

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-2.519

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

mint

 

 
 

13.489

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(1.062

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-0.774

         

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(3.002

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(-2.148

 

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.374

         

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-3.499

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

4.807

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-3.433

         

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(3.440

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-1.049

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

mint

 

IA-CA-Col 

4.312

 

+

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.468

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-0.816

        

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(1.360

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(-0.740

 

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.387

        

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(2.050

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

4.106

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-2.432

        

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-0.782

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.887

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

mint

 

 

7.586

+

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(-1.326

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(0.790

        

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-2.967

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(2.230

 

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.362

        

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(2.897

 

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-4.961

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(2.601

        

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-4.329

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

1.760

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

mint

 

 

IA-CR+OI-Col 

 

7.895

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.112

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-0.488

        

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-0.827

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(1.258

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.050

        

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(0.496

 

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

1.456

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-1.517

        

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(1.539

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-2.436

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

mint

 

 

15.241

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.296

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(0.771

        

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-1.328

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(0.682

 

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.246

        

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-2.131

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-1.130

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.066

        

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-0.0788

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.737

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

mint

 

background image

vi 

 

CA-CR+OI-Col 

12.350

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.078

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(0.161

        

        

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-0.894

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(0.988

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.528

        

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-1.139

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

0.431

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-0.537

        

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(1.971

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-2.322

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

mint

 

 

3.501

+

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.143

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-1.277

        

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.921

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

-0.465

(

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.260

        

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(0.446

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

1.346

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.161

        

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(2.606

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.407

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

mint

 

 

The tectonic settings are: IA−island arc; CA−continental arc; CR−continental rift; OI−ocean island; and Col−collision. The subscript 

adj

 refers to adjusted data from the 

SINCLAS (Verma et al. 2002) or IgRoCS computer program (Verma and Rivera-Gómez 2013a).

 

 
 

 

 

background image

vii 

 

Table S6. 
 DF1-DF2 equations (approximate coefficients) for the set of five diagrams based on immobile major and trace element ratios proposed by Verma and 
Verma (2013) for intermediate magmas. 
 

Figure reference; 

figure type 

Discrimination 

diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Verma and Verma 
(2013); log-ratios of 
immobile major and 
trace elements (mtint) 

IA+CA-CR+OI-Col

 

1.901

 

+

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.583

 

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(0.454

        

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(1.677

 

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

-0.415

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.939

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.631

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

1.023

(

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

mtint

 

 

18.638

-

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(-2.008

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(0.214

         

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(-1.712

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

-0.131

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.336

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.477

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

0.249

(

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

mtint

 

 

IA-CA-CR+OI

 

8.228

 

+

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.843

 

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(0.835

         

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(1.924

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

-0.372

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.686

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.428

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

0.875

(

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

mtint

 

 

 

12.452

 

+

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.387

 

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(1.921

         

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(-0.185

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

0.118

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(0.176

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-2.651

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-1.172

(

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

mtint

 

IA-CA-Col

 

8.109

 

+

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.723

 

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(-0.641

         

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(-0.368

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

0.320

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(0.908

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.125

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.801

(

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

mtint

 

 

20.630

-

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(-1.365

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(-1.783

         

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(-0.872

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

-0.134

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.124

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(2.200

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

1.317

(

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

mtint

 

 

IA-CA-CR+OI

 

 

4.469

-

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(-0.692

 

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(-0.757

         

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(-1.583

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

0.385

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(0.862

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.301

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.856

(

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

mtint

 

 

 

17.041

-

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(-1.981

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(0.426

         

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(-1.710

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

-0.122

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.323

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.504

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

0.215

(

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

mtint

 

 

CA-CR+OI-Col

 

5.752

 

+

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(-0.714

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(0.337

         

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(-1.620

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

0.545

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(1.438

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-1.082

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-1.256

(

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

mtint

 

 
 

21.028

-

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(-1.772

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(0.069

         

)

)

ln(V/TiO

 

(-1.641

)

)

ln(Ni/TiO

 

-0.174

(

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.861

         

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.054

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.0240

(

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

mtint

 

The tectonic settings are: IA−island arc; CA−continental arc; CR−continental rift; OI−ocean island; and Col−collision. The subscript 

adj

 refers to adjusted data from the 

SINCLAS (Verma et al. 2002) or IgRoCS computer program (Verma and Rivera-Gómez 2013a).

