background image

www.geologicacarpathica.com

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

, FEBRUARY 2016, 67, 1, 21—40                                                      doi: 10.1515/geoca-2016-

0002

Planktonic and benthic foraminiferal biostratigraphy

of the Middle Eocene—Lower Miocene successions

from the Sivas Basin (Central Anatolia, Turkey)

AYNUR HAKYEMEZ

1

, NAZIRE ÖZGEN-ERDEM

2

 and ÖZGEN KANGAL

2

1

General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration, Department of Geological Research, 06800 Ankara, Turkey;

aynurhakyemez@yahoo.com

2

Cumhuriyet University, Department of Geological Engineering, 58140 Sivas, Turkey

(Manuscript received December 8, 2014; accepted in revised form December 8, 2015)

Abstract: Planktonic and benthic foraminifera are described from the Middle Eocene-Lower Miocene successions in
the  Sivas  Basin,  Central  Anatolia.  An  integrated  foraminiferal  zonation  provides  new  age  assignments  in  terms  of
a great number of taxa for the studied sections. Four biostratigraphical intervals are first recorded based on the concur-
rent ranges of sporadically occurring but well preserved planktonic foraminiferal assemblages. The first interval cha-
racterized by the co-occurrences of Acarinina bullbrooki, Truncorotaloides topilensis and Turborotalia cerroazulensis
is referable to the E11 Zone of late Lutetian—early Bartonian. An assemblage yielding Paragloborotalia opima accom-
panied by Globigerinella obesa forms a basis for the late Chattian O5 Zone. The successive interval corresponds to the
late Chattian O6 Zone indicated by the presence of Globigerina ciperoensis and Globigerinoides primordius along with
the absence of Paragloborotalia opima. The early Aquitanian M1 Zone can be tentatively defined based mainly on the
assemblage of Globigerina, Globigerinella, Globoturborotalita and Tenuitella. The biostratigraphical data obtained
from the benthic foraminifera assign the studied sections to the SBZ 21—22, SBZ 23 and SBZ 24 ranging in age from
Rupelian to Aquitanian. The SBZ 23 and 24 are well constrained biozones by the occurrences of Miogypsinella complanata
and Miogypsina gunteri, respectively, whereas the SBZ 21—22 defined by nummulitids and lepidocylinids in the Tethyan
Shallow Benthic Zonation is characterized dominantly by peneroplids, soritids and miliolids in the studied sections.
Benthic foraminiferal assemblages suggest different paleoenvironments covering lagoon, algal reef and shallow open
marine whereas planktonic foraminifera provides evidence for relatively deep marine settings on the basis of assem-
blages characterized by a mixture of small-sized simple and more complex morphogroups indicative for intermediate
depths of the water column.

Key words: Biostratigraphy, planktonic foraminifera, benthic foraminifera, Oligocene-Early Miocene, Sivas Basin, Turkey.

Introduction

The  Sivas  Basin  is  one  of  the  Central  Anatolian  basins  and
developed  mainly  after  the  closure  of  the  northern  branch
of  Neotethys  (Poisson  et  al.  1996;  Fig. 1).

 

The  Eocene—

Miocene sedimentary sequences widely exposed in the basin
are composed mainly of siliciclastics, pyroclastics, carbonates
and  evaporites  which  characterize  a  wide  range  of  deposi-
tional  environments  from  fluvial  and  lacustrine  to  coastal,
shallow  and  deep  marine.  They  have  been  the  focus  of  nu-
merous  studies  mainly  on  the  stratigraphy,  structural  geo-
logy, sedimentology, evaporite geochemistry and petroleum
potential  of  the  basin  (Blumental  1938;  Yalç

l

nlar  1955;

Nebert 1956; Norman 1964; Pisoni 1965; Baykal & Erentöz
1966;  Artan  &  Sestini  1971;  Kurtman  1973;  Gökçen
1981;  I

·

nan  &  I

·

nan  1990;  Aktimur  et  al.  1990;  Cater  et  al.

1991;  Poisson  et  al.  1992,  1996;  Tekeli  et  al.  1992;  Temiz
1994;  Tekin  1995;  Çubuk  &  I

·

nan  1998;  Dirik  et  al.  1999;

Kangal  &  Varol  1999;  Çiner  et  al.  2002;  Gündog˘an  et  al.
2005).  Only  minor  emphasis  has  generally  been  placed  on
the paleontological investigations dealing with various fossil
groups within the limited numbers of published papers (mol-
luscs,  corals  and  echinids  by  Stchepinsky  1939  and  by

Erünal-Erentöz  1956;  benthic  foraminifera  by  Dizer  1962;
mammals  by  Sümengen  et  al.  1989  and  by  De  Bruijn  et  al.
1992;  palynomorphs  by  Akgün  et  al.  2000)  and  in  unpub-
lished  reports  (Aktimur  et  al.  1990;  Kangal  et  al.  2005).
More  recently,  Lower  Miocene  larger  foraminifera  were
studied  by  Özcan  et  al.  (2009),  whereas  Oligocene  larger
foraminifera  including  some  new  groups  of  taxa  from  four
sections  including  two  studied  sections  in  the  present  study
(Tuzlagözü  and  Eg˘ribucak)  were  reported  by  Sirel  et  al.
(2013).

Shallow water benthic foraminifera bearing limestones to-

gether with mudstones and siltstones have been variously re-
ported  by  previous  studies  commonly  as  associated  facies
within  the  marine  Oligocene—Lower  Miocene  sequences  of
the Sivas Basin (Kurtman 1973; Aktimur et al. 1990; Çubuk
&  I

·

nan1998; Ocakog˘lu 2001). However, planktonic forami-

nifera  which  form  one  of  the  most  significant  fossil  groups
for biostratigraphy and wide stratigraphic correlation has re-
ceived  very  little  attention  so  far  or  passed  unobserved  by
the previous studies carried out in the basin. Poor data on the
occurrence of planktonic foraminiferal taxa were reported in
a  few  studies  (Kurtman  1973;  Gökçen  1981;  Aktimur  et  al.
1990;  Poisson  et  al.  1996;  Kavak  &  inan  2001;  Ocakog˘lu

background image

22

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

Fig.  1.  Tectonic  map  showing  major  structural  elements  of  Turkey  and  location  of  the  Sivas  Basin  (from  Poisson  et  al.  1996).
a – Neogene-Quaternary volcanics; b – Kangal Basin; c – Sivas Basin; d – Late Cretaceous—Paleocene plutonic rocks; e – K

l

r ehir-Nig˘de

massif; f – Tauride Belt; g – Pontide Belt; h – Tokat Massif; i – Ophiolites; NAF – North Anatolian Fault; EAF – East Anatolian
Fault.

Geological setting and stratigraphy

The Sivas Basin is bounded by the Tauride belt along the

southern  margin  and  metamorphic  rocks  of  the  K

l

r ehir

Massif  and  the  allochthonous  Neotethyan  sequences  along
the  western  and  northern  margins  (Poisson  et  al.  1996;
Fig. 1).  It  is  considered  to  be  in  peripheral  foreland  setting
during the Late Paleocene—Middle Eocene, whereas it was a
part  of  the  large  Central  Anatolian  molasse  basins  in  the
Oligo—Miocene time (Poisson et al. 1996). The Sivas Basin
exposes  a  thick  sedimentary  sequence  which  is  representa-
tive of a wide range of sedimentary environments from con-
tinental  to  deep  marine  (

Fig.  2)

.  The  oldest  sedimentary

rocks,  Tecer  Formation,  unconformably  overlie  ophiolitic
units  to  the  south  and  consist  of  Maastrichtian—Paleocene
shallow  water  carbonates  (I

·

nan  &  I

·

nan  1990).  The  genera

lized  stratigraphy  of  the  Sivas  Basin  adopted  in  this  study
mainly  follows  Kurtman  (1973)  and  Poisson  et  al.  (1996)
and  is  described  as:  At  the  base,  the  sequence  is  characte-
rized by a Lower Eocene polygenic conglomerate (Bahçecik
conglomerate)  comprising  clasts  of  ophiolite,  marble,
radiolarite,  limestone  and  quartzite.  The  Bahçecik  conglo-
merate  is  exposed  along  the  northern  and  southern  margins
of the basin and unconformably overlies the ophiolitic base-
ment.  The  Middle  Eocene  Bozbel  formation  conformably

2001;  Vrielynck  et  al.  2012),  whereas  biostratigraphic  age
determinations were provided only by Poisson et al. (1997).
However, no detailed investigation on the planktonic forami-
niferal assemblages and biozones has been carried out so far,
although  the  marine  Upper  Oligocene  sequences  comprise
several  levels  containing  relatively  abundant  planktonic
foraminifera. Therefore, one of the major problems encoun-
tered  by  the  previous  workers  on  the  stratigraphic  recon-
struction in the basin was the poor age data especially on the
Oligocene successions as a result of their poor fossil record.

In this paper we document for the first time occurrences of

planktonic  foraminiferal  asssemblages  by  focusing  mainly
on  four  sections  (I

·

han

l

,  Eg˘ribucak,  Tuzlagözü  and

Akçamescit

) encompassing Middle Eocene—Lower Miocene

lithostratigraphic  units  with  special  emphasis  on  the  Oli-
gocene—Lower  Miocene  interval  measured  from  the  central
part of the Sivas basi

n (Fig. 2). 

A spot sample yielding rich

planktonic foraminifera is also investigated to provide addi-
tional  biostratigraphic  information.  We  also  document
benthic  foraminiferal  assemblages  from  the  same  strati-
graphical sections and thus, we aim to establish an integrated
biostratigraphical  zonation  of  planktonic  and  benthic  fora-
minifera throughout  the studied successions and to analyse
paloenvironmental  and  paleoecologic  conditions  during  the
Oligocene—Early Miocene.

background image

23

EOCENE—MIOCENE FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, CENTRAL ANATOLIA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

overlies  the  Bahçecik  conglomerate  and  consists  of  flysch
deposits  with  carbonate,  volcanoclastic  and  olistrostrome
intercalations. The Oligocene successions widely exposed in
the  basin  represent  various  depositional  environments  from
fluvial  and  lacustrine  to  marine.  The  Lower  Oligocene
Selimiye  formation  is  a  siltstone  and  sandstone  dominated
unit  with  subordinate  gypsum  levels  in  its  lower  part  and
overlies  the  Bozbel  formation  unconformably.  It  has  been
considered  to  be  fluvial  to  lagoonal  facies  (Kurtman  1973;
Özçelik 2000; Ocakog˘lu 2001) or marine based on ostracod
fauna  (Gökçen  1981;  Gökçen  &  Kelling  1985)  and  plank-
tonic foraminifera (Poisson et al. 1996; Kavak & I

·

nan 2001).

The  fluvial  conglomerates,  sandstones  and  mudstones  which
may be a lateral equivalent of the Selimiye formation, are re-
ferred  to  the  Karayün  formation  (Poisson  et  al.  1996).  The
Late  Oligocene  charophytes  characterizing  lacustrine  envi-
ronments  are  determined  by  Vrielynck  et  al.  (2012)  in  the
Karayün formation. The Hafik formation consists of a mas-
sive  gypsum  sequence  and  is  referred  to  the  Oligocene  age
by means of its stratigraphic position. However, the lack of
precise datings due to the poverty or absence of age diagnos-
tic  fossil  groups  as  well  as  rapid  lateral  change  of  the
lithofacies  often  make  it  difficult  to  assign  the  Oligocene
deposits  to  the  lithostratigraphic  units.  The  Karacaören  for-
mation is composed mainly of limestone, sandy limestone in
the lower part whereas marl, sandstone and shale alternation
in  the  upper  part.  It  was  subdivided  into  three  members  by
Poisson  et  al.  (1996):  lower  detritics,  limestones  and  upper
detritics.  The  lower  detritics  are  represented  by  marls  near
Sivas  (Sivas  marls)  and  overlie  the  evaporitic  Hafik  forma-

tion. These marls contain planktonic foraminifera of Middle—
Late Oligocene and Early Miocene age (Poisson et al. 1996,
1997;  Vrielynck  et  al.  2012).  The  limestone  member  is  the
best known and most widely exposed unit and was dated to
the  Early  Miocene  (Aquitanian—Burdigalian)  by  foramini-
fera  (Dizer  1962;  Kurtman  1973;  Özcan  et  al.  2009).  The
Karacaören formation is overlain by the Benlikaya formation
which  consists  of  continental  clastics  (sandstone,  conglo-
merate,  silt  and  clay)  with  intercalated  gypsum  and  lignite.
It might be Middle  Miocene in age based on its stratigraphic
position. The poorly consolidated sands, conglomerates with
marls  and  lacustrine  limestones  of  Late  Miocene—Pliocene
age are assigned to the I

·

ncesu formation.

