background image

www.geologicacarpathica.sk

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, APRIL 2013, 64, 2, 141—151                                                              doi: 10.2478/geoca-2013-0010

Introduction

The  Eocene  closure  of  the  Tethys  Ocean  during  the  Alpine
orogenesis was not uniform. After the closure in the west, a
remnant oceanic basin remained in the Carpathian-Pannonian
region  to  the  east,  separating  the  Pannonian  block  from  the
European  platform.  In  the  Western  Carpathians,  southward
oceanic subduction persisted until the Middle Miocene when
a  collision  took  place  (Nemčok  et  al.  1989;  Rögl  1996;
Sperner et al. 2002). The collisional process in the Western
Carpathians is often termed “soft collision” (e.g. Sperner et
al. 2002), as it did not lead to a large amount of continental
subduction,  significant  crustal  thickening  or  widespread
metamorphism, as was the case for the Alps to the west.

In  the  Western  Carpathians,  the  Podhale-Spišská  Magura

Paleogene  basin  forms  the  northernmost  edge  of  the  North
Pannonian  block,  which  overrides  the  European  plate
(Fig. 1). Although the basin has been subjected to inversion,
the  sedimentary  rocks  show  little  evidence  for  compressive
deformation. Pre-inversion burial history is reasonably well
defined  mainly  by  illite-smectite  (I-S)  data  (Kotarba  2003;
Środoń  et  al.  2006),  and  to  lesser  extent  by  vitrinite  reflec-
tance  data  (Marynowski  &  Gawęda  2005;  Poprawa  &
Marynowski  2005;  Wagner  2011).  However,  these  tech-
niques  record  maximum  paleotemperatures  and  do  not  pro-
vide  information  on  subsequent  cooling  and  inversion
history. The goal of this study is to refine the thermal history
of the Podhale Basin through the use of apatite fission track
analysis.

Thermal history of the Podhale Basin in the internal Western

Carpathians from the perspective of apatite fission track

analyses

ANETA AGNIESZKA ANCZKIEWICZ

1

, JAN ŚRODOŃ

1

 and MASSIMILIANO ZATTIN

2

1

Institute of Geological Sciences, Polish Academy of Sciences, Senacka 1, 31-002 Kraków,

 

Poland;

ndstruzi@cyf-kr-edu.pl;   ndsrodon@cyf-kr.edu.pl

2

Dipartimento di Geoscienze, Universit

a

 di Padova, Via Giotto 1, 35137 Padova, Italy

(Manuscript received March 14, 2012; accepted in revised form December 11, 2012)

Abstract: The thermal history of the Paleogene Podhale Basin was studied by the apatite fission track (AFT) method.
Twenty four Eocene-Oligocene sandstone samples yielded apparent ages from 13.8 ± 1.6 to 6.1 ± 1.4 Ma that are signifi-
cantly younger than their stratigraphic age and thus point to a post-depositional resetting. The thermal event responsible
for the age resetting is interpreted as a combination of heating associated with mid-Miocene volcanism and variable
thickness of Oligocene and potentially also Miocene sediments. Extending the mid-Miocene thermal event found in the
Inner Carpathians into the Podhale Basin as a likely heat source suggests that the amount of denudation in the Podhale
Basin determined only on the basis of heat related to the thickness of sedimentary sequence might have be significantly
overestimated. Two samples from the western part of the basin that yielded 31.0 ± 4.3 and 26.9 ± 4.7 Ma are interpreted
as having mixed ages resulting from partial resetting in temperature conditions within the AFT partial annealing zone.
This observation agrees very well with reported vitrinite reflectance and illite-smectite thermometry, which indicate a
systematic drop of the maximum paleotemperatures towards the western side of the basin.

Key  words:  Miocene,  Western  Carpathians,  Central  Carpathian  Paleogene  Basin,  Podhale  Basin,  thermal  history,
thermochronology, apatite fission track dating.

Geological setting

The  Western  Carpathians  form  the  northernmost  part  of

the Carpathian belt, which belongs to the Alpine-Carpathian
orogenic system (Fig. 1). They are subdivided into two main
tectonic units: the Outer and the Inner  Carpathians (Birken-
majer  2001).  The  Outer  Carpathians  (OC)  are  composed  of
Lower  Cretaceous  to  Lower  Miocene  flysch  sequences,
which developed in several basins on the northern margin of
Tethys  (e.g.  Csontos  et  al.  1992).  Subsequent  northward
thrusting  juxtaposed  the  basin  sediments  forming  a  large
scale  nappe  stack.  The  southern  boundary  of  the  OC  is  de-
fined by the E-W trending Pieniny Klippen Belt (PKB) that
separates  the  nappe  stack  from  the  Inner  Carpathians  (IC)
Paleogene flysch. This narrow zone predominantly comprises
strongly  deformed  carbonates  of  Jurassic  to  Cretaceous  age
(Birkenmajer  1986;  Ratschbacher  et  al.  1993;  Nemčok  &
Nemčok  1994)  and  is  interpreted  as  a  plate  boundary  be-
tween the European plate to the north and the North Pannon-
ian block to the south. The two blocks collided at the Early
Miocene/Middle  Miocene  boundary  (Nemčok  et  al.  1989;
Rögl 1996; Sperner et al. 2002). The IC comprise Variscan
crystalline basement, covered mainly by Mesozoic carbonate
rocks and by Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks. This
sequence is interpreted as the southern (Apulian) margin of
the  Tethyan  Ocean.  The  Tatra  Mountains  and  the  Podhale
Basin are part of the IC (Fig. 1).

The  Podhale  Basin  constitutes  part  of  the  Central  Car-

pathian Paleogene Basin (CCPB), and comprises marine sed-

à

background image

142

ANCZKIEWICZ, ŚRODOŃ and ZATTIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

imentary  rocks  that  were  deposited  on  an  erosional  surface
comprising  Lower  Triassic—Lower  Turonian  dolomites  and
limestones that cover the crystalline units of the Tatra Moun-
tains  (Bac-Moszaszwili  et  al.  1990).  The  basin  sedimentary
fill  consists  of  up  to  100 m  thick  Eocene  carbonates,  above
which several kilometers of flysch were deposited (Radomski
1958;  Andrusov  &  Köhler  1963;  Westwalewicz-Mogilska
1986;  Soták  et  al.  1996,  2001).  In  Poland,  the  flysch  se-
quence has been divided into four informal lithostratigraphic
units: the Szaflary, Zakopane, Chochołów and Ostrysz beds.
In the Spišská Magura region of Slovakia, the eastern con-
tinuation  of  the  basin,  equivalent  units  are:  the  Šambron
Beds,  Huty,  Zuberec  and  Biely  Potok  Formations,  respec-
tively  (Gross  et  al.  1984).  The  youngest  Ostrysz  beds  are
preserved only in the western part of the basin and were dated
as  Late  Oligocene  on  the  basis  of  dinocysts  (Gedl  2000).
Garecka (2005) determined the age of the youngest deposits
in the basin as Aquitanian (the earliest Miocene), using cal-
careous nannoplankton.