 

background image

viii 

 

 
 

Table S7.  
DF1-DF2 equations (approximate coefficients) for the set of five diagrams based on immobile trace element ratios proposed by Verma and Verma 
(2013) for intermediate magmas. 

Figure reference; 

figure type 

Discrimination 

diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Verma and Verma 
(2013); log-ratios of 
immobile trace 
elements (tint) 

IA+CA-CR+OI-Col

 

3.816

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(0.181

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(1.929

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(0.270

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

1.332

(

         

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(1.295

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(-1.254

 

ln(La/Yb)

-0.167

(

DF1

tint

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

 

 

3.306

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(-0.489

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(0.851

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(0.960

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

-1.276

(

         

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(0.490

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(1.727

 

ln(La/Yb)

-0.243

(

DF2

tint

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

 

 
 

IA-CA-CR+OI

 

3.385

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(0.172

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(1.581

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(0.029

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

1.324

(

         

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(1.741

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(-1.269

 

ln(La/Yb)

0.018

(

DF1

tint

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

 

 

0.292

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(1.070

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(1.877

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(1.244

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

1.022

(

         

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(-0.412

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(-2.044

 

ln(La/Yb)

-2.100

(

DF2

tint

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

 

IA-CA-Col

 

5.801

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(-0.034

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(1.473

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(0.348

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

0.124

(

         

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(0.930

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(0.752

 

ln(La/Yb)

0.093

(

DF1

tint

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

 

 

3.684

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(0.444

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(2.774

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(1.825

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

-0.078

(

         

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(-1.360

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(-0.073

 

ln(La/Yb)

-2.038

(

DF2

tint

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

 

 

IA-CR+OI-Col

 

2.934

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(-0.164

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(1.558

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(-0.042

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

1.164

(

       

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(1.379

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(-1.352

 

ln(La/Yb)

0.721

(

DF1

tint

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

 

 

4.155

 

+

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(0.377

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(-0.787

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(-0.761

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

1.347

(

         

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(-0.250

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(-2.035

 

ln(La/Yb)

0.238

(

DF2

tint

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

 

 

CA-CR+OI-Col

 

0.877

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(-0.305

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(1.658

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(0.569

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

1.900

(

         

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(1.366

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(-1.389

 

ln(La/Yb)

-0.977

(

DF1

tint

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

 

 

3.915

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb

 

(-0.400

)

ln(Y/Yb

 

(1.191

)

ln(Th/Yb

 

(1.126

)

ln(Nb/Yb

 

-0.901

(

         

)

ln(Sm/Yb

 

(0.364

)

ln(Ce/Yb

 

(1.164

 

ln(La/Yb)

-0.0870

(

DF2

tint

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

 

 

The tectonic settings are: IA−island arc; CA−continental arc; CR−continental rift; OI−ocean island; and Col−collision. 

 

 
 

 
 

 

background image

ix 

 

Table S8. 
DF1-DF2 equations (approximate coefficients) for the set of five diagrams based on major element ratios proposed by Verma et al. (2012) 
for acid magmas. 

 

Figure reference; figure 

type 

Discrimination diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Verma 

et al.

 (2012); 

log-ratios of major 
elements (m3) 

IA+CA-CR-Col

 

1.583

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

 

(-0.156

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-1.652

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.561

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

 

(0.456

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

 

(0.187

       

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(0.427

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

0.934

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-2.092

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(0.957

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

0.361

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CR

-

CA

(IA

m3

 

 

6.691

 

+

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

 

(-0.354

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(0.174

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.232

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

 

(-0.245

       

)

)

ln(M gO/SiO

 

 

(-0.028

)

)

ln(M nO/SiO

 

(0.740

       

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

0.699

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.110

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-0.955

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

 

0.472

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CR

-

CA

(IA

m 3

 

IA-CA-CR

 

 

6.257

 

+

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

 

(0.339

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(1.717

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

 

(-0.714

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

  

(-0.852

       

)

)

ln(M gO/SiO

 

 

(-0.191

)

)

ln(M nO/SiO

 

(-0.139

       

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-1.066

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(2.743

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-0.087

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.479

(

F1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

CR)

-

CA

-

(IA

m 3

 

 
 

0.998

 

+

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.019

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

 

(1.662

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(1.314

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

 

(1.250

       

)

)

ln(M gO/SiO

 

 

(-0.074

)

)

ln(M nO/SiO

 

 

(0.217

       

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

1.121

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-3.205

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-1.758

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

 

-0.320

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

CR)