Material and method

Over  80  samples  collected  from  four  stratigraphic  sec-

tions,  I

·

han

l

Eg˘ribucak, Tuzlagözü and Akçamescit,  have

been  studied  for  foraminiferal  biostratigraphic  analysis.
A  spot  sample  rich  in  planktonic  foraminifera  from  near
Bak

l

ml

l

 was also investigated (Fig. 2). More than 40 samples

were  prepared  for  extraction  of  isolated  planktonic  forami-
niferal  specimens  from  the  samples.  Washed  residues  were
obtained  by  disaggregating  samples  of  mudstone  with  the
standard  washing  technique  of  diluted  hydrogen  peroxide
(

%30

). Planktonic foraminifera show mainly scattered occur-

rences  with  low  to  moderately  abundant  assemblages  along
the  sections.  Preservation  varies  from  poor  (recrystallized
but clearly recognizable specimens) in the Middle Eocene to

Fig. 2. Geological map of the Sivas region in the central part of the Sivas Basin and location of the studied sections (modified from Geo-
logical  Map  of  Turkey  (MTA,  2002).  1  –  I

·

han

l

 

section;  2  –  Eg˘ribucak  section;  3  –  Tuzlagözü  section;  4  –  Akçamescit  section;

triangle  –  Spot  sample;  a  –  Quaternary;  b  –  Pleistocene  (Continental  clastics);  c  –  Pliocene  (Continental  carbonates);  d  –  Upper
Miocene—Pliocene  (Continental  clastics);  e  –  Lower—Middle  Miocene  (Continental  clastics);  f  –  Lower  Miocene  (Neritic  limestone);
g – Lower Miocene (Clastics and carbonates); h – Lower Miocene (Evaporitic sedimentary rocks); j – Oligocene (Continental clastics);
k – Middle—Upper Eocene (Clastics and carbonates);  l – Eocene (Volcanics); m – Upper Cretaceous—Paleocene (Neritic limestone);
n – Ophiolites.

background image

24

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

remarkably  good  in  the  Chattian  and  early  Aquitanian.
Benthic foraminifera have been analysed from 435 thin sec-
tions of 46 samples. Contrary to the planktonic foraminifera,
benthic  foraminifera  are  found  in  a  great  abundance  in  the
samples. The taxonomic criteria adopted for planktonic fora-
minifera  are  taken  from  Bolli  &  Saunders  (1985),
Spezzaferri (1994) and Pearson et al. (2006a). The definition
of planktonic foraminiferal biozones follows Berggren et al.
(1995)  and  Berggren  &  Pearson  (2005),  whereas  benthic
foraminiferal biozones are largely based on the Shallow wa-
ter Benthic Zonation (SBZ) by Cahuzac & Poignant (1997).

Studied sections

I· han

l

 section

The section was sampled to the E of I

·

han

l

 village which is

located  5  km  SE  of  Sivas  (39°42’40.48”N;  37°04’17.64”E;
Fig. 2).  The  whole  succession  exposed  at  the  section  mea-
sures  more  than  130  m.  The  I

·

han

l

  section  begins  with  an

alternation of grey-green mudstone with sandstone intercala-
tions (30 m) belonging to the Bozbel formation and follows
a 5 m thick gypsum interval. Above, the Karayün formation
is  characterized  by  thick  (100 m)  reddish  fluvial  conglome-
rates,  sandstones  and  mudstones.  The  uppermost  15 m  of
the section consists of cream-white, fossiliferous limestones,
clayey  limestones  and  grey-green  mudstones  of  the
Karacaören formati

on (Fig. 3).

Eg˘ribucak section

The Eg˘ribucak section, 125 m thick, is located in the vici-

nity  of  Eg˘ribucak  village  (39°43’48.08”N;  37°16’33.84”E),
30 km  E  of  Sivas  (Fig. 2).  The  section  is  characterized  by
highly variable and rapidly changing types of lithology. The
lower 15 m of the section consists mainly of thin bedded silt-
stones and a few conglomerate intercalations. The major part
of  the  section  (~80 m)  consists  of  mudstones  intercalated
with sandstone, clayey limestone, sandy limestone and gyp-
sum  layers  which  predominantly  occur  in  the  lower  part.
Planktonic foraminifera are absent or extremely poor and re-
stricted  to  some  layers  in  the  middle  part  of  this  interval.
Benthic foraminifera, however, are rich and characterized by
a  porcellaneous  assemblage  in  the  clayey  limestones  from
the same interval (Fig. 4). Small benthic foraminifera (miliolid
and peneroplid forms), echinid spines and ostracods are also
present  in  some  samples  throughout  the  section.  The  upper
25 m  part  of  the  section  consists  of  mudstones  with  lime-
stone intercalations yielding abundant planktonic and benthic
foraminifera and red algae (Fig. 4). The Eg˘ribucak section is
comparable  to  the  Eg˘ribucak  formation  which  was  intro-
duced by Çiner & Ko un (1996). In the original description,
the  Eg˘ribucak  formation  consists  of  fluvial  sheet-sandstone
and red mudstone (lower member), bedded to massive gyp-
sum and red-green mudstone (middle member) and shallow-
marine  fossiliferous  mudstone  and  sandy  limestone  (upper
member).  The  Early-Middle  Miocene  age  assigned  to  the
formation (Çiner & Ko un 1996; Çiner et al. 2002) is revised

to  the  Oligocene-Early  Miocene  by  recent  studies  (Özgen-
Erdem et al. 2013; Sirel et al. 2013; Kangal et al. 2014).

Tuzlagözü section

The  Tuzlagözü  section  is  exposed  to  the  E  of  Tuzlagözü

village  (39°42’45”N;  37°40’41.23”E;  Fig.  2).  It  is  150 m  in
thickness and comparable to the Karacaören formation. The
section  starts  with  a  10 m  thick  limestone-clayey  limestone
package.  The  lower  7 m  of  this  interval  is  rich  in  por-
cellaneous  benthic  foraminifera  and  dasclad  algae  whereas
the  upper  3 m  yields  abundant  hyaline  miogypsinid  forami-
nifera  and  coralline  alg

ae  (Fig. 5). 

The  upper  interval  from

10 m to the top of the section comprises a deep marine suc-
cession  which  consists  of  thick  (140 m)  green  mudstones
rich  in  planktonic  foraminiferal  assemblages  and  sandstone
intercalations. The diversity of the assemblages is relatively
high in the lower part, but lower in the upper part of this in-
terval. Common pelecypod accumulations are also observed
in the siltstone layers from the upper parts.

Akçamescit section

The  170 m  thick  section  was  sampled  from  the  N  of

Akçamescit village (39°36’24.61”N; 37°14’59.95”E), 22 km
SE  of  Sivas  (Fig. 2).  The  section  consists  of  a  mudstone
dominated  unit  with  limestone  intercalations  overlying
a  gypsum  level  at  the  base  and  corresponds  to  the  Kara-
caören formation. A sandstone level occurs in the lowest part
of the section. The cream-white limestones are rich in benthic
foraminiferal  assemblages  whereas  planktonic  foraminifera
could be obtained from only two levels throughout the sec-
ti

on (Fig. 6).

Foraminiferal biostratigraphy

Foraminiferal biozone schemes based on reliable age indi-

cators provide a firm basis for worldwide and regional bio-
stratigraphic  correlations.  On  the  basis  of  planktonic
foraminiferal  zonations,  Oligocene—Lower  Miocene  bio-
stratigraphy has been well documented from continuous sec-
tions  in  deep-sea  sites  (Miller  et  al.  1985;  Spezzaferri  &
Premoli  Silva  1991;  Leckie  et  al.  1993;  Spezzaferri  1994,
1995; Li et al. 2004, 2005; Wade et al. 2007). A majority of
marker species, however, are sporadically present or missing
in  the  areas  of  restricted  marine  setting  due  to  their  poor
preservation.  Likewise,  the  occurrences  of  larger  forami-
nifera  are  often  controlled  by  facies  changes  and  therefore,
this  makes  it  difficult  to  apply  the  standard  zonation  (SBZ)
to the successions of restricted marine setting.

The  Oligo—Miocene  time  is  marked  by  the  restricted  ma-

rine settings in Anatolia and adjacent regions resulting from
the  uplift  of  Alpine  orogenic  belt  ( engör  &  Y

l

lmaz  1981).

Besides, the Oligocene is a well known period characterized
by large and abrupt climatic and paleoceanographic changes
in  the  world  oceans  driven  by  changes  in  the  continental-
and  polar-ice  volume.  These  changes  were  reflected  by  the

background image

25

EOCENE—MIOCENE FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, CENTRAL ANATOLIA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

Fig. 3. Distribution of planktonic and benthic foraminiferal species with other fossil groups in the I

·

han

l

 

section.

the  occurrences  of  zonal  species  except  for  the  Rupelian—
lower Chattian inter

val (Fig. 7).

The  lowermost  mudstones  from  the  I

·

han

l

  section  are

Middle  Eocene  in  age  based  on  an  assemblage  consisting
predominantly  of  Acarinina  associated  with  rare  Truncoro-
taloides
  and  Morozovelloides  which  last  occurred  in  the
latest  Middle  Eocene  (Fig. 3).  The  concurrent  ranges  of
Acarinina  bullbrooki,  Truncorotaloides  topilensis  and
Turborotalia  cerroazulensis  confines  this  interval  to  within
the  E11  Zone  which  is  defined  by  the  partial  range  of  the
Morozovelloides lehneri between the LO of Guembelitrioides
nuttalli 
and the FO of Orbulinoides beckmanni (Berggren &
Pearson 2005; Wade et al. 2011). Although the zonal marker,
M. lehneri
, could not be recorded in the studied samples the
combination of three diagnostic species (A. bullbrooki, T. topi-
lensis
  and  T.  cerroazulensis)  provides  a  worldwide  correla-
tion  by  their  synchronous  first  and  last  occurrences  (Berg-

cool and warm periods accompanied by the sea level fluctua-
tions  as  well  as  the  global  land-ocean  reorganizations  (Haq
et  al.  1988;  Zachos  2001).  After  a  major  faunal  turnover
including the last occurrences of several planktonic forami-
niferal groups (Turborotalia, HantkeninaCribrohantkenina
and  Globigerinatheka)  at  the  Eocene—Oligocene  boundary,
the  Oligocene  interval  is  generally  represented  by  long-
ranged planktonic foraminiferal taxa (Coxall & Pearson 2006;
Premoli  Silva  et  al.  2006;  Pearson  et  al.  2006b;  Wade  &
Pearson 2008). For these reasons, a complete biostratigraphic
sequence for the studied successions could be established by
integrating  benthic  and  planktonic  foraminiferal  zones  with
some  modifications  of  standard  zonations.  In  the  present
study,  planktonic  foraminiferal  biozones  are  defined  based
mainly on the concurrent ranges of some age-diagnostic spe-
cies due to the absence of biostratigraphic markers, whereas
shallow benthic foraminiferal zones are well constrained by

background image

26

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

Fig.  5.  Distribution  of  planktonic
and  benthic  foraminiferal  species  in
the Tuzlagözü section.

Fig. 4. Distribution of planktonic and benthic foraminiferal species in the Eg˘ribucak section.

background image

27

EOCENE—MIOCENE FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, CENTRAL ANATOLIA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

gren et al. 2006; Pearson et al. 2006b). No age data could be
obtained from the overlying fluvial deposit of conglomerate,
sandstone and mudstone completely devoid of fossil groups
(Fig. 3).

