background image

www.geologicacarpathica.com

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

, APRIL 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

doi: 10.1515/geoca-2016-0009

Perovskite, reaction product of a harzburgite with Jurassic—

Cretaceous accretionary wedge fluids (Western Carpathians,

Slovakia): evidence from the whole-rock and mineral

trace element data

MARIÁN PUTIŠ

1

, YUE-HENG YANG

2

, TOMÁŠ VACULOVIČ

3,4

, MATÚŠ KOPPA

1

, XIAN-HUA LI

2

and PAVEL UHER

1

1

Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovakia;  putis@fns.uniba.sk

2

State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China

3

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, 611 37 Brno, Czech Republic

4

The Central European Institute of Technology, Masaryk University, 625 00 Brno, Czech Republic

(Manuscript received September 16, 2015; accepted  in revised form March 10, 2016)

Abstract: Perovskite (Prv) was discovered in an abyssal harzburgite from a “mélange” type blueschist-bearing accre-
tionary wedge of the Western Carpathians (Meliata Unit, Slovakia). Perovskite-1 formation in serpentinized orthopyroxene
may be simplified by the mass-balance reaction: Ca

2

Si

2

O

6

 (Ca-pyroxene-member)+2Fe

2

TiO

4

 (ulvöspinel molecule in

spinel)+2H

2

O+O

2

=2CaTiO

3

 (Prv)+2SiO

2

+4FeOOH (goethite). Perovskite-2 occurs in a chlorite-rich blackwall zone

separating serpentinite and rodingite veins, and in rodingite veins alone. The bulk-rock trace-element patterns suggest
negligible  differences  from  visually  and  microscopically  less  (“core”)  to  strongly  serpentinized  harzburgite  due  to
serpentinization and rodingitization: an enrichment in LREE(La,Ce), Cs, ±Ba, U, Nb, Pb, As, Sb, ±Nd and Li in com-
parison  with  HREE,  Rb  and  Sr.  The  U/Pb  perovskite  ages  at  ~135 Ma  are  interpreted  to  record  the  interaction  of
metamorphic fluids with harzburgite blocks in the Neotethyan Meliatic accretionary wedge. Our LA—ICP—MS mineral
study provides a complex view on trace element behaviour during the two stages of rodingitization connected with Prv
genesis. The positive anomalies of Cs, U, Ta, Pb, As, Sb, Pr and Nd in Cpx, Opx and Ol are combined with the negative
anomalies of Rb, Ba, Th, Nb and Sr in these minerals. The similar positive anomalies of Cs, U, Ta, ±Be, As, Sb found
in typical serpentinization and rodingitization minerals, with variable contents of La, Ce and Nd, and negative anoma-
lies of Rb, Ba, Th, Nb and Sr suggest involvement of crustal fluids during MP-LP/LT accretionary wedge metamor-
phism. LA—ICP—MS study revealed strong depletion in LREE from Prv-1 to Prv-2, and a typically negative Eu (and Ti)
anomaly for Prv-1, while a positive Eu (and Ti) anomaly for Prv-2. Our multi-element diagram depicts enrichment in U,
Nb, La, Ce, As, Sb, Pr, Nd and decreased Rb, Ba, Th, Ta, Pb, Sr, Zr in both Prv generations. In general, both Prv
generations are very close to the end-member composition. In spite of low concentrations of isomorphic constituents,
Prv-1 and Prv-2 display the 

A

(La,Ce)

3+

+

B

(Fe,Cr)

3+

=

A

Ca

2+

+

B

Ti

4+

 heterovalent couple substitution. A decrease of ferric

iron in Prv-2 indicates increasing reduction conditions during rodingitization.

Keywords:  perovskite,  serpentinization,  rodingitization,  ICP—MS,  LA—ICP—MS,  Western  Carpathians  accretionary
wedge

Introduction

Perovskite  (CaTiO

3

)  represents  an  accessory  but  petrologi-

cally  important  constituent  in  different  lithologies,  inclu-
ding: (1) SiO

2

-undersaturated, especially alkaline magmatic

rocks (Currie 1975; Ulrych et al. 1988; Chakhmouradian &
Mitchell  1997,  2000;  Mitchell  &  Chakhmouradian  1998;
Heaman et al. 2003); (2) skarns (Marincea et al. 2010; Uher
et al. 2011) and (3) in medium to lower-temperature reaction
domains  in  greenschist  and  blueschist  to  eclogite  facies
metamorphic rocks (Müntener & Hermann 1994; Malvoisin
et al. 2012).

Mineralogical—petrological  data  of  harzburgite  host,  and

of  metamorphic—metasomatic  perovskite  from  the  Western
Carpathians  Meliata  Unit  (Slovakia),  including  U/Pb  SIMS
and LA—ICP—MS perovskite ages and Nd isotopes were pub-
lished by Putiš et al. (2012, 2014, 2015) and Li et al. (2014).

Element  mobility  in  accretionary  wedges  using  the  LA—

ICP—MS data was searched, for example, by Scambelluri et
al. (2004, 2014) and Khedr & Arai (2009) in HP peridotites
and  serpentinites  with  implications  for  fluid  processes  and
trace-element recycling. Kodolányi et al. (2012) investigated
fluid-rock  interaction  processes  in  ocean  floor  and  fore-arc
serpentinites.

Our  presented  data  are  focused  on  the  origin  of  the

harzburgite  host  using  the  mineral  (Ol,  Opx,  Cpx,  Spl)
chemical  composition  diagrams.  The  LA—ICP—MS  mineral
patterns of Ol, Cpx, Opx, Srp, Grt, Ep and Chl from serpenti-
nized/rodingitized harzburgite domains are compared to the
LA—ICP—MS  perovskite  patterns  in  their  association,  docu-
menting a model of perovskite genesis due to hydration pro-
cesses in an accretionary wedge.

The mineral abbreviations used in text, tables and figures

are  taken  from  Whitney  &  Evans  (2010):  Act=actinolite,

background image

134

PUTIŠ, YANG, VACULOVIČ, KOPPA, LI and UHER

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

Adr=andradite,  Alm=almandine  (component),  Amp=amphi-
bole  (group),  Ap=apatite,  Atg=antigorite,  Chl=chlorite,
Cpx=clinopyroxene, 

Ctl=chrysotile, 

Czo=clinozoisite,

Di=diopside,  Ep=epidote,  Grs=grossular  (component),
Grt=garnet,  Gth=goethite,  Hem=hematite,  Hbl=hornblende,
Lz=lizardite,  Mag=magnetite,  Ol=olivine,  Opx=orthopy-
roxene, Prg=pargasite, Pph=pyrophanite; Prp=pyrope (com-
ponent),  Prv=perovskite,  Qz=quartz,  Spl=spinel,  Sps=
spessartine  (component),  Srp=serpentine  group  minerals,
Tlc=talc, Ves=vesuvianite, except for Carb=carbonates.

Geological setting and previous results

Geological setting

The Western Carpathians form a collisional orogenic belt

subdivided  into  Outer,  Central  and  Inner  Western  Car-
pathians  (OWC,  CWC  and  IWC  –  Plašienka  et  al.  1997;
Fig. 1); where (1) the OWC are mainly composed of Tertiary
flysch complexes, (2) the CWC comprise the basement and
Mesozoic  cover  nappes  exposed  in  the  Tatric,  Veporic  and
Gemeric tectonic zones separated by major Late Cretaceous
shear zones, and (3), the IWC include Meliata tectonic unit
overlain  by  the  Turňa  and  higher  Silica  nappes.  The  under-

lying Gemeric Unit is composed of mostly low-grade meta-
morphosed Lower Paleozoic basement complexes with Per-
mian  and  subordinate  Mesozoic  cover  rocks  (Mello  et  al.
2008). This unit represents the northern or passive continen-
tal  margin  of  the  Meliata-Hallstatt  Ocean.  The  southern  ac-
tive  continental  margin  in  the  Inner  Western  Carpathians  is
represented by the overlying Turňa Nappe composed of Car-
boniferous  to  Jurassic  VLT  to  LT  greenschist  facies
metasediments  (Vozárová  &  Vozár,  1992;  Mello  et  al.
1996). The uppermost tectonostratigraphic unit is composed
of Triassic—Jurassic successions of the Silica Nappe (Biely et
al. 1996).

The  perovskite-bearing  serpentinized  harzburgite  blocks

described herein belong to a mélange complex of the Meliata
tectonic unit (Putiš et al. 2012). Mock et al. (1998) had pre-
viously reported that high-pressure rocks of the Meliata Unit
were incorporated in the Bôrka Nappe (Leško & Varga 1980;
Mello et al. 1998) overlying the Gemeric and Veporic tectonic
units of the CWC, and Faryad (1995) specified metamorphic
blueschist facies conditions of 380—460 °C at 9—12 kbar.

