background image

www.geologicacarpathica.com

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, AUGUST 2014, 65, 4, 273—284                                                         doi: 10.2478/geoca-2014-0018

LA-ICP-MS U-Pb apatite dating of Lower Cretaceous rocks

from teschenite-picrite association in the Silesian Unit

(southern Poland)

KRZYSZTOF SZOPA

1

, ROMAN WŁODYKA

1

 and DAVID CHEW

2

1

Faculty of Earth Science, University of Silesia, Będzińska Str. 60, 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland;

krzysztof.szopa@us.edu.pl;  roman.wlodyka@us.edu.pl

2

Department of Geology, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland;  chewd@tcd.ie

(Manuscript received February 6, 2014; accepted in revised form June 5, 2014)

Abstract: The main products of volcanic activity in the teschenite-picrite association (TPA) are shallow, sub-volcanic
intrusions, which predominate over extrusive volcanic rocks. They comprise a wide range of intrusive rocks which fall
into two main groups: alkaline (teschenite, picrite, syenite, lamprophyre) and subalkaline (dolerite). Previous 

40

Ar/

39

Ar

and 

40

K/

40

Ar dating of these rocks in the Polish Outer Western Carpathians, performed on kaersutite, sub-silicic dio-

pside, phlogopite/biotite as well as on whole rock samples has yielded Early Cretaceous ages. Fluorapatite crystals were
dated by the U-Pb LA-ICP-MS method to obtain the age of selected magmatic rocks (teschenite, lamprophyre) from the
Cieszyn igneous province. Apatite-bearing samples from Boguszowice, Puńców and Lipowa yield U-Pb ages of 103 ± 20 Ma,
119.6 ± 3.2 Ma  and  126.5 ± 8.8 Ma,  respectively.  The  weighted  average  age  for  all  three  samples  is  117.8 ± 7.3  Ma
(MSWD = 2.7). The considerably smaller dispersion in the apatite ages compared to the published amphibole and biotite
ages is probably caused by the U-Pb system in apatite being less susceptible to the effects of hydrothermal alternation
than the 

40

Ar/

39

Ar or 

40

K/

40

Ar system in amphibole and/or biotite. Available data suggest that volcanic activity in the

Silesian Basin took place from 128 to 103 Ma with the the main magmatic phase constrained to 128—120 Ma.

Key words: geochronology, U-Pb dating, Outer Western Carpathians, Cieszyn magmatic province, apatite.

Introduction

The  Early  Cretaceous  alkaline  volcanic  region,  with  the  te-
schenite-picrite  association  (TPA)  of  volcanic  rocks,  is
unique to the western part of the Outer Western Carpathians.
This magmatic province ( ~ 1500 km

2

) is 15—25 km wide and

extends  in  a  NE  direction  for  over  100 km  from  Hranice  in
Moravia,  Czech  Republic,  to  Cieszyn  and  Bielsko-Biała  in
Poland (Fig. 1). Teschenite is named after the original German
name  for  the  Teschen  locality  that  is  now  divided  into  two
parts: Těšín (in the Czech Republic) and Cieszyn (in Poland).
The term “teschenite” (originally teschinite) was used for the
first time by Hohenegger (1861) to describe all granular rocks
from  the  Moravo-Silesian  Beskids  Mountains.  Tschermak
(1866) distinguished melanocratic olivine-rich rocks (picrite),
confining the term teschenite to olivine-free granular rocks.
The studies of Smulikowski in Cieszyn (Smulikowski 1929)
and the region as a whole (Smulikowski 1930) along with the
work  of  Pacák  (1926),  Mahmood  (1973),  and  Kudlásková
(1987) have provided basic knowledge on the chemistry and
petrography of these rocks.

The main products of volcanic activity in the TPA are shal-

low,  sub-volcanic  intrusions,  which  predominate  over  erup-
tive  volcanic  rocks.  In  the  Moravian  part  of  the  Cieszyn
magmatic province they form submarine lava flows, sills and
dykes,  while  in  the  Polish  sector,  they  chiefly  comprise  sill
complexes  and  more  rarely  dykes  with  thicknesses  varying
from a few centimeters to 40 meters (Konior 1963; Lemberger
1971).  Minor  amounts  of  submarine  volcanism  in  Cieszyn

(Puńców  and  Zamarski)  were  described  by  Gucwa  et  al.
(1971).  The  teschenite-picrite  association  contains  a  wide
range  of  intrusive  rocks  which  belong  to  two  main  groups:
alkaline  (teschenite,  picrite,  syenite,  lamprophyre)  and  sub-
alkaline (typically dolerite) (Fig. 2). Based on modal relation-
ships  between  plagioclase  and  alkaline  feldspars  three
varieties of teschenites can be distinguished: theralitic, essex-
itic and monzonitic (Smulikowski 1929, 1930). The nepheline
syenites  occur  only  as  small  irregular  bodies  with  sharp
boundaries in the upper part of the teschenite sills or as veins
cross-cutting the upper or lower chilled margins. They consti-
tute the final product of the extensive fractional crystallization
in individual teschenite sills and do not form independent in-
trusions.  Dolerites  are  not    very  common  rocks  within  the
TPA. They contain high concentrations of SiO

2

; some of the

dolerite  samples  are  quartz  and  hyperstene  normative  while
others are nepheline normative using a CIPW normative min-
eralogy calculation (Fig. 2). Monchiquite, sannaite and camp-
tonite  represent  the  alkaline  lamprophyre  group  in  the  TPA
(Smulikowski  1929,  1930).  They  are  very  common  through-
out the region and form sills up to 4-6 meters thick. According
to  Wieser  (1971),  contact  metamorphic  assemblages  indicate
that temperatures of 400—500 °C were reached in the aureoles
(diopside-sanidine hornfels facies) of the thickest sills.

The  volcanic  activity  was  sited  in  a  zone  parallel  to  the

axis of the Proto-Silesian Basin (Hovorka & Spišiak 1988).
It  was  confined  to  isolated  tensional  fissures  (Hovorka  &
Spišiak 1988) and the upwelling magma was emplaced in an
extensional  horst-graben  system  mainly  as  sills  into  uncon-

background image

274

SZOPA, WŁODYKA and CHEV

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

solidated Cretaceous sediments. Sometimes, on reaching the
sea-floor, they flowed laterally to form local lava piles. This
initial  rifting  phase  never  resulted  in  sea-floor  spreading
(Nemčok et al. 2001). The major- and trace-element patterns,

and also the Nd-Sr isotopic values, indicate that the parental
magma  of  the  differentiated  rocks  series  of  the  TPA  was
likely  to  have  been  the  product  of  partial  melting  in  an  en-
riched,  HIMU  OIB-like  upper  mantle  (Narębski  1990;
Dostal & Owen 1998; Harangi et al. 2003; Włodyka 2010).
The  generation  of  magma  is  inferred  to  have  occurred  at
depths  of  70—80 km  (Włodyka  2010).  Spišiak  et  al.  (2011)
interpreted the Cretaceous alkaline volcanism in the Alpine-
Carpathian-Pannonian realm as a result of partial melting of
Sub-Continental  Lithospheric  Mantle  (SCLM)  on  the  peri-
pheries  of  upwellings  of  asthenospheric  mantle  confined  to
slow-spreading ridges of the Alpine Tethys.

Most researchers agree on an Early Cretaceous age for the

TPA, with the exception of Konior (1977) who proposed two
main  magmatic  phases  during  the  Cretaceous  and  Miocene
in the Silesian Basin. 