The  first  biostratigraphic  age  from  the  Oligocene  succes-

sion  is  documented  by  the  benthic  foraminifera  in  the
Eg˘ribucak  and  Tuzlagözü  sections  (Figs.  4,  5).  The  assem-
blages are rich in porcellaneous taxa including a remarkable
group of new taxa which have recently been introduced and
referred  to  the  SBZ  21—22  (Rupelian—early  Chattian)  by
Sirel  et  al.  (2013).  They  are  characterized  by  Praearchaias
diyarbakirensis
, P. minimus, Archaias kirkukensis and A. as-
maricus 
associated with Peneroplis evolutus, P. flabelliformis
and  Sivasina  egribucakensis  in  the  Tuzlagözü  section
(Figs. 5, 9). On the other hand, the latter three species are ac-
companied by Coscinospira sivasensis and C. elongata with
the exception of P. diyarbakirensis, P. minimus, A. kirkukensis
and A. asmaricus in  the  Eg˘ribucak  section  (Figs. 4, 9). It is
known  that  a  porcellaneous  assemblage  yielding  specimens

of  Praearchaias,  Austrotrillina,  Peneroplis  and  Archaias
which is not indicative for a precise zonation was referred to
a  combined  SB  21—22  zonal  interval  from  some  SE  Anato-
lian  sections  (Sirel  1996,  2003).  Although  Nummulites  vas-
cus
N. fichteli and lepidocyclinids, which characterize SBZ
21 and 22 (Cahuzac & Poignant 1997), were missing, a ten-
tative  SBZ  21—22  was  established  based  on  not  only  the
overlying  SBZ  23  (Sirel  2003;  e.g.  Malatya  region,  p.  277)
but also a planktonic foraminiferal assemblage indicating the
P21 Zone (revised O4 and O5 zones of Berggren & Pearson
2005)  with  the  presence  of  Paragloborotalia  opima  (Sirel
2003; e.g. Mu  region, p. 286). Following the zonal assign-
ment of Sirel (1996, 2003) the rich porcellaneous assemblages
from  the  Tuzlagözü  and  Eg˘ribucak  sections  are  referred  to
the SBZ 21—22 (Figs. 4, 5, 7). The planktonic foraminifera are
extremely poor and restricted to some layers from this inter-
val  with  Globigerina  praebulloides,  G.  occlusa,  G.  ouachi-
taensis,  G.  gnaucki,  Cassigerinella  chipolensis
  and
tenuitellids,  which  do  not  allow  an  assignment  of  biostrati-

Fig. 6. Distribution of planktonic and benthic foraminiferal species in the Akçamescit section.

background image

28

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

graphic  age  (Fig. 4),  or  are  completely  missing  (Fig. 5).
However,  an  abundant  and  diverse  planktonic  foraminiferal
assemblage  yielding  Paragloborotalia  opima  and  Globige-
rinella  obesa
  in  a  single  sample  (34A)  is  referable  to  the
late Chattian O5 Zone in the upper part of the Eg˘ribucak sec-
tion  (Fig.  4).  In  addition,  a  spot  sample  (Bak

l

ml

l

  22)  from

the  mudstones,  which  are  comparable  to  the  upper  parts  of
the  Eg˘ribucak  section  (1km  NW  of  Bak

l

ml

l

  village;

39°42’56.43”N;  37°28’1.61”E;  Fig.  2),  yields  abundant  and
well preserved planktonic foraminifera including Paragloboro-
talia  opima,  Dentoglobigerina  globularis,  D.  tripartita,
D. venezuelana Globorotaloides permicrus, G. suteri, Globi-
gerina  occlusa,  G.  ciperoensis,  G.  ouachitaensis  
and  Cata-

Fig. 7. Correlation chart of Oligocene—Lower Miocene planktonic and benthic foraminiferal bio-
zones (Berggren et al. 1995; Cahuzac & Poignant 1997) and integrated biostratigraphic zonation
established for the studied sections (in grey) with ranges of marker species (P – Pseudohastigerina,
T

  –  Turborotalia,  G  –  Globoturborotalita,  Ch  –  Chiloguembelina,  Pg  –  Paragloborotalia,

Nu

 – Nummulites, E – Eulepidina, N – Nephrolepidina, C – Cycloclypeus, M – Miogypsinella,

Ma

 – Miogypsina).

psydrax martin

i (Figs. 8, 10).

 Although a precise biozone for

single samples is difficult to establish, the co-occurrences of
Paragloborotalia  opima  and  Globigerinella  obesa  provides
evidence for defining the O5 (Paragloborotalia opima) Zone
since these species have overlapping ranges within this zone
(Coccioni et al. 2008). This biostratigraphical data is in ac-
cordance with that of Poisson et al. (1997) who detected the
P21  Zone  (O4  and  O5  zones  of  Berggren  &  Pearson  2005)
based on the co-occurrences of P. opima and Globoturboro-
talita angulisuturalis
 from the Sivas marls in the close vicini-
ty  of  Sivas.  The  O5  Zone  is  defined  by  the  LOs  of  Chilo-
guembelina  cubensis
  and  P.  opima  and  corresponds  to  the
SBZ 22B (Berggren et al. 1995; Cahuzac & Poignant 1997).

Fig. 8. SEM photograps of selected planktonic foraminiferal species from the studied sections. 1—3 – Globigerinatheka subconglobata
(Shutskaya),  I

·

han

l

 

3;  4  –  Pseudohastigerina  micra  (Cole),  I

·

han

l

 

3;  5  –  Acarinina  bullbrooki  (Bolli),  umbilical  view,  I

·

han

l

 

3;

6 – Acarinina bullbrooki (Bolli), side view, I

·

han

l

 

3; 7 – Subbotina sp., umbilical view, I

·

han

l

 

3; 8 – Subbotina eocaena (Guembel),

spiral  view,  I

·

han

l

 

3;  9  –  Paragloborotalia  sp.,  umbilical  view,  I

·

han

l

 

3;  10  –  Acarinina  collactea  (Finlay),  spiral  view,  I

·

han

l

;

11  –  Truncorotaloides  topilensis  (Cushman),  side  view,  I

·

han

l

 

3;  12  –  Globorotaloides  suteri  Bolli,  spiral  view,  Eg˘ribucak  34A;

13  –  Paragloborotalia  sp.,  spiral  view,  Eg˘ribucak  38;  14  –  Paragloborotalia  semivera  (Hornibrook),  umbilical  view,  Eg˘ribucak  38;
15 – Paragloborotalia pseudocontinuosa (Jenkins), spiral view, Eg˘ribucak 38; 16 – Paragloborotalia pseudocontinuosa (Jenkins), um-
bilical view, Eg˘ribucak 38; 17 – Globorotaloides suteri Bolli, umbilical view, Eg˘ribucak 34A; 18 – Paragloborotalia opima (Bolli), spi-
ral  view,  Eg˘ribucak  34A;  19  –  Paragloborotalia  opima  (Bolli),  spiral  view,  Tuzlagözü  9A;  20  –  Paragloborotalia  opima  (Bolli),
umbilical  view,  Bak

l

ml

l

  22;  21  –  Paragloborotalia  opima  (Bolli),  umbilical  view,  Eg˘ribucak  34A;  22  –  Turborotalia  cerroazulensis

(Cole), spiral view, I

·

han

l

 

3; 23 – Subbotina gortanii (Borsetti), side view, Tuzlagözü 9A; 24 – Dentoglobigerina sellii (Borsetti), spiral

view, Eg˘ribucak 34A; 25 – Dentoglobigerina globularis (Bermudez), spiral view, Bak

l

ml

l

 22; 26 – Dentoglobigerina globularis (Bermu-

dez), umbilical view, Bak

l

ml

l

 22; 27 – Dentoglobigerina tripartita (Koch), umbilical view, Tuzlagözü 10 (Scale bar: 100 µm).

By  considering  this  correlation
between  the  O5  Zone  and  SBZ
22B  (Fig. 7),  the  middle  part  of
the Eg˘ribucak section seems to be
comparable  to  the  SBZ  22  rather
than a combined SBZ 21—22 sug-
gested  by  Sirel  et  al.  (2013).
Moreover,  this  zonal  assignment
of  SBZ  22  is  supported  by  the
SBZ  23,  which  is  defined  by  the
FO  of  Miogypsinella  complanata
in the overlying interval (Fig. 4).

The SBZ 23 is also recorded by

the presence of M. complanata in
the  upper  part  of  the  basal  lime-
stone  interval  in  the  Tuzlagözü
section (Fig. 5). M. complanata is
the  most  common  and  indicative
species  for  the  SBZ  23  of  Late
Oligocene in the western Tethyan
basins  (Italy  and  Spain,  Drooger
1954,  1956a,  Wildenborg  1991;
Aquitaine Basin, France, Drooger
et  al.  1955;  Algeria,  Drooger  &
Magné, 1959; as well as in Egypt
(Ouda  1998,  Boukhary  et  al.
2008)  and  in  the  Middle  East
(Sharland  et  al.  2004).  This  zone
corresponds to the O6 (Globigeri-
na ciperoensis
) Zone which is de-
fined  by  the  partial  range  of  G.
ciperoensis
  between  the  FO  of

background image

29

EOCENE—MIOCENE FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, CENTRAL ANATOLIA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

Paragloborotalia opima and the FO of Paragloborotalia ku-
gleri
  (Berggren  et  al.  1995;  Cahuzac  &  Poignant  1997;
Fig. 7). The O6 Zone is determined by the co-occurrences of
G.  ciperoensis  and  Globigerinoides  primordius  which  first
appears approximately at the same level as the LO of P. opi-

ma  (Coccioni  et  al.  2008)  in  the  uppermost  part  of  the
Eg˘ribucak section (Figs. 4, 7).

The  planktonic  foraminiferal  assemblages  of  O5  and  O6

zones  in  the  Eg˘ribucak  section  are  very  similar  to  those
of  the  Mediterranean  and  Iranian  basins  as  well  as  those

background image

30

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

background image

31

EOCENE—MIOCENE FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, CENTRAL ANATOLIA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

of some Anatolian basins. Corresponding assemblages were
reported from Italy (Como Molasse, Rögl et al. 1975; March
Basin,  Menichini  1999;  N  Apennines,  Mancin  &  Pirini
2001),  from  Egypt  (Ouda  1998),  from  NW  Greece
(Wielandt-Schuster  et  al.  2004),  central  Iran  (Qom  Basin,
Reuter et al. 2009), S Spain (Fenero et al. 2013), S Slovakian
Basin  (Ozdínova  &  Soták  2015),  SE  Anatolia  (Mu   and
Elaz

l

g˘ basins, Hüsing et al. 2009), S Anatolia (Kahramanma-

ra  Basin, I

l

k & Hakyemez 2011).

The SBZ 24 of Aquitanian is recognized in the I

·

han

l

 and

Akçamescit  sections  by  the  occurrence  of  Miogypsina  gun-
te

ri (Figs. 3, 6, 11).

 This species is associated with M. tani,

which is the second marker taxon of the SBZ 24 (Cahuzac &
Poignant 1997) in the uppermost part of the Akçamescit sec-
tion (Fig. 6). The SBZ 24 is an easily comparable biostrati-
graphic  interval  based  on  the  common  occurrence  of  the
marker  taxa,  M.  gunteri,  throughout  the  Mediterranean  and
Indo-Pacific provinces (Drooger 1956b, 1963, Drooger et al.
1955; Drooger & Magné 1959; Raju 1974; de Mulder 1975;
Ferrero  Mortara  1987;  Wildenborg  1991).  This  zone  was
previously  documented  based  on  M.  gunteri  in  the  Tu-
zlagözü  and  I

·

han

l

  sections  from  the  Sivas  Basin  by  Özcan

et al. (2009). Our data is in accordance with that of Özcan et
al.  (2009)  from  the  I

·

han

l

  section,  whereas  it  differs  from

their  data  obtained  from  the  lowermost  limestones  of  the
Tuzlagözü  section  where  the  lower  part  of  SBZ  24  was  re-
corded. The assemblage characterizing SBZ 23 Zone shows
no  evidence  that  the  Tuzlagözü  section  presented  here
extends into the Aquitanian (Fig. 5).