The Podhale Basin sequence is considered to represent one

of the erosional remnants of the continuous Paleogene fore-
arc  basin,  which  once  covered  the  entire  Eastern  Alps  and
the Western Carpathians (Kázmer et al. 2003) and developed
on the Mesozoic cover of the Variscan basement probably as
a  result  of  extensional  faulting  (Olszewska  &  Wieczorek

1989). In its present position, the Podhale Basin forms a gen-
tle, approximately E-W trending depression, bounded to the
north  by  the  PKB  and  to  the  south  by  the  Tatra  Mountains
(Fig. 2b). Sedimentary rocks in the Podhale Basin show little
evidence of deformation and shortening associated with plate
convergence,  and  the  most  significant  structural  disconti-
nuities  in  the  study  area  are  the  Krowiarki  and  Ružbachy
faults (Fig. 2a). Our study was conducted in the Podhale Ba-
sin, in the area between the Krowiarki and Ružbachy faults,
as shown in Fig. 2a.

Sampling and methods

The  main  goal  of  this  study  was  to  complement  previous

studies of the thermal history of this part of CCPB conducted
by  means  of  illite-smectite  (I-S)  and  vitrinite  reflectance
thermometry,  as  well  as  provide  time  constraints  on  the
youngest thermal evolution of the basin. To achieve this aim,
twenty four sandstone and two bentonite samples were col-
lected from surface outcrops distributed across the Podhale-
Spišská  Magura  basin.  The  majority  of  samples  come  from
the Polish part of the basin, while six samples were collected
from  the  Spišská  Magura  region  in  Slovakia.  Additionally,
four samples were collected from the Bukowina Tatrzańska

Fig. 1. Tectonic sketch of the Western Carpathians, after Żytko et al. (1989). Black rectangle marks study area. Sketch of the Alpine-Car-
pathian system in the upper left corner after Roca et al. (1995).

background image

143

APATITE FISSION TRACK ANALYSES OF THE PODHALE BASIN (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

PIG-1 borehole. The GPS locations of all samples are given
in  Table 1  and  are  shown  in  Fig. 2a.  Where  possible,  the
Podhale  samples  were  collected  from  the  same  (or  nearby)
outcrops to those used in the illite-smectite paleotemperature
studies of Kotarba (2003) and Środoń et al. (2006).

The apatite fission track (AFT) dating method is a well es-

tablished technique used to unravel the thermal history expe-
rienced by rocks both during burial and their motion towards
the surface (Wagner & Van den Haute 1992; Donelick et al.
2005).  Fission  tracks  are  totally  annealed  at  temperatures
higher than about 120 °C,  but  partial  resetting  occurs  down
to 60 °C. Some variations in annealing kinetics occur due to
differences  in  the  chemical  composition  of  apatites  (e.g.
Barbarand et al. 2003).

Flysch  deposits  in  the  internal  and  the  external  Car-

pathians are usually cut by numerous joints, which served as

migration paths for hot fluids. Temperature of the migrating
fluids  often  significantly  exceeded  regional  temperatures
(Hurai et al. 2000). Thus, we were collecting samples free of
such veins. Where this was not possible, parts of the samples
containing mineralized veins were cut out with large margins
using a saw. Apatites from sandstones were separated using
standard crushing, sieving, magnetic and heavy liquids sepa-
ration techniques. We used the external detector method and
the   age calibration approach to determine the fission tracks
age (Gleadow 1981; Hurford & Green 1983).

Polished grain mounts were etched for 20 seconds in 5 N

HNO

3

  at  20 °C.  The  standard  glass  CN5  was  used  as  a  do-

simeter to monitor the neutron flux. Thin flakes of low-U mus-
covite  were  used  as  external  detectors.  Samples  together  with
age standards (Fish Canyon, Durango, and Mount Dromedary
apatite)  and  CN5  standard  glass  dosimeters  were  irradiated

Fig. 2. Sample locations (a) on a simplified geological map (compiled by A. Łaptaś) after Żytko et al. (1989) and Janočko et al. 2000. Line
A—B marks cross-section shown in (b), simplified after Gedl (2000).

background image

144

ANCZKIEWICZ, ŚRODOŃ and ZATTIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

Table 1:

 Apatite 

Fission 

Track 

results 

for 

the 

Podhale-Spišská 

Magura 

b

asin.

Continued 

o

the 

next 

page.

background image

145

APATITE FISSION TRACK ANALYSES OF THE PODHALE BASIN (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

Table 1:

  

Continued.

with thermal neutron nominal flux of 9 10

15

n/cm

2

 at the

Oregon State University TRIGA reactor in the USA. Af-
ter  their  irradiation  muscovite  external  detectors  were
etched for about 45 minutes in 40% HF in order to reveal
the induced tracks. Spontaneous and induced tracks were
counted  by  optical  microscopy  at  1250   magnification
using  a  NIKON  Eclipse  E-600,  equipped  with  motor-
ized  stage,  digitizing  tablet  and  drawing  tube  controlled
by  program  FTStage  3.12  and  FTStage  4.04  (Dumitru
1993).  Data  analyses  and  age  calculations  based  on  a
Zeta value for CN5 

CN5 

of 344 ± 5 were calculated using

program Trackkey 4.2 (Dunkl 2002).

All quoted AFT ages are “central ages” (weighted mean

ages) of Gailbraith & Laslett (1993)  ± 1  , and the varia-
tion of single grain ages assessed using the % age disper-
sion of the central age and chi-square test (Galbraith 1981;
Green 1981). In nearly all analysed samples about 20 or
more  apatite  grains  were  selected  for  analyses.  Only
clean grains free of defects and inclusions were selected
for track counting. Apatites with no tracks were included
in age calculations.