40

Ar/

39

Ar and 

40

K/

40

Ar dating (see Ta-

ble 1) on amphibole, pyroxene, phlogopite and biotite from a
variety of rock types within the TPA (Lucińska-Anczkiewicz
et al. 2002; Grabowski et al. 2003; Harangi et al. 2003) have
yielded  Early  Cretaceous  ages.  Available  geochronological
and  biostratigraphic  data  indicate  that  Cretaceous  alkaline
volcanism  in  the  Western  Carpathians  (in  various  tectonic
units of the central and external zones) started during the ear-
liest  Cretaceous  (at  ca.  140 Ma)  and  culminated  during  the
Aptian and early Albian (from 125 to 100 Ma – Spišiak et
al.  2011).  In  Central  Europe,  Lower  Cretaceous  alkaline
rocks which exhibit close genetic and tectonomagmatic rela-
tionships  to  the  TPA  occur  in  the  Mecsek-Alföld  Igneous
Province (southern Hungary, Harangi et al. 2003). K-Ar age

Fig. 1. Simplified geological map of the tectonic elements of the Outer Western Carpathians modified after Żytko et al. (1989). The white
asterisks indicate the location of the teschenitic rocks investigated in this study. All magmatic rock localities are after Włodyka (2010).

Fig. 2. Chemical classification of the TPA rocks using a TAS dia-
gram  (analyses  recalculated  to  100 %  on  an  anhydrous  basis).
Pc – picrobasalt, U

1a

 – basanite, U

1b

 – tephrite, U

2

 – phonoteph-

rite, U

3

 – tephriphonolite, Ph – phonolite, B – basalt, S

1

 – tra-

chybasalt,  S

2

  –  basaltic  trachyandesite,  O

1

  –  basaltic  andesite.

Filled  symbols  represent  data  from:  Smulikowski  1929;  Mahmood
1973; Kudlásková 1987; Dostal & Owen 1998;  Włodyka 2010.

background image

275

APATITE DATING OF LOWER CRETACEOUS TESCHENITES AND PICRITES (SOUTHERN POLAND)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

data  range  between  130  and  110 Ma  (Harangi  &  Árva-Sós
1993). Mesozoic teschenites are rare elsewhere although oc-
curences  have  been  documented  in  Georgia  (Lebedev  et  al.
2009), the French Pyrenees (Azambre et al. 1992; Storetvedt
et  al.  1999)  and  Russia  (Transbaikalia  –  Metelkin  et  al.
2004; Stupak et al. 2004) where volcanic activity associated
with teschenite emplacement occured during the Late Creta-
ceous (from 86 to 110 Ma).

In  this  paper  LA-ICP-MS  U-Pb  data  of  apatite  separated

from  from  teschenite  and  monchiquite  rocks  from  the  TPA
are  presented.  Of  the  five  main  types  of  magmatic  rocks  in
the  TPA  (Fig. 2),  three  (from  Lipowa,  Boguszowice  and
Puńców) yielded sufficient high quality apatite mineral sepa-
rates suitable for LA-ICP-MS analysis.

Geological setting and sampling

The Outer Carpathians are sub-divided into the Subsilesian,

Silesian, Fore-Magura and Magura Units (Nappes) (Oszczypko
2006) which are the structural remnants of several basins de-
veloped on the margin of the European Platform that were in-
corporated  later  into  the  Tertiary  Carpathian  accretionary
wedge  (Fig. 1).  The  Proto-Silesian  Basin  (Waśkowska  et  al.
2009)  developed  during  Late  Jurassic  times  as  a  rift  and/or
back-arc basin. It existed until Late Cretaceous times when it
was  tectoncially  compartmentalized  into  the  Silesian  and
Skole basins. The oldest sediments in the western part of the
Proto-Silesian  Basin  are  represented  by  marly  shales  of  the
Vendryně  Shale  Formation,  previously  termed  the  Lower
Cieszyn  Shales  of  Oxfordian-Tithonian  age.  This  formation
passes  upwards  into  turbiditic  limestones  and  marls  of  the
Cieszyn  Limestone  Formation  (Tithonian—Valanginian).  The
overlying  Valanginian—Aptian  Hradiště  Formation  comprises
calcareous shales with intercalations of calcareous sandstones.
Within  this  formation  two  members  are  distinguishable:  a
shaly facies termed the Cisownica Member (formerly termed

the Upper Cieszyn Shales) and a sandstone
facies  termed  the  Piechowka  Member.  The
Hradiště  Formation  is  overlain  by  Aptian—
Albian black shales of the Veřovice Forma-
tion  which  are  in  turn  overlain  by
Albian—Early  Cenomanian  black  shales  of
the Lhoty Formation.

During  Late  Jurassic  to  Aptian  times  the

development of the Outer Carpathian basins
was controlled by normal faulting and syn-
rift  subsidence  which  was  associated  with
alkaline  volcanism  in  the  Western  Car-
pathians.  This  was  followed  by  post-rift
thermal subsidence, resulting in the Albian-
Cenomanian  expansion  of  deep-water  fa-
cies  (Nemčok  et  al.  2001;  Poprawa  et  al.
2002).  The  sills  of  alkaline  rocks  occur
mainly  in  the  lower  part  of  the  Hradiště
Formation  (the  Cisownica  Member)  and
sporadically  within  the  underlying  Cieszyn
Limestone  Formation  and  the  Vendryně
Shale Formation. Redeposited fragments of

Locality 

Rock type 

Analyzed fraction  Age (Ma) 

teschenite amphibole 

122.0

±1.5

*

 122.4

±1.1

Boguszowice 

monchikite apatite 

103

±20

**** 

Międzyrzecze picrite 

flogopite 

126.4

±1.8

**

, 133.4

±1.8

** 

Lipowa 

monchikite apatite 

126.5

±8.8

**** 

amphibole 

111.7

±1.8

**

, 97.0

±1.8

**

, 99.4

±1.6

**

89.9

±3.5

**

, 96.3

±3.7

*** 

biotite 

134.9

±2.0

**

, 137.9

±2.0

** 

teschenite 

apatite 

119.6

±3.2

**** 

Puńców 

syenite amphibole 

120.4

±1.3

Rudów teschenite 

amphibole 122.2

±0.9

*

, 112.5

±1.6

** 

Świętoszówka dolerite  pyroxene 

122.7

±4.7

*** 

Horní Bludovice  basalt 

pyroxene 

122.4

±6.4

*** 

Nový Jičín lamprophyre  amphibole 

109.2

±4.2

*** 

Markov teschenite 

amphibole/biotite 

109.8

±4.6

*** 

Straník camptonite 

amphibole 113.6

±4.4

*** 

Žilina camptonite 

amphibole 

128.3

±5.6

*** 

Životice lamprophyre  biotite 

106.1

±4.4

*** 

Table 1:  Radiometric  age  data  for  the  Early  Cretaceous  alkaline  rocks  of  the  TPA.
*  – 

40

Ar/

39

Ar,  Lucińska-Anczkiewicz  et  al.  (2002);  **  – 

40

K/

40

Ar,  Grabowski  et  al.