In  contrast  to  the  larger  foraminifera,  the  absence  of  Pa-

ragloborotalia  kugleri  and  Globoquadrina  dehiscens,  mar-
ker  species  of  the  M1  (Paragloborotalia  kugleri)  Zone  of
lower  Aquitanian,  makes  zonal  assignment  to  this  interval
more difficult. The M1 Zone is defined by the total range of
Paragloborotalia  kugleri  and  is  subdivided  into  two  sub-
zones  by  the  FO  of  Globoquadrina  dehiscens  (Berggren
et  al.  1995;  Wade  et  al.  2011).  These  two  biostratigraphic
markers  are  fairly  common  in  the  Aquitanian  successions
throughout  the  Mediterranean  (Bizon  et  al.  1974;  Kras-
sheninnikov  1994;  Iaccarino  et  al.  1996;  Menichini  1999;
Toufiq & Feinberg 2000; Mancin & Pirini 2001; Hakyemez
& Toker 2010). Although the lack of P. kugleri and G. de-
hiscens
 prevents a precise biozonal attribution to the mud-
stones overlying the SBZ 23 in the Tuzlagözü section, this
interval is referable to a tentative M1 Zone (Fig. 5). Single
specimens  of  Paragloborotalia  opima  and  Subbotina

Fig. 9. Selected benthic foraminiferal species from the Eg˘ribucak and Tuzlagözü sections. 1 – Peneroplis flabelliformis Sirel & Özgen-
Erdem, incomplete equatorial view, Eg˘ribucak 11/36 (Sirel et al., 2013, pl. I, fig. 1); 2 – Peneroplis flabelliformis Sirel & Özgen-Erdem,
incomplete equatorial view, Eg˘ribucak 11/37; 3 – Coscinospira sivasensis Sirel & Özgen-Erdem, slightly oblique view, Eg˘ribucak 11/03
(Sirel et al., 2013, pl. II, fig. 12); 4 – Coscinospira sivasensis Sirel & Özgen-Erdem, equatorial view, Eg˘ribucak 11/64; 5 – Coscinospira
elongata
 Sirel & Özgen-Erdem, longitudinal view, Eg˘ribucak 11/30. (Sirel et al., 2013, pl. III, fig. 13); 6 – Coscinospira elongata Sirel &
Özgen-Erdem,  longitudinal  view,  Eg˘ribucak  11/31;  7  –  Sivasina  egribucakensis  Sirel  &  Özgen-Erdem,  axial  views,  Eg˘ribucak  33/61;
8 – Sivasina egribucakensis Sirel & Özgen-Erdem, axial view, Eg˘ribucak 11/34, (Sirel et al., 2013, pl. IV, fig. 7); 9 – Sivasina egribu-
cakensis
  Sirel  &  Özgen-Erdem,  equatorial  view,  Eg˘ribucak  33/1e  (Sirel  et  al.,  2013,  pl.  V,  fig.  2);  10  –  Praearchaias  diyarbakirensis
Sirel,  axial  view,  Tuzlagözü  2/2a;  11  –  Praearchaias  minimus  Sirel,  axial  view,  Tuzlagözü  1/6  (Sirel  et  al.,  2013,  pl.  X,  fig.  10);
12 – Praearchaias minimus Sirel, equatorial view, Tuzlagözü 1/7; 13 – Archaias asmaricus Smout & Eames, oblique equatorial view,
Tuzlagözü 1/1b, (Sirel et al., 2013, pl. IX, fig. 14); 14 – Archaias kirkukensis Henson, axial view, Tuzlagözü 1/2 (Sirel et al., 2013, pl. IX,
fig. 8) (Scale bar: 250 µm for 1—6, 166 µm for 7—9, 330 µm for 10—14).

gortanii observed in the lower part might be considered to
be  evidence  for  reworking  into  the  tentative  M1  Zone
(Fig. 8). A very similar assemblage in a sample (Sample 1)
from the Akçamescit section seems to be comparable to the
M1  Zone.  Although  this  age  assignment  cannot  be  preci-
sely defined due to the lack of biostratigraphical markers, it
is confirmed not only by the absence of Oligocene species
but also by the SBZ 24 determined in the overlying interval
(Fig. 6).

Paleoenvironmental and paleoecologic

interpretations

Planktonic  and  benthic  foraminifera  are  one  of  the  most

important  constituents  of  the  marine  sequences  and
commonly  used  in  biostratigraphy.  Their  occurrences  are
strongly controlled by a complex interaction of physical and
chemical    environmental  parameters,  including  bathymetry,
water-energy,  salinity,  temperature,  oxygenation,  substrate
condition,  turbidity,  nutrient  concentration  and  hydrodyna-
mics of the water mass. Since larger foraminifera occur most
abundantly  in  shallow  water  carbonates  their  composition
changing  in  different  parts  of  carbonate  platforms  makes
them valuable facies indicators in paleoenvironmental recon-
structions.  On  the  other  hand,  planktonic  foraminifera  are
highly sensitive to oceanographic conditions and extensively
utilized  as  proxies  for  climatic  changes,  such  as  warm
and cool events, variations in temperature and mass stratifi-
cation  of  water  column  in  terms  of  quantitative  analysis
(relative  abundances)  of  assemblages  and  oxygen  isotope
values  from  their  tests.  Their  response  to  the  increased  en-
vironmental  stress  is  indicated  by  decline  in  relative  abun-
dance  of  dominant  species,  sporadic  richness  of  opportu-
nistic  species  and  abundance  fluctuations  in  population
of  long-ranging  species  (Spezzaferri  1996;  Spezzaferri  &
Spiegler 2005; Wade et al. 2007; Alegret et al.2008).

The  studied  successions  represent  different  paleoenviron-

ments changing from deep marine to lagoonal and protected
very  shallow  marine  during  the  Middle  Eocene—Early
Miocene time interval. The lowermost mudstones belonging
to the E11 Zone in the I

·

han

l

 section (Fig. 3) clearly suggest

a  deep  marine  environment  reflected  by  the  presence  of
Acarinina, Truncorotaloides and Morozovelloides which are
the  prominent  deep  dwelling  taxa  within  the  tropical  and
subtropical oceanic sediments from the Late Paleocene to the

background image

32

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

Fig. 10. SEM photograps of selected planktonic foraminiferal species from the studied sections in the Sivas Basin. 1 – Tenuitella sp., spiral
view, Eg˘ribucak 35A; 2 – Tenuitella munda (Jenkins), umbilical view, Eg˘ribucak 35A; 3 – Tenuitella sp., umbilical view, Eg˘ribucak
35A; 4 – Globigerina ouachitaensis Howe & Wallace, umbilical view, Akçamescit 1; 5 – Globigerina gnaucki Blow & Banner, umbili-
cal  view,  Akçamescit  1;  6  –  Cassigerinella  chipolensis  (Cushman  &  Ponton),  Eg˘ribucak  35A;  7  –  Tenuitellinata  angustiumbilicata
(Bolli), umbilical view, Eg˘ribucak 38; 8 – Tenuitella clemenciae (Bermudez), umbilical view, Akçamescit 1; 9 – Tenuitella clemenciae
(Bermudez), umbilical view, Akçamescit 1; 10 – Globigerina fariasi Bermudez, spiral view, Akçamescit 1; 11 – Globigerinita sp., side
view,  Tuzlagözü  12;  12  –  Cassigerinella  chipolensis  (Cushman  &  Ponton),  Eg˘ribucak  35A;  13  –  Dentoglobigerina  venezuelana
(Hedberg), spiral view, Eg˘ribucak 34A; 14 – Dentoglobigerina venezuelana (Hedberg), umbilical view,  Bak

l

ml

l

 22; 15  – Globorota-

loides  cf.  permicrus  (Blow  &  Banner),  umbilical  view,  Eg˘ribucak  35A;  16  –  Catapsydrax  martini  (Blow  &  Banner),  umbilical  view,
Bak

l

ml

l

 22;  17 – Paragloborotalia sp., umbilical view, Eg˘ribucak 38; 18 – Globigerinoides primordius Blow & Banner, spiral view,

Akçamescit 

1; 19 – Globigerinella obesa (Bolli), spiral view, Akçamescit 1; 20 – Globigerinella obesa (Bolli), umbilical view, Akça-

mescit 

1; 21 – Globigerinella obesa (Bolli), side view, Akçamescit 1; 22 – Catapsydrax unicavus Bolli, Loeblich & Tappan, umbilical

view, Eg˘ribucak 38; 23 – Globotuborotalita anguliofficinalis (Blow), spiral view, Eg˘ribucak 38; 24 – Globigerina leroyi Blow & Ban-
ner, spiral view, Tuzlagözü 11; 25 – Globigerina occlusa Blow & Banner, spiral view, Bak

l

ml

l

 22; 26 – Globigerina occlusa Blow &

Banner, umbilical view, Akçamescit 1; 27 – Globorotaloides permicrus (Blow & Banner), spiral view, Bak

l

ml

l

 22; 28 – Globorotaloides

variabilis Bolli, umbilical view, Bak

l

ml

l

 22; 29 – Globigerina ciperoensis Bolli, spiral view, Eg˘ribucak 38 (Scale bar: 75 µm for figures

1—9, 12, 18; 100 µm for others).

background image

33

EOCENE—MIOCENE FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, CENTRAL ANATOLIA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

latest Middle Eocene. These deep marine sediments are com-
parable to a well documented Middle Eocene interval which
characterizes  widespread  “flysch”  deposition  throughout
Anatolia following the collision of the Anatolide-Torid plat-
form  with  the  Pontides  during  the 

Latest

  Paleocene—Early

Eocene  (Fig. 1;  engör  &  Y

l

lmaz,  1981;  Poisson  et  al.

1996). A marked environmental change leading to the thick
continental  successions  deposited  during  the  Early—Middle
Oligocene is reflected by the fluvial deposits unconformably
overlying  the  Middle  Eocene  deep  water  mudstones  in  the
I

·

han

l

  section  (Fig.  3).  Conversely,  the  marine  Oligocene—

Lower  Miocene  sections  investigated  provide  evidence  of
different paleoenvironments covering lagoon, algal reef and
shallow  to  deep  marine  settings  based  on  the  analysis  of
mainly benthic and planktonic foraminiferal abundance and
distribution. Three larger benthic foraminifera-bearing biofa-
cies are distinguished. The first biofacies characterizing the
SB  21—22  zonal  interval  is  dominated  by  the  porcellaneous
assemblages  including  species  of  Peneroplis,  Sivasina,
Praearchaias,  Archaias,  Coscinospira,  Austrotrillina  
and
miliolids  in  the  lowermost  part  of  the  Tuzlagözü  section
(Figs.  5,  9).  The  limestones  involving  these  assemblages
consist of packstone-grainstone facies with frequent to abun-
dant algae, byrozoa and bivalve fragments and is assignable
to a shallow protected marine environment. It is known that
abundant  occurrence  of  porcellaneous  benthic  foraminifera
(such as ArchaiasPeneroplisAlveolina, Austrotrillina and
miliolids) characterizes protected areas under restricted ma-
rine  conditions  (e.g.  shallow  shelf  lagoon;  Wilson  1975;
Epting  1980;  Flügel  1982).  Almost  similar  foraminiferal
facies  were  reported  from  the  shelf  lagoon  or  inner  ramp
environments  in  Iran  (Vaziri-Moghaddam  et  al.  2006;
Amirshahkarami et al. 2007; Rahmani et al. 2009; Seyrafian
et  al.  2011  and  Sajadi  et  al.  2014),  from  NE  Italy  (Bassi
et  al.  2007),  from  SE  Turkey  (Sirel  1996,  2003)  and  from
back  reef  environments  in  Iraq  (Edgell  1997;  Al-Banna
2004).

In  contrast  to  the  Tuzlagözü  section,  the  limestones  en-

closing  the  foraminiferal  packstone-grainstone  facies  alter-
nate with pelecypod bearing sandstone, fossiliferous (mainly
ostracoda) siltstone with plant fragments, sandy conglomerate
and  evaporites  and  mudstones  with  planktonic  foraminifera
in the Eg˘ribucak section (Fig. 4). The composition of larger
foraminifera  is  similar  to  that  of  the  Tuzlagözü  section  but
less diverse (Figs. 4, 5). The planktonic foraminiferal assem-
blages  from  the  same  levels  are  dominated  by  the  simple
morphotypes with small-sized, spinose tests with thin walls
and globular chambers, which are representatives of stressed
environments such as Globigerina praebulloides, G. occlusa,
G. ouachitaensis, G. gnaucki, Cassigerinella chipolensis
 and
tenuitellids (Fig. 4). Such morphotypes are regarded as eco-
logical opportunists (r-strategist), which are more resistant to
the  environmental  perturbation  than  complex  morphologies
with  compressed,  keeled,  non-spinose  and  thicker  tests,
which are not able to adapt to changing environmental con-
ditions (K-strategist) (Spezzaferri & Spiegler 2005). The oc-
currences  of  a  large  variety  of  types  of  lithology  may  be
considered  to  imply  depositional  processes  under  unstable
conditions reflected by small scale relative sea-level fluctua-

tions,  possibly  controlled  by  the  regional  tectonic  activity
during  the  Oligocene.  Accordingly,  it  is  concluded  that  the
exclusion of Nummulites vascusN. fichteli and lepidocylinids
which characterize shallow water conditions of open marine
settings appears to be controlled by protected shallow marine
(Tuzlagözü)  and  lagoonal  (Eg˘ribucak)  settings  during  the
Rupelian—early  Chattian  interval.  The  overlying  mudstone
unit yields a highly diverse planktonic foraminiferal assem-
blage  reflecting  the  rapid  deepening  of  the  environment  in
the uppermost part of the Eg˘ribucak section. The larger fora-
minifera  within  the  limestone  intercalations  might  be  rede-
posited from the reefal facies (Fig. 4).