Chlorine  content  in  apatites  was  determined  by  elec-

tron  microprobe  CAMECA  SX-100  applying  20 nA
beam current and 15 kV accelerating voltage. The analyses
were  carried  out  at  the  Institute  of  Mineralogy  and
Geochemistry, University of Warsaw, Poland.

Results

The results of the AFT analyses are presented in Table 1

and  Fig. 3.  The  regional  distribution  of  ages  is  shown  on
the geological map (Fig. 4a). Nearly all analysed samples
yielded  ages  significantly  younger  than  the  estimated
Eocene-Oligocene stratigraphic age of the layers that they
were collected from (Table 1), thus indicating post-deposi-
tional  temperatures  in  excess  of  100 °C  for  durations  of
heating >10

6—7

 yrs, which lead to resetting of the AFT sys-

tem. They are also younger than the 18—17 Ma K-Ar illite
ages from the Podhale Basin, which are interpreted as re-
cording maximum paleotemperatures (Środoń et al. 2006)
and  as  such  place  the  maximum  limit  on  resetting  AFT
dates.  Most  samples  yield  a  single  population  of  grain
ages as shown by the high P(

2

) values (Table 1). Central

ages  range  from  13.8 ± 1.7  to  6.4 ± 0.7 Ma  with  the  vast
majority grouping between 13 and 8 Ma. Only two samples
showed  significant  dispersion  with  P(

2

)  < 5 %  and  gave

much  older ages  of 31.0 ± 4.3 and 26.9 ± 4.7 Ma (Table 1).
They are interpreted as mixed population ages that reflect
temperatures too low to cause full resetting.

Four  samples  from  the  borehole  Bukowina  Tatrzańska

PIG-1  were  collected  at  regular  intervals  of  500 m.  The
deepest  sample  comes  from  the  depth  of  2044 m  (depths
given  relatively  to  the  surface  level),  which  is  ca.  100 m
above the Mesozoic cover of the Tatra crystalline units, on
which the Tertiary basin was formed. These samples have
central ages that range from 6.1 ± 1.4 Ma at 2044 m depth
to  9.9 ± 1.5 Ma  at  504 m  depth.  All  the  ages  are  younger
than  the  depositional  Eocene-Oligocene  ages  hence  indi-

A

patite 

Fission 

Track 

results 

for 

Podhale-Spišská 

Magura 

basin.

 Footnote 

to 

Table

 1

: *

 – 

Sample 

from 

borehole, 

depth 

below 

surface.

 

s 

– 

density 

of 

spontaneous 

tracks 

(

10

6

 tracks 

for 

cm

—2

);

Ns

 – 

number 

of 

counted 

spontaneous 

tracks; 

i 

– 

density 

of 

induced 

tracks 

in 

external 

detector 

(

10

6

 tracks 

for 

cm

—2

); 

Ni

 – 

number 

of 

counted 

induced 

tracks; 

d

 – 

density 

of 

induced

tracks 

in 

external 

mica 

detector 

covering 

dosimeter 

CN5 

glass 

(

10

6

 tracks 

for 

cm

—2

); 

Nd

 – 

number 

of 

counted 

tracks 

in 

external 

mica 

detector. 

(

2

– 

the 

result 

of 

2

 test 

(Galbraith 

1981;

Green 

1981). 

Age

 – 

is 

central 

age 

of 

sample 

(Galbraith 

Laslett 

1993). 

Cal

culations 

by 

Trackkey 

4.2 

(Dunkl 

2002). 

See 

text 

for 

details. 

Dpar 

– 

average 

etch 

pit 

diameter 

of 

fission 

tracks.

background image

146

ANCZKIEWICZ, ŚRODOŃ and ZATTIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

Fig. 3.

 Radial 

plots 

of 

fission 

track 

ages 

estimated 

from 

the 

analysed

 samples. 

Central 

ages 

of 

samples 

are 

defined 

by 

dashed 

lines, 

stratigraphic 

age 

is 

represented 

by 

shaded 

area. 

The 

position

of 

the 

x-scale 

records 

the 

uncertainty 

of 

individual 

age 

estimates, 

whi

lst 

each 

point 

has 

the 

same 

standard 

error 

on 

the 

y-scale 

(illustrated 

as

 ±

2

 

). 

The 

age 

of 

each 

crystal 

may 

be 

determined 

by

extrapolating a line from the origin 

on the left through the cr

ystal’s 

x

co-ordinates 

to 

intercept 

the 

radial 

age 

scale 

(Galbraith 

1990)

.

background image

147

APATITE FISSION TRACK ANALYSES OF THE PODHALE BASIN (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

cating total resetting. The ages show a linear trend with depth
(Fig. 4b). The deepest sample (2044 m), from the present-day
temperatures of  ~ 40 °C (adopting 20 °C present day geother-
mal  gradient  from  Kępińska  (1995  and  1997))  is  well  below
the  > 100 °C required to reset the samples, and thus the reported
ages are entirely related to the paleogeothermal gradient.

Unfortunately, very few confined tracks could be measured,

which did not permit meaningful numerical modelling of ther-
mal  history  to  be  carried  out.  Nevertheless,  measured  track
lengths are significantly reduced and vary from 10.4 to 13.2 µm,
with the vast majority oscillating around 12 µm (Table 1).

The observed variations in ages cannot be ascribed either

to variations in elevation, which is very similar for all sam-

ples  (Table 1)  or  to  apatite  chemistry.  The  chlorine  content
of individual grains in eight samples (3/02, 5/02, 13/02, 18/02,
22/02,  51/02,  52/02,  F9)  was  found  to  be  below  0.1 wt. %
and  did  not  contribute  significantly  to  the  age  dispersion.
The etch pit diameter (Dpar) was used to check annealing ki-
netics (Burtner et al. 1994). Measured Dpars are in the range
of  standard  Durango  apatite  (Ketcham  et  al.  2007),  indicat-
ing that for all samples similar annealing kinetics can be ap-
plied. The average Dpar value of 1.5 µm, points to fluorine
apatite, which agrees with the composition of apatites deter-
mined by electron microprobe (Table 1).

