background image

www.geologicacarpathica.sk

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, FEBRUARY 2013, 64, 1, 71—79                                                        doi: 10.2478/geoca-2013-0005

Introduction

The Western Carpathians metallogenic province is a division
of  the  Alpine-Balkan-Carpathian-Dinaride  (ABCD)  metallo-
genic  belt,  one  of  the  word’s  oldest  mining  areas,  playing  a
major  role  in  the  history  of  European  civilizations.  The  Car-
pathians  form  part  of  an  extensive,  equatorial,  orogenic  belt
extending  from  the  Moroccan  Atlas,  through  the  Alps,  Di-
narides,  Pontides,  Zagros,  Hindukush  to  the  Himalayas  and
China. The Western Carpathians are the northernmost, E—W
trending  branch  of  this  Alpine  belt,  linked  to  the  Eastern
Alps in the west and to the Eastern Carpathians in the east,
continuing farther to the Apuseni Mountains and the South-
ern  Carpathians  (Săndulescu  1984).  The  recent  structure  of
the Alps, Carpathians and Dinarides originated from the sub-
duction—collision  (convergence)  processes  of  the  African
plate fragments (Adria-Apulia) with Eurasia mainly from the
Cretaceous to the present. The timing and duration of geologi-
cal  events  that  produce  economic  concentrations  of  mineral
wealth in the earth’s crust are of crucial importance in under-
standing ore deposits. However, unravelling ore-forming epi-
sodes  in  the  ore  deposits  is  practically  impossible  without
precise  dating,  as  spatial-structural  relations  are  frequently
ambiguous. There are several radioactive isotope tracers com-
monly used for dating metalliferous events (K-Ar, 

40

Ar/

39

Ar,

Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and U-Pb), although often can fail to date min-

Re-Os and U-Th-Pb dating of the Rochovce granite and its

mineralization (Western Carpathians, Slovakia)

MILAN KOHÚT

1

,

 

HOLLY STEIN

2,3

, PAVEL UHER

4

, AARON ZIMMERMAN

2

 and

  UBOMÍR HRAŠKO

1

1

Dionýz Štúr State Institute of Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava, Slovak Republic;   milan.kohut@geology.sk

2

AIRIE Program, Department of Geosciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, USA

3

CEED Centre of Excellence, University of Oslo, 0316 Oslo, Norway

4

Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina-G, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

(Manuscript received December 8, 2011; accepted in revised form June 13, 2012)

Abstract: The subsurface Rochovce granite intrusion was emplaced into the contact zone between two principal tec-
tonic units (the Veporic Unit and the Gemeric Unit) of the Central Western Carpathians (CWC), Slovakia. The Creta-
ceous  age  of  this  granite  and  its  Mo-W  mineralization  is  shown  using  two  independent  methods:  U-Pb  on
zircon and Re-Os on molybdenite. The studied zircons have a typical homogeneous character with oscillatory zoning
and scarce restite cores. SHRIMP U-Pb data provide an age of 81.5 ± 0.7 Ma, whereas restite cores suggest a latest
Neoproterozoic—Ediacaran age ( ~ 565 Ma) source. Zircon  Hf

(81)

 values —5.2 to  + 0.2 suggest a lower crustal source,

whereas one from the Neoproterozoic core  Hf

(565)

= + 7.4 call for the mantle influenced old precursor. Two molybden-

ite-bearing samples of very different character affirm a genetic relation between W-Mo mineralization and the Rochovce
granite. One sample, a quartz-molybdenite vein from the exocontact (altered quartz-sericite schist of the Ochtiná For-
mation), provides a Re-Os age of 81.4 ± 0.3 Ma. The second molybdenite occurs as 1—2 mm disseminations in fine-
grained granite, and provides an age of 81.6 ± 0.3 Ma. Both Re-Os ages are identical within their 2-sigma analytical
uncertainty and suggest rapid exhumation as a consequence of post-collisional, orogen-parallel extension and unroof-
ing. The Rochovce granite represents the northernmost occurrence of Cretaceous calc-alkaline magmatism with Mo-W
mineralization associated with the Alpine-Balkan-Carpathian-Dinaride metallogenic belt.

Key words: Western Carpathians, Cretaceous granitic rocks, SHRIMP zircon dating, Re-Os molybdenite dating, Mo-W
mineralization.

eralization because of alteration processes and/or not consan-
guineous origin. In the last decade the 

187

Re—

187

Os chronome-

ter applied to molybdenite (MoS

2

) and/or other sulphide and

oxide  minerals  has  shown  that  the  timing  of  mineralization
can be directly determined (Stein et al. 1997, 2001; Selby &
Creaser  2001;  Selby  et  al.  2007).  Since  its  discovery,  the
Rochovce  granite  and  its  Mo-W  mineralization  has  provided
the possibility to determine both the age of mineralization and
the  granite  magmatism  thereby  providing  improved  know-
ledge  of  the  geologic  evolution  of  the  Veporic  and  Gemeric
Units contact zone. Because a modern single-grain cathodolu-
minescence controlled (CLC) zircon dating (Poller et al. 2001)
brings  different  result  than  a  conventional  zircon  U-Pb  dat-
ing  (Hraško  et  al.  1999)  we  decided  to  test  this  uncertainty
with additional methods. We present a new SHRIMP zircon
U-Th-Pb dating and high-precision Re-Os ages for molybden-
ite from the Rochovce granite and its host rock occurrences to
determine  synchronous  magmatic/mineralization  process  in
the contact zone between the Gemeric and the Veporic Supe-
runits, Central Western Carpathians, Slovakia.