The  second  foraminiferal  facies  documents  an  algal  reef

setting  referable  to  the  SBZ  23  of  Chattian  age  in  the  Tu-
zlagözü  section  (Fig.  5).  This  biofacies  is  represented  pre-
dominantly by red algae and consists of an algal boundstone.
Red  algae  are  accompanied  by  mainly  Miogypsinella  com-
planata  
and  M.  borodinensis,  but  some  hyaline  calcareous
taxa  such  as  Amphistegina,  Planorbulina  and  Spiroclypeus
occasionally  occur  (Fig.  11).  The  algal  assemblage  consists
of coralline algae such as Polystrata alba (Pfender), Sporoli-
thon
  sp.,  Lithoporella  sp.  and  Lithothamnion  sp.  The  over-
lying thick mudstone succession of Aquitanian age is rich in
planktonic  foraminifera  but  it  lacks  larger  foraminifera  and
seems to indicate an environmental change towards deepening
open marine in the Tuzlagözü section (Fig. 5).

The  Aquitanian  is  well  documented  by  the  third  benthic

foraminiferal  facies  which  is  characterized  by  the  presence
of  Miogypsina,  Nephrolepidina  and  Operculina  and  clearly
refers  to  the  SBZ  24  in  the  I

·

han

l

  and  Akçamescit  sections

(Figs.  3,  6).  This  larger  foraminiferal  assemblage  accompa-
nied  by  red  algae  suggests  a  shallow  open  marine  environ-
ment  in  the  I

·

han

l

  section  (Fig.  3).  On  the  other  hand,  the

same  larger  foraminiferal  taxa  bearing  limestones  are  inter-
calated with mudstones yielding planktonic foraminifera and
are  most  likely  transported  from  an  adjacent  shallow  water
environment  into  the  deeper  marine  setting  in  the  Akça-
mescit section (Fig. 6).

The  planktonic  foraminifera  are  mainly  represented  by

abundant  and  medium  to  highly  diversified  assemblages
from the upper Chattian (Eg˘ribucak section; Fig. 3) and the
lower Aquitanian intervals (Tuzlagözü and Akçamescit sec-
tions;  Figs.  5,  6).  Both  the  sporadic  presence  of  planktonic
foraminifera and the generally insufficient numbers of speci-
mens  preclude  performing  the  paleoecological  inferences
based  on  the  relative  abundance  of  individual  species  by
means of quantitative analysis. A tentative assessment, never-
theless, may be deduced from the comparable occurrences of
ecologically  sensitive  species  with  those  of  numerous  stu-
dies published recently. The assemblages yield a mixture of
both  surface/subsurface  and  intermediate  dwelling  morpho-
groups,  among  them  Globigerina  ciperoensis,  G.  fariasi,
Cassigerinella  chipolensis
  and  Globorturborotalita  an-
gulioffcinalis
 lived in the warm surface water, whereas Glo-
bigerina  ouachitaensis,  G.  gnaucki,  G.  officinalis,  G.
praebulloides
 are also surface dweller group but characterize
somewhat  cooler  water  conditions  (Spezzaferri  &  Premoli
Silva 1991; Li et al. 1992; Spezzaferri, 1994, 1995; Menichini
1999;  Molina  et  al.  2006;  Olsson  et  al.  2006;  Wade  et  al.

background image

34

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

background image

35

EOCENE—MIOCENE FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, CENTRAL ANATOLIA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

2007). These two groups are recorded in similar abundances
from the samples analysed. Other representatives of cool water
are  characterized  by  rare  to  common  tenuitellids  (Tenuitella
clemenciae,  T.  munda
),  globorotaloidiids  (Globorotaloides
suteri,  G.  variabilis
)  and  globigerinellids  (Globigerinella
obesa,  G.  praesiphonifera
),  which  probably  inhabited  the
subsurface of the mixed layer. An additional group of taxa are
Paragloborotalia  (P.  opima,  P.  nana,  P.  pseudocontinuosa,
P.  siakensis,  P.  semivera
)  indicating  intermediate  depth  of
the water column observed in low numbers. However, exclu-
sion  of  complex  morphologies  with  large-sized  and  thick
walled  tests  (such  as  Catapsydrax  dissimilis,  C.  unicavus,
Globoquadrina
  dehiscens)  seems  to  imply  that  the  water
column is not sufficiently deep for this group of taxa which
are characteristic of much greater water depths.

Discussion and conclusion

An  integrated  biostratigraphic  investigation  in  terms  of

planktonic and benthic foraminifera from four sections pro-
vides  new  age  data  to  contribute  a  well  established  strati-
graphic framework and description of paleoenvironments for
the  Middle  Eocene-Lower  Miocene  successions  from  the
Sivas Basin. The Middle Eocene age is recorded in deep ma-
rine  mudstones  by  diagnostic  planktonic  foraminiferal  taxa
such  as  Acarinina,  Morozovelloides  and  Truncorotaloides
which  last  occurred  in  the  latest  Middle  Eocene.  The  co-
occurrences  of  Acarinina  bullbrooki,  Truncorotaloides  to-
pilensis
  and  Turborotalia  cerroazulensis  in  the  assemblage
confine the biostratigraphic age to the E11 Zone of late Lu-
tetian-early Bartonian. In contrast to the Middle Eocene in-
terval, the lower parts of Oligocene sections investigated are
characterized by the rich porcellaneous benthic foraminiferal
assemblages dominated by soritids, peneroplids and miliolids.
Although Nummulites fichteli, N. vascus and lepidocyclinids
are  missing,  the  assemblages  yielding  Praearchaias  diyar-
bakirensis
,  P.  minimus,  Archaias  kirkukensis  and  A.  asma-
ricus 
together with a group of new taxa were referred to the
SBZ 21—22 (Sirel et al. 2013) based on the correlation with
those of some SE Anatolian sections (Sirel 2003). The exclu-
sion  of  nummulitids  and  lepidocylinids  which  characterize
shallow water conditions of open marine settings seems to be
controlled by the protected shallow marine and lagoonal set-
tings of the studied successions. A sporadic and poor occur-
rence of small simple planktonic foraminiferal morphotypes
preventing  an  assignment  of  biostratigraphic  age  also  re-

flects  restricted  marine  conditions.  Within  the  uppermost
part of this interval, the O5 planktonic foraminiferal Zone of
early Chattian which corresponds to the SBZ 22B (Berggren
et al. 1995; Cahuzac & Poignant 1997) is recorded by the co-
occurrences  of  Paragloborotalia  opima  and  Globigerinella
obesa.
 Considering this data, the combined SB 21—22 zonal in-
terval seems to be referable to the SBZ 22 of late Rupelian—
early Chattian age. This biostratigraphic age is in accordance
with that of Poisson et al. (1997) who recorded P21 Zone of
Mid-Oligocene  (late  Rupelian—early  Chattian)  in  the  Sivas
marls. Moreover, the tentative SBZ 22 is also confirmed by
the overlying SBZ 23 of late Chattian age.

The  SBZ  23  is  determined  by  the  occurrence  of  Mio-

gypsinella  complanata  accompanied  by  abundant  algae
which  defines  the  second  biofacies  as  an  algal  reef  lime-
stone. The O6 Zone of the 

upper Chattian

, on the other hand,

reflects a change towards a deepening open marine environ-
ment  with  a  relatively  high  diversity  of  planktonic  forami-
nifera.  In  this  interval,  benthic  foraminifera  possibly
transported  from  the  adjacent  reef  areas  are  enriched  in  the
limestone interlayers and provide a clear correlation between
the SBZ 23 and O6 Zone (Berggren et al. 1995; Cahuzac &
Poignant  1997).  Thus,  the  integrated  foraminiferal  data  re-
veals that the lagoonal or protected shallow and the overlying
deep  marine  intervals  might  be  dated  to  the  late  Rupelian—
Chattian age which is conformable with some previous studies
(e.g.  Lüttig  &  Steffens  1976;  Gökçen  1981;  Çubuk  &  I

·

nan

1998; Poisson et al. 1997; Vrielynck et al. 2012).

The  Lower  Miocene  sections  indicate  an  environmental

modification from protected shallow water and algal reef set-
tings to either shallow open marine or deep marine environ-
ments. The SBZ 24 of the Aquitanian is well recorded by the
presence  of  Miogypsina  gunteri  and  documents  the  third
foraminiferal  biofacies  of  shallow  marine,  whereas  the  lack
of biostratigraphic marker species of planktonic foraminifera
makes  it  difficult  to  establish  a  precise  biozonation  for  this
time interval. Nevertheless, a moderately diversified assem-
blage  points  to  a  deep  marine  setting  and  is  referable  to
a  tentative  M1  Zone  of  early  Aquitanian  based  on  the  ab-
sence  of  both  Oligocene  taxa  and  Globigerinoides  species
such  as  trilobus,  sacculifer  and  quadrilobatus  which  com-
monly occurred in the late Aquitanian.

The planktonic foraminifera are mainly characterized by the

common  to  abundant  occurrences  of  small  simple  morpho-
types  inhabiting  in  near  surface  water  such  as  Globigerina,
Cassigerinella,  Globoturborotalita  
and  Dentoglobigerina
throughout  the  Chattian-Aquitanian  interval.  This  group  is

Fig. 11. Selected benthic foraminiferal species from the studied sections in the Sivas Basin. 1 – Miogypsinella complanata (Schlumberger),
axial view, Eg˘ribucak 36/1; 2 – Miogypsinella complanata (Schlumberger), equatorial view, Tuzlagözü 6/1; 3 – Miogypsinella borodin-
ensis
  Hanzawa,  equatorial  view,  Eg˘ribucak  34/1c; 4  –  Postmiogypsinella intermedia  Sirel  &  Gedik,  equatorial  view,  Eg˘ribucak  34/1c;
5  –  Postmiogypsinella  intermedia  Sirel  &  Gedik,  equatorial  view,  Eg˘ribucak  36/2;  6  –  Miogypsina  gunteri  Cole,  equatorial  view,
I

·

han

l

 8/6; 7 – Miogypsina gunteri Cole, equatorial view, I

·

han

l

 

8/4; 8 – Miogypsina tani Drooger, equatorial view, Akçamescit 14/5—6;

9 – Miogypsina tani Drooger, equatorial view, Akçamescit 14/5—5; 10 – Nephrolepidina morgani Lemoine & Douville, equatorial view,
I

·

han

l

 

7;  11  –  Nephrolepidina  morgani  Lemoine  &  Douville,  equatorial  view,  Akçamescit  9/5;  12  –  Spiroclypeus  cf.  blanckenhorni

Henson,  equatorial  view,  Tuzlagözü  6/3;  13  –  Spiroclypeus  cf.  blanckenhorni  Henson,  axial  view,  Tuzlagözü  6/4;  14  –  Operculina
complanata
 Defrance, equatorial view, I

·

han

l

 

6/1; 15 – Operculina complanata Defrance, equatorial view, I

·

han

l

 

6/3 (Scale bar: 250 µm

for 1—9 and 500 µm for 10—15).

background image

36

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

associated  with  Tenuitella,  Globorotaloides  and  Globige-
rinella
 which are the representatives of subsurface habitats.
A  mixed  occurrence  of  these  two  groups  together  with  rare
specimens  of  Paragloborotalia  possibly  provide  evidence
for warm to temperate conditions and intermediate depths of
the water column.

Acknowledgements:  This  study  was  carried  out  as  part  of
project ÇAYDAG-109Y041, supported by the Scientific and
Research  Council  of  Turkey  (TÜBITAK).  Two  anonymous
reviewers  and  the  handling  editor  Ján  Soták  are  gratefully
acknowledged for constructive comments greatly improving
the early version of the manuscript. We would like to thank
Martin C. Styan for linguistic improvement of the final text.

References

Akgün F., Kaya T., Forsten A. & Atalay Z. 2000: Biostratigraphic

data  (Mammalia  and  Palynology)  from  the  Upper  Miocene
I

·

ncesu Formation at Düzyayla (Hafik-Sivas, Central Anatolia).

Turkish J. Earth Sci. 9, 57—67.

Aktimur H.T., Tekirli M.E. & Yurdakul M.E. 1990: Geology of the

Sivas-Erzincan  Tertiary  Basin.  Bulletin  of  Mineral  Research
and Exploration (MTA)
 111, 25—36 (in Turkish).

Al-Banna N. 2004: Microfacies analysis of Oligocene formations in

Butmah and Rafan areas, northwest Iraq. Iraqi J. Earth Sci. 4,
8—21.

Alegret L., Cruz L.E., Fenero R., Molina E., Ortiz S. & Thomas E.