Gently downhole decreasing ages along with reduced track

length  (ca.  11—12 µm,  see  Table 1)  suggest  complex  thermal

Fig. 4. a – Summary of AFT data for the Podhale-Spišská Magura basin (this study). Isotherms (dotted lines) correspond to paleotempera-
tures established by the illite-smectite method (Środoń et al. 2006). K-Ar dates of illite (Środoń et al. 2006) are given in white ellipses.
b – AFT age-depth diagram for samples from the borehole Bukowina Tatrzańska PIG-1 indicates average uplift and exhumation rate of ca.
400 m/Ma.

background image

148

ANCZKIEWICZ, ŚRODOŃ and ZATTIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

evolution  and  may  be  interpreted  either  in  terms  of  slow
cooling related to exhumation or as a reheating episode (e.g.
Hammerschmidt et al. 1984). Naturally, more complex sce-
narios  cannot  be  excluded.  Thus,  below  we  discuss  the
meaning of our AFT results in more detail, in the context of
all  previous  Podhale-Spišská  Magura  basin  thermal  history
studies, which include vitrinite reflectance and illite-smectite
thermometry.

Discussion

The thermal structure of the Podhale-Spišská Magura ba-

sin has received relatively a lot of attention in recent years.
The  studies  focused  primarily  on  applying  vitrinite  reflec-
tance  and  illite-smectite  thermometry  to  determine  basin
evolution (Kotarba 2003; Marynowski & Gawęda 2005; Śro-
doń et al. 2006; Wagner 2011). On the basis of illite-smectite
thermometry  Środoń  et  al.  (2006)  documented  a  general
westward decrease of the maximum paleotemperature on the
present day erosional surface from more than 160 °C to less
than  100 °C  (Fig. 4a).  Changes  in  the  temperature  were  in-
terpreted as resulting strictly from variable thickness of Oli-
gocene flysch deposits, which was increasing in the eastern
part  of  the  basin,  towards  the  Ružbachy  fault  (Fig. 4a).  A
similar picture was obtained on the basis of vitrinite reflec-
tance  study  by  Wagner  (2011),  who  reports  paleotempera-
tures at the surface ranging from 90 °C to 160 °C. The latter
study  is  based  on  a  dense  sampling  network  and  indicates
SE-NW rather than E-W trend in temperature change. Some-
what  lower  temperatures  were  estimated  by  Marynowski  &
Gawęda  (2005)  who  applied  the  same  method  and  deter-
mined maximum paleotemperatures at the surface in the west-
ern  part  of  the  basin  (Chochołów  area)  as  low  as  50—70 °C
and in the SE part (Poronin and Zakopane area) between 100
and  130 °C.  Despite  some  variations  in  absolute  values  of
the estimated paleotemperatures, all three studies display the
same general trend, showing higher temperatures in the east-
ern or southeastern part of the basin decreasing towards the
northwest.

Lower temperatures in the western part are also manifested

in  AFT  analyses.  Botor  et  al.  (2006,  2011)  performed  AFT
dating  of  apatites  from  volcanic  ash  horizons  in  the  NW
Podhale  Basin  obtaining  apparent  ages  between  30  and
20 Ma. This is in agreement with 31.0 ± 4.3 and 26.9 ± 4.7 Ma
apparent  ages  reported  in  this  study,  that  are  also  only  par-
tially  reset,  as  expected  under  low  temperature  conditions
determined for the western side of the basin by vitrinite re-
flectance and I-S techniques (Fig. 4a).

Since our samples were collected from the same or nearby

outcrops as the samples of Środoń et al. (2006) and Kotarba
(2003), we can make direct comparison of temperature esti-
mates based on clay minerals with the AFT record. Sample
5/02 can be correlated with sample Ost-1 of Kotarba (2003),
who  determined  paleotemperature  below  70 °C.  Another
sample with mixed age (22/02) shows 35% smectite, which
corresponds to 95—110 °C temperature (Kotarba 2003). Such
low  temperature  record  in  sample  5/02  explains  the  incom-
plete resetting of fission tracks for all apatite grain types giv-

ing  the  mixed  age  population.  However,  in  the  case  of  the
sample 22/02, the temperature postulated by Kotarba (2003)
was sufficiently high to completely reset the earlier thermal
record in apatite. This contradicts the above presented AFT
result,  which  points  to  much  lower  paleotemperature  (ca.
60—90 °C)  for  this  outcrop.  We  cannot  explain  this  differ-
ence  but  this  is  a  rather  small  “incompatibility”  on  the  re-
gional scale, and our AFT results support the general picture
recorded by clay minerals and vitrinite reflectance data that
show higher temperatures in the eastern part of the basin at
the  present  erosion  surface  (Marynowski  &  Gawęda  2005;
Środoń et al. 2006; Wagner 2011).

The variations in paleotemperature on the present day sur-

face  of  the  Podhale  flysch  were  ascribed  to  variable  thick-
ness of the eroded overlying sediments (Środoń et al. 2006),
based  on  differences  in  depth-sensitive  parameters,  such  as
porosity,  grain  density,  and  degree  of  clay  mineral  orienta-
tion. These authors postulated about 2 km difference in erod-
ed  overburden  between  the  Chochołów  and  Bukowina
regions.  This  interpretation  finds  qualitative  support  in  the
study  of  Nemčok  et  al.  (1996)  who  documented  westward
thinning  of  the  sediments.  Adopting  burial  as  the  only  heat
source, the amount of removed sediments solely depends on
the  adopted  geothermal  gradient.  Low  paleogradient  of
21 ± 2 °C/km inferred by Środoń et al. (2006) requires from 4
(W)  to  7 km  (E)  of  sediment  removal.  However,  such  low
paleogradient determined by interpretation of I-S and vitrin-
ite  reflectance  data  is  incompatible  with  the  results  of
Kępińska (2006) who estimated the maximum paleogradient
as 30—40 °C using the same methods. The latter estimate is
in  an  agreement  with  the  conclusions  of  Marynowski  &
Gawęda  (2005)  who  observed  a  significant  rise  of  vitrinite
reflectance  with  depth.  In  the  Chochołów  borehole  in  the
western part of the basin, the near surface paleotemperature
was  estimated  by  these  authors  as  50—70 °C,  while  at
2000 m depth it was 100—130 °C. This points to an average
gradient  of  > 25 °C/km.  To  the  southeast,  in  the  Zakopane
and  Poronin  area,  the  evaluated  paleotemperature  increases
from  100—130 °C  at  the  surface  to  160—200 °C  at  2000 m
depth, which points to a gradient of about 35 °C/km. These
estimates suggest that the gradient not only could have been
significantly above the 20—25 °C/km estimated by Środoń et
al. (2006) but may have also strongly varied. A significantly
lower gradient is obtained for the western part of the basin,
where the AFT recorded mixed ages. Accepting such higher
geothermal gradients has two important consequences: 1) It
reduces  the  4—7 km  estimate  of  eroded  overburden  by  at
least 2 km, and 2) it seems unlikely that low thermal conduc-
tivity sediments could have developed such high geothermal
gradient  by  themselves,  which  makes  more  feasible  the  hy-
pothesis  of  an  additional  heat  source  in  the  area  during  the
Miocene.