The Meliata-Hallstatt Ocean opened in the Anisian—Ladi-

nian  time  (Kozur  1991),  most  likely  as  a  back-arc  basin
(Stampfli 1996). The Late Jurassic closure of this basin was
dated  at  160—150  Ma  by  the 

40

Ar/

39

Ar  ages  of  “phengitic”

white mica in the blueschists (Dallmeyer et al. 1996; Faryad

Fig.  1.  Geological-tectonic  sketch  map  of  the  Western  Carpathians  (after  Biely  et  al.  1996).  OWC=Outer  Western  Carpathians;
CWC=Central Western Carpathians, divided into the Tatric, Veporic and Gemeric basement/cover complexes (Late Cretaceous tectonic
units) overlain by often less than kilometre-size fragments of the IWC Meliata tectonic Unit. IWC=Inner Western Carpathians.

background image

135

REACTION PRODUCTS OF J/K ACCRETIONARY WEDGE FLUIDS IN W CARPATHIANS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

& Henjes-Kunst 1997). The Meliatic accretionary wedge de-
veloped  during  exhumation  of  blueschist  facies  rocks  from
a subduction channel via a corner flow triggered by the lea-
ding  edge  of  the  upper  plate.  This  wedge  was  then  trans-
formed  between  ca.  150  and  130  Ma  into  numerous  small
nappe  fragments  coalescing  as  the  Bôrka  Nappe  and  thrust
over  the  passive  continental  margin  Gemeric  and  Veporic
tectonic units forming the CWC orogenic wedge (Putiš et al.
2014, and citations therein).

Previous results

The  Meliatic  Bôrka  Nappe  perovskite-bearing  serpen-

tinites associated with blueschists are located in a quarry at
Dobšiná  town  in  eastern  Slovakia.  Radvanec  (2009)  disco-
vered perovskite in a pale fragment enclosed in serpentinites
at the Danková locality, close to Dobšiná and considered that
Prv is most likely a product of ultra-high-pressure metamor-
phism.  Putiš  et  al.  (2012)  proposed  a  late-metamorphic  ori-
gin  for  Prv  related  to  serpentinization  (Prv-1)  and
rodingitization (Prv-2) of a harzburgite host in a subduction—
accretionary wedge, according to geological, mineralogical—
petrological and whole-rock chemical data. A similar type of
Prv, mostly replaced by Pph, was described in Perkupa ser-
pentinite in northern Hungary (Zajzon et al. 2013).

Harzburgite was found to be the most abundant ultramafic

rock-type  in  the  mélange  complex  in  the  Dobšiná  quarry;
with lherzolites and pyroxenites rarely encountered (Putiš et
al. 2012). The mélange complex is composed of decimetre-
to  100  metre-size  fragments  of  serpentinized  harzburgite,
talc-“phengite”-glaucophane  schists,  “phengite”  schists,
blueschists, metaradiolarites, marbles and their blueschist fa-
cies tectonoclastics embedded in a soft serpentinitic matrix.
This kind of matrix groups large blocks of HP rocks in olis-
tolith  like  bodies  within  the  Jurassic  anchimetamorphosed
turbiditic  flysch  sediments  of  the  accretionary  wedge.  The
mixture  or  “mélange”  type  large  composite  blocks  are
formed by (1) subducted high- to medium-pressure metaba-
salt,  metadolerite  and  metaradiolarite  fragments  which  are
the oceanic crust-related (Hovorka et al. 1984), and (2) talc-
“phengite”  schists  and  marbles  associated  with  blueschists,
the latter most likely related to the subducted (northern) con-
tinental margin (Putiš et al. 2014).

The specific position of Prv in serpentinized and rodingi-

tized parts of harzburgite fragments infers a fluid-rock inter-
action  responsible  for  the  occurrence  of  the  two  Prv
generations.  Perovskite-1  formed  in  serpentinized  orthopy-
roxene  (Opx1)  porphyroclasts,  often  accompanied  by  Adr
clusters. Perovskite-2 was found in 1 to 3 cm wide chlorite-
rich  blackwall  zone  separating  serpentinite  and  rodingite
veins.  Perovskite-2  also  occurs  in  rodingite  veins,  ingrown
by chlorite and apatite, and surrounded by a typical rodingite
mineral  assemblage  of  Di,  Adr,  Ves,  Ep/Czo,  Ap  and  Chl.
Perovskite is replaced by Pph along the grain rims and  inte-
riors.  Both  Prv  generations  (mainly  Prv-2)  are  partly  to
almost totally replaced by (Ti-)Adr (Putiš et al. 2012).

The  size,  shape  and  distribution  analysis  of  Prv-1  grains

was  carried  out  on  drilled  cylindrical  specimens,  1 cm  in
diameter  (thick  5—10 mm),  sampled  along  a  profile  of

ca. 20 cm  from  the  dark  core  to  the  greenish  serpentinized
zone  of  harzburgite,  by  X-ray  micro-tomograph  Nanotom
180 at the Institute of Measurement of Science of the Slovak
Academy  of  Sciences  in  Bratislava.  A  characteristic  X-ray
absorption of Prv, besides the other physical properties, such
as density and shape, enabled us to visualize the Prv-1 crystal
distribution  in  serpentinite  matrix  and  distinguish  them  from
other silicate, oxide and carbonate minerals (Putiš et al. 2011).

The perovskite location in 200 to 300 

µm thick rock slabs

was checked under a polarizing microscope at the Comenius
University  in  Bratislava,  and  Prv  grains,  mostly  50  to
300 

µm in size, were then handpicked from the slabs under

a stereomicroscope. The perovskite grains were embedded in
epoxy and polished to expose the grain-centres (in Beijing).
The  U/Pb  SIMS  concordia  ages  of  Prv-1  from  3  samples
range  from  137±1 Ma  to  135±1 Ma,  with  mean  of
135.6±0.58 Ma, while Prv-2 was dated to 133.7±5.4 Ma (Li
et  al.  2014).  Perovskite-1  age  at  ~135±2.0 Ma  was  also  de-
termined by LA—ICP—MS (Putiš et al. 2015).

The 

143

Nd /

144

Nd 

mean 

value 

of 

Prv-1 

is

0.512153±0.000017  by  LA—MC—ICP—MS,  thus  correspon-
ding to the initial 

ε

Nd

(t=135)=—8.2±0.4 (math’s mean). This

suggests that the subducted and dehydrated continental crust
was the main source of the interactive fluids which initiated
serpentinization and rodingitization in the Neotethyan Melia-
tic Jurassic to Cretaceous accretionary wedge (Li et al. 2014;
Putiš et al. 2014).

Samples and methods

Sample description

The  investigated  hand-samples  were  taken  in  Dobšiná

quarry (N 48°49.622, E 20°21.977) from the central parts of
the crushed metre-size serpentinized harzburgite blocks em-
placed in a soft serpentinitic matrix.

Partly-preserved  magmatic  structures  of  Spl  harzburgite

were  petrographically  investigated  by  Putiš  et  al.  (2012)
from  the  inner  Prv-free  dark  “cores”  of  serpentinite  blocks.
These  slightly  serpentinized  dark  harzburgitic  “cores”  con-
sist  of  Ol  (~70 vol. %),  Opx1  (~25 vol. %),  accessory  Spl
(~4 vol. %)  and  rare  Cpx1  (~1 vol. %).  Magmatically  cor-
roded  and  partly  dissolved  porphyric  Opx1  (±Cpx1)  is  en-
closed  in  Ol  matrix  with  Spl.  Both  pyroxenes  show
exsolution  lamellae,  of  Cpx  in  Opx1,  or  Opx  in  Cpx1,
respectively. 

Aggregates 

of 

late-magmatic 

Cpx2

(~10 vol. %, mostly at the expense of dissolved Opx1) with
(~1 vol. %) Cr-Spl, and scarce aggregates of Opx2 with Cpx
exsolution lamellae occur at the rim of the Opx1 porphyro-
clasts. Orthopyroxene1 often forms sygmoidally rotated por-
phyroclasts, 

including 

Cpx 

exsolution 

lamellae.

Microfractures and cleavage planes of the kinked and rotated
Opx1  porphyroclasts  are  filled  by  Cpx3  (still  Al-rich),  the
latter representing the late-magmatic subsolidus (syn-HT de-
formation)  recrystallization  of  the  Opx1  porphyroclasts.
Cloudy  lower  Al  (1.2—2.5 wt. %)  Cpx4  and  associated  Prg
occur  in  metamorphic  reaction  rims  between  the  Opx1  and

background image

136

PUTIŠ, YANG, VACULOVIČ, KOPPA, LI and UHER

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

Cpx2  aggregates.  Central  parts  of  the  Cpx2  grains  contain
exsolution  lamellae  of  Opx,  enclosed  in  metamorphic  diop-
sidic  rim  (Cpx5,  with  very  low  Al

2

O

3

  contents  of  0.02—

0.1 wt. %). The serpentinized harzburgite contains Srp group
minerals,  Cr—Fe  Spl,  Prv-1/Pph,  (Ti)Adr,  Mag  and  Hem,
rarely Carb with Tlc, Qz and characteristic relics of Ol, Opx
(with  Prv-1),  Cpx  and  Spl.  They  preserve  subsolidus  struc-
tures with HT-deformed Opx1 and rare Cpx1 porphyroclasts
surrounded by late-magmatic aggregate of Cpx2 and Cr-Spl,
±Opx2.