2008: Effects of the Oligocene climatic events on the forami-
niferal  record  from  Fuente  Caldera  section  (Spain,  western
Tethys).  Palaeogeogr.  Palaeoclimatol.  Palaeoecol.  269,
94—102.

Amirshahkarami  M.,  Vaziri-Moghaddam  H.  &  Taheri  A.  2007:

Sedimentary  facies  and  sequence  stratigraphy  of  the  Asmari
Formation  at  Chaman-Bolbol,  Zagros  Basin,  Iran.  J.  Asian
Earth Sci.
 29, 947—959.

Artan Ü. & Sestini G. 1971: Geology of Sivas-Zara-Beypazar

l

  re-

gion. Bulletin of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA) 76,
80—97 (in Turkish).

Bassi D., Hottinger L. & Nebelsick J.H. 2007: Larger foraminifera

from  the  Upper  Oligocene  of  the  Venetian  area,  north-east
Italy. Palaeontology 50, 845—868.

Baykal F. & Erentöz C. 1966: Explanatory text of 1/500.000 scale

geological map of Turkey, Sivas sheet. Publication of General
Directorate  of  Mineral  Research  and  Exploration  (MTA)
,
Ankara, 1—116 (in Turkish).

Berggren W.A. & Pearson P.N. 2005: A revised tropical to subtro-

pical Paleogene planktonic foraminiferal zonation:  Journal of
Foraminiferal Research
 35, 279—298.

Berggren  W.A.,  Kent  D.V.,  Swisher  C.C.  &  Aubry  M.P.  1995:

A  revised  Cenozoic  geochronology  and  chronostratigraphy.
In:  Berggren  W.A.,  Kent  D.V.,  Swisher  C.C.,  Aubry  M.P.  &
Hardenbol J. (Eds.): Geochronology, Time Scales and Global
Stratigraphic Correlation. Society of Economic Paleontologists
and  Mineralogists  (SEPM),  Special  Publication
  54,  Tulsa,
129—212.

Berggren  W.A.,  Pearson  P.N.,  Huber  B.T.  &  Wade  B.S.  2006:

Taxonomy, biostratigraphy and phylogeny of Eocene Acarinina.
In:  Pearson  P.N.,  Olsson  R.K.,  Huber  B.T.,  Hemleben  C.  &
Berggren  W.A.  (Eds.):  Atlas  of  Eocene  Planktonic  Forami-
nifera. Cushman Foundation Special Publication 41, 257—326.

Bizon G., Biju-Duval B., Letouzey J., Monod O., Poisson A., Özer

B. & Öztümer E. 1974: Nouvelles précisions stratigraphiques
concernant les bassins tertiaires du sud de la Turquie (Antalya,
Mut, Adana). Revue de L’Institut du Pétrole 29, 305—324.

Blow  W.H.  1969:  Late  middle  Eocene  to  Recent  planktonic  fora-

miniferal  biostratigraphy.  In  Brönnimann  P.  &  Renz  H.H.
(Eds.):  Proceedings  of  the  First  International  Conference  on
Planktonic  Microfossils,  Geneva,  v.  1.  E.  J.  Brill,  Leiden,
199—422.

Blumenthal  M.  1938:  Geological  investigation  of  Hekimhan-

Kangal-Hasançelebi region (Eastern Taurides). General Direc-
torate  of  Mineral  Research  and  Exploration  (MTA)
  Report
no. 570 (unpublished).

Bolli H.M. & Saunders J.B. 1985: Oligocene to Holocene low lati-

tude planktonic foraminifera. In: Bolli H.M., Saunders J.B. &
Perch-Nielsen  K.  (Eds.):  Plankton  Stratigraphy.  Cambridge
University Press
, Cambridge, 155—262.

Boukhary M., Kuss J. & Abdelraouf M. 2008: Chattian larger fora-

minifera from Risan Aneiza, northern Sinai, Egypt, and impli-
cations for Tethyan paleogeography, Stratigraphy 5, 179—192.

Cahuzac B. & Poignant A. 1997: Essai de biozonation de l’Oligo—

Miocène  dans  les  bassins  européens  à  l’aide  des  grands  fora-
minifères néritiques. Bull. Soc. Géol. France 168, 155—169.

Cater J.M.L., Hanna S.S., Ries A.C. & Tuner P. 1991: Tertiary evo-

lution of the Sivas Basin, Central Turkey. Tectonophysics 195,
29—46.

Çiner A. & Ko un E. 1996: Stratigraphy and sedimentology of the

Oligo—Miocene  deposits  in  the  south  of  Hafik  (Sivas  Basin).
Bull.  Turkish  Assoc.  Petrol.  Geologists  8,  16-34  (in  Turkish
with English abstract).

Çiner  A.,  Ko un  E.  &  Deynoux  M.  2002:  Fluvial,  evaporitic  and

shallow marine facies architecture, depositional evolution and
cyclicity in the Sivas Basin (Lower to Middle Miocene), Cen-
tral Turkey. J. Asian Earth Sci. 21, 147—165.

Coccioni R., Montanari A., Bellanca A., Bice D.M., Brinkhuis H.,

Church  N.,  Deino  A.,  Lirer  F.,  Macalady  A.,  Maiorano  P.,
Marsili A., McDaniel A., Monechi S., Neri R., Nini C., Nocchi
M., Pross J., Rochette P., Sagnotti L., Sprovieri M., Tateo F.,
Touchard Y., Van Simaeys S. & Williams G.L. 2008: Integrated
stratigraphy of the Oligocene pelagic sequence in the Umbria-
Marche basin (Northeastern Apennines, Italy): a potential Glo-
bal  Stratotype  Section  and  Point  (GSSP)  for  the  Rupelian/
Chattian boundary. Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull. 120, 487—511.

Coxall H.K. & Pearson P.N. 2006: Taxonomy, biostratigraphy and

phylogeny  of  the  Hantkeninidae  (Clavigerinella,  Hantkenina
and Cribrohantkenina). In: Pearson P.N., Olsson R.K., Huber
B.T., Hemleben C. & Berggren W.A. (Eds.): Atlas of Eocene
Planktonic Foraminifera. Cushman Foundation Special Publi-
cation
 41, 213—256.

Çubuk Y. & I

·

nan S. 1998: Stratigraphic and tectonic features of the

Miocene Basin in the south of I

·

mranl

l

 Bulletin of Mineral Re-

search and Exploration (MTA) 120, 45—60 (in Turkish).

de Bruijn H., Ünay E., Van den Hoek Ostende L. & Saraç G. 1992.

A  new  association  of  small  mammals  from  the  lowermost
Lower Miocene of Central Anatolia. Geobios 25, 651—671.

de Mulder E.F.J. 1975: Microfauna and sedimentary-tectonic histo-

ry  of  the  Oligo—Miocene  of  the  Ionian  Islands  and  western
Epirus  (Greece).  Utrecht  Micropaleontological  Bulletins  13,
Utrecht Universitet, 1—140.

Dirik  K.,  Göncüog˘lu  C.  &  Kozlu  H.  1999:  Stratigraphy  and  pre-

Miocene  tectonic  evolution  of  the  southwestern  part  of  the
Sivas  Basin,  Central  Anatolia,  Turkey.  Geol.  Journal  34,
303—319.

Dizer  A.  1962:  Foraminifera  of  the  Miocene  of  the  Sivas  Basin

(Turkey).  Bulletin  of  Faculty  of  Science,  Istanbul  University,
Seri B
 1—2, 49—83.

Drooger C.W. 1954: Miogypsina in Northern Italy. Proceedings of

background image

37

EOCENE—MIOCENE FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, CENTRAL ANATOLIA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

the  Koninklijge  Nerderlandse  Akademie  van  Wetenschappen
57, 227—249.

Drooger C.W. 1956a: Miogypsina at Puente Viejo. Proceedings of

the  Koninklijge  Nerderlandse  Akademie  van  Wetenschappen
59, 68—72.

Drooger  C.W.  1956b:  Transatlantic  correlation  of  the  Oligo—

Miocene  by  means  of  Foraminifera.  Micropaleontology  2,
183—192.

Drooger C.W. 1963: Evolutionary trends in the Miogypsinidae. In:

Von  Koenigswald  G.H.R.,  Emeis  J.D.,  Buning  W.L.  &  Wag-
ner C.W. (Eds.): Evolutionary trends in foraminifera. Elsevier
Publishing Company
, Amsterdam, 315—349.

Drooger  C.W.  &  Magné  J.  1959:  Miogypsinids  and  planktonic

foraminifera  of  the  Algerian  Oligocene  and  Miocene.  Micro-
paleontology
 5, 273—284.

Drooger C.W., Kaasschieter J.P.H. & Keij. A.J. 1955: The micro-

fauna of the Aquitanian—Burdigalian of Southwestern France.
Proceedings  of  the  Koninklijge  Nerderlandse  Akademie  van
Wetenschappen
 21, 1—136.

Edgell  H.S.  1997:  Significance  of  reef  limestones  as  oil  and  gas

reservoirs in the Middle East and North Africa. 10

th

 Edgeworth

David  Symposium,  Department  Geology  and  Geophysics,
University of Sydney, 1—16.

Epting  M.  1980:  Sedimentology  of  Miocene  carbonate  buildups,

Central  Luconia,  offshore  Sarawak.  Geological  Society  of
Malaysia, Bulletin
 12, 17—30.

Erünal-Erentöz  L.  1956:  Stratigraphie  des  Bassins  Neogenes  de

Turquie,  plus  specialement  d’Anatolie  Meridionale  et  com-
paraisons avec le Domaine Mediterranean dans son ensemble.
Publication  of  Mineral  Research  and  Exploration  Institute,
Serie C
 No. 3, 1—50.

Fenero R., Cotton L., Molina E. & Monechi S. 2013: Micropalaeonto-

logical evidence for the late Oligocene Oi-2b global glaciation
event at the Zarabanda section, Spain. Palaeogeogr. Palaeocli-
matol. Palaeoecol.
 369, 1—13.

Ferrero Mortara E. 1987: Miogypsinidi della serie Oligo—Miocenica

della  collina  di  Torino  (Italia  nord-Occidentale).  Bollettino
della Società Paleontologica Italiana
 26, 119—150.

Flügel  E.  1982:  Microfacies  Analysis  of  Limestones.  Springer-

Verlag, Berlin, 1—633.

Gökçen  S.L.  1981:  Sedimentology  and  paleogeographic  evolution

of Paleogene succession in the south of Zara-Hafik. Bull. Earth
Sci.,  Hacettepe  University
  8,  1—25  (in  Turkish  with  English
abstract).

Gökçen  S.L.  &  Kelling  G.  1985:  Oligocene  deposits  of  the  Zara-

Hafik  region  (Sivas,  Central  Turkey):  evolution  from  storm-
infuenced shelf to evaporitic basin. Geol. Rdsch. 74, 139—153.

Gündog˘an  I

·

.,  Önal  M.  &  Depçi  T.  2005:  Sedimentology,  petro-

graphy  and  diagenesis  of  Eocene—Oligocene  evaporites:
The  Tuzhisar  Formation,  SW  Sivas  Basin,  Turkey.  J.  Asian
Earth Sci.
 25, 791—803.

Hakyemez A. & Toker V. 2010: Planktonic foraminiferal biostrati-

graphy from the sedimentary cover of Troodos Massif, Northern
Cyprus:  Remarks  on  Aquitanian—Langhian  biozonation.
Stratigraphy 7, 33—59.

Haq B.U., Hardenbol J. & Vail P.R. 1988: Mesozoic and Cenozoic

chronostratigraphy and cycles of sea-level change. In: Wilgus
C.K.,  Hastings  B.S.,  Posamentier  H.W.,  Van  Wagoner  J.C.,
Ross C.A. & Kendall C.G.S.C. (Eds.): Sea-Level Changes –
An Integrated Approach. Society of Economic Paleontologists
and Minerologists, Special Publication
 42, 71—108.

Husing  S.K.,  Zachariasse  W.J.,  van  Hinsbergen  D.J.J.,  Krijgsman

W.,  I

·

nceöz  M.,  Harzhauser  M.,  Mandic  O.  &  Kroh  A.  2009:

Oligocene—Miocene  basin  evolution  in  SE  Anatolia,  Turkey:
constraints  on  the  closure  of  the  eastern  Tethys  gateway.  In:
Van  Hinsbergen  D.J.J.,  Edwards  M.A.  &  Govers  R.  (Eds.):

Collision and Collapse at the Africa—Arabia—Eurasia Subduc-
tion Zone. Geol. Soc. London, Spec. Publ. 311, 107—132.