A potential source of higher heat flow during the Miocene

in the Inner Western Carpathians is reported by Danišík et al.
(2008, 2010, 2012), who named it the “mid-Miocene thermal
event”.  The  authors  postulated  the  regional  significance  of
this  event  by  documenting  it  by  means  of  AFT  and  apatite
(U-Th)/He  thermochronology  in  numerous  locations  in  the
Variscan  crystalline  basement  rocks  of  the  Western  Car-

background image

149

APATITE FISSION TRACK ANALYSES OF THE PODHALE BASIN (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

pathians,  Pannonian  Basin  and  the  margin  of  the  Eastern
Alps. They linked the increased heat flux primarily to mantle
upwelling  and  volcanic  activity  (Král  et  al.  1987;  Szabó  et
al.  1992;  Tari  et  al.  1992;  Danišík  et  al.  2012).  AFT  data
from  the  CCPB  in  the  direct  vicinity  of  the  Branisko  Mts,
some  50—60 km  to  the  ESE  of  the  studied  area,  also  show
clear  indication  of  thermal  resetting  (Danišík  et  al.  2012).
Although their data point to the presence of at least two age
populations,  the  Miocene  component  (16—11 Ma)  is  very
clearly  distinguished.  The  influence  of  heating  associated
with Miocene volcanism seems justified on the basis of coin-
cidence  of  volcanic  and  AFT  ages.  Miocene  volcanics  are
common in Slovakia both to the SW and SE of the study area.
In  the  Slanské  vrchy  Mts  they  were  dated  to  17—11 Ma
(Pécskay  et  al.  2006),  and  were  interpreted  as  being  related
to subduction and mantle upwelling (Král et al. 1987; Szabó
et al. 1992; Tari et al. 1992). The final stage of this episode
found its expression in andesite intrusions in the direct vicin-
ity of the studied area, in the PKB and Magura Nappe in Po-
land.  K-Ar  andesite  dating  resulted  in  wide  range  of  ages
reflecting variable degrees of problems related to K and Ar
mobility, but the ages group around 11 Ma, which was inter-
preted as the time of emplacement (Birkenmajer & Pécskay
1999; Birkenmajer et al. 2000).

Although  we  consider  Miocene  volcanism  as  a  likely

cause  of  thermal  changes  recorded  by  AFT  analyses,  the
contribution of sedimentary cover must not be neglected. In
addition to the Paleogene sequence, Środoń et al. (2006) and
Danišík  et  al.  (2012)  considered  a  deep  burial  by  Neogene
sediments  as  one  of  the  likely  heat  sources.  Although  such
possibility  cannot  immediately  be  rejected,  this  hypothesis
does not find strong support. Firstly, so far there has been no
evidence found for the thick pile of Neogene sediments. Sec-
ondly,  as  discussed  above,  a  thick  pile  of  sediments  alone
cannot develop a geothermal gradient as high as observed in
some  studies  in  the  Podhale  area  (Marynowski  &  Gawęda
2005;  Kępińska  2006)  and  in  other  regions  of  the  internal
Carpathians  and  Pannonian  Basin  (Danišík  et  al.  2012  and
references therein). Thus, the accurate value of paleogeother-
mal  gradient  could  enable  us  to  decide  between  the  signifi-
cance  of  the  two  major  heat  sources,  and  as  such  is  of  key
significance  for  interpreting  the  geological  evolution  of  the
Podhale-Spišská Magura basin.

The  key  question  concerning  the  origin  of  our  young

group  of  AFT  ages  (13—6 Ma)  is  whether  they:  1)  reflect
slow  cooling  caused  by  uplift  and  erosion,  which  followed
the mid-Miocene heating or 2) they are apparent ages reflect-
ing thermal relaxation after the heating ceased. Both scenarios
could  lead  to  similar  age-depth  distribution  as  presented
above and to the observed track lengths reduction. Preserva-
tion of only partially reset tracks from the western side of the
basin,  the  fairly  large  13—6 Ma  age  span  of  “single  popula-
tion” ages along with short track lengths seem to favour the
latter  option.  However,  a  more  complex  scenario,  where
thermal relaxation is accompanied by slow uplift and erosion
cannot be excluded. Change in thermal regime was certainly
accompanied  by  change  in  tectonic  configuration.  The  ap-
parent  ages  recorded  by  AFT  coincide  with  the  collisional
period,  which  likely  led  to  some  degree  of  thickening  and

uplift and erosion of the overriding block. Most likely, this is
the time, when basin inversion happened. The age-depth pro-
file recorded in the Bukowina Tatrzańska borehole allows us
to determine an approximate exhumation rate as ca. 0.4 mm/yr,
which seems very realistic (Fig. 4b). However, as mentioned
above,  similar  profile  could  have  resulted  from  the  thermal
relaxation after Miocene volcanism ceased. Pure thermal re-
laxation  does  not  seem  very  likely,  especially,  when  taking
into  account  that  both  in  the  Tatra  Mts,  immediately  to  the
south, as well as in the OC immediately to the north of the
Podhale  Basin,  at  the  same  time  exhumation  took  place
(Burchart 1972; Krá  1977; Kováč et al. 1994; Struzik et al.
2002; Anczkiewicz et al. 2005; Mazzoli et al. 2010; Śmigielski
et al. 2010, 2011, 2012; Botor et al. 2011; Zattin et al. 2011).
Hence,  we  favour  a  more  complex  scenario,  in  which  ther-
mal  relaxation  is  accompanied  by  slow  uplift  and  erosion
during the collisional period.