The  pale  rodingite  veins  (1  to  50 cm  wide)  crosscutting

serpentinized harzburgites are composed of Di, Ves, Ep/Czo,
(Ti-)Adr, Ap, Chl, Prv-2/Pph. They are separated from serpen-
tinite by a blackwall Chl-rich 1—3 cm across the reaction zone.

Perovskite-1  was  discovered  in  relatively  narrow  1  to

20 cm  wide  zone  between  a  dark  “core”  and  surrounding
strongly  serpentinized  (also  Prv-free)  zone.  Perovskite-1
varies in size from 20 to 700 

µm and it is present in lamellar

to cubic shapes or in crystal aggregates within serpentinized
Opx porphyroclasts. Perovskite-2 was detected in blackwall
chlorite-rich  zone  separating  serpentinite  and  rodingite,  and
in rodingite veins alone.

Methods

The  major  element  composition  of  both  Prv  generations

and X-ray element maps were determined from polished sec-
tions  by  Cameca  SX-100  electron  microprobe  at  the  State
Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr in Bratislava. Represen-
tative chemical analyses of Ol, all Px generations (including
those  in  exsolution  lamellae),  Spl,  Prv,  Pph,  Adr  and  Amp
from  EMPA  were  published  by  Putiš  et  al.  (2012,  table  1).
Additional EMPA Prv analyses are given in Table 1.

The  whole-rock  major-  and  a  part  of  the  trace  elements

were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF)
using  a  PHILIPS  PW2400  (Department  of  Lithospheric
Research,  Vienna  University,  Austria).  Trace-element
(including rare earth elements, REE) contents were analysed
by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP—MS)
at  the  Department  of  General  and  Analytical  Chemistry,
Montanuniversity  Leoben,  Austria.  In  total  0.1 g  of  fine
grained  sample  was  sintered  with  sodium  peroxide  (purity
95 %) to achieve complete digestion of all silicate and spinel
mineral phases. Measurements were performed with an Agi-
lent  7500ce  ICP—MS  collision  cell  mode  with  and  without
He  (sample  preparation  and  analytical  procedure  details  in
Meisel  et  al.  2002  and  Putiš  et  al.  2012).  These  analyses
were  published  by  Putiš  et  al.  (2012,  table  2)  and  they  are
used (Fig. 7) for comparison with the mineral trace element
data (Fig. 8).

Perovskite(1 and 2), Ol, Opx, Cpx, Ctl, Grt(Adr), Ep and

Chl  trace  element  compositions,  including  REE,  were  con-
ducted using the Laser Ablation Multi-collector Inductively
Coupled  Plasma  Mass  Spectrometry  (LA—ICP—MS)  at  the
State  Key  Laboratory  of  Lithospheric  Evolution,  Chinese
Academy of Sciences in Beijing (China) and The Central Eu-
ropean  Institute  of  Technology  at  Masaryk  University  in
Brno (Czech Republic). Representative trace element analy-
ses of Prv-1 and Prv-2 are in Table 1. The following isotopes

were used for determination: 

7

Li, 

9

Be, 

23

Na, 

24

Mg, 

27

Al, 

28

Si,

29

Si, 

31

P, 

39

K, 

43

Ca, 

45

Sc, 

47

Ti, 

49

Ti,

51

V, 

52

Cr, 

53

Cr,

55

Mn,

56

Fe, 

59

Co, 

60

Ni, 

66

Zn, 

69

Ga, 

71

Ga, 

85

Rb, 

88

Sr, 

89

Y, 

90

Zr, 

92

Zr,

93

Nb, 

105

Pd, 

118

Sn, 

133

Cs, 

137

Ba, 

139

La, 

140

Ce, 

141

Pr, 

146

Nd,

147

Sm, 

153

Eu, 

157

Gd, 

159

Tb, 

163

Dy, 

165

Ho, 

166

Er, 

169

Tm, 

172

Yb,

175

Lu, 

178

Hf, 

181

Ta, 

182

W, 

195

Pt, 

204

Pb, 

206

Pb, 

207

Pb, 

208

Pb,

232

Th, 

238

U.

Analytical  procedures  in  Beijing  approximated  those  of

Yuan et al. (2004) and Xie et al. (2008). Trace element ana-
lysis  was  conducted  using  an  Agilent  7500a  ICP—MS.  An
ArF excimer laser ablation system from Geolas CQ operated
at  193 nm  with  a  pulse  width  of  approximately  15 ns  was
used  for  laser  ablation  analysis.  Subsequent  to  2007  upda-
ting of the GeoLas PLUS laser system, 40, 60 

µm and larger

spot  sizes  were  used,  depending  on  the  mineral  grain-size.
Similar  precision  was  maintained  throughout  all  analyses.
The laser repetition rate was 2—10 Hz depending on the sig-
nal intensity, with fluency of ~15 J/cm

2

. The ablation depth

was  estimated  at  ~30—40 

µm.  With  a  40 µm  spot  size  and

4 Hz  repetition  rate,  the  ablated  material  volume  was  esti-
mated at 200,000 

µm

3

. Helium gas was flushed through the

sample cell to minimize aerosol deposition around the abla-
tion  pit  and  to  improve  transport  efficiency  (Eggins  et  al.
1998;  Jackson  et  al.  2004).  Trace  element  concentrations
were calculated by using GLITTER 4.0, and these were cali-
brated with 

40

Ca internal standard and NIST SRM 610 exter-

nal reference material (Li et al. 2014).

Analytical determination of major and trace elements was

performed by means of LA—ICP—MS setup in Brno. This set-
up consist of laser ablation system UP213 (NewWave, USA)
emitting  laser  pulses  with  wavelength  of  213 nm  and  pulse
width  of  4.2 ns  and  quadrupole  ICP—MS  Agilent  7500ce
(Agilent,  Japan).  The  laser  spot  with  diameter  of  40  and
100 µm were used depending on size of the mineral grains.
The rest of ablation parameters such as repetition rate (10Hz)
and laser beam fluence (18 J/cm

-2

) were the same for both la-

ser spot sizes. The ablated material was carried from the ab-
lation  cell  into  the  ICP—MS  by  helium  with  a  flow  rate  of
0.6 l/min. Behind the ablation cell the argon (1.0 l/min) was
admixed  into  the  helium  flow.  The  quantification  was  per-
formed using certified reference material NIST 610 with in-
ternal standardization using 

28

Si.

Results

Origin of harzburgite host

Modal compositions from a few relatively well preserved

(weakly  serpentinized)  samples  of  ultramafic  fragments
cores confirmed harzburgite as an original mantle rock. The
mineral  chemical  composition  discrimination  diagrams
(Figs. 2—4)  of  these  samples  suggest  abyssal  peridotites
(harzburgites) as precursors of Prv-bearing serpentinites.

Occurrence of perovskite

Perovskite  was  discovered  in  abyssal  harzburgites  from

a blueschist-bearing  “mélange”  type  accretionary  wedge  of

background image

137

REACTION PRODUCTS OF J/K ACCRETIONARY WEDGE FLUIDS IN W CARPATHIANS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

Table 

1:

 Representative 

EMPA 

compositions 

(in 

wt. 

%) 

and 

trace 

elements

 (in 

ppm) 

of 

Prv-1 

and 

Prv-2 

from 

Dobšiná 

serpentinite. 

Average

 compositions 

from 

LA—ICP—MS.

  

Prv-1

 Pr

v-1

 Prv-1

 

P

rv-2

 

  

D

O

-2

D DO

-2

E

 

DO-2

F

 

DO

-1

1

1

 

  

n

 = 6 

n

 = 5 

n

 = 7 

n

 = 4 

LDL

 

Sc bdl

 

bdl

 

bdl

 

16

.5

 

5.

00

V

 

80

.6

 8

6

.9

 88

.1

 

49

5

 

0.

92

C

1

898 2

4

34 2

266 

6

1

.0

 

11

.5 

G

a

 1.

55

 

bdl

 

24

.8

 

1.

99

 

0.

54

S

36

.9

 5

6

.9

 49

.4

 

16

9

 

0.

10

Y

 4

77 

5

58 

4

07 

2

39 

0.

10

Z

r 17

.8

 

1

6

.4

 

0.

6

 

55

.9

 

0.

10

N

b

 1

44 

3

95 

3

4

.9

 

1

03 

0.

10

S

n

 

11

.5

 1

2

.6

 16

.8

 

11

.7

 

7.

33 

B

a bdl

 

bdl

 

0.

3

 

23

.1

 

0.

10

L

a

 

2

759 2

8

82 3

012 

2

27 

0.

10

C

e 1

011

1

3

0

5

1

 

7

498 

8

02 

0.

06

P

r 7

17 

7

81 

8

35 

1

08 

0.

10

N

d

 

2

383 2

7

06 2

684 

4

76 

0.