Geological setting

The  Western  Carpathians  as  a  part  of  the  extensive  Al-

pine—Himalayan  orogenic  system  represent  a  typical  colli-

background image

72

KOHÚT, STEIN, UHER, ZIMMERMAN and HRAŠKO

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 1, 71—79

sional  orogen.  They  are  divided  into  two  belts:  the  Outer
Western  Carpathians,  consisting  mostly  of  Neo-Alpine
nappes and the Inner Western Carpathians with essentially a
Paleo-Alpine  structure  overlain  by  Tertiary  post-nappe  de-
posits. The Inner Western Carpathians consist of three main
crustal-scale  superunits  which  are,  from  north  to  south
(Fig. 1A): the Tatric, Veporic and Gemeric and several cover-
nappe systems: the Fatric, Hronic and Silicic (Plašienka et al.

1997). The basement units together with the Mesozoic cover
and  nappe  complexes  were  tectonically  juxtaposed  through
north-directed  thrusting  during  the  Late  Cretaceous.  The
Rochovce  granite  is  a  not  exposed  intrusion  in  the  south-
eastern part of the Veporic Unit near the contact with overly-
ing Gemeric Unit (Fig. 1B,C). The hidden granite body was
discovered by the drill-hole KV-3 (Klinec et al. 1979, 1980),
situated  in  the  centre  of  a  magnetic  anomaly  (Filo  et  al.

Fig. 1. A  Simplified tectonic-geological sketch of the Western Carpathians (Slovak part), displaying the principal tectonic units of the IWC
and position of the study area. Explanations: OWC – Outer Western Carpathians, IWC – Inner Western Carpathians. – Detailed geolog-
ical sketch of the study area with the positions of principal exploration boreholes. Rocks symbols are identical as in Fig. 1C. – Idealized
geological profile across Rochovce granite body, with location of dated samples Ro-3/398.5 and Ro-3/676.6 m. Explanations: 1 – granite
of the 2

nd

 intrusive phase, 2 – marginal fine-grained granite of the 1

st

 intrusive phase, 3 – coarse-grained porphyric granite – 1

st

 phase,

4 – metagabbro, 5 – Rimava Formation, 6 – Slatviná Formation, 7 – Ochtiná Formation, 8 – mineralized zone with sulphides and tung-
sten [W-zone], 9 – mineralized zone with molybdenite [Mo-zone], 10 – tectonic lines – fault and thrust.

background image

73

THE ROCHOVCE GRANITE  Re-Os AND U-Pb DATING (W CARPATHIANS)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 1, 71—79

1974). As revealed by the borehole KV-3, the granitic rocks
intruded  mostly  into  the  metapelitic  to  psammitic  mica-
schists  and  phyllites  of  the  so-called  Slatviná  Formation
(Vozárová  &  Vozár  1982).  Direct  contact  forms  a  layer  of
metagabbro  100 m  thick  (607—702 m).  Subsequent  drilling
exploration revealed that in the SE part this granite intruded
into the quartz-sericite schists of the Ochtiná Formation (Ge-
meric Unit) (Fig. 1C), and the southern part intruded into the
Permian psammitic to psephitic rocks of the Rimava Forma-
tion as well as. The Alpine contact metamorphism is bound
exclusively  to  these  Carboniferous  and  Permian  metasedi-
mentary rocks. The Rochovce magmatic body is formed by
two intrusive phases (Határ et al. 1989). The first phase com-
prises  two  petrographic  varieties:  (i)  coarse-grained  biotite
monzogranites with the pink K-feldspars phenocrysts, locally
with mafic microgranular enclaves (central part of the body);
and (ii) granite porphyries (marginal part). The second phase,
forming  mainly  the  S  to  SE  part  of  the  magmatic  body,  is
more  evolved  type  represented  by  medium-  to  fine-grained
biotite  leucogranites  and  leucogranitic  porphyries.  Narrow

veins  of  leucogranite  randomly  penetrate  coarse-grained
granites  of  the  1

st

  phase  (Fig. 2A).  When  the  first  granite

samples from drill-core KV-3 appeared on surface they were
attracted attention not only for their fresh pinkish colour, but
also  for  their  undeformed  character,  rather  unusual  for  the
Western Carpathians basement granites. The Rochovce gran-
ites  have  normal  to  elevated  SiO