Conclusions

AFT  analyses  of  the  Podhale-Spišská  Magura  basin  pre-

sented in this study complement previous thermal evolution
studies conducted by illite-smectite and vitrinite reflectance.
Nearly  all  analysed  samples  yielded  apparent  ages  between
14  and  6 Ma,  among  which  vast  majority  groups  between
11—8 Ma. These ages are much younger than the deposition
ages of the studied sediments spanning from Eocene to Oli-
gocene. The AFT ages are interpreted as reflecting resetting
related  to  the  mid-Miocene  thermal  event  associated  with
mantle upwelling and volcanism (Danišík et al. 2012) and to
variable thickness of the sediments. Such interpretation fur-
ther shifts the extent of the mid-Miocene thermal episode to
the  northern  edge  of  the  Pannonian  block  and  provides  an
extra heat source, which additionally helps to explain the el-
evated  paleogeothermal  gradient  postulated  in  some  studies
on  the  basis  of  vitrinite  reflectance  and  illite-smectite  ther-
mometry  (Marynowski  &  Gawęda  2005;  Kępińska  2006).
This,  however,  contradicts  the  conclusions  of  Środoń  et  al.
(2006)  who  on  the  basis  of  I-S  data  postulated  a  paleogeo-
thermal  gradient  of  20—25 °C/km.  Accepting  more  elevated
paleogeothermal gradients suggests that the erosion of 4—7 km
of sediments proposed by Środoń et al. (2006) may be over-
estimated by at least 2 km.

Two samples from the western part of the basin that yielded

31.0 ± 4.3 and 26.9 ± 4.7 Ma are interpreted as mixed ages re-
sulting  from  partial  resetting  under  temperature  conditions
significantly  lower  than  in  the  remaining  part  of  the  basin.
This observation is in a very good agreement with reported
vitrinite  reflectance  and  I-S  thermometry,  which  indicate
systematic  drop  of  paleotemperature  towards  the  western-
northwestern side of the basin.

Acknowledgments:  We  thank  Danuta  Poprawa  and  Janusz
Skulich for providing the borehole samples. We are grateful
to  Andrzej  Łaptaś  for  his  help  in  the  field.  Reviews  by  an
anonymous reviewer and in particular by M. Danišík greatly
helped to improve the manuscript.

background image

150

ANCZKIEWICZ, ŚRODOŃ and ZATTIN

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

References

Anczkiewicz A.A., Zattin M. & Środoń J. 2005: Cenozoic uplift of

the Tatras and Podhale Basin from the perspective of the apa-
tite  fission  track  analyses.  Mineral.  Soc.  Pol.,  Spec.  Pap.  25,
261—264.

Andrusov D. & Köhler E. 1963: Nummulites, facies et development

pretectonique  des  Karpates  Occidentales  Centrales  au  Paleo-
gene. Geol. Sbor. Slov. Acad. Vied. 14, 1, 175—192.

Bac-Moszaszwili  M.  &  Gąsienica-Szostak  M.  1990:  The  Polish

Tatra. Geological guide for tourists. Wydaw. Geol., Warszawa,
1—159 (in Polish).

Barbarand J., Carter A., Wood I. & Hurford T. 2003: Compositional

and  structural  control  of  fission-track  annealing  in  apatite.
Chem. Geol. 198, 107—137.

Birkenmajer K. 1986: Stages of structural evolution of the Pieniny

Klippen Belt, Carpathians. Stud. Geol. Pol. 88, 7—32.

Birkenmajer K. 2001: Pieniny Klippen Belt. Introduction. In: Paulo

A. & Krobicki M. (Eds.): 12th Meeting of the Association of
European  Geological  Societies,  10—15  September,  Krakow.
Field Trip Guide, 127—138.

Birkenmajer  K.  &  Pécskay  Z.  1999:  K-Ar  dating  of  the  Miocene

andesite  intrusions,  Pieniny  Mts,  West  Carpathians,  Poland.
Bull. Pol. Acad. Sci. Earth Sci. 47, 155—169.

Birkenmajer  K.  &  Pécskay  Z.  2000:  K-Ar  dating  of  the  Miocene

andesite intrusions, Pieniny Mts, West Carpathians: a supple-
ment. Stud. Geol. Pol. 117, 7—25.

Botor D., Dunkl I., Rauch-Włodarska M. & von Eynatten H. 2006:

Attempt to dating of accretion in the West Carpathian Flysch
Belt:  apatite  fission  track  thermochronology  of  tuff  layers.
Proc.  of  VI  Internat.  Conference.  Central  European  Tectonic
Studies, Zakopane 19—22. 04. 2006. Geolines, 41—43.

Botor D., Dunkl I., Rauch M. & von Eynatten H. 2011: Timing of

tectonic subsidence, accretion and exhumation of the Western
Carpathian Flysch by apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He ther-
mochronology. Europen Geosciences Union General Assembly
(EGU)
 Vienna 3—8. 04. 2012.

Burchart J. 1972: Fission-track age determination of accessory apa-

tite from the Tatra Mountains, Poland. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.
15, 418—422.

Burtner R.L., Nigrini A. & Donelick R.A. 1994: Thermochronology

of Lower Cretaceous source rocks in the Idaho—Wyoming thrust
belt. AAPG Bull. 78, 1613—1636.

Csontos L., Nagymarosy A., Horvath F. & Kováč M. 1992: Tertiary

evolution of the Intra-Carpathian area: a model.  Tectonophysics
208, 221—241.

Danišík M., Kohút M., Dunkl I., Hraško L. & Frisch W. 2008: Apa-

tite  fission  track  and  (U—Th)/He  thermochronology  of  the
Rochovce  granite  (Slovakia)  –  implications  for  the  thermal
evolution of the Western Carpathian-Pannonian region.  Swiss
J. Geosci.
 101, 225—33.

Danišík M., Kohút M., Broska I. & Frisch W. 2010: Thermal evolu-

tion  of  the  Malá  Fatra  Mountains  (Central  Western  Car-
pathians):  insights  from  zircon  and  apatite  fission  track
thermochronology. Geol. Carpathica 61, 19—27.

Danišík M., Kohút M., Evans N.J. & Mcdonald B.J. 2012: Eo-Al-

pine  metamorphism  and  the  ‘mid-Miocene  thermal  event’  in
the Western Carpathians (Slovakia): new evidence from multi-
ple thermochronology. Geol. Mag. 149, 158—171.