31

S

m

 4

43 

5

16 

4

80 

1

17 

0.

10

E

u

 1

02 

1

34 

1

23 

2

1

.7

 

0.

10

Gd

 3

54 

4

10 

3

52 

1

01 

0.

10

Tb 

49

.7

 6

0

.3

 52

.0

 

14

.0

 

0.

05

D

y

 2

66 

3

09 

2

68 

7

2

.5

 

0.

10

H

o

 

44

.5

 4

7

.7

 40

.4

 

13

.0

 

0.

10

E

87

.0

 8

9

.1

 75

.9

 

28

.6

 

0.

10

T

m

 

7.

45

 8

.30

 6.

61

 

3.

49

 

0.

10

Y

b

 

30

.2

 3

4

.6

 25

.7

 

20

.2

 

0.

10

L

u

 

2.

62

 2

.78

 2.

21

 

2.

47

 

0.

10

Hf

 

1.

48

 1

.14

 0.

75

 

2.

52

 

0.

10

T

a bdl

 

0.

7

 

0.

1

 

8.

20

 

0.

05

Pb

 

23

.0

 2

6

.1

 13

.0

 

3.

15

 

4.

00 

T

h

 bdl

 

bdl

 

bdl

 

18

.1

 

0.

10

U

 2

37 

2

99 

1

46 

1

9

.8

 

0.

10

 

LD

L

 - lo

we

r d

et

ec

ti

on li

m

it

bd

l - b

elow

 l

o

we

r d

et

ec

ti

on li

m

it

 

L

i, Be

, N

i, 

Co

, T

ar

e be

lo

w

 de

te

cti

o

n

 l

imit

 

 

S

am

p

le

 

D

O

-2DD

 

D

O

-2f

-1

 

D

O

-2f

-1

 

D

O

-2

-3

 

D

O

-111

 

D

O

-111

 D

O

-111

 D

O

-111 

M

ine

ra

P

rv

 1 

P

rv

 1 

P

rv

 1 

Pr

v

 1 

P

rv

 2 

P

rv

 2 

P

rv

 2 

P

rv

 2

 

Nb

2

O

5

 

0

.04

 

0.

00

 0.

00

 0.

00

 

0.

17

 0.

10

 0.

10

 

0.

13 

Ti

O

2

  

5

5

.13 5

5

.60 

5

6

.60 5

5

.50 

5

7

.71 

5

8

.12 

5

6

.62 5

7

.9

6

 

Cr

2

O

3

 

0

.44

 

0.

33

 0.

29

 0.

66

 

0.

00

 0.

00

 0.

00

 

0.

00 

La

2

O

3

 

0

.46

 

0.

34

 0.

17

 0.

31

 

0.

06

 0.

00

 0.

05

 

0.

00 

Ce

2

O

3

 

1

.22

 

1.

08

 0.

82

 1.

02

 

0.

28

 0.

14

 0.

10

 

0.

25 

Fe

2

O

3

 

1

.13

 

1.

08

 1.

17

 0.

91

 

0.

51

 0.

34

 0.

53

 

0.

71 

C

aO 

  

3

9

.90 3

9

.41 

4

0

.27 3

9

.85 

4

1

.30 

4

1

.07 

4

0

.06 4

0

.8

9

 

Na

2

O

  

0

.00

 

0.

05

 0.

00

 0.

04

 

0.

00

 0.

00

 0.

03

 

0.

00 

T

o

ta

9

8

.31 9

7

.89 

9

9

.31 9

8

.30 

1

0

0

.03 

9

9

.77 

9

7

.48 9

9

.9

4

 

F

o

rm

u

lae

 bas

ed o

n

 2 c

atio

ns

, 3

 a

n

io

ns

 an

d

 v

al

ence

 cal

cu

la

tio

n

 

N

b

 

0.

0

0

0

 0.

00

0

 

0.

00

0

 0

.00

0

 

0.

00

2

 

0.

00

1

 

0.

00

1

 0.

00

T

0.

9

6

8

 0.

97

8

 

0.

97

9

 0

.97

2

 

0.

98

6

 

0.

99

3

 

0.

99

1

 0.

99

C

0.

0

0

8

 0.

00

6

 

0.

00

5

 0

.01

2

 

0.

00

0

 

0.

00

0

 

0.

00

0

 0.

00

L

a

 

0.

0

0

4

 0.

00

3

 

0.

00

1

 0

.00

3

 

0.

00

1

 

0.

00

0

 

0.

00

0

 0.

00

C

0.

0

1

0

 0.

00

9

 

0.

00

7

 0

.00

9

 

0.

00

2

 

0.

00

1

 

0.

00

1

 0.

00

Fe

3+

 

0.

0

2

0

 0.

01

9

 

0.

02

0

 0

.01

6

 

0.

00

9

 

0.

00

6

 

0.

00

9

 0.

01

C

0.

9

9

9

 0.

98

7

 

0.

99

2

 0

.99

5

 

1.

00

6

 

1.

00

0

 

0.

99

9

 0.

99

N

0.

0

0

0

 0.

00

2

 

0.

00

0

 0

.00

2

 

0.

00

0

 

0.

00

0

 

0.

00

1

 0.

00

S

u

m

 

2.

0

0

9

 2.

00

4

 

2.

00

4

 2

.00

9

 

2.

00

6

 

2.

00

1

 

2.

00

2

 2.

00

Su

A

 

1.

0

1

3

 1.

00

1

 

1.

00

0

 1

.00

9

 

1.

00

9

 

1.

00

1

 

1.

00

1

 0.

99

Su

B

 

0.

9

9

6

 1.

00

3

 

1.

00

4

 1

.00

0

 

0.

99

7

 

1.

00

0

 

1.

00

1

 1.

00

CaT

iO

3

 

9

8

.6

 

98

.8

 99

.2

 98

.8

 

99

.7

 99

.9

 99

.9

 

99

.8 

(C

e,

L

a

)F

eO

3

 

1.

0

 

0.

9

 0.

6

 0.

7

 

0.

3

 0.

1

 0.

1

 

0.

(Ce

,L

a

)CrO

3

 

0.

4

 

0.

3

 0.

2

 0.

5

 

0.

0

 0.

0

 0.

0

 

0.

 

Su

A

 = L

a+Ce

+

C

a+N

Su

m

 B

 = N

b

+T

i+

Cr+F

e

3+

 

T

a, S

i,

 A

l, M

n

, N

i, 

M

g

, Sr

, K

, F

, an

C

l con

te

n

ts

 ar

e be

lo

w

 d

ete

ctio

n

 l

im

it.

 

 

background image

138

PUTIŠ, YANG, VACULOVIČ, KOPPA, LI and UHER

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

the Meliata Unit in Western Carpathians, Slovakia. The spe-
cific  position  of  Prv  in  serpentinized  and  rodingitized  parts
of  harzburgite  fragments  infers  a  fluid-rock  interaction  re-
sponsible  for  the  two  Prv  generations.  Perovskite-1  formed
in serpentinized orthopyroxene (Opx1) porphyroclasts, often
accompanied  by  Adr  clusters.  A  grain  scale  metasomatic
mechanism (Putnis 2009) might have partitioned Ca and Ti
from  the  host  Opx1  with  Cpx  exsolutions  (Ca,  Ti?),  spinel
(Ti)  and  grain-boundary  pervasive  LREE(Ce,La),  Ca

2+

,  Ti

and Fe

3+

-enriched aqueous fluids to Prv.

Perovskite-1  formation  from  Ti-bearing  spinel  and  possi-

bly also Ti-bearing Ca-pyroxene member may be simplified
by  this  inferred  stoichiometric  reaction  for  the  estimated
LT/MP-LP  conditions:  Ca

2

Si

2

O

6

  (Ca-pyroxene-member)

+2Fe

2

TiO

4

  (ulvöspinel  molecule  in  spinel)+2H

2

O+O

2

=

2CaTiO

3

 (Prv)+2SiO

2

+4FeOOH (goethite). Perovskite-1 ex-

clusively  occurs  in  serpentinized  Opx1  porphyroclasts
(Fig.  5a)  surrounded  with  characteristic  very  fine-needle
(mostly around 1 µm across) goethite clusters (Fig. 5b). Be-
cause  of  very  small  grain  size,  goethite  was  identified  only
by  EDX  analysis,  which  confirmed  iron  and  oxygen  in  this
phase chemical composition.

Perovskite-1 rarely shows parallel-cube crystal aggregates

in Opx1. These growth planes are often parallel to still visi-
ble  and  detectable  Cpx  exsolution  lamellae,  most  likely
(110)  plane  system  of  Opx1  (Fig.  5a).  However,  many
Prv grains are obliquely oriented to inferred (110) planes of
the  host  Opx  (Fig.  5b,  c).  Perovskite-1  often  shows  zoning
due  to  variable  content  of  the  LREE(La,Ce)  elements
(Fig. 5d).