-

CA

-

(IA

m 3

 

IA-CA-Col

 

3.083

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

 

(0.268

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(1.507

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-0.817

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(-0.139

       

)

)

ln(M gO/SiO

 

(-0.123

)

)

ln(M nO/SiO

 

(-0.722

       

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-0.498

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.520

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-0.034

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.362

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

m 3

 

 

18.190

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.495

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

 

(-2.339

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-3.189

 

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(-1.152

       

)

)

ln(M gO/SiO

 

(0.062

)

)

ln(M nO/SiO

 

(-1.226

       

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-0.735

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(1.747

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(1.984

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.142

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

m 3

 

IA-CR-Col

 

.179

2

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

-0.075

(

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-2.058

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

 

(0.622

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

 

(0.062

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.067

       

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(0.197

 

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

949

.

2

(

 

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-2.641

      

 

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

 

(1.288

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

0.023

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CR

-

(IA

m3

 

background image

 

 

517

.

6

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

-0.226

(

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(0.670

       

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

 

(0.152

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

 

(-0.326

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.090

       

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(0.408

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

0.303

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.827

        

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

 

(-1.054

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

0.279

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CR

-

(IA

m3

 

CA-CR-Col

 

8.262

 

+

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

-0.034

(

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(1.810

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.106

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(-0.326

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.072

       

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(0.341

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

0.638

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.526

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-1.794

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

0.064

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CR

-

(CA

m3

 

 

3.896

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.353

 

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-3.309

      

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-0.205

 

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

 

(-0.062

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

 

(-0.001

       

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(0.754

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

 

-0.880

(

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.247

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(0.802

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

0.876

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CR

-

(CA

m3

 

The tectonic settings are: IA−island arc; CA−continental arc; CR−continental rift; and Col−collision. The subscript 

adj

 refers to adjusted data from the SINCLAS (Verma 

et al.

 2002) or IgRoCS 

computer program (Verma and Rivera-Gómez 2013a). 
 
 

 

 

background image

xi 

 

Table S9.  
DF1-DF2 equations (approximate coefficients) for the set of five diagrams based on major element ratios proposed by Verma et al. (2013) for acid magmas. 

Figure reference; 
figure type 

Discrimination 
diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Verma et al. (2013); 
log-ratios of major 
elements (macid) 

IA+CA-CR+OI-Col

 

2.115

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.146

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-1.781

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.742

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(0.225

       

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.134

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.0652

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

1.831

(

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-1.769

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(0.226

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

0.051

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

macid

 

 

 

2.543

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.854

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(0.085

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.212

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(0.023

       

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.026

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(0.823

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

1.030

(

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-1.189

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-1.648

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

1.091

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

macid

 

IA-CA-CR+OI

 

2.650

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.164

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(2.038

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-0.520

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(-0.239

       

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.147

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.083

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-0.761

(

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.623

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

0.130

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

OI)

CR

-

OI

CA

-

(IA

macid

 

 

2.979

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.002

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-1.405

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-2.448

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(-0.451

       

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.253

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(1.160

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-5.151

(

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(5.102

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.045

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

macid

 

IA-CA-Col

 

3.220

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.409

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(1.154

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-1.231

       

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.156

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.912

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-1.238

(

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.619

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(2.271

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.489

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

macid

 

 

12.688

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.226

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(1.163

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(3.036

       

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.255

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.374

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

3.691

(

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-3.899

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(2.244

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

0.681

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

macid

 

 

IA-CR+OI -Col

 

 

4.290

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.024

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(2.577

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.383

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(0.075

       

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.443

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(-0.743

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.144

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

+

CR

-

(IA

macid

 

 

 

2.595

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.751

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-0.320

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.150

)

)

ln(CaO/SiO

 

(0.023

       

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.753

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(1.545

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.873

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

macid

 

CA-CR+OI -Col

 

 

4.332

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.212

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(-2.431

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(0.650

       

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(0.119

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.296

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

1.889

(

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(-1.651

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(1.065

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-0.022

(

DF1

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

macid

 

 

background image

xii 

 

 

0.916

-

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.726

)

)

O/SiO

ln(K

 

(0.651

       

)

)

O/SiO

ln(Na

 

(-0.223

)

)

ln(MgO/SiO

 

(-0.018

)

)

ln(MnO/SiO

 

(-0.779

)

)

ln(FeO/SiO

 

-0.798

(

       

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Fe

 

(0.992

)

)

/SiO

O

ln(Al

 

(1.626

 

)

)

/SiO

ln(TiO

-1.084

(

DF2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

3

2

adj

2

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

macid

 

 

The tectonic settings are: IA−island arc; CA−continental arc; CR−continental rift; OI−ocean island; and Col−collision. The subscript 

adj

 refers to adjusted data from the SINCLAS 

(Verma et al. 2002) or IgRoCS computer program (Verma and Rivera-Gómez 2013a).