Donelick R.A., O’Sullivan P.B. & Ketcham R.A. 2005: Apatite fis-

sion-track analysis. Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 58, 49—94.

Dumitru T.A. 1993: A new computer automated microscope stage

system  for  fission-track  analysis.  Nucl.  Tracks  and  Radiat.
Meas.
 21, 575—580.

Dunkl I. 2002: TRACKKEY: A Windows program for calculation

and  graphical  presentation  of  fission  track  data.  Comput.
Geosci
. 28, 2, 3—12.

Galbraith R.F. 1981: On statistical models for fission track counts.

Math. Geol. 13, 471—438.

Galbraith R.F. 1990: The radial plot; graphical assessment of spread

in ages. Nucl. Tracks and Radiat. Meas. 17, 207—214.

Galbraith R.F. & Laslett G.M. 1993: Statistical models for mixed fis-

sion track ages. Nucl. Tracks and Radiat. Meas. 21, 459—470.

Garecka M. 2005: Calcareous nannoplankton from the Podhale Flysch

(Oligocene—Miocene,  Inner  Carpathians,  Poland).  Stud.  Geol.
Pol.
 124, 353—369.

Gedl  P.  2000:  Biostratigraphy  and  Palaeogene  (Inner  Carpathians,

Poland)  in  the  light  of  palynological  studies.  Part I.  [Bio-
stratygrafia  i  paleośrodowisko  paleogenu  Podhala  w  świetle
badań  palinospastycznych.  Część I.]  Stud.  Geol.  Pol.  117,
69—154.

Gleadow A.J.W. 1981: Fission track dating methods: What are the

real alternatives? Nuclear Tracks 5, 3—14.

Green P.F. 1981: ‘Track-in track’ length measurements in annealed

apatites. Nuclear Tracks 5, 12—18.

Gross  P.,  Köhler  E.  &  Samuel  O.  1984:  A  new  lithostratigraphic

subdivision of the Central Carpathian Paleogene. Geol. Práce,
Spr.
 81, 103—117.

Hammerschmidt  G.,  Wagner  A.  &  Wagner  M.  1984:  Radiometric

dating  on  research  drill  core  Urach III:  a  contribution  to  its
geothermal history. J. Geophys. 54, 97—105.

Hurai V., Świerczewska A., Marko F., Tokarski A. & Hrušecký I.

2000: Paleofluid temperatures and pressures in Tertiary accre-
tionary prism of the Western Carpathians. Slovak Geol. Mag.
6, 194—7.

Hurford  A.J.  &  Green  P.F.  1983:  The  age  calibration  of  fission-

track dating. Isot. Geosci. 1, 285—317.

Janočko J., Gross P., Jacko S., Buček S., Karoli S., Žec B., Polák

M., Rakús M., Potfaj M. & Halouzka R. 2000: Geological map
of  the  Spišska  Magura  region.  1 : 50,000.  Ministerstvo  Život-
ného  Prostredia  Slovenskej  Republiky,  Štátny  Geologický
Ústav Dionýza Štúra – Bratislava.

Kázmer M., Dunkl I., Frisch W., Kuhlemann J. & Ozsvárt P. 2003:

The Paleogene forearc basin of the Eastern Alps and Western
Carpathians:  subducion  erosion  and  basin  evolution.  J.  Geol.
Soc.
London 160, 413—428.

Ketcham R.A., Carter A., Donelick R.A., Barbarand J. & Hurford

A.J. 2007: Improved modeling of fission track annealing in ap-
atite. Amer. Mineralogist 92, 799—810.

Kępińska B. 1995: The temperature of the main aquifer geothermal

field  of  the  Podhale  Basin.  Technika  Poszukiwań  Geologic-
znych. Geosynoptyka i Geotermia 6, 3—14 (in Polish).

Kępińska  B.  1997:  The  geological-geothermal  model    of    the

Podhale Basin. Studia, Rozprawy, Monografie IGSMiE PAN w
Krakowie
 48, 1—111.

Kępińska  B.  2006:  Thermal  and  hydrothermal  conditions  of  the

Podhale  geothermal  system.  Studia,  Rozprawy,  Monografie
IGSMiE PAN w Krakowie
, 135, 1—112 (in Polish, English sum-
mary).

Kotarba M. 2003: History of illite/smectite diagenesis in claystones

of  the  Western  Carpathians    along  Kraków-Zakopane  profile.
PhD Thesis, Inst. Geol. Sci., Pol. Acad. Sci., 1—198 (in Polish).

Kováč M., Král J., Márton E., Plašienka D. & Uher P. 1994: Alpine

uplift history of the Central Western Carpathians: geochrono-
logical, paleomagnetic, sedimentary and structural data. Geol.
Carpathica 
45, 83—96.

Král M., Lisol J. & Janáček J. 1987: Geothermal Research in Slova-

kia,  Report  1981—1985.  Manuscript,  Geofyzika  Brno,  1—186
(in Slovak).

Krá   J.  1977:  Fission  track  ages  of  apatites  from  some  granitoid

rocks in West Carpathians. Geol. Carpathica 28, 269—276.

background image

151

APATITE FISSION TRACK ANALYSES OF THE PODHALE BASIN (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 2, 141—151

Marynowski L. & Gawęda A. 2005: Correlation between biomarkers

and thermal maturity of the organic matter from the Paleogene
sedimentary  rocks  of  the  Podhale  trough.  Mineral.  Soc.  Pol.,
Spec. Pap. 
25, 329—332.

Mazzoli S., Jankowski L., Szaniawski R. & Zattin M. 2010: Low-T

thermochronometric evidence for post-thrusting ( < 11 Ma) ex-
humation  in  the  Western  Outer  Carpathians,  Poland.  C.R.
Geosci.
 342, 162—169.

Nemčok M. & Nemčok J. 1994: Late Cretaceous deformation of the

Pieniny Klippen Belt, West Carpathians.  Tectonophysics 239,
81—109.

Nemčok M., Marko F., Kováč M. & Fodor L. 1989: Neogene tec-

tonics and paleostress changes in the Czechoslovakian part of
the Vienna basin. Jb. Geol. B.—A 132, 443—458.

Nemčok M., Keith J.F. & Neese D.G. 1996: Development and hy-

drocarbon potential of the Central Carpathian Paleogene Basin,
West Carpathians, Slovak Republic. In: Ziegler P.A. & Horvath
F.  (Eds.):  Peri-Tethys  Memoir 2:  Structure  and  prospects  of
Alpine Basins and Forelands. Mem. Nat. Mus. Nat. Hist. 170,
Bratislava, 321—342.

Olszewska  B.W.  &  Wieczorek  J.  1989:  The  Paleogene  of  the

Podhale Basin (Polish Inner Carpathians) – micropaleontho-
logical perspective. Przegl. Geol. 46, 721—728.

Pécskay  Z.,  Lexa  J.,  Szakács  A.,  Seghedi  I.,  Balogh  K.,  Konečný

V.,  Zelenka  T.,  Kovacs  M.,  Póka  T.,  Fülöp  A.,  Márton  E.,
Panaiotu C. & Cvetković V. 2006: Geochronology of Neogene
magmatism  in  the  Carpathian  arc  and  intra-Carpathian  area.
Geol. Carpathica 57, 511—30.

Poprawa P. & Marynowski L. 2005: Thermal history of the Podhale

Trough (northern part of the Central Carpathian Paleogene Ba-
sin) – preliminary results from 1-D maturity modeling. Min-
eral. Soc. Pol., Spec. Pap.
 25, 352—355.

Radomski A. 1958: The sedimentological character of the Podhale

flysch. Acta Geol. Pol. 8, 335—409 (in Polish).

Ratschbacher L., Frisch W., Linzer H.G., Sperner B., Meschede M.,

Decker  K.,  Nemčok  M.,  Nemčok  J.  &  Grygar  R.  1993:  The
Pieniny Klippen Belt in the Western Carpathians of northeast-
ern  Slovakia:  Structural  evidence  for  transpression.  Tectono-
physics
 226, 471—483.

Roca E., Bessereau G., Jawor E., Kotarba M. & Roure F. 1995: Pre-

Neogene  evolution  of  the  Western  Carpathians:  Constraints
from  the  Bochnia-Tatra  Mountains  section  (Polish  Western
Carpathians). Tectonics 14, 855—873.

Rögl  F.  1996:  Stratigraphic  correlation  of  the  Paratethys  Oligo-

cene  and  Miocene.  Mitt.  Gesell.  Geol.  Bergbaustud.  Österr.
41, 65—73.

Soták J., Bebej J. & Biroň A. 1996: Detrital analysis of the Paleo-

gene flysch deposits of the Levoca Mts., evidence for sources
and paleogeography. Slovak Geol. Mag. 3, 4, 345—349.

Soták  J.,  Pereszlényi  M.,  Marschalko  R.,  Milička  J.  &  Starek  G.

2001:  Sedimentology  and  hydrocarbon  habitat  of  the  subma-

rine-fan  deposits  of  the  Central  Carpathian  Paleogene  Basin
(NE Slovakia). Mar. Petrol. Geol. 18, 87—114.

Sperner B., Ratschbacher L. & Nemčok M. 2002: Interplay between

subduction retreat and lateral extrusion: Tectonics of the West-
ern Carpathians. Tectonics 21, 6, 1—24.

Struzik A., Zattin M. & Anczkiewicz R. 2002: Timing of uplift and

exhumation  of  the  Polish  Western  Carpathians.  Geotemas  4,
151—154.

Szabó Cs., Harangi S. & Csontos L. 1992: Review of Neogene and

Quaternary  volcanism  of  the  Carpathian  Pannonian  Region.
Tectonophysics 208, 243—256.

Śmigielski  M.,  Krzywiec  P.,  Sinclair  H.,  Persano  C.,  Stuart  F.,

Aleksandrowski P. & Pisaniec K. 2010: Mechanisms of uplift
and erosion in the Carpathian thrust wedge and foreland basin:
low  temperature  thermochronology  of  the  Tatra  Mountains,
southern  Poland.  12-th  International  Conference  on  Thermo-
chronology, Glasgow, 16
20 August, 2010, 279.

Śmigielski M., Krzywiec P., Pisaniec K., Stuart F., Persano C., Sin-

clair  H.,  Oszczypko  N.  &  Sobien  K.  2011:  Inversion  of  the
Central  Carpathian  Basin  constrained  using  low  temperature
thermochronology and its implications for Carpathian orogene-
sis. Geophys. Res. Abstr. 13, 12938.

Śmigielski M., Stuart F.M., Krzywiec P., Persano C., Sinclair H.D.,

Pisaniec K. & Sobien K. 2012: Dating the tectonic evolution of
the  Northern  Carpathians  (Poland)  by  zircon  and  apatite  low
temperature  thermochronology.  13-th  International  Confer-
ence on Thermochronology, Guilin, 24
28 August, 2012, 78.

Środoń J., Kotarba M., Biroň A., Such P., Clauer N. & Wójtowicz

A.  2006:  Diagenetic  history  of  the  Podhale-Orava  Basin  and
the  underlying  Tatra  sedimentary  structural  units  (Western
Carpathians): evidence from XRD and K-Ar of illite-smectite.
Clay Miner. 41, 751—774.

Tari G., Horváth F. & Rumpler J. 1992: Styles of extension in the

Pannonian Basin. Tectonophysics 208, 203—219.

Wagner G. & Van den Haute P. 1992: Fission-track dating. Kluwer

Academy, Dordrecht, 285.

Wagner M. 2011: Petrologic studies and diagenetic history of coaly

matter in the Podhale flysch sediments, Southern Poland. Ann.
Soc. Geol. Pol. 
81, 173—183.

Westwalewicz-Mogilska E. 1986: New insights into the genesis of

Podhale Basin flysch sediments. Przegl. Geol. 12, 690—698 (in
Polish).

Zattin M., Andreucci B., Jankowski L., Mazzoli S. & Szaniawski R.

2011: Neogene exhumation in the Outer Western Carpathians.
Terra Nova 00, 1—9.

Żytko K., Zając R., Gucik S., Ryłko W., Oszczypko N., Garlicka I.,

Nemčok J., Elíáš M., Menčík E. & Stráník Z. 1989: Map of the
tectonic  elements  of  the  Western  Outer  Carpathians  and  their
foreland 1 : 500,000. In: Poprawa D. & Nemčok J. (Eds.): Geo-
logical Atlas of the Western Outer Carpathians and their fore-
land. Państwowy Instytut Geologiczny, Warszawa.