(2003); *** – 

40

K/

40

Ar, Harangi et al. (2003); **** – Apatite U-Pb data from this study.

these rocks have been recognized in Albian sediments of the
Lhoty  Formation  (Geroch  et  al.  1972).  The  TPA  rocks  en-
countered  at  Stara  Wieś  (Nowak  1978),  Bacharowice
(Gucwa & Wieser 1985) and boreholes in the Skoczów area
(Konior 1959) represent detached blocks in Miocene depos-
its  and  are  believed  to  have  been  derived  from  the  Cieszyn
Beds.  Heavy  mineral  studies  from  the  Hradiště  Formation
(Cisownica  Member)  next  to  the  top  of  a  theralite  teschenite
sill  in  Rudów  (Szczurowska  1961)  showed  the  presence  of
detrital diopside and kaersutite grains in shale. Their origin is
interpreted as the result of a disaggregation of these early te-
schenite  sills  in  submarine  conditions.  It  has  been  assumed
that the age of these submarine eruptions was contemporane-
ous with the deposition of the Upper Cieszyn Shales at Ru-
dowo (Late Valanginian – Grabowski et al. 2003). The above
stratigraphic data suggest the duration of the alkaline volcan-
ism ranged from the Valanginian through to the Aptian.

Analytical techniques

Apatite crystals were separated using standard techniques,

including: crushing, hydrofracturing, washing, Wilfley shak-
ing  table,  Frantz  magnetic  separator  and  handpicking.  The
separation was undertaken at the Institute of Geological Sci-
ences, Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow.

The morphology and chemical homogeneity of apatite crys-

tals  were  investigated  using  a  scanning  FET  Philips  30  elec-
tron  microscope  (15 kV  and  1 nA)  equipped  with  an  EDS
(EDAX) detector at the Faculty of Earth Sciences, University
of Silesia, Sosnowiec, Poland.

Apatite analyses (major/minor elements) were carried out

in the Inter-Institution Laboratory of Microanalyses of Min-
erals and Synthetic Substances, Warsaw (CAMECA SX-100
electron microprobe; 1 kV, 2 nA). The apatite analyses have
been calculated to the sum of 50 negative charges including
24  oxygen  ions  and  two  monovalent  anions  (fluorine  site),

background image

276

SZOPA, WŁODYKA and CHEV

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

according  to  the  ideal  chemical  formula  of  apatite:
A

10

(BO

4

)

6

(X)

2

 where the A site is occupied by Ca, Fe, Mn,

Mg, Th, REE, Y and Na, the B site by P (substituted by S, Si)
and the X site by F, Cl and OH

 ions. The hydroxyl content

was  calculated  by  normalization  assumming  ideal  stoichio-
metry (i.e. no vacancies in the X site so that F + CI + OH

= 2).

Apatite U-Pb data were acquired using a Photon Machines

Analyte  Exite  193 nm  ArF  Excimer  laser-ablation  system
coupled to a Thermo Scientific iCAP Qc at the Department
of  Geology  Trinity  College  Dublin.  Twenty-eight  isotopes
(

31

P, 

35

Cl, 

43

Ca, 

55

Mn, 

86

Sr, 

89

Y, 

139

La, 

140

Ce, 

141

Pr, 

146

Nd,

147

Sm, 

153

Eu, 

157

Gd, 

159

Tb, 

163

Dy, 

165

Ho, 

166

Er, 

169

Tm, 

172

Yb,

175

Lu, 

200

Hg, 

204

Pb, 

206

Pb, 

207

Pb, 

208

Pb, 

232

Th, 

238

U and mass

248(

232

Th

16

O) were acquired using a 50 µm laser spot, a 4 Hz

laser repetition rate and a fluence of 3.31 J/cm

2

. A ca. 1 cm

sized  crystal  of  Madagascar  apatite  which  has  yielded  a
weighted average ID-TIMS concordia age of 473.5 ± 0.7 Ma
(Thomson et al. 2012; Cochrane et al. 2014) was used as the
primary  apatite  reference  material  in  this  study.  McClure
Mountain syenite apatite (the rock from which the 

40

Ar/

39

Ar

hornblende  standard  MMhb  is  derived)  was  used  as  a  sec-
ondary  standard.  McClure  Mountain  syenite  has  moderate
but reasonably consistent U and Th contents ( ~ 23 ppm and
71 ppm – Chew & Donelick 2012) and its thermal history,
crystallization  age  (weighted  mean 

207

Pb/

235

U  age  of

523.51 ± 2.09 Ma)  and  initial  Pb  isotopic  composition
(

206

Pb/

204

Pb = 17.54 ± 0.24; 

207

Pb/

204

Pb = 15.47 ± 0.04)  are

known  from  high-precision  TIMS  analyses  (Schoene  &
Bowring  2006).  Durango  apatite  was  also  analysed  in  this
study as a secondary standard. Durango apatite is a distinc-
tive yellow-green fluorapatite widely used as a mineral stan-
dard  in  apatite  fission-track  and  (U-Th)/He  dating  and
apatite  electron  micro-probe  analyses.  It  is  found  as  large
crystals  within  an  open  pit  iron  mine  at  Cerro  de  Mercado,
Durango, Mexico. The apatite formed between the eruptions
of two major ignimbrites which have yielded a sanidine-an-
orthoclase 

40

Ar—

39

Ar  age  of  31.44 ± 0.18 Ma  (McDowell  et

al.  2005).  NIST  612  standard  glass  was  used  as  the  apatite
trace element concentration reference material.

The raw isotope data were reduced using the “VizsualAge”

data reduction scheme of Petrus & Kamber (2012) within the
freeware  IOLITE  package  of  Paton  et  al.  (2011).  User-de-
fined  time  intervals  are  established  for  the  baseline  correc-
tion  procedure  to  calculate  session-wide  baseline-corrected
values  for  each  isotope.  The  time-resolved  fractionation  re-
sponse of individual standard analyses is then characterized
using a user-specified down-hole correction model (such as
an exponential curve, a linear fit or a smoothed cubic spline).
The data reduction scheme then fits this appropriate session-
wide  “model”  U-Th-Pb  fractionation  curve  to  the  time-re-
solved  standard  data  and  the  unknowns.  Sample-standard
bracketing is applied after the correction of down-hole frac-
tionation  to  account  for  long-term  drift  in  isotopic  or  ele-
mental ratios by normalizing all ratios to those of the U-Pb
reference standards. Common Pb in the apatite standards was
corrected  using  the 

207

Pb-based  correction  method  using  a

modified version of the VizualAge DRS that accounts for the
presence of variable common Pb in the primary standard ma-
terials (Chew et al. 2014). Over the course of two months of

analyses,  McClure  Mountain  apatite  (

207

Pb/

235

U  TIMS  age

of 523.51 ± 1.47 Ma – Schoene & Bowring 2006) yielded a
U-Pb  Tera-Wasserburg  concordia  lower  intercept  age  of
524.5 ± 3.7 Ma  with  an  MSWD = 0.72.  The  lower  intercept
was anchored using a 

207

Pb/

206

Pb value of value of 0.88198

derived  from  an  apatite  ID-TIMS  total  U-Pb  isochron
(Schoene & Bowring 2006).

Results

Petrography and apatite chemistry

In  the  Polish  part  of  the  Outer  Western  Carpathians  out-

crops of TPA alkaline and sub-alkaline rocks are scarce. The
best  outcrops  are  found  in  several  abandoned  quarries,  but
even at these localities the state of preservation is often very
poor due to common alteration by hydrothermal fluids and/or
chemical  weathering.  Apatite  crystals  were  separated  from
rocks from three localities (Fig. 1); two within the lower part
of  the  Hradiště  Formation  (Puńców,  Boguszowice)  and  one
within the Cieszyn Limestone Formation (Lipowa).