Iaccarino  S.,  Borsetti  A.  M.  &  Rögl  F.  1996:  Planktonic  forami-

nifera  of  the  Neogene  Lemme—Carrosio  GSSP  Section  (Pied-
mont, Northern Italy). Giornale di

Geologia 58, 35—49.

I

l

k U. & Hakyemez A. 2011: Integrated Oligocene—Lower  Miocene

larger  and  planktonic  foraminiferal  biostratigraphy  of  the
Kahramanmara  Basin (Southern Anatolia, Turkey). Turkish J.
Earth Sci.
 20, 185—212.

I

·

nan  S.  &  I

·

nan  N.  1990:  The  features  of  Gürlevik  limestones  and

a  new  suggested  name  as  Tecer  formation.  Geol.  Bulletin
of Turkey
 33, 51—56 (in Turkish with English abstract).

Kangal  Ö.  &  Varol  B.  1999:  Facies  of  basin  margin  in  the  Lower

Miocene succession of Sivas Basin. Bulletin of Turkish Associa-
tion  of  Petroleum  Geologists
  11,  31—53  (in  Turkish  with
English abstract).

Kangal  Ö.,  Varol  B.  &  Özgen-Erdem  N.  2014:  An  example  from

Early  Oligocene  marine  evaporites  of  the  Sivas  Basin: 

E

ri-

bucak

 section. 67

th

 Geological Congress of Turkey, 756—757.

Kangal Ö., Poisson A., Temiz H., Karadenizli L., Varol B., Özden

S.  &  Sirel  E.  2005:  Geologic  and  sedimentologic  evolution
during the Eocene of the Sivas Basin. Report of Scientific and
Technological research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) project
(unpublished).

Kavak  K. .  &  I

·

nan  S.  2001:  Tectonostratigraphic  features  of

Savcun-Karacaören region (Ula -Sivas) in the southern margin
of  Sivas  Basin.  Bull.  Earth  Sci.,  Hacettepe  University  23,
113—127 (in Turkish with English abstract).

Kennett J.P. & Srinivasan M.S. 1983: Neogene planktonic forami-

nifera,  a  phylogenetic  atlas.  Hutchinson  Ross,  Stroudsburg,
Pennsylvania, 1—265.

Krasheninnikov  V.A.  1994:  Stratigraphy  of  the  Maastrichtian  and

Cenozoic  deposits  of  the  coastal  part  of  Northwestern  Syria
(Neoautochthon of the Bassit Ophiolite Massif). In: Krashenin-
nikov  V.A.  &  Hall  J.K.  (Eds.):  Geological  Structure  of  the
North-Eastern  Mediterranean  (Cruise 5 of the Research Vessel
‘Akademik  Nikolaj  Strakhov’).  Historical  Productions—Hall
Ltd.
, 265—276.

Kurtman  F.  1973:  Geologic  and  tectonic  structure  of  Sivas-Hafik-

Zara-Ýmranl

l

 region. Bulletin of Mineral Research and Explo-

ration (MTA) 80, 1—32 (in Turkish).

Leckie R.M., Farnham C. & Schmidt M.G. 1993: Oligocene plank-

tonic  foraminifer  biostratigraphy  of  Hole  803D  (Ontong  Java
Plateau)  and  Hole  628A  (Little  Bahama  Bank),  and  compari-
son with the southern High Latitudes. In: Berger W.H., Kroenke
L.W.,  Mayer  L.A.,  et  al.  (Eds.):  Proceedings  of  the  Ocean
Drilling  Program,  Scientific  Results,  College  Station,  TX
(Ocean Drilling Program)
 130, 113—136.

Li Q. 1987: Origin, phylogenetic development and systematic taxo-

nomy  of  the  Tenuitella  plexus  (Globigerinitidae,  Globigerini-
na). J. Foram. Res. 17, 298—320.

Li  Q.,  Jian  Z.  &  Li  B.  2004:  Oligocene—Miocene  planktonic  fora-

minifer biostratigraphy, Site 1148, northern South Chine Sea.
In: Prell W.L., Wang P., Blum P., Rea D.K. & Clemens S.C.
(Eds.): Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific
Results
 184, 1—26 [Online].

Li Q., Jian Z. & Su X. 2005: Late Oligocene rapid transformations

in the South China Sea. Mar. Micropaleont. 54, 5—25.

Li Q., Radford S.S. & Banner F.T. 1992: Distribution of microper-

forate  tenuitellid  planktonic  foraminifers  in  Holes  747  A  and
749 B, Kerguelen Plateau. In: Wise Jr. S.W. et al. (Eds.): Pro-
ceedings  of  the  Ocean  Drilling  Program,  Scientific  Results
120: College Station. Ocean Drilling Program
, 569—594.

Lüttig G. & Steffens P. 1976: Explanatory notes for the paleogeo-

graphic  Atlas  of  Turkey  (1:1,500,000)  from  the  Oligocene  to
the  Pleistocene.  Bundesanstalt  für  Geowissenchaften  und

background image

38

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

Rohstoffe, Hannover, 1—64.

Mancin N. & Pirini C. 2001: Middle Eocene to Early Miocene fora-

miniferal  biostratigraphy  in  the  Epiligurian  succession  (northern
Apennines, Italy). Riv. Ital. Paleont. Stratigr. 107, 371—393.

Menichini  M.  1999:  Planktonic  foraminiferal  biostratigraphy  and

palaeoclimatic  modelling  of  the  pelagic  Oligocene—Basal
Miocene from the Piobbico area (Marche Basin, Central Italy).
Riv. Ital. Paleont. Stratigr. 105, 417—438.

Miller  K.G.,  Aubry  M.P.,  Khan  M.J.,  Melillo  A.J.,  Kent  D.V.  &

Berggren  W.A.  1985:  Oligocene—Miocene  biostratigraphy,
magnetostratigraphy,  and  isotopic  stratigraphy  of  the  western
North Atlantic. Geology 13, 257—261.

Molina E., Gonzalvo C., Ortiz S. & Cruz L.E. 2006: Foraminiferal

turnover  across  the  Eocene—Oligocene  transition  at  Fuente
Caldera, southern Spain: No cause-effect relationship between
meteorite  impacts  and  extinctions.  Mar.  Micropaleont.  58,
270—286.

M. T. A.  2002:  1:500,000  Scale  Geologic  map  of  Turkey,  Sivas

sheet. General Directorate of Mineral Research and Explora-
tion
 (MTA, Ed. M.  enel).

Nebert K. 1956: On the stratigraphic position of gypsiferous series

in  the  Zara-I

·

mranl

l

  region  (Sivas).  Bulletin  of  Mineral

Research and Exploration (MTA) 52, 537—546 (in Turkish).

Norman T.N. 1964: 1:25,000 Scale Geological Map of Turkey, I

·

38—c2

Sheet, Geology of Celalli region. General Directorate of Mine-
ral Research and Exploration (MTA) Report
 4144 (in Turkish,
unpublished).

Ocakog˘lu  F.  2001:  Repetitive  subtidal-to-coastal  sabkha  cycles

from a Lower—Middle Miocene Marine Sequence, Eastern Sivas
Basin. Turkish J. Earth Sci. 10, 17—34.

Olsson  R.K.,  Hemleben  C.,  Pearson  P.N.  &  Berggren  W.A.  2006:

Taxonomy, biostratigraphy, and phylogeny of Eocene Globige-
rina
,  Globoturborotalita,  Subbotina,  and  Turborotalita.  In:
Pearson P.N., Olsson R.K., Huber B.T., Hemleben C. & Berg-
gren  W.A.  (Eds.):  Atlas  of  Eocene  Planktonic  Foraminifera.
Cushman Foundation Special Publication 41, 111—168.

Ouda  K.  1998:  Biostratigraphy,  paleoecology  and  paleogeography

of the middle and late Tertiary deposits of the northern Wes-
tern Desert, Egypt. N. Jb. Geol. Paläont. Abh. 207, 311—394.

Ozdínova S. & Soták J. 2015: Oligocene—Early Miocene planktonic

microbiostratigraphy and paleoenvironments of the South Slo-
vakian  Basin  (Lučenec  Depression).  Geol.  Carpathica  65,
451—470.

Özcan  E.,  Less  G.  &  Baydog˘an  E.  2009:  Regional  implication  of

biometric analysis of Lower Miocene larger foraminifera from
Central Turkey. Micropaleontology 55, 559—588.

Özçelik  O.  2000:  Source  rock  evaluation  of  Tertiary  sediments  in

the Sivas Basin, Central Anatolia. Bulletin of Faculty of Engi-
neering of Cumhuriyet University, Serie A—Earth Sciences
 17,
31—44.

Özgen-Erdem N., Kangal Ö., Varol B., Sirel E., Akkiraz S., Mayda

S.,  Karadenizli  L.

,  Tunog˘lu  C.  &  en  . 

2013:  Stratigraphy,

sedimentology  and  basin  development  of  the  Sivas  Basin
during  the  Oligocene-Miocene.  Report of Scientific and Tech-
nological research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) project
 (un-
published).

Pearson P.N., Olsson R.K., Huber B.T., Hemleben C. & Berggren

W.A.  (Eds.)  2006a:  Atlas  of  Eocene  planktonic  foraminifera.
Cushman Foundation for Foraminiferal Research Special Pub-
lication
 41, Fredericksburg, USA, 1—513.

Pearson P.N., Premec-Fucek V. & Premoli Silva I. 2006b: Taxono-

my, biostratigraphy and phylogeny of Eocene Turborotalia. In:
Pearson P.N., Olsson R.K., Huber B.T., Hemleben C. & Berg-
gren  W.A.  (Eds.):  Atlas  of  Eocene  Planktonic  Foraminifera.
Cushman Foundation Special Publication 41, 433—460.

Pisoni C. 1965: Geology of Sivas I

·

38—c2, c4 sheets. General Direc-

torate  of  Mineral  Research  and  Exploration  (MTA)  Archive
no. 21922, Ankara.

Poisson A., Temiz H. & Gürsoy H. 1992: Pliocene thrust tectonics

in the Sivas Basin near Hafik (Turkey): southward fore thrust
and  associated  northward  back  thrusts.  Bulletin  of  Faculty  of
Engineering, Cumhuriyet University
 9, 19—26.

Poisson A., Wernli R., Lozouet P., Poignant A. & Temiz H. 1997:

Nouvelles données stratigraphiques concernant les formations
oligo—miocènes  marines  du  bassin  de  Sivas  (Turquie).  Earth
and Planetary Sciences
 325, 869—875.

Poisson A., Guezou J.C., Öztürk A., I

·

nan S., Temiz H., Gürsoy H.,

Kavak K. . & Özden S. 1996: Tectonic setting and evolution
of the Sivas Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey. International Ge-
ology Review
 38, 838—853.

Premoli  Silva  I.,  Wade  B.S.  &  Pearson  P.N.  2006.  Taxonomy,

biostratigraphy,  and  phylogeny  of  Globigerinatheka  and
Orbulinoides.  In:  Pearson  P.N.,  Olsson  R.  K.,  Huber  B.T.,
Hemleben C. & Berggren W.A. (Eds.): Atlas of Eocene Plank-
tonic Foraminifera. Cushman Foundation Special Publication 41,
169—211.

Rahmani  A.,  Vaziri-Moghaddam  H.,  Taheri  A.  &  Ghabeishavi  A.

2009: A model for the paleoenvironmental distribution of larg-
er  foraminifera  of  Oligocene—Miocene  carbonates  rocks  at
Khaviz  Anticline,  Zagros  Basin,  SW  Iran.  Historical  Biology
21, 215—227.

Raju D.S.N. 1974: Study of Indian Miogypsinidae. Utrecht Micro-

paleontological Bulletins 9, 1—148.

Reuter  M.,  Piller  W.E.,  Harzhauser  M.,  Mandic  O.,  Berning  B.,

Rögl  F.,  Kroh  A.,  Aubry  M.—P.,  Wielandt-Schuster  U.  &
Hamedani  A.  2009:  The  Oligo—Miocene  Qom  Formation
(Iran):  evidence  for  an  early  Burdigalian  restriction  of  the
Tethyan  Seaway  and  closure  of  its  Iranian  gateways.  Int.  J.
Earth Sci. (Geol Rdsch.)
 98, 627—650.

Rögl F., Cita M.B., Müller C. & Hochuli P. 1975: Biochronology of

conglomerate  bearing  molasse  sediments  near  Como  (Italy).
Riv. Ital. Paleont. Stratigr. 81, 57—88.