Perovskite-2  occurs  in  a  1  to  3  cm  wide  chlorite-rich

blackwall  zone  separating  serpentinite  and  rodingite  veins
(Fig. 6a). Perovskite-rich veinlets (Fig. 6b), or Prv grain ag-
gregates  in  Chl-rich  matrix  (Fig.  6c,  d)  are  characteristic
here.  Perovskite-2  also  occurs  in  rodingite  veins  alone,  in-
grown by Chl and Ap, and surrounded by a typical rodingite
mineral  assemblage  of  Di,  Ves,  Adr,  Ep/Czo,  Ap  and  Chl.
Perovskite (1 and 2) is replaced by Pph along the grain rims
and interiors most likely by fluid-aided coupled dissolution—
reprecipitation  (Putnis  2009)  at  increased  Fe—Mn  element
solubility  in  rodingitization  fluids  pervading  serpentinized
harzburgite. Perovskite (mainly Prv-2) is partly to almost to-
tally replaced by (Ti-)Adr (Fig. 6d).

Whole-rock and mineral trace element compositions

Whole-rock trace element composition

We evaluated again our published bulk-rock trace-element

patterns  from  visually  and  microscopically  less  altered
harzburgite “cores” with the patterns from strongly serpenti-
nized harzburgite (Putiš et al. 2012). Despite macro- and mi-
croscopic  differences,  the  obtained  Primitive  Mantle  (PM)
normalized  patterns  are  quite  unified,  suggesting  an  enrich-
ment in LREE(La,Ce), Cs, ±Ba, U, Nb, Pb, As, Sb, ±Nd and
Li  in  comparison  with  HREE,  Rb  and  Sr  (Fig. 7a,  b).  The
LILE  in  the  core  of  harzburgite  samples  display  various  to
relatively high enrichments in Cs and partly Ba besides de-
pleted Rb and Sr. HFSE and REE contents show overall de-

pletions, however Nb is slightly and Sb extremely enriched.
Moreover, sample DO 23-core is also significantly enriched
in U and Ta. Part of the LILE shows an increase (Cs, Ba and
U), but the rest suffered a decrease (Rb, Th and Sr) after ser-
pentinization and/or rodingitization.

Mineral trace element composition

The LA—ICP—MS mineral study provides a complex view

of trace element behaviour during the two stages of rodingi-
tization  connected  with  Prv  genesis.  Hydration  of  harzbur-
gite  was  accompanied  by  trace  element,  including  REE
mobility. The PM normalized patterns of Cpx, Opx, Ol from
the relic harzburgite “cores” and those of Srp (Ctl), Chl, Ep,
(Ti)Adr  and  Prv  from  the  alteration  (serpentinization/rodin-
gitization) domains in harzburgite document strong mobility
of LREE, most LILE and some other elements. The positive
anomalies of Cs, U, Ta, Pb, As, Sb, Pr and Nd in Cpx, Opx
and Ol are combined with the negative anomalies of Rb, Ba,
Th,  Nb  and  Sr  (Fig.  8a—f).  The  positive  anomalies  of  the
same elements (Cs, U, Ta, Pb, As, Sb, Pr and Nd, including
Be in Grt and Ep) in Srp-Ctl, Grt, Ep, Chl and Prv of serpen-
tinites and rodingites, with variable contents of La, Ce, and
negative  anomalies  of  Rb,  Ba,  Th,  Nb  and  Sr  (Fig.  8g—p),
could suggest involvement of crustal fluids during accretio-
nary wedge metamorphism.

For a comparison, the LA—ICP—MS study revealed strong

depletion in LREE from Prv-1 to Prv-2, and typically a posi-
tive  Eu  anomaly  for  Prv-2  (Fig.  8p).  Our  multi-element
diagram  depicts  relative  enrichment  in  U,  Nb,  La,  Ce,
As, Sb, Pr, Nd, and decreased Rb, Ba, Th, Ta, Pb, Sr, Zr in
both Prv generations. Also characteristic seem to be a nega-
tive  Ti  anomaly  in  Prv-1  and  a  positive  one  in  Prv-2
(Fig. 8o).

Perovskite  from  both  generations  shows  a  relatively  uni-

form  composition.  The  BSE  images  illustrate  sector  zoning
of Prv-1 (Fig. 5d) with sectors slightly enriched or depleted
in LREE(La,Ce), whereas Prv-2 does not display visible in-
ternal zoning. The (unpublished) X-ray element maps of Ca,
Fe and Ti are absolutely homogeneous.

In general, both Prv-1 and Prv-2 exhibit negligible admix-

tures of REE, Fe, Cr and Nb (Table 1). According to EMPA
data,  the  Prv-1  contains  0.2  to  0.5 wt. %  La

2

O

3

  and  0.8  to

1.2 wt. % Ce

2

O

3

, in contrast to only ~0.05 wt. % La

2

O

3

 and

0.1 to 0.3 wt. % Ce

2

O

3

 in Prv-2. Similarly, concentrations of

Cr and Fe are distinctly higher in Prv-1 in comparison with
Prv-2: 0.2 to 0.7 wt. % Cr

2

O

3

 and 0.6 to 1.3 wt. % Fe

2

O

3

 in

Prv-1, but 

≤0.05 wt. % Cr

2

O

3

 and 0.2 to 0.7 wt. % Fe

2

O

3

 in

Prv-2. On the other hand, Nb content in Prv-1 (

≤0.06 wt. %

Nb

2

O

5

) is lower in comparison with Prv-2 (0.1 to 0.2 wt. %

Nb

2

O

5

). Both Prv generations are very close to the end-member

composition: Prv-1 encloses 98.7 (rarely 97.2) to 99.2 mol %
and  Prv-2  shows  99.7  to  99.9 mol %  CaTiO

3

  (Table  1).  In

spite of low concentrations of isomorphic constituents, Prv-1
and  Prv-2  display  the 

A

(La,Ce)

3+

+

B

(Fe,Cr)

3+

=

A

Ca

2+

+

B

Ti

4+

heterovalent couple substitution (Fig. 9).

The distribution of REE in both Prv generations, based on

the  LA—ICP—MS  analyses,  exhibits  a distinctly  higher  total
REE  concentration  in  Prv-1  (14800  to  22800 ppm)  in  com-

background image

139

REACTION PRODUCTS OF J/K ACCRETIONARY WEDGE FLUIDS IN W CARPATHIANS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

Fig. 3. a – The Al

2

O

3

—TiO

2

 (wt. %) diagram of Spl after Kamenetsky et al. (2001) shows a clear relationship of Dobšiná harzburgites to

MORB peridotites; b – The Cr#[=Cr/(Cr+Al) atomic ratio]—TiO

2

 (wt. %) diagram of Spl after Arai (1992) exhibits a similar relationship

of Dobšiná harzburgites to abyssal peridotites.

Fig. 2. a – compositional relationship between Fo[ =Mg/((Mg+Fe+Ca +Ni)/100) atomic ratio] content of Ol and Cr#[=Cr/(Cr+Al) atomic
ratio]  of  Spl  from  Dobšiná  harzburgites.  OSMA  (Olivine—Spinel  Mantle  Array)  is  a  spinel  peridotite  residual  trend  (Arai  1994);
b – discrimination diagram TiO

2

 (wt. %) vs. Cr#[=Cr/(Cr+Al)/100 atomic ratio] with plotted Spl from Dobšiná harzburgites (after Franz

& Wirth 2000). Melting trend (red curve annotated by melting %) from Choi et al. (2008). FMM — fertile MORB mantle.

parison  with  Prv-2  (1200  to  1900 ppm;  Table 1,  Fig. 8p).
Perovskite-1  also  shows  a strong  dominance  of  LREE  over
HREE  (La

N

/Yb

N

=53—101)  in  contrast  to  slightly  dominant

LREE over HREE or relatively flat REE normalized patterns
of  Prv-2  (La

N

/Yb

N

=2—10;  Fig. 8p).  Perovskite-1  reveals

slightly to distinctly positive Ce anomaly (Ce

N

/Ce*

N

=1.1—2.2;

Fig. 8o) and a slightly negative Eu anomaly (Eu

N

/Eu*

N

=0.7—

1.0;  Fig.  8p),  whereas  Prv-2  shows  a slightly  positive  Ce
anomaly (1.2—1.4; Fig. 8o) and slightly to distinctly positive
Eu anomaly (1.2—2.2; Fig. 8p).

Discussion and conclusions

Concerning  the  genetic  aspects,  Prv-1  does  not  occur  in

relic  magmatic  mineral  assemblages  of  harzburgite  blocks

composed of Ol, Opx, Spl and rare Cpx. Despite Prv-1 can
have lamellar-cube shape (Putiš et al. 2011) it was not found
as a late magmatic exsolution phase besides Cpx exsolution
lamellae in porphyroclastic (deformed) Opx1. In case of con-
sidered  potential  magmatic  origin,  Prv  would  have  most
likely  been  subjected  to  dissolution,  similar  to  magmatic
Opx1 by the effect of Ca-(Ti) poor aqueous serpentinization
fluids, as a potential source of Ca (and Ti) for evolving rod-
ingitization. Perovskite does not belong to HP metamorphic
assemblage  found  only  from  the  relatively  well  preserved
harzburgite “cores”. However, these “cores” are good indica-
tors of Prv-1 in a narrow zone between Prv-free “cores” and
widely  serpentinized  (also  Prv-free)  harzburgite  rims  (Putiš
et al. 2012; Li et al. 2014).