Samples  collected  in  Puńców  come  from  an  abandoned

quarry,  ca.  1.5 km  north  of  the  church  in  Puńców  village
(No. 1, N 49°43’49.6774” and E 18°40’1.9152”) and repre-
sent the central parts of a theralite-teschenite sill. The samples
dated by Lucińska-Anczkiewicz et al. (2002), Grabowski et al.
(2003) and Harangi et al. (2003) come from the same location.
They  were  probably  sampled  from  the  bottom  portion  of  the
same teschenite sill which is also visible in a small outcrop by
the right inflow of the Puńcówka creek. The typical medium-
grained  theralite-teschenite  from  Puńców  (Figs. 3A, 4)  is
formed  of  elongated  plagioclase  laths  sub-ophitically  inter-
grown with purplish-red, sector-zoned sub-silicic diopside of
“fassaitic”  composition.  In  these  rocks  intergrowths  of  cli-
nopyroxene  and  amphibole  (kaersutite)  occur,  indicating
simultaneous crystallization. Sometimes the intergrowth com-
mences  along  a  surface  corresponding  to  a  crystal  face  of
pyroxene. During the late-stages of melt crystallization kaer-
sutite superseded growth of pyroxenes. We can then observe
sub-silicic  diopsides  variably  replaced  by  late  magmatic
brown  kaersutite  (Fig. 4).  It  can  be  attributed  to  a  reaction
between  pyroxene  and  melt  at  temperatures  below  1050 °C
(Yagi et al. 1975). The rock also contains titanomagnetite as
the  dominant  spinel  phase  which  is  oxidized  to  titano-
maghemite (Harańczyk et al. 1971) during extensive sub-soli-
dus,  low-temperature  alteration.  The  feldspars  are  the  most
altered mineral phases and are replaced mainly by a mixture of
zeolites  (analcime,  natrolite,  thomsonite,  mesolite)  and  chlo-
rite. Individual crystals of diopside (Fig. 3B) often have rims
of  mica  (annite-siderophyllite).  Apatite  crystals  sometimes
form inclusions in kaersutite and diopside but occur mainly in
secondary mesostasis (i.e. late stage interstitial material) after
decomposed  plagioclase.  The  apatite  crystals  are  thin  (up  to
0.3 mm) and forms accicular crystals up to 2 mm.

The  second  sample  (No. 2)  comes  from  a  small  closed

quarry found on the bank of the Kalembianka stream in Bo-
guszowice  Valley  near  Cieszyn  (N 49°46’16.39”  and
E 18°37’25.0095”). At this locality the central and top por-

background image

277

APATITE DATING OF LOWER CRETACEOUS TESCHENITES AND PICRITES (SOUTHERN POLAND)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

Fig. 3. Photographs of the investigated samples. Photographs A, C and E show polished rock slabs while photomicrographs B, D and F are
thin sections of samples from Boguszowice, Lipowa and Puńców, respectively. Ap – apatite, Bt – biotite, Cal – calcite, Chl – chlorite,
Di – diopside, Mt

Ti 

– Ti-magnetite, Mt – magnetite, Kae – kaersutite, Eg – aegirine, At – annite, Sdf – siderophyllite (abbreviation

according to Whitney & Evans (2010)).

tions of a thin ( ~ 6 m) monchiquite sill are visible. The fine-
grained  central  portion  of  the  sill  contains  phenocrysts  of
sector-zoned,  sub-silicic  diopside  and  biotite  (Fig. 3C).
Green  aegirine,  locally  overgrowing  Al-Ti  diopside  is
present in accessory amounts. Opaque minerals (titanomag-

netite)  are  equally  distributed  throughout  the  rock  matrix.
Microcrysts of diopside, biotite, kaersutite are common in a
cryptocrystalline  groundmass  in  addition  to  lesser  amounts
of titaniferous magnetite and alkaline feldspars which are re-
placed  by  variable  amounts  of  analcime,  natrolite,  calcite

background image

278

SZOPA, WŁODYKA and CHEV

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

and chlorite. Biotite, pyroxene and the groundmass encloses
prismatic needles (up to 2.5 mm long) of apatite.

The third (No. 3) sample was collected from an abandoned

quarry  near  Nadkościół  village  (N 49°40’51.6271”  and
E 19°5’18.834”),  to  the  west  of  Lipowa  in  the  district  of
Żywiec.  The  apatite  crystals,  which  take  the  form  of  long

Fig. 4. An example of intergrowths of clinopyroxene and amphibole. In some cases the intergrowth commences along a surface correspond-
ing  to  a  crystal  face  of  pyroxene.  The  crystallization  of  pyroxene  may  be  followed  by  amphibole  which  then  encloses  small  relict
pyroxenes. Transmitted light, crossed polars.

prisms up to     2—3 mm, were sepa-
rated  from  an  altered  monchiquite
sample  (Fig. 3E,F).  They  occur  in
a  groundmass  of  primary  alkali
feldspars  and  pyroxenes  altered  to
an  analcime-calcite-chlorite-quartz
mixture. A characteristic feature of
these  rocks  is  the  presence  of  a
signifcant  amount  of  secondary
pyroxene of aegirine and aegirine-
augite compositions. They form ir-
regular  rims  on  diopside  crystals.
Their  secondary  origin  was  con-
firmed  by  a  fluid  inclusion  study
by Dolníček et al. (2010).

All  of  the  dated  apatite  crystals

from  the  different  magmatic  rocks
of  the  Cieszyn  igneous  province
can  be  classified  as  fluorapatite
with  1.6—3.7 wt. %  F  [ca. 1.4  at-
oms  per  formula  unit]  (Table 2;
Fig. 5). The crystals range from 0.1
to  0.8 mm  long  and  are  0.1  to
0.2 mm  wide  (Fig. 6);  in  general
stubby apatite dominates over acic-
ular varities in the studied popula-
tions.  Apatite  crystals  in  all  the
samples show high but variable Sr
contents  2580—3218 ppm  (mean
value 2980 ppm), 145—184 ppm  Y
(mean  value  171 ppm)  and  low
Mn 

contents 

(230—540 ppm).

Their chondrite (C1)-normalized REE patterns are dominated
by  very  strong  LREE  fractionation  (La

N

/Yb

N

=57.8—73.6  –

Puńców,  68—77.1  –  Lipowa  and  67.1—72.5  –  Boguszo-
wice),  minor  positive  Eu  anomalies  (1.04—1.15)  for  apatite
from Puńców and slightly negative Eu anomalies for Lipowa
(0.93—0.95) and Boguszowice (0.91—0.93) (Fig. 6; Table 3).

Fig. 5.  Classification
diagram  for  apatite
crystals  based  on
OH-F-Cl 

substitu-

tion. All electron mi-
croprobe 

analyses

(EPMA)  points  are
recalculated based on
24 O

2—

 and two mono-

valent ions (F

, Cl

).

background image

279

APATITE DATING OF LOWER CRETACEOUS TESCHENITES AND PICRITES (SOUTHERN POLAND)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

Lipowa Boguszowice Puńców 

  
  

#1  #2  #3  #4  #5  #6  #7  #8  #9  #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 

SO

3

 (wt. %) 

0.48 

0.24 

0.22 

0.53 

0.33 0.51 0.06 

0.07 

0.05 

0.00 

0.00 

0.03 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

P

2

O

5

 

40.50 

40.76  39.94  40.26 

40.86 40.79 41.49 

41.10 

40.89 

40.81 

40.56 

39.14 

40.27 

40.30 

39.58 

SiO

2

 

0.51 

0.38 

0.64 

0.33 

0.53 0.43 0.37 

0.47 

0.46 

0.56 

0.80 

1.64 

1.03 

0.95 

1.35 

Y

2

O

3

 

0.02 

0.03 

0.00 

0.01 

0.02 0.05 0.09 

0.01 

0.05 

0.08 

0.02 

0.10 

0.08 

0.16 

0.11 

La

2

O

3

 