 

 
 

 

 

background image

xiii 

 

 

Table S10. 
DF1-DF2 equations (approximate coefficients) for the set of five diagrams based on immobile major and trace element ratios proposed by 
Verma et al. (2013) for acid magmas. 
 

Figure reference; 

figure type 

Discrimination 

diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Verma et al. (2013); 
log-ratios of 
immobile major and 
trace elements 
(mtacid) 

IA+CA-CR+OI-Col

 

 

4.704

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.577

 

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(-0.237

     

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(0.729

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.228

      

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.091

(

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

mtacid

 

 

3.709

-

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(-0.082

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(0.209

      

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.476

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-1.253

      

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.268

(

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

mtacid

 

 

IA-CA-CR+OI

 

4.701

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.301

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(-0.530

      

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(1.060

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.025

      

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.018

(

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

mtacid

 

 

3.702

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.742

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(1.099

      

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.724

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.118

      

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.197

(

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

mtacid

 

IA-CA-Col

 

3.988

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.136

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(-0.861

      

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(1.183

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(0.248

 

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

mtacid

 

 

7.274

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.682

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(1.126

      

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.382

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(1.129

 

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

mtacid

 

 

IA-CR+OI-Col

 

2.771

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.333

      

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(-0.900

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(1.104

      

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.079

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

0.095

(

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

mtacid

 

 

0.805

-

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.171

      

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(0.339

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.279

      

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.998

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.298

(

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

CR

-

(IA

mtacid

 

CA-CR+OI-Col

 

3.726

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(0.824

      

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(-0.131

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(0.444

      

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-0.432

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.081

(

DF1

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

CR

-

(CA

mtacid

 

 

background image

xiv 

 

5.425

-

)

)

ln(Zr/TiO

 

(-0.377

      

 

)

)

ln(Y/TiO

 

(0.271

)

)

ln(Nb/TiO

 

(-0.754

      

)

)

/TiO

O

ln(P

 

(-1.110

 

)

)

ln(MgO/TiO

-0.341

(

DF2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

adj

2

5

2

adj

2

Col)

-

CR

-

(CA

mtacid

 

The tectonic settings are: IA−island arc; CA−continental arc; CR−continental rift; OI−ocean island; and Col−collision. The subscript 

adj

 refers to adjusted data 

from the SINCLAS (Verma et al. 2002) or IgRoCS computer program (Verma and Rivera-Gómez 2013a).

 

 
 

 

 

background image

xv 

 

 

Table S11.  
DF1-DF2 equations (approximate coefficients) for the set of five diagrams based on immobile trace element ratios proposed by Verma et al. 
(2013) for acid magmas. 
 

Figure reference; 

figure type 

Discrimination 

diagram 

Discriminant function equations 

 

 

 

Verma et al. (2013); 
log-ratios of 
immobile trace 
elements (tacid) 

IA+CA-CR+OI-Col

 

9.497

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(-0.567

)

ln(Y/Yb)

 

(0.644

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(0.063

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(0.822

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(-4.329

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

7.810

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

-4.994

(

DF1

tacid

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

 

 

10.251

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(-1.269

)

ln(Y/Yb)

 

(-1.139

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(0.843

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(0.250

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(2.621

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

-3.620

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

2.325

(

DF2

tacid

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

CA

(IA

 

 

IA-CA-CR+OI

 

9.614

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(-0.488

)

ln(Y/Yb)

 

(1.558

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(0.334

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(1.692

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(-3.632

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

6.616

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

-5.209

(

DF1

tacid

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

 

 

4.934

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(-0.342

)

ln(Y/Yb)

 

(1.035

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(-0.499

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(0.158

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(-2.678

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

4.792

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

-3.72

(

DF2

tacid

OI)

CR

-

CA

-

(IA

 

 

IA-CA-Col

 

 

0.731

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(-0.878

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(0.594

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(0.840

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(-0.963

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

1.076

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

-0.047

(

DF1

tacid

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

 

 