The  mineral  chemical  composition  discrimination  dia-

grams (Figs. 2—4) of studied samples suggest abyssal perido-

background image

140

PUTIŠ, YANG, VACULOVIČ, KOPPA, LI and UHER

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

Fig. 5. Perovskite-1 images in serpentinized Opx1: a – two partial cubes of Prv are oriented parallel to relic Cpx exsolution lamellae sys-
tem; transmitted PL microscope image; b – Prv surrounded by goethite needles in serpentinized Opx1; transmitted PL microscope image;
c – BSE image of Prv cube obliquely oriented to inferred (110) planes of Opx, with Ctl inclusion; d – coloured BSE image of zoned Prv
showing pale green sectors enriched in LREE(Ce,La) and a red Pph rim.

Fig. 4. a – The Mg#—Al

2

O

3

 diagram of Cpx and Opx suggests close relationship of Dobšiná harzburgites to abyssal peridotites in diagram

of Choi et al. (2008); b – Correlation between Dy and Yb in Cpx (after Jean et al. 2010) of harzburgite cores from Dobšiná quarry indi-
cates abyssal peridotites (harzburgites).

tites  (harzburgites)  as  precursors  of  Prv-bearing  serpen-
tinites. Low degree (10—12 %) melting of an original abyssal
(dry) lherzolite is characteristic.

The inferred Opx breakdown/dissolution reaction could be

a part of a hypothetical non-stoichiometric reaction proposed
by Putiš et al. (2012, E4 event):

background image

141

REACTION PRODUCTS OF J/K ACCRETIONARY WEDGE FLUIDS IN W CARPATHIANS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

(Mg,Fe,Ca)(Mg,Fe,Al)(Si,Al)

2

O

6

  (Opx  with  higher-Ti  Cpx

exsolution  lamellae)+LREE

(La,Ce)

-bearing  Cpx1-3+(CO

2

)

aq

+

(P,F,Cl,La,Ce)

aq

+Ca

2+

+Ti

4+

 and Fe

3+

=(La,Ce)CaTiO

3

 (Prv-1)

and/or Ti-rich Adr+Ap+Di+Srp+Carb+Qz.

This  reaction  was  partly  modified  by  Li  et  al.  (2014)  to:

(Mg,Fe,Ca)(Mg,Fe,Al)(Si,Al)

2

O

6

  (Opx1  with  Cpx  ex-

solution lamellae)+(La,Ce)

aq

±(CO

2

)

aq

+Ca

2+

+Ti

4+

 and  Fe

3+

=

(La,Ce)CaTiO

3

(Prv-1)+(Mg,Fe)

3

Si

2

O

5

(OH)

4

(Srp)+Fe

3

O

4

(Mag).  They  mentioned  that  Spl  was  also  the  source  of  Ti
mobilized by aqueous metamorphic fluids.

Genesis of Prv-1 (Fig. 5) in early rodingitization stage can

be defined by this inferred stoichiometric reaction: Ca

2

Si

2

O

6

(Ca-pyroxene-member)+2Fe

2

TiO

4

  (ulvöspinel  molecule  in

spinel)+2H

2

O+O

2

=  2CaTiO

3

  (Prv)+2SiO

2

+4FeOOH  (goet-

hite). The reaction could be initiated by influx of H

2

O during

serpentinization-driven  rodingitization.  The  presence  of

Fig.  6.  Perovskite-2  in  rodingite  veins:  a  –  Rodingite  vein  with  ca.  1cm  thick  (dark)  Prv-rich  layer  at  the  contact  with  serpentinite;
b  –  Perovskite  veinlet  in  Prv(—Chl)  rich  layer  from  a);  PL  microscope  image;  c  –  BSE  image  of  Prv  cubes  in  Chl  aggregate  from
Prv(—Chl) rich layer; d – BSE image of Prv and Ti-Adr (a pseudomorph after Prv) in rodingite.

Fig. 7. Primitive Mantle-normalized patterns of harzburgites (normalization according to McDonough & Sun 1995) register the chemical
changes from the less serpentinized (“core”) to strongly serpentinized parts:  a – the whole-rock trace multi-element patterns; b – the
whole-rock REE patterns (cf. Putiš et al. 2012).

background image

142

PUTIŠ, YANG, VACULOVIČ, KOPPA, LI and UHER

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

Fig. 8. LA—ICP—MS mineral patterns (ap). Normalization after McDonough & Sun (1995).

background image

143

REACTION PRODUCTS OF J/K ACCRETIONARY WEDGE FLUIDS IN W CARPATHIANS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

Fig. 8 continuation. LA—ICP—MS mineral patterns (ap). Normalization after McDonough & Sun (1995).

background image

144

PUTIŠ, YANG, VACULOVIČ, KOPPA, LI and UHER

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

a Ca-pyroxene member containing Ti might also be inferred
according to Cpx exsolution lamellae (with 0.13—0.24 wt. %
TiO

2

)  presence  in  Opx1  containing  only  0.03—0.06 wt. %

TiO

2

  (Putiš  et  al.  2012,  table 1).  Occurrence  of  Fe-oxides

represented by typical needle clusters of goethite around Prv-1
in serpentinized Opx1 is well consistent with this reaction.

The formation of Prv-1 in serpentinized Opx1 (Prv-1 con-

tains  inclusions  of  Srp-Ctl)  most  likely  occurred  by  grain
scale fluid-aided coupled dissolution—reprecipitation mecha-
nism  (Putnis  2009;  Li  et  al.  2014).  Activities  of  Ca  were
likely  high,  and  of  Si  fairly  low,  to  replace  inferred  Ca-py-
roxene-member  and/or  Cpx  lamellae  in  Opx1  by  Prv-1  at
presence  of  (Ti,Fe)Spl.  However,  it  is  not  clear,  why  Prv-1
was  not  found  in  rare  Cpx1  porphyroclasts  or  Cpx2  aggre-
gates  (with  an  average  0.15  wt.%  TiO

2

  comparable  to  Spl)

surrounding Opx1. This may have been caused by a less ef-
fective dissolution (Ca and Ti release) or a higher Cpx stabil-
ity and therefore unsuitable nucleation/precipitation (kinetic)
conditions  for  Prv  growth  in  serpentinized  harzburgite  Cpx
that is on the other hand consistent with various (mostly ob-
lique)  Prv  shape  orientation  to  still  recognizable  inferred

(110) Cpx exsolution lamellae system in serpentinized Opx1
(Putiš et al. 2011).

Perovskite-2  genesis  is  related  to  an  evolved  rodingitiza-

tion  stage.  Formation  of  rodingite  veins  and  veinlets  cross-
cutting  serpentinite,  where  Prv-2  precipitated  from
rodingitization  fluid  phase  in  the  form  of  grain  aggregates
and  veinlets  (Fig.  6)  followed  initial  stages  of  serpentiniza-
tion. It is remarkable that during an advanced rodingitization
stage  Cpx  was  directly  (sometimes  almost  totally)  replaced
by Adr but not Prv most likely due to distinctly changed re-
dox conditions.

The  bulk-rock  trace  element  patterns  exhibit  relative  de-

crease in REE that can be explained by melt extraction from
a harzburgitic residue by a low-degree melting (Fig. 2b). The
LREE display a U-shaped pattern (Fig. 7b) mainly due to La
and Ce enrichment (Fig. 5d, Table 1). Our samples, enriched
in LREE(La,Ce), Cs, ±Ba, U, Nb, Pb, As, Sb, ±Nd and Li in
comparison with HREE, Rb and Sr (Fig. 7a, b) can therefore
be  interpreted  as  having  been  overprinted  by  slab-derived
metamorphic  fluids  (e.g.,  Scambelluri  et  al.  2004,  2014;
Khedr & Arai 2009; Putiš et al. 2012).

Fig. 9. Substitution diagrams of perovskite from Dobšiná harzburgite serpentinite (Prv analyses from our database).

background image

145

REACTION PRODUCTS OF J/K ACCRETIONARY WEDGE FLUIDS IN W CARPATHIANS

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

Our  LA—ICP—MS  mineral  study  revealed  behaviour  of

trace elements during the harzburgite alterations in relation-
ship to Prv genesis. The PM normalized patterns of Ol, Opx,
Cpx from the relic harzburgite „cores” and those of Srp (Ctl),
(Ti)Adr, Ep, Chl and Prv from the serpentinization/rodingiti-
zation  domains  document  many  similarities  in  the  positive
anomalies of Cs, U, Ta, Pb, As, Sb, Pr and Nd, the negative
ones of Rb, Ba, Th, Nb and Sr (Fig. 8a—p), variable contents
of  La,  Ce,  suggesting  involvement  of  crustal  fluids  during
accretionary wedge metamorphism. This also highlights the
decisive contribution of serpentinization and rodingitization
to  huge  element  mobility  in  the  accretionary  wedges  (e.g.,
Scambelluri et al. 2014). The obtained Prv LA—ICP—MS pat-
terns, Prv Nd isotopes and the Prv U/Pb isotopic ages (Li et
al.  2014)  document  well  a  model  of  Prv  genesis  due  to  hy-
dration processes in an accretionary wedge (Putiš et al. 2012,
Fig. 8).