0.21 

0.21 

0.16 

0.07 

0.14 0.22 0.10 

0.09 

0.17 

0.19 

0.25 

0.54 

0.40 

0.47 

0.53 

Ce

2

O

3

 

0.31 

0.31 

0.11 

0.19 

0.19 0.40 0.25 

0.22 

0.41 

0.44 

0.60 

1.05 

0.76 

0.64 

1.00 

Pr

2

O

3

 

0.21 

0.06 

0.01 

0.00 

0.02 0.26 0.11 

0.04 

0.00 

0.06 

0.00 

0.00 

0.10 

0.02 

0.04 

Nd

2

O

3

 

0.03 

0.15 

0.08 

0.00 

0.13 0.48 0.01 

0.16 

0.22 

0.17 

0.19 

0.19 

0.41 

0.35 

0.72 

Sm

2

O

3

 

0.08 

0.05 

0.01 

0.05 

0.00 0.00 0.08 

0.11 

0.17 

0.14 

0.01 

0.11 

0.00 

0.11 

0.00 

Gd

2

O

3

 

0.05 

0.00 

0.11 

0.08 

0.16 0.00 0.00 

0.02 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.03 

0.05 

0.08 

0.00 

Dy

2

O

3

 

0.03 

0.03 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 0.22 0.14 

0.00 

0.04 

0.00 

0.00 

0.17 

0.04 

0.03 

0.08 

Ho

2

O

3

 

0.13 

0.19 

0.15 

0.00 

0.08 0.13 0.25 

0.02 

0.17 

0.29 

0.20 

0.06 

0.00 

0.25 

0.15 

Er

2

O

3

 

0.06 

0.00 

0.12 

0.01 

0.02 0.10 0.14 

0.00 

0.00 

0.06 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.05 

Yb

2

O

3

 

0.04 

0.00 

0.00 

0.21 

0.06 0.10 0.00 

0.00 

0.04 

0.04 

0.08 

0.01 

0.04 

0.00 

0.05 

MgO 

0.04 

0.08 

0.11 

0.05 

0.24 0.07 0.12 

0.18 

0.01 

0.04 

0.00 

0.01 

0.01 

0.02 

0.01 

CaO 

54.38 

54.27  53.52  53.99 

54.74 53.81 54.99 

54.72 

54.18 

54.03 

54.23 

53.24 

53.86 

53.88 

53.17 

MnO 

0.04 

0.01 

0.02 

0.00 

0.00 0.06 0.03 

0.00 

0.00 

0.06 

0.06 

0.02 

0.06 

0.06 

0.05 

FeO 

0.12 

0.13 

0.13 

0.16 

0.16 0.10 0.14 

0.20 

0.04 

0.10 

0.05 

0.10 

0.24 

0.10 

0.14 

SrO 

0.28 

0.60 

0.28 

0.36 

0.28 0.46 0.25 

0.25 

0.39 

0.39 

0.37 

0.38 

0.37 

0.39 

0.39 

Na

2

0.03 

0.02 

0.07 

0.03 

0.05 0.03 0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

2.37 

2.33 

2.61 

2.90 

2.41 2.27 2.96 

2.28 

2.88 

2.94 

3.60 

3.48 

2.97 

2.90 

2.80 

Cl 

0.23 

0.24 

0.38 

0.32 

0.20 0.35 0.10 

0.18 

0.14 

0.11 

0.06 

0.06 

0.13 

0.08 

0.18 

Total  

100.15  100.08  98.67  99.53  100.58 100.84 101.67  100.09  100.31  100.51  101.07  100.34  100.82  100.78  100.39 

O = F.Cl 

1.05 

1.04 

1.18 

1.29 

1.06 1.04 1.27 

1.00 

1.24 

1.26 

1.52 

1.47 

1.28 

1.24 

1.22 

H

2

0.59 

0.59 

0.40 

0.29 

0.58 0.60 0.35 

0.64 

0.36 

0.34 

0.04 

0.07 

0.32 

0.36 

0.37 

Total 

99.69 

99.64  97.89  98.54  100.10 100.41 100.75 

99.73 

99.42 

99.59 

99.58 

98.94 

99.86 

99.90 

99.55 

Σ

REE+Y

 

1.17 

1.02 

0.75 

0.61 

0.79 1.95 1.16 

0.66 

1.27 

1.47 

1.34 

2.26 

1.89 

2.10 

2.72 

S (apfu

0.06 

0.03 

0.03 

0.07 

0.04 0.07 0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

5.83 

5.87 

5.85 

5.85 

5.84 5.85 5.91 

5.89 

5.90 

5.89 

5.86 

5.72 

5.82 

5.82 

5.76 

Si 

0.09 

0.07 

0.11 

0.06 

0.09 0.07 0.06 

0.08 

0.08 

0.10 

0.14 

0.28 

0.18 

0.16 

0.23 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 0.00 0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

La 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.00 

0.01 0.01 0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.02 

0.03 

0.03 

0.03 

0.03 

Ce 

0.02 

0.02 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 0.02 0.02 

0.01 

0.03 

0.03 

0.04 

0.07 

0.05 

0.04 

0.06 

Pr 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 0.02 0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

Nd 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 0.03 0.00 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.02 

0.02 

0.04 

Sm 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 0.00 0.00 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

Gd 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

0.01 0.00 0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Dy 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 0.01 0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Ho 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 0.01 0.01 

0.00 

0.01 

0.02 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

0.01 

Er 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 0.01 0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Yb 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 0.01 0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Mg 

0.01 

0.02 

0.03 

0.01 

0.06 0.02 0.03 

0.04 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

Ca 

9.90 

9.90 

9.92 

9.93 

9.91 9.77 9.91 

9.93 

9.90 

9.87 

9.91 

9.85 

9.85 

9.85 

9.80 

Mn 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 0.01 0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

0.01 

0.00 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

Fe 

0.02 

0.02 

0.02 

0.02 

0.02 0.01 0.02 

0.03 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.01 

0.03 

0.01 

0.02 

Sr 

0.03 

0.06 

0.03 

0.04 

0.03 0.05 0.02 

0.02 

0.04 

0.04 

0.04 

0.04 

0.04 

0.04 

0.04 

Na 

0.01 

0.01 

0.02 

0.01 

0.01 0.01 0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

X

OH

 

0.66 

0.67 

0.46 

0.34 

0.65 0.68 0.40 

0.73 

0.40 

0.38 

0.04 

0.09 

0.36 

0.41 

0.43 

X

F

 

1.27 

1.26 

1.43 

1.57 

1.29 1.22 1.57 

1.22 

1.56 

1.59 

1.94 

1.90 

1.60 

1.57 

1.52 

X

Cl

 

0.07 

0.07 

0.11 

0.09 

0.06 0.10 0.03 

0.05 

0.04 

0.03 

0.02 

0.02 

0.04 

0.02 

0.05 

Σ 

X

 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 2.00 2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

2.00 

Table 2: Representative electron microprobe analyses of apatite (EMPA) and number of ion p.f.u. calculated on the basis of 24 O

2—

 of the

investigated samples of the TPA.

None of the investigated apatite crystals show any internal

zonation (Fig. 7) in either optical or BSE images.

Apatite dating

Tera-Wasserburg concordia plots of the LA-ICPMS U-Pb

apatite  data  from  three  magmatic  samples  from  the  TPA
(a  monchiquite  from  both  Boguszowice  and  Lipowa  and  a
theralite-teschenite  sill  from  Puńców)  are  plotted  in  fig. 8
and the analytical data are listed in Table 4. All the analyses

from  the  three  samples  are  characterized  by  relatively  high
amounts  of  common  Pb  (

207

Pb/

206

Pb  values  typically  be-

tween 0.4 and 0.8). This is a function of the relatively young
age  of  the  samples  and  the  relatively  low  uranium  contents
(3.54—6.44 ppm – Boguszowice; 2.47—5.43 ppm – Lipowa
and 2.99—5.89 ppm – Puńców).