5.099

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(-2.495

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(0.774

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(-0.225

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(-0.077

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

4.736

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

-4.067

(

DF2

tacid

Col)

-

CA

-

(IA

 

 

IA-CR+OI-Col

 

2.914

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(-0.620

)

ln(Y/Yb)

 

(0.089

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(0.542

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(0.898

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(-1.004

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

1.047

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

0.259

(

DF1

tacid

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

 

 

13.950

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(0.373

)

ln(Y/Yb)

 

(1.119

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(-0.411

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(0.483

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(-5.369

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

8.414

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

-5.356

(

DF2

tacid

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(IA

 

 

CA-CR+OI-Col

 

11.340

-

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(-0.263

)

ln(Y/Yb)

 

(0.636

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(-0.079

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(0.776

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(-4.783

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

8.436

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

-5.409

(

DF1

tacid

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

 

 

6.088

)

ln(Zr/Yb)

 

(-1.414

)

ln(Y/Yb)

 

(-0.984

)

ln(Th/Yb)

 

(1.037

)

ln(Nb/Yb)

 

(0.838

      

)

ln(Sm/Yb)

 

(0.516

)

ln(Ce/Yb)

-1.730

(

 

)

ln(La/Yb)

1.683

(

DF2

tacid

Col)

-

OI

CR

-

(CA

 

 

The tectonic settings are: IA−island arc; CA−continental arc; CR−continental rift; OI−ocean island; and Col−collision. 

 

 

 

background image

xvi 

 

 
Table S12  
Synthesis of the compilation of “fresh” rock samples used in the present study for testing of discrimination diagrams (18 test studies)

Test study 

 

Approximate 

location 

 

Number of Samples* 

(Figure no; 

Table no. for results

 

Age and rock type 

 

Inferred 

Tectonic 

setting 

 

Reference 

Region 

Sub-region 

 

Long. (°)  Lat. (°) 

 

B + U 

 

Age (Ma) 

Author rock type 

 

 

m1/m2, t1, t2 

m, mt, t 

m, mt, t 

 

Expected tectonic setting: Ocean Island 

1. Hawaiian Islands 
(Pacific Ocean) 

1a.  Mauna Kea 

 

-155.5 

19.8 

 

303+3, 0, 303+3 
(Figs. 1, S2, S3; 

Table 1) 

--- 

--- 

 

0.1-0.4 

submarine 

basaltic lava 

 

OIB 

 

Rhodes and Vollinger 
 (2004), Rhodes (2012)  

1b.  Mauna Loa 

 

-155.6 

19.5 

 

43+2, 0, 43+2 

(Figs. S4-S6; 

Table S14) 

--- 

--- 

 

0.1-0.4 

submarine 

basaltic lava 

 

OIB 

  Rhodes and Vollinger (2004) 

1c. Maui 

 

-156.6 

20.9 

 

10, 0, 10 

(Figs. S7- S9; 

Table S15) 

--- 

---    

 

1.9–2.1 

basaltic lava 

 

OIB 

  Sherrod et al. (2007) 

1d.  Oahu 

 

-157.9 

21.5 

 

9, 4, 9 

(Figs. S10- S12; 

Table S16) 

15, 15, 3 

(Figs. S13- 

S14; Table 

S17) 

--- 

 

2.9–3.9 

basaltic lava and 

dike rocks 

 

OIB; OI 

  Jackson et al. (1999) 

2. Trindade Island  
(southern Atlantic 
Ocean) 

2. Trindade 

 

-29.3 

-20.5 

 

2+12, 2+11, 0 

(Figs. S15- S17; 

Table S18) 

24, 0, 13 

(Figs. S18- 

S19; Table 

S19) 

--- 

 

<0.27–3.6 

different types of 

alkalic rocks 

 

OIB; CR+OI 

  Marques et al.(1999) 

Expected tectonic setting: Ocean Island or Continental rift 

3. Antarctica (Ross 
Sea) 

3. White Island  

 

168.0 

 

-78.0 

 

 

22, 22, 22 

(Figs. S20- S23; 

Table S20) 

--- 

--- 

 

0.17-7.65 

Alkali rocks 

 

CRB; OIB 

 

Cooper et al. (2007) 
 

4. Antarctica 

4. McMurdo Sound 

 

166.9 

 

-77.8 

 

 

24, 20, 20 

(Figs. S24- S27; 

Table S21) 

--- 

--- 

 

15.9-18.4 

 

drill core glasses 

 