Sajadi S.H., Baghbani D. & Daneshian J. 2014: Facies distribution,

paleoecology and sedimentary environment of the Oligocene—
Miocene  (Asmari  Formation)  deposits,  in  Qeshm  Island,  SE
Persian  Gulf.  Advances  in  Environmental  Biology  8,  2407—
2418.

Seyrafian A., Vaziri-Moghaddam H., Arzani N. & Taheri A. 2011:

Facies analysis of the Asmari Formation in central and north-
central  Zagros  basin,  southwest  Iran:  Biostratigraphy,  paleo-
ecology  and  diagnesis.  Revista  Mexicana  de  Ciencias
Geológicas
 28, 439—458.

Sharland P.R., Casey D.M., Davis R.B., Simmons M.D. & Sutcliffe

O.E. 2004: Arabian plate sequence stratigraphy. GeoArabia 9,
199—214.

Sirel  E.  1996: Praearchaias,  a  new  soritid  genus  (Foraminiferida)

and  its  Oligocene  shallow  water  foraminiferal  assemblage
from  the  Diyarbak

1

r  region  (SE  Turkey).  Geologica  Romana

32, 167—181.

Sirel E. 2003: Foraminiferal description and biostratigraphy of the

Bartonian, Priabonian and Oligocene shallow water sediments
of the southern and eastern Turkey. Revue de Paléobiologie 22,
269—339.

Sirel E., Özgen-Erdem N. & Kangal Ö. 2013: Systematics and bio-

stratigraphy  of  Oligocene  (Rupelian—Early  Chattian)  forami-
nifera from lagoonal-very shallow water limestone in the eastern
Sivas Basin (central Turkey). Geol. Croatica 66, 83—109.

Spezzaferri  S.  1994:  Planktonic  foraminiferal  biostratigraphy  and

taxonomy of the Oligocene and Lower Miocene in the oceanic
record. An Overview. Palaeontographica Italica 81, 1—187.

Spezzaferri  S.  1995:  Planktonic  foraminiferal  paleoclimatic  impli-

cations across the Oligocene/Miocene transition in the oceanic

background image

39

EOCENE—MIOCENE FORAMINIFER BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, CENTRAL ANATOLIA

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

record  (Atlantic,  Indian  and  South  Pacific).  Palaeogeogr.
Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol.
 114, 43—74.

Spezzaferri  S.  1996:  The  Oligocene/Miocene  boundary  in  the

Lemme section (Piedmont basin, northern Italy): paleoclimatic
evidence based on planktonic foraminifera. Giornale di Geolo-
gia
 58, 119—139.

Spezzaferri S. & Premoli Silva I. 1991: Oligocene planktonic fora-

miniferal biostratigraphy and paleoclimatic interpretation from
Hole  538A,  DSDP  Leg  77,  Gulf  of  Mexico.  Palaeogeogr.
Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol.
 83, 217—263.

Spezzaferri S. & Spiegler D. 2005: Fossil planktic foraminifera (an

overview). Paläont. Zeitschrift 79, 149—166.

Stchepinsky  V.  1939:  Faune  Miocene  du  vilayet  Sivas  (Turquie).

Publication  of  Mineral  Research  and  Exploration  Institute,
Monograph
 1, Ankara, 94—101.

Sümengen M., Terlemez I., Tayfun B., Gürbüz M., Ünay E, Özanar

S.  &  Tüfekçi  K.  1987:  Stratigraphy,  sedimentology  and
geomorphology  of  Tertiary  Basin  around  the  ark

l

la

-Geme-

rek region. General Directorate of Mineral Research  and Ex-
ploration (MTA) Report 
no. 8118 (in Turkish, unpublished).

engör  A.M.C.  &  Y

l

lmaz  Y.  1981:  Tethyan  evolution  of  Turkey:

a plate tectonic approach. Tectonophysics 75, 181—241.

Tekeli O., Varol B. & Gökten E. 1992: Geology of the western part

of  the  Sivas  Basin  (region  between  Tuzla  Lake  and  Tecer
Mountain).  Turkish  Petroleum  Corporation  Report  no.  3178,
Ankara (unpublished).

Tekin E. 1995: Origin of Celestine occurrences in Sivas Basin (NW

Ula )  of  Tertiary  age  and  their  sedimentologic  and  petrogra-
phical  properties.  PhD.  thesis,  Ankara  University,  Ankara  (in
Turkish with English abstract, unpublished).

Temiz  H.  1994:  Tectonostratigraphy  and  deformation  style  of

Kemah (Erzincan) and Hafik (Sivas) regions in the Sivas Ba-
sin. PhD thesis, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas (in Turkish with
English abstract, unpublished).

Toufiq  A.  &  Feinberg  H.  2000:  Planktonic  foraminifera  at  the

Paleogene—Neogene  transition  and  the  Oligocene—Miocene
boundary in the Ouled Ktir Section (Western Prerif, Northern

Morocco). Giornale di Geologia 62, 93—102.

Wade B.S. & Pearson P.N. 2008: Planktonic foraminiferal turnover,

diversity  fluctuations  and  geochemical  signals  across  the
Eocene/Oligocene  boundary  in  Tanzania. Mar.  Micropaleont.
68, 244—255.

Wade B.S., Berggren W.A. & Olsson R.K. 2007: The biostratigra-

phy  and  paleobiology  of  Oligocene  planktonic  foraminifera
from  the  equatorial  Pacific  Ocean  (ODP  Site  1218).  Mar.
Micropaleont.
 62, 167—179.

Wade  B.S.,  Pearson  P.N.,  Berggren  W.A.  &  Pälike  H.  2011.

Review  and  revision  of  Cenozoic  tropical  planktonic  forami-
niferal biostratigraphy and calibration to the geomagnetic po-
larity  and  astronomical  time  scale.  Earth  Sci.  Rev.  104,
111—142.

Vaziri-Moghaddam  H.,  Kimiagari  M.  &  Taheri  A.  2006:  Deposi-

tional  environment  and  sequence  stratigraphy  of  the  Oligo—
Miocene Asmari Formation in SW Iran. Facies 52, 41—51.

Vrielynck  B.,  Poisson  A.,  Temiz  H.  &  Orszag-Sperber  F.  2012:

Paleogeographic  evolution  of  Sivas  Basin.  65th.  Geological
Congress of Turkey
, 96—97.

Wielandt-Schuster  U.,  Schuster  F.,  Harzhauser  M.,  Mandic  O.,

Kroh A., Rögl F., Reisinger J., Liebetrau V., Steininger F.F. &
Piller E.E. 2004: Stratigraphy and palaeoecology of Oligocene
and Early Miocene sedimentary sequences of the Mesohellenic
Basin  (NW  Greece).  Courier  Forschungsinstitut  Senckenberg
248, 1—55.

Wildenborg A.F.B. 1991: Evolutionary aspects of the miogypsinid

in the Oligo—Miocene carbonates near Mineo (Sicily). Utrecht
Micropaleontological Bulletins
 41, 1—139.

Wilson  J.L.  1975:  Carbonate  facies  in  geologic  history.  Springer,

Berlin, 1—471.

Yalç

l

nlar I

·

. 1955: Geological report of Sivas 61/1, 61/2, 62/4 sheets.

General  Directorate  of  Mineral  Research  and  Exploration
(MTA) Report
 no. 2577 (in Turkish, unpublished).

Zachos  J.,  Pagani  M.,  Sloan  L.,  Thomas  E.  &  Billups  K.  2001:

Rhythms, and aberrations in global climate 65 Ma to present.
Science 292, 686—693.

background image

40

HAKYEMEZ, ÖZGEN-ERDEM and KANGAL

G

G

G

G

GEOL

EOL

EOL

EOL

EOLOGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPA

OGICA CARPATHICA

THICA

THICA

THICA

THICA, 2016, 67, 1, 21—40

Paragloborotalia sp.

(Fig. 8: 9)

The  small  and  poorly  preserved  specimen  is  considered  to
belong  to  Paragloborotalia  on  the  basis  of  position  of  the
aperture and wall texture.

Dentoglobigerina globularis (Bermúdez)

(Fig. 8: 25, 26)

Globoquadrina globularis Bermúdez, 1961, p. 1311, pl. 13, figs. 4—6

The  specimens  assigned  to  this  taxon  have  cancellate  sur-
face,  rounded  chambers  and  a  weakly  developed  umbilical
tooth.

Tenuitella munda (Jenkins)

(Fig. 10: 2)

Globorotalia munda Jenkins, 1966, p.1112, fig. 14

The smooth wall and the inflated chambers are the most typi-
cal  features  of  this  small  species.  It  differs  from  Tenuitella
clemenciae
  by  its  slightly  smaller  size  and  more  inflated
chambers.

Globigerina ouachitaensis Howe & Wallace

(Fig. 10: 4)

Globigerina  ouachitaensis  Howe  &  Wallace,  1932,  p. 74,  pl.  10,  figs.
7a—c

This species is assigned to Globoturborotalita because of its
well  developed  cancellate  surface  by  Olsson  et  al.  (2006).
Because  the  specimens  referable  to  ouachitaensis  and
gnaucki do not appear to have cancellate wall in our material
we follow the concept of Spezzaferri (1994) for two species.
Globigerina ouachitaensis is characterized by four globular
chambers in the last whorl that increase slowly in size, and
relatively wide umbilicus. It is distinguished from Globige-
rina gnaucki
 in having an umbilical aperture.

Globigerina gnaucki Blow & Banner

(Fig. 10: 5)

Globigerina  ouchitaensis  gnaucki  Blow  &  Banner,  1962,  p.  91,  pl.  9,
figs. L—N.

In  contrast  to  Globigerina  ouachitaensis  this  species  has
a  distinctly  umbilical-extraumbilical  aperture.  The  distribu-
tion of Globigerina gnaucki is from the E11 Zone to the O2
Zone  according  to  Olsson  et  al.  (2006),  but  ranges  up  into
the Miocene according to Spezzaferri (1994).

Tenuitella clemenciae (Bermúdez)

(Fig. 10: 8, 9)

Turborotalia clemenciae Bermúdez, 1961, p. 1321, pl. 17, figs. 10a, b

Specimens referable to this species have four chambers mode-
rately increasing in size in the last whorl, weakly pustulose

surface  on  the  umblical  side  and  low  arched  aperture  with
a bordered lip, triangular plate in shape. Kennett & Srinivasan
(1983) report the FO of this species from the base of the N5
Zone, whereas it ranges down into the Lower Oligocene ac-
cording to Blow (1969), Li (1987) and Spezzaferri (1994).

Globigerina fariasi Bermúdez

(Fig. 10: 10)

Globigerina fariasi Bermúdez, 1961, p. 1181, pl.3, figs. 5a—c.

A high trochospiral arrangement of the chambers is the spe-
cific  feature  that  distinguishes  Globigerina  fariasi  from
Globigerina ciperoensis.

Globigerinita sp.

(Fig. 10: 11)

The specimen referred to this taxon appears to be a morpho-
logically  transitional  form  between  Globigerinita  juvenilis
and G. uvula. It differs from G. incrusta and G. glutinata by
its high-spired and non-bullate test.

Globorotaloides suteri Bolli

(Fig. 8: 12, 17)

Globorotaloides suteri Bolli, 1957, p. 117, pl. 27, figs. 13a—c.

This species has a considerable variation in the shape of the
small  and  four-  chambered  test  due  to  often  having  a  bulla
that is variable in size and shape

Catapsydrax martini (Blow & Banner)

(Fig. 10: 16)

Globigerinita martini martini Blow & Banner, 1962, p. 110, pl. 14,  fig. O

It  is  characterized  by  a  small  test  with  four  globular  cham-
bers rapidly increasing in size in the last whorl and a smaller
bulla-like last chamber.

Globorotaloides permicrus (Blow & Banner)

(Fig. 10: 15, 27)

Globorotalia  (Turborotalia)  permicra  Blow  &  Banner,  1962,  p.  120,
pl. 12, figs. N—P.

It is characterized by a strongly cancellate surface. It differs
from Globorotaloides variabilis in having rapidly enlarging
chambers  in  the  last  whorl  and  smaller  umbilicus;  differs
from Globorotaloides suteri in lacking the bulla.

Globorotaloides variabilis Bolli

(Fig. 10: 28)

Globorotaloides variabilis Bolli, 1957, p. 117, pl. 27, figs. 15a—20c

It has a distinctly cancellate surface and flattened spiral side.
We differentiate this species from Globrotaloides suteri and
Globrotaloides permicrus by its less rapidly enlarging cham-
bers and wide umbilicus.

Taxonomic appendix for planktonic foraminifera

The appendix briefly describes 12 taxa and provides commentary regarding our taxonomic assignments.