The  Tera-Wasserburg  concordias  were  anchored  using

initial  Pb  isotopic  ratios  calculated  using  the  Stacey  &
Kramers  (1975)  terrestial  Pb  evolution  model.  The  apatite
U-Pb age was used as a starting estimate for the Stacey &

background image

280

SZOPA, WŁODYKA and CHEV

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

Fig. 7. BSE images of the dated apatites. A—C – Outer crystal sur-
faces, D—E – an examples of polished grain interiors which were
used for EMP and LA-ICP-MS analysis.

Fig. 6.  Chondrite  (C1)-normalized  REE  diagrams  for  apatite  from
the  Cieszyn  magma  province.  Light  grey  area  –  Boguszowice,
dark-grey – Lipowa, black area – Puńców.

Kramers  (1975)  model  and  the  initial  Pb  isotopic  composi-
tion was calculated using an iterative approach (cf. Chew et
al.  2011).  The  anchored  concordia  lower  intercept  ages  are
103 ± 20 Ma  (MSDW = 3.5)  for  Boguszowice  (Fig. 8A),
126.5 ± 8.8 Ma  (MSDW = 1.4)  for  Lipowa  (Fig. 8B),  and
119.6 ± 3.2 Ma (MSDW = 1.4) for Puńców (Fig. 8C). Taking
into  account  the  age  uncertainties,  the  U-Pb  data  cluster
around  120 Ma  yields  a  weighted  average  age  of
117.8 ± 7.3 Ma (MSWD = 2.7). This age is consistent with the
120 Ma 

40

Ar/

39

Ar  and 

40

K/

40

Ar    pyroxene  and  amphibole

Fig. 8. Tera-Wasserburg concordia plots for LA-ICP-MS U-Pb apa-
tite analyses from the Cieszyn igneous province (A – Boguszowice,
B – Lipowa, C – Puńców). Data-point error ellipses are 2 

σ.

background image

281

APATITE DATING OF LOWER CRETACEOUS TESCHENITES AND PICRITES (SOUTHERN POLAND)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

All 

of 

the 

calculated 

ratios 

have 

been 

done 

after 

normalizattio

to 

chondrite-C1(Sun 

McDonough 

1989). 

LOD

 –

 limit 

of 

detection 

for 

concentration 

of 

analysed 

elements.

Table 3:

 Representative 

LA-ICP-MS 

analyses 

of 

REE, 

Y, 

Mn 

and 

Sr 

content

in 

apatite 

crystals 

from 

this 

study.

background image

282

SZOPA, WŁODYKA and CHEV

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

Table 4: 

Representative

 LA-ICP-MS 

U-Pb 

apatite 

data 

for 

rock 

samples 

from 

Boguszowice, 

Puńców 

and 

Lipowa.

ages  obtained  by  Lucińska-
Anczkiewicz  et  al.  (2002)
and Grabowski et al. (2003)
(Table 1).

Discussion

Closure temperature of ap-
atite

Experimental  determina-

tion of the diffusion parame-
ters  of  Pb  in  apatite  by
high-temperature  annealing
experiments  (Watson  et  al.
1985)  and  ion  implantation
with Rutherford backscatter-
ing  techniques  (Cherniak  et
al. 1991) imply closure tem-
peratures  between  450 °C
and  550 °C  for  typical  apa-
tite  grain  dimensions  and
crustal  cooling  rates.  These
estimates are consistent with
field-based  studies  (Cham-
berlain  &  Bowring  2000;
Schoene  &  Bowring  2006).
They  are  also  compatible
with  those  predicted  on  the
basis  of  crystal  chemistry
and  ionic  porosity  (Dahl
1997) and the empirical esti-
mates  based  on  U-Pb  dating
of  large  apatites  from  peg-
matites (Krogstad & Walker
1994).  Apatite  is  chemically
stable in middle-amphibolite
facies  conditions  (i.e.  tem-
peratures  above  its  closure
temperature).  Under  such
conditions  it  is  believed  the
U-Pb  systematics  of  apatite
are controlled predominantly
by  volume  diffusion  rather
than  by  new  growth  or  re-
crystallization  (Chamberlain
& Bowring 2000).

The ages of the TPA mag-

matic  rocks  range  from  90
to  138 Ma  (Table 4  –  Lu-
cińska-Anczkiewicz  et  al.
2002, 120—122 Ma; Harangi
et  al.  2003,  96—128 Ma;
Grabowski  et  al.  2003,
90—138 Ma) which is longer
than  the  tme  span  of  mag-
matic activity in the Mecsek-
Alföld  Igneous  Province  in

background image

283

APATITE DATING OF LOWER CRETACEOUS TESCHENITES AND PICRITES (SOUTHERN POLAND)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

Hungary and comparable to the range of Cretaceous alkaline
volcanism  documented  from  various  tectonic  units  in  the
Western Carpathians (ca. 140 to 125—100 Ma – Spišiak et al.
2011).  The  very  small  age  range  between  ca.  122 Ma  (te-
schenite) and 120 Ma (nepheline syenite) emplacement docu-
mented  by  Lucińska-Anczkiewicz  et  al.  (2002)  is  interpreted
as recording the time of the solidification of teschenite sills by
fractional  crystallization  (FC)  process  which  is  a  result  of
crystallization of the later interstitial melts as a small irregu-
lar bodies or cross-cutting veins of nepheline syenites in the
upper and lower part of the sill.

Much of the teschenite geochronological data is often some-

what contradictory as data from the same sill at an individual
locality  often  show  significant  age  dispersion.  This  is  likely
due to low-temperature alteration (chloritization) of the dated
mafic  mineral  phases,  and  the  late  magmatic  crystallization
of amphibole. This situation is documented in Puńców where
the same theralite-teschenite sill was dated by four different
authors (see Table 1). The younger ages ( < 100 Ma) were ob-
tained by the K-Ar amphibole dating (Grabowski et al. 2003;
Harangi et al. 2003) and Ar-Ar amphibole dating  (Lucińska-
Anczkiewicz  et  al.  2002).  Petrographic  studies  reveal  that
this sill shows evidence for intensive late magmatic crystal-
lization of amphibole (Fig. 4) which followed crystallization
of  pyroxene  with  amphibole  commonly  mantling  pyroxene.
In contrast, the oldest ages ( > 130 Ma) were obtained by K-Ar
dating  of  biotite  (Puńców)  and  phlogopite  (Międzyrzecze)
(Grabowski et al. 2003).

The  results  obtained  in  this  study  yield  similar  ages  (ca.

120 Ma) to those from the studies of Lucińska-Anczkiewicz et
al. (2002) and Harangi et al. (2003). The apatite population is
magmatic  and  EMP  analyses  and  BSE  observation  imply  no
significant  alternation  which  is  common  in  magmatic  rocks
from the Cieszyn magma province. An analysis of the avail-
able robust geochronological data, including the new U-Pb ap-
atite data from this study, suggest that volcanic activity in the
Proto-Silesian Basin took place from 128 to 103 Ma and most
likely peaked between 128 and 120 Ma. The U-Pb apatite dat-
ing technique has clear potential to constrain the emplacement
and evolution of the Cieszyn magmatic province, as apatite is
the  main  U-bearing  phase  suitable  for  U-Pb  geochronology
and the U-Pb apatite system appears unaffected by secondary
alteration  that  has  historically  plagued  K-Ar  and 

40

Ar-

39

Ar

dating studies on these rocks.