       OIB 

 

Nyland et al. (2013) 
 

Expected tectonic setting: Continental rift 

5. Spain 

5. Garrotxa, NE 
Volcanic province 

 

2.5 

 

42 

 

 

8+8, 8+7, 8+7 

(Figs. S28- S31; 

Table S22) 

--- 

--- 

 

0.7-0.0115 

 

alkaline rocks 

 

CRB 

  Cebriá et al. (2000) 

6. Austria 

6. Styrian basin 

 

14.4 

47.5 

 

9+30, 9+30, 9+30 

(Figs. S32- S35; 

Table S18) 

--- 

--- 

 

Quaternary 

Styrian basin 

lavas 

 

CRB 

 

Ali et al. (2013) 
 

7. Cameroon 

7. Mount Cameroon 

 

9.2 

4.2 

 

14, 0, 14 

(Figs. S36- S38; 

Table S18) 

--- 

--- 

 

Eruptions of 

years 1999 and 

2000 

Lava flow 

 

CRB 

 

Suh et al. (2003) 
 

background image

xvii 

 

8. Madagascar 

8. Nosy Be Archipelago 

 

48.3 

 

-13.3 

 

 

27, 0, 27 

(Figs. S39- S41; 

Table S25) 

--- 

--- 

 

7-10 

 

Mafic alkaline 

rocks 

 

CRB 

  Melluso and Morra (2000) 

9. Inner Mongolia, 
China 

9. Tianheyong 

 

114.0 

41.0 

 

8, 8, 0 

(Figs. S42- S44; 

Table S26) 

--- 

--- 

 

21.7±1.7 

basanites 

 

CRB; OIB 

  Yang et al. (2009) 

10. China (north-
east) 

10. Halaha volcanic 
field, Central Great 
Xing‘an Range 

 

120.5 

 

47.5 

 

 

14, 14, 14 

(Figs. S45- S48; 

Table S27) 

--- 

--- 

 

0.17-2.04 

 

basalt 

 

CRB 

  Ho et al. (2013) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expected tectonic setting: Continental arc 

11. Aleutian arc, 
Alaska 

11. Aniakchak 
ignimbrite 

 

-158.1 

56.9 

 

--- 

--- 

9, 9, 9 

(Figs. 

S49- S52; 

Table 

S28) 

 

0.0034 

rhyodacitic to 

andesitic 

ignimbrite 

 

 CA 

  Dreher et al. (2005) 

12. Guatemala 

12a. Fuego volcanic 
complex 

 

-90.9 

14.5 

 

--- 

9, 0, 0 

(Table S29) 

--- 

 

Recent 

eruptions 

lava 

 

CA 

 

Chesner and Rose Jr. 
(1984) 

12b. Meseta Volcano 

 

-90.7 

14.6 

 

--- 

40, 0, 0 

(Table S30) 

--- 

 

Quaternary 

 

lava 

 

CA 

  Chesner and Halsor (1997) 

12c. Santiaguito 
volcanic dome complex 

 

-91.6 

14.8 

 

--- 

18, 5, 18 

(Table S31) 

17, 17, 17 

(Table 

S32) 

 

0.000112 

lava 

 

CA; IA or 

CA-Col 

  Scott et al.(2013) 

13. Chile 

13. Huequi volcano 
dome complex 

 

-72.6 

-42.5 

 

--- 

9, 9, 0 

(Table S33) 

--- 

 

0.000123 

lava 

 

CA 

  Watt et al. (2011) 

14. Greece 

14. Nisyros Island, 
Dodecanese 

 

27 

36.6 

 

--- 

16, 0, 0 

(Table S34) 

11, 0, 0 

(Table 

S35) 

 

Quaternary 

volcanic rocks 

 

CA 

  Di Paola (1974) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expected tectonic setting: Island arc 

15. Aleutian arc 

15. Augustine Island 

 

-153.4 

59.36 

 

--- 

21, 0, 0 

(Table S36) 

--- 

 

6.0 

volcanic rocks 

 

IA  

  Johnson et al. (1996) 

16. Andaman-
Nicobar Islands 

16a. Barren Island 

 

93.85 

12.29 

 

25, 11, 24 

(Table S37) 

21, 21, 9 

(Table S38) 

--- 

 

Quaternary 

volcanic rocks 

 

Arc 

 

Chandrasekharam et al. 
(2009); Streck et al. (2011)  

16b. Narcondam Island