2

  values  (66—77 wt. %),  a

typical calc-alkaline, subaluminous to peraluminous charac-
ter (Shand’s index – A/CNK = 0.9—1.4), high concentrations
of Ba, Rb, Li, Cs, Mo, Nb, Y, V, W, Cr, F, Th, U and low
concentrations of Sr, Zr and Be (Határ et al. 1989). The low
to moderate initial Sr isotope ratios (I

Sr

= 0.7083—0.7126), to-

gether  with  negative  Nd

(81)

= —3.0  to  —2.4,  and  stable  iso-

topes values (

18

O

(VSMOW)

= 8.0 to 8.3 ‰; 

34

S

(CDT)

= —2.1 ‰;

7

Li

(SVEC)

= 4.7 ‰)  suggest  a  lower  crustal  meta-igneous

protolith (Hraško et al. 1998; Kohút et al. 2001; Magna et al.
2010).  Although  the  first  K/Ar  cooling  ages  on  biotites
88—75 Ma (Kantor & Rybár 1979) indicated the Alpine—Cre-
taceous  age  of  the  Rochovce  granite,  Cambel  et  al.  (1989)
still  supposed  its  Permian  age  by  means  of  Rb/Sr  isochron

Fig. 2. A – Sharp contact of the narrow vein of fine-grained granite – 2

nd

 intrusive phase to coarse-grained granite of the 1

st

 phase with

chilled margin. Sample taken from borehole KV-3 depth 1379.8 m. Scale bar 1 cm. – Molybdenite-bearing (Mlb) veinlets structure in the
fine-grained granite-porphyry of the 2

nd

 intrusive phase – sample Ro-3/676.6 m. Natural size (scale bar 1 cm). – Quartz-molybdenite vein-

let structure in host rock quartz phyllite of the Ochtiná Formation – sample Ro-3/398.5 m. Scale bar 1 cm. – Tiny inclusions of molybdenite
(Mlb) in medium-grained porphyry – sample Ro-2/532.3 m. Abbreviations: Ab – albite, Kfs – K-feldspar, Ms – muscovite. Back-scat-
tered electron image (BSEI). – Quartz-molybdenite (Qtz-Mlb) veinlet in phyllite rock (Ochtiná Formation); sample Ro-5/549.5 m; BSEI.

background image

74

KOHÚT, STEIN, UHER, ZIMMERMAN and HRAŠKO

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 1, 71—79

(WR)  –  253 ± 2 Ma.  However,  a  Cretaceous  magmatic  age
for the Rochovce granite was already proved by U-Pb zircon
dating  –  conventional  method  82 ± 1 Ma  (Hraško  et  al.
1999)  and  cathodoluminescence  controlled  single  zircon
method 75.6 ± 1.1 Ma (Poller et al. 2001).

Sample description

We  selected  for  zircon  dating  purpose  a  representative

sample of coarse-grained biotite porphyric granite of the 1

st

intrusive phase (sample KV-3/1360) and two representative
molybdenite samples for the time comparison of the granite
porphyry-type mineralization to stockwork mineralization in
the  host  rocks.  Sample  RO-3/676.6  –  was  typical  fine-
grained granite of the 2

nd

 intrusive phase with disseminated

flakes  of  molybdenite  (Fig. 2B),  taken  from  a  depth  of
676.6 m  in  the  borehole  RO-3,  whereas  the  next  sample
RO-3/398.5 was taken from the depth of 398.5 m in the same
borehole. It is a quartz-molybdenite veinlet from exocontact
of the Rochovce granite body in the Gemeric – hydrother-
mally  altered  quartz-sericite  schists  of  the  Ochtiná  Forma-
tion (Fig. 2C).

Analytical methods

The heavy-mineral separation of accessory zircon was done

using  a  common  separation  procedure  (crushing,  sieving,
gravitation  separation  by  Wilfley  table,  heavy  liquid  –  bro-
mophorm, and electro-magnetic separation). Euhedral trans-
parent and semitransparent crystals of zircon, usually 150 to
450 µm in size, were selected for dating. The zircon sample
preparation  and  the  SHRIMP  dating  were  done  at  the  All-
Russian Geological Research Institute (VSEGEI) at St. Peters-
burg;  including  the  CL,  BSE  and  optical  images  of  the
polished  mounts  with  zircon  crystals  for  the  choice  of  the
measured  spots.  The  U-Th-Pb  analyses  were  done  using
SHRIMP II,  using  the  SQUID  Excel  Macro  of  Ludwig
(2000). Data for each spot were collected in sets of five scans
through the mass range. The probe spot diameter was 25 µm
and primary beam intensity was about 4 nA. The Pb/U ratios
have  been  normalized  relative  to  a  value  of  0.0668  for  the

206

Pb/

238

U ratio of the TEMORA reference zircons, equiva-

lent  to  an  age  of  416.75 Ma  (Black  et  al.  2003).  Uncertain-
ties given for individual analyses (ratios and ages) are at the
one   level; however the uncertainties in calculated concor-