Conclusions

1. The weighted mean LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age for all three

samples  is  117.8 ± 7.3 Ma  and  is  similar  to  previously  pub-
lished K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages.

2. The considerably smaller dispersion in the U-Pb apatite

age data compared to K-Ar (whole rock) and 

40

Ar—

39

Ar am-

phibole  and  biotite  ages  is  likely  because  the  U-Pb  apatite
system is unaffected by alteration compared to the K-Ar and

40

Ar—

39

Ar systems.

3. The  probable  time  of  volcanic  activity  in  the  Silesian

Basin took place from 128 to 103 Ma and most likely peaked
between 128 and 120 Ma.

4. A lack of primary magmatic zircon, monazite or xeno-

time  makes  apatite  the  most  suitable  phase  for  U-Pb  dating
of the igneous rocks from the Cieszyn magmatic province.

Acknowledgments: The authors would like to thank Jaromír
Ulrych,  Ján  Spišiak  and  an  anonymous  reviewer  who  pro-
vided  detailed  and  useful  reviews  of  the  manuscript.  Piotr
Dzierżanowski  and  Lidia  Jeżak  are  thanked  for  their  help
during  the  microprobe  analyses.  This  work  was  financially
supported by Department of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and
Petrology at Faculty of Earth Sciences, Univeristy of Silesia,
Katowice.

References

Azambre B., Rossy M. & Albaréde F. 1992: Petrology of the alka-

line  magmatism  from  the  Cretaceous  North-Pyrenean  Rift
Zone (France and Spain). Eur. J. Mineral. 4, 813—834.

Chamberlain  K.R.  &  Bowring  A.B.  2000:  Apatite-feldspar  U—Pb

thermochronometer:  a  reliable,  mid-range  ( ~ 450 °C),  diffu-
sion-controlled system. Chem. Geol. 172, 173—200.

Cherniak D.J., Lanford W.A. & Ryerson F.J. 1991: Lead diffusion

in  apatite  and  zircon  using  ion  implantation  and  Rutherford
backscattering  techniques.  Geochim.  Cosmochim.  Acta  55,
1663—1673.

Chew D.M. & Donelick R.A. 2012: Combined apatite fission track

and  U-Pb  dating  by  LA-ICPMS  and  future  trends  in  apatite
provenance analysis. In: Sylvester P. (Ed.): Quantitative min-
eralogy and microanalysis of sediments and sedimentary rocks.
Mineral. Assoc. Canada, 219—248.

Chew D.M., Sylvester. P.J. & Tubrett M.N. 2011: U-Pb and Th-Pb

dating of apatite by LA-ICPMS. Chem. Geol. 280, 200—216.

Chew  D.M.,  Petrus  J.A.  &  Kamber  B.S.  2014:  U-Pb  LA-ICPMS

dating  using  accessory  mineral  standards  with  variable  com-
mon Pb. Chem. Geol. 363C, 185—199.

Cochrane  R.,  Spikings  R.A.,  Chew  D.,  Wotzlaw  J.-F.,  Chiaradia

M., Tyrrell S., Schaltegger U. & Van der Lelij R. 2014: High
temperature ( > 350 °C) thermochronology and mechanisms of
Pb loss in apatite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 127, 39—56.

Dahl P.S. 1997: A crystal-chemical basis for Pb retention and fis-

sion-track  annealing  systematics  in  U-bearing  minerals,  with
implications  for  geochronology.  Earth  Planet.  Sci.  Lett.  150,
3—4, 277—290.

Dolníček Z., Kropáč K., Uher P. & Polách M. 2010 online: Mineral-

ogical and geochemical evidence for multistage origin of min-
eral  veins  hosted  by  teschenites  at  Tichá,  Outer  Wester
Carpathians, Czech Republic. Chem. Erde.

        Doi:10.1016/j.chemer.2010.03.003
Dostal  J.  &  Owen  J.V.  1998:  Cretaceous  alkaline  lamprophyres

from  northeastern  Czech  Republic:  geochemistry  and  petro-
genesis. Geol. Rdsch. 87, 67—77.

Geroch S., Nowak W. & Wieser T. 1972: The occurrence of rocks

of  the  teschenite  formation  on  the  secondary  deposit  in  the
Lower Cretaceous sediments of Beskid Mały. Kwart. Geol. 16,
1069—1070 (in Polish).

Grabowski J., Krzemiński L., Nescieruk P., Sszydło A., Paszkowski

M.,  Pécskay  Z.  &  Wójtowicz  A.  2003:  Geochronology  of  te-
schenitic  intrusions  in  the  Outer  Western  Carpathians  of  Po-
land  –  constraints  from 

40

K/

40

Ar  ages  and  biostratigraphy.

Geol. Carpathica 54, 6, 385—393.

Gucwa  I.  &  Wieser  T.  1985:  The  limburgites  of  the  Polish  Car-

pathians. Kwart. Geol. 29, 3—30.

Gucwa  I.,  Nowak  W.  &  Wieser  T.  1971:  Submarine  volcanism  in

background image

284

SZOPA, WŁODYKA and CHEV

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2014, 65, 4, 273—284

the  Neocomian  of  the  Western  Flysch  Carpathians.  Kwart.
Geol
. 15, 734—735 (in Polish).

Harangi Sz. & Árva-Sós E. 1993: The Early Cretaceous volcanic rocks

in the Mecsek Mts. (South Hungary). Földt. Közl. 123, 129—165.

Harangi Sz., Tonarini S., Vasellio O. & Manetti P. 2003: Geochemis-

try and petrogenesis of Early Cretaceous alkaline igneous rocks
in Central Europe: implications for a long-lived EAR-type man-
tle component beneath Europe. Acta Geol. Hung. 46, 77—94.

Harańczyk C., Mahmood A. & Narębski W. 1971: Titanomaghemite

in theralitic teschenite from Pastwiska near Cieszyn (Polish Car-
pathians). Bull. Acad. Pol. Sci. 19, 4, 223—231.

Hohenegger L. 1861: Die geognostischen Verhältnisse der Nordkar-

paten  in  Schlesien  und  den  angrenzenden  Teilen  von  Mähren
und Galizien. Gotha, 1—50.

Hovorka D. & Spišiak J. 1988: Mesozoic Volcanism of the Western

Carpathians. VEDA, Bratislava, 1—263 (in Slovak, with English
summary).

Konior K. 1959: The character and the age of igneous rocks intrusion

of Cieszyn Silesia. Acta Geol. Pol. 9, 4, 445—498 (in Polish).

Konior K. 1963: Real thicknesses of igneous rocks of Cieszyn Sile-

sia  between  Cieszyn  and  Bielsko.  Przegl.  Geol.  11,  288—290
(in Polish).

Konior  K.  1977:  Further  comments  on  the  age  of  teschenites.

Kwart. Geol. 21, 499—513 (in Polish).

Krogstad E.J. & Walker R.J. 1994: High closure temperatures of the

U-Pb system in large apatites from the Tin Mountain Pegma-
tite,  Black  Hills,  South  Dakota,  USA.  Geochim.  Cosmochim.
Acta 
58, 18, 3845—3853.

Kudlásková  J.  1987:  Petrology  and  geochemistry  of  selected  rock

types  of  teschenite  association,  Outer  Western  Carpathians.
Geol. Carpathica 38, 5, 545—573.

Lebedev V.A., Sakhano V.G. & Yakusev A.I. 2009: Late Cenozoic

volcanic activity in Western Georgia: Evidence from new iso-
tope geochronological data. Dokl. Earth Sci. 427, 819—825.