The  differences  in  quantity  and  content  of  trace  elements

in  the  two  Prv  generations  suggest  the  gradual  chemical
changes in fluid phase pervading serpentinite. There is typi-
cally  a  distinct  decrease  in  REE  content,  particularly  the
LREE by a few orders of magnitude in Prv-2 in comparison
with the Prv-1 (Fig. 8o—p), documenting ceasing LREE mo-
bility with changing temperature (decreasing), alkalinity (in-
creasing) and redox (increasing reduction) conditions.

Earlier oxidation conditions during serpentinization are in-

ferred from ferrous iron oxidation in olivine and pyroxene to
the  ferric  iron  in  magnetite  (Müntener  &  Hermann  1994).
Transformation of Prv firstly to Pph indicates still high oxi-
dation  potential,  but  at  an  increased  Fe—Mn  mobility  in  ro-
dingitization  fluids.  The  blueschist  fragments  could  have
been a potential source of Fe and Mn during an accretionary
wedge  late  metamorphic—metasomatic  event.  Transforma-
tion of Prv to Ti-Adr and Adr seems to be a marker of a ser-
pentinite  redox  conditions  change  (increasing  reduction
conditions)  in  Dobšiná  rodingites  despite  the  assumption
that a part of the ferrous iron from the serpentinite is trans-
ferred  as  ferric  iron  in  Adr  (Malvoisin  et  al.  2012).  A  de-
crease  of  ferric  iron  in  Prv-2  (Fig. 9)  is  compatible  with
increasing  reduction  conditions  during  rodingitization.  This
process  is  well  registered  in  substitution  diagrams  of  both
Prv  generations  (Fig. 9),  which  are  in  general  very  close  to
the end-member composition. In spite of low concentrations
of  isomorphic  constituents,  Prv  1  and  2  display  the

A

(La,Ce)

3+

+

B

(Fe,Cr)

3+

=

A

Ca

2+

+

B

Ti

4+

 heterovalent couple sub-

stitution.

Similar Prv types seem to be suitable constraints of hydra-

tion  processes  in  accretionary  wedges  where  eventually
a higher quantity of natural (metamorphic-metasomatic) Prv
can  be  expected.  The  suitable  conditions  for  Prv  formation
were estimated as temperatures between 400 and 300 °C (ac-
cording  to  chlorite  thermometer  of  Cathelineau  1988,  ap-
plied  for  Prv-2—Chl  intergrowths)  at  medium  to  low
pressures  in  the  Neotethyan  Meliatic  accretionary  wedge
(Putiš et al. 2014, 2015).

Acknowledgements:  Reviews  of  J.  Ulrych  (Prague)  and
I.  Petrík  (Bratislava)  with  valuable  suggestions  are  greatly
acknowledged.  M.  Styan  is  thanked  for  the  English  correc-

tion.  This  work  was  supported  by  APVV-0081-10  and
VEGA-1/0255/11 and 1/0079/15 scientific grants (M.P.)

References

Arai S. 1992: Chemistry of chromian spinel in volcanic rocks a po-

tential guide to magma chemistry. Mineral. Mag. 56, 173—184.

Arai  S.  1994:  Characterization  of  spinel  peridotites  by  olivine—

spinel compositional relationships: review and interpretations.
Chem. Geol. 113, 191—204.

Biely A., Bezák V., Elečko M., Gross P., Kaličiak M., Konečný V.,

Lexa  J.,  Mello  J.,  Nemčok  J.,  Potfaj  M.,  Rakús  M.,  Vass  D.,
Vozár  J.  &  Vozárová  A.  1996:  Geological  map  of  Slovakia,
1:500,000.  State  Geological  Institute  of  D.  Štúr  Publishers,
Bratislava.

Cathelineau M. 1988: Cation site occupancy in chlorites and illites

as a function of temperature. Clay Miner. 23, 471—485.

Chakhmouradian A.R. & Mitchell R.H. 1997: Compositional varia-

tion  of  perovskite  group  minerals  from  the  carbonatite  com-
plexes  of  the  Kola  alkaline  province,  Russia.  Canad.
Mineralogist
 35, 1293—1310.

Chakhmouradian  A.R.  &  Mitchell  R.H.  2000:  Occurrence,  alte-

ration  patterns,  and  compositional  variation  of  perovskite  in
kimberlites. Canad. Mineralogist 38, 975—994.

Choi  S.H.,  Shervais  J.W.  &  Mukasa  S.B.  2008:  Supra-subduction

and  abyssal  mantle  peridotites  of  the  Coast  Range  ophiolite,
California. Contrib. Mineral. Petr. 156, 551—576.

Currie K.L. 1975: The geology and petrology of the Ice River alkaline

complex, British Columbia. Geol. Surv. Canad. Bull. 245, 1—68.

Dallmeyer  R.D.,  Neubauer  F.,  Handler  R.,  Fritz  H.,  Müller  W.,

Pana D. & Putiš M. 1996: Tectonothermal evolution of the in-
ternal Alps and Carpathians: Evidence from 

40

Ar/

39

Ar mineral

and whole-rock data. Eclogae Geol. Helv. 89, 203—227.

Eggins S.M., Kinsley L.P.J. & Shelley J.M.G. 1998: Deposition and

element  fractionation  processes  occurring  during  atmospheric
pressure sampling for analysis by ICP-MS. Appl. Surf. Sci. 127
(129), 278—286.

Faryad  S.W.  1995:  Phase  petrology  and  P—T  conditions  of  mafic

blueschists from the Meliata unit, Western Carpathians, Slova-
kia. J. Metamorph. Geol. 13, 701—714.

Faryad S.W. & Henjes-Kunst F. 1997: Petrological and K—Ar and

40

Ar—

39

Ar  age  constraints  for  the  tectonothermal  evolution  of

the  high-pressure  Meliata  unit,  Western  Carpathians  (Slova-
kia). Tectonophysics 280, 141—156.

Franz L. & Wirth R. 2000: Spinel inclusions in olivine of peridotite

xenoliths from TUBAF seamount (Bismark Archipelago/Papua
New Guinea): evidence for the thermal and tectonic evolution
of  the  oceanic  lithosphere.  Contrib.  Mineral.  Petrol.  140,
283—295.

Heaman L.M., Kjarsgaard B.A. & Creaser R.A. 2003: The timing of

kimberlite magmatism and implications for diamond explora-
tion: a global perspective. Lithos 71, 153—184.

Hovorka D., Jaroš J., Kratochvíl M. & Mock R. 1984: The Mesozo-

ic  ophiolites  of  the  Western  Carpathians.  Krystalinikum  17,
143—157.

Jackson S.E., Pearson N.J., Griffin W.L. & Belousova E.A. 2004:

The  application  of  laser  ablation-inductively  coupled  plasma-
mass  spectrometry  (LA-ICP-MS)  to  in-situ  U—Pb  zircon  geo-
chronology. Chem. Geol. 211, 47—69.

Jean  M.M.,  Shervais  J.W.,  Choi  S.H.  &  Mukasa  S.B.  2010:  Melt

extraction  and  melt  refertilization  in  mantle  peridotite  of  the
Coast Range ophiolite: an LA-ICP-MS study. Contrib. Mineral.
Petrol.
 159, 113—136.

Johnson  K.T.M.  &  Dick  H.J.B.  1992:  Open  system  melting  and

background image

146

PUTIŠ, YANG, VACULOVIČ, KOPPA, LI and UHER

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 2, 133—146

temporal  and  spatial  variation  of  peridotite  and  basalt  at  the
Atlantis II fracture zone. J. Geophys. Res. 97, 9219—9241.

Johnson  K.T.M.,  Dick  H.J.B.  &  Shimizu  N.  1990:  Melting  in  the

oceanic upper mantle: an ion microprobe study of diopsides in
abyssal peridotites. J. Geophys. Res. 95, 2661—2678.

Kamenetsky  V.S.,  Crawford  A.J.  &  Meffre  S.  2001:  Factors  con-

trolling  chemistry  of  magmatic  spinel:  an  empirical  study  of
associated  olivine,  Cr-spinel  and  melt  inclusions  from  primi-
tive rocks. J. Petrology 42, 655—671.

Khedr M.Z. & Arai S. 2009: Geochemistry of metasomatized peri-

dotites  above  subducting  slab:  a  case  study  of  hydrous  meta-
peridotites  from  Happo-O’ne  complex,  central  Japan.
J. Mineral. Petrol. Sci. 104, 313—318.

Kodolányi  J.,  Pettke  T.,  Spandler  C.,  Kamber  B.S.  &  Gméling  K.

2012: Geochemistry of ocean floor and fore-arc serpentinites:
constraints  on  the  ultramafic  input  to  subduction  zones.
J. Petrology 53, 235—270.

Kozur H. 1991: The evolution of the Meliata—Hallstatt ocean and its

significance  for  the  early  evolution  of  the  Eastern  Alps  and
Western  Carpathians.  Palaeogeogr.  Palaeoclimatol.  Palaeo-
ecol.
 87, 109—135.

Leško B. & Varga I. 1980: Alpine elements in the West Carpathian

structure and their significance. Miner. Slovaca 12, 97—130.

Li X.H., Putiš M., Yang Y.H., Koppa M. & Dyda M. 2014: Accre-

tionary wedge harzburgite serpentinization and rodingitization
constrained by perovskite U/Pb SIMS age, trace elements and
Sm/Nd  isotopes:  Case  study  from  the  Western  Carpathians,
Slovakia. Lithos 205, 1—14.

Malvoisin  B.,  Chopin  Ch.,  Brunet  F.  &  Galvez  M.E.  2012:  Low-

temperature  wollastonite,  formed  by  carbonate  reduction:
a  marker  of  serpentinite  redox  conditions.  J.  Petrology  53,
159—176.

Marincea  ., Dumitra  .D.G. & Fransolet A.M. 2010: The associa-

tion spurrite—perovskite in the inner exoskarn zone from Cor-
net  Hill  (Metaliferi  Mountains,  Romania).  Acta  Mineral.
Petrogr., Abstract Ser.
 6, 433.

McDonough  W.F.  &  Sun  S.  1995:  The  composition  of  the  Earth.

Chem. Geol. 120, 223—253.

Meisel T., Schöner N., Paliulionyte V. & Kahr E. 2002: Determina-

tion of rare earth elements (REE), Y, Th, Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta in
geological reference materials G-2, G-3, SCo-1 and WGB-1 by
sodium  peroxide  sintering  and  ICP-MS.  Geostand.  Newslett.
26, 53—61.

Mello  J.  (Ed.),  Elečko  M.,  Pristaš  J.,  Reichwalder  P.,  Snopko  L.,

Vass D. & Vozárová A. 1996: Geological map of the Sloven-
ský kras Mts., 1:50,000. Regional geological maps of Slovakia.
Ministry of Environment of Slovak Republic and State Geologi-
cal Survey
, Bratislava.

Mello J., Reichwalder P. & Vozárová A. 1998: Bôrka Nappe: high-

pressure relic from the subduction-accretion prism of the Meli-
ata Ocean (Inner Western Carpathians, Slovakia). Slovak Geol.
Mag.
 4, 261—274.

Mello J., Ivanička J. (Eds.), Grecula P., Janočko J., Jacko S., Elečko

M., Pristaš J., Vass D., Polák M., Vozár J., Vozárová A., Hraš-
ko  ., Kováčik M., Bezák V., Biely A., Németh Z., Kobulský
J., Gazdačko  ., Madarás J. & Olšavský M. 2008: General geo-
logical map of the Slovak Republic 1: 200,000. Map sheet: 37
–  Košice.  Ministry  of  Environment  of  Slovak  Republic  and
State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr
, Bratislava.

Mitchell R.H. & Chakhmouradian A.R. 1998: Instability of perovs-

kite in a CO

2

-rich environment: examples from carbonatite and

kimberlite. Canad. Mineralogist 36, 939—952.

Mock  R.,  Sýkora  M.,  Aubrecht  R.,  Ožvoldová  L.,  Kronome  B.,

Reichwalder  P.  &  Jablonský  J.  1998:  Petrology  and  petro-
graphy of the Meliaticum near the Meliata and Jaklovce villages,
Slovakia. Slovak Geol. Mag. 4, 223—260.

Müntener O. & Hermann J. 1994: Titanian andradite in a metapy-

roxenite  layer  from  the  Malenco  ultramafics  (Italy):  implica-
tions  for  Ti-mobility  and  low  oxygen  fugacity.  Contrib.
Mineral. Petrol.
 116, 156—168.

Plašienka D., Grecula P., Putiš M., Kováč M. & Hovorka D. 1997:

Evolution  and  structure  of  the  Western  Carpathians:  an  over-
view. In: Grecula P., Hovorka D. & Putiš M. (Eds.): Geologi-
cal  Evolution  of  the  Western  Carpathians.  Miner.  Slovaca
Monographs, Geocomplex
, Bratislava, 1—24i.

Putiš M., Radvanec M., Hain M., Koller F., Koppa M. & Snárska B.

2011: 3-D analysis of perovskite in serpentinite (Dobšiná quar-
ry) by X-ray micro-tomography. In: Ondrejka M. & Šarinová
K. (Eds.): Proceedings. Petros Symposium. Bratislava, Come-
nius University Press
, 33—37.

Putiš  M.,  Koppa  M.,  Snárska  B.,  Koller  F.  &  Uher  P.  2012:  The

blueschist-associated  perovskite—andradite-bearing  serpenti-
nized  harzburgite  from  Dobšiná  (the  Meliata  Unit),  Slovakia.
J. Geosci. 57, 221—240.

Putiš M., Danišík M., Ružička P. & Schmiedt I. 2014: Constraining

exhumation  pathway  in  an  accretionary  wedge  by  (U-Th)/He
thermochronology  –  Case  study  on  Meliatic  nappes  in  the
Western Carpathians. J. Geodyn. 81, 80—90.

Putiš M., Yang Y.H., Koppa M., Dyda M. & Šmál P. 2015: U/Pb

LA—ICP—MS  age  of  metamorphic-metasomatic  perovskite
from serpentinized harzburgite in the Meliata Unit at Dobšiná,
Slovakia: Time constraint of fluid-rock interaction in an accre-
tionary wedge. Acta Geol. Slov. 7, 63—71.

Putnis  A.  2009:  Mineral  replacement  reactions.  Rev.  Mineral.

Geochem. 70, 87—124.

Radvanec M. 2009: P—T path of perovskite—clinopyroxene—grossu-

lar  bearing  fragments  enclosed  in  meta-peridotite  (Danková,
Gemer  area,Western  Carpathians).  8

th

  International  Eclogite

Conference, Xining, China. Abstracts, 121—122.

Scambelluri M., Fiebig J., Malaspina N., Müntener O. & Pettke T.

2004: Serpentinite subduction: implications for fluid processes
and trace-element recycling. Int. Geol. Rev. 46, 595—613.

Scambelluri  M.,  Pettke  T.,  Rampone  E.,  Godard  M.  &  Reusser  E.

2014:  Petrology  and  trace  element  budgets  of  high-pressure
peridotites  indicate  subduction  dehydration  of  serpentinized
mantle  (Cima  di  Gagnone,  Central  Alps,  Switzerland).
J. Petrology 55, 459—498.

Stampfli G.M. 1996: The Intra-Alpine terrain: A Paleotethyan rem-

nant in the Alpine Variscides. Eclogae Geol. Helv. 89, 13—42.

Uher P., Koděra P. & Vaculovič T. 2011: Perovskite from Ca—Mg

skarn—porphyry deposit Vysoká-Zlatno, Štiavnica stratovolca-
no, Slovakia. Miner. Slovaca 43, 247—254.

Ulrych J., Pivec E., Povondra P. & Rutšek J. 1988: Perovskite from

melilite rocks, Osečná complex, northern Bohemia, Czechoslo-
vakia. Neu. Jb. Mineral. Mh. H. 2, 81—95.

Vozárová A. & Vozár J. 1992: Tornaicum and Meliaticum in bore-

hole  Brusník  BRU-1,  Southern  Slovakia  (Brusník  Anticline,
Rimava Depression). Acta geol. Acad. Sci. Hung. 35, 97—116.

Whitney  D.L.  &  Evans  B.W.  2010:  Abbreviations  for  names  of

rock-forming minerals. Amer. Mineralogist 95, 185—187.

Xie L.W., Zhang Y.B., Zhang H.H., Sun J.F. & Wu F.Y. 2008: In

situ  simultaneous  determination  of  trace  elements,  U—Pb  and
Lu—Hf  isotopes  in  zircon  and  baddeleyite.  Chinese  Sci.  Bull.
53, 1565—1573.

Yuan  H.L.,  Gao  S.,  Liu  X.M.,  Li  H.M.,  Gunther  D.  &  Wu  F.Y.

2004: Accurate U—Pb age and trace element determinations of
zircon by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spec-
trometry. Geostand. Geoanal. Res. 28, 353—370.

Zajzon N., Váczi T., Fehér B., Takács Á., Szakáll S. & Weiszburg

T.G.  2013:  Pyrophanite  pseudomorphs  after  perovskite  in
Perkupa  serpentinites  (Hungary):  a  microtextural  study  and
geological implications. Phys. Chem. Miner. 40, 611—623.