Lemberger  M.  1971:  Tectonic  conditions  of  the  occurrence  of  te-

schenites in the Teschen region in the light of magnetic investi-
gations. Pr. Geol., PAN, Komisja Nauk. Geol., 7—108 (in Polish).

Lucińska-Anczkiewicz  A.,  Villa  I.M.,  Anczkiewicz  R.  &  Ślączka

A.  2002: 

40

Ar/

39

Ar  dating  of  alkaline  lamprophyres  from  the

Polish Western Carpathians. Geol. Carpathica 53, 45—52.

Mahmood A. 1973: Petrology of the teschenitic rock series from the

type area of Cieszyn (Teschen) in the Polish Carpathians. Ann.
Soc. Geol. Pol
. 43, 2, 153—216.

McDowell  F.W.,  McIntosh  W.C.  &  Farley  K.A.  2005:  A  precise

40

Ar—

39

Ar  reference  age  for  the  Durango  apatite  (U—Th)/He

and fission-track dating standard. Chem. Geol. 214, 249—263.

Metelkin D.V., Gordienko I.V. & Xixi Zhao 2004: Paleomagnetism

of  Early  Cretaceous  volcanic  rocks  from  Transbaikalia:  argu-
ment for mesozoic strike-slip motions in Central Asian struc-
ture. Russ. Geol. Geophys. 45, 1404—1417.

Narębski W. 1990: Early rift stage in the evolution of western part

of the Carpathians: geochemical evidence from limburgite and
teschenite rock series. Geol. Carpathica 41, 521—528.

Nemčok M., Nemčok J., Wojtaszek M., Ludhova L., Oszczypko N.,

Sercombe  W.J.,  Cieszkowski  M.,  Paul  Z.,  Coward  M.P.  &
Ślączka  A.  2001:  Reconstruction  of  Cretaceous  rifts  incorpo-
rated in the Outer West Carpathians wedge by balancing. Mar.
Petrol. Geol.
 18, 39—64.

Nowak W. 1978: The occurrence of the teschenite rocks in the Mio-

cene of Stara Wieś (Karpaty Bielskie). Kwart. Geol. 20, 105—122
(in Polish).

Oszczypko N. 2006: Late Jurassic—Miocene evolution of the Outer

Carpathian  fold-and-thrust  belt  and  its  foredeep  basin  (West-
ern Carpathians, Poland). Geol. Quart. 50, 169—194.

Pacák O. 1926: Volcanic rocks of the north foothill of Moravia Bes-

kydy. Česká Akad. Věd a Umění, Praha, 1—232 (in Czech).

Petrus J.A. & Kamber B.S. 2012: Vizual age: A novel approach to

laser  ablation  ICP-MS  U-Pb  geochronology  data  reduction.
Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research 36, 3, 247—270.

Poprawa P., Malata T. & Oszczypko N. 2002: Tectonic evolution of

the Polish part of Outer Carpathians sedimentary basins – con-
straints from subsidence analysis. Przegl. Geol. 11, 1092—1108
(in Polish).

Schoene B. & Bowring S.A. 2006: U-Pb systematics of the McClure

Mountain syenite: thermochronological constraints on the age
of  the 

40

Ar/

39

Ar  standard  MMhb.  Contr.  Mineral.  Petrology

151, 5, 615—630.

Smulikowski K. 1929: Materials to the knowledge of igneous rocks

of Cieszyn Silesia. Arch. Tow. Nauk. we Lwowie III, V, 1, 1—122
(in Polish).

Smulikowski K. 1930: Les roches eruptives de la zone subbeskidique

en Silésie et Moravie. Kosmos A 54, 3, 4, 749—850.

Spišiak J., Plašienka D., Bucová J., Mikuš T. & Uher P. 2011: Petrol-

ogy  and  palaeotectonic  setting  of  Cretaceous  alkaline  basaltic
volcanism  in  the  Pieniny  Klippen  Belt  (Western  Carpathians,
Slovakia). Geol. Quart. 55, 27—48.

Stacey J.S. & Kramers J.D. 1975: Approximation of terrestrial lead

isotope  evolution  by  a  two-stage  model.  Earth  Planet.  Sci.
Lett
. 26, 207—221.

Storetvedt  K.M.,  Márton  E.,  Abranches  M.C.  &  Rother  K.  1999:

Alpine  remagnetization  and  tectonic  rotations  in  the  French
Pyrenees. Geol. Rdsch. 87, 658—674.

Stupak F.M. & Travina A.V. 2004: The age of late mesozoic volca-

nogenic  rocks  of  Northern  Transbaikalia  (estimated  by  the

40

Ar/

39

Ar method). Russ. Geol. Geophys. 45, 280—284.

Sun  S.S.  &  McDonough  W.F.  1989:  Chemical  and  isotopical  sys-

tematics  of  oceanic  basalts:  implications  for  mantle  composi-
tion  and  processes.  Magmatism  in  the  Oceanic  Basins.  Geol.
Soc., Spec. Publ.
 42, 313—345.

Szczurowska J. 1961: Age of teschenites on the basis of an analysis

of their heavy minerals from the Upper Teschen Shales. Kwart.
Geol
. 5, 175—179 (in Polish).

Thomson S.N., Gehrels G.E., Ruiz J. & Buchwaldt R. 2012: Rou-

tine low-damage apatite U-Pb dating using laser ablation-mul-
ticollector-ICPMS. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 13, Q0AA21.
Doi:10.1029/2011GC003928

Tschermak G. 1866: Felsarten von ungewőhnlicher Zusammenset-

zung in der Umgebung von Teschen und Neutitschein. Sitz.-Ber.
K. Akad. Wiss., Math.-Naturwiss. Kl
. 53, 1—5, 260—287.

Waśkowska  A.,  Golonka  J.,  Strzeboński  P.,  Krobicki  M.,  Vašíček

Z. & Skupien P. 2009: Early Cretaceous deposits of the Proto-
Silesian  Basin  in  Polish-Czech  Flysch  Carpathians.  Geologia
35, 39—47 (in Polish).

Watson E.B., Harrison T.M. & Ryerson F.J. 1985: Diffusion of Sm,

Sr,  and  Pb  in  fluorapatite.  Geochim.  Cosmochim.  Acta  49,  8,
1813—1823.

Whitney  D.L.  &  Evans  B.W.  2010:  Abbreviations  for  names  of

rock-forming minerals. Amer. Mineralogist 95, 185—187.

Wieser  T.  1971:  Exo-  and  endocontact  alterations  connected  with

teschenites of the Polish Flysch Carpathians. Kwart. Geol. 15,
901—920 (in Polish).

Włodyka  R.  2010:  The  evolution  of  mineral  composition  of  the

Cieszyn magma province rocks. Wyd. Uniw. Śląskiego, 1—232
(in Polish).

Yagi K., Hariya Y., Onuma K. & Fukushima N. 1975: Stability relation

of kaersutite. J. Fac. Sci., Hokkaido Univ.Ser 4 16, 331—342.

Żytko K., Zając R., Gucik S., Ryłko W., Oszczypko N., Garlicka I.,

Nemčok J., Eliáš M., Menčik E. & Stráník Z. 1989: Map of the
tectonic  elements  of  the  Western  Outer  Carpathians  and  their
foreland. In: Poprawa D. & Nemčok J. (Eds.): Geological Atlas
of  the  Western  Outer  Carpathians  and  their  Foreland.  Państw.
Inst. Geol
., Warszawa/GÚDŠ, Bratislava/UUG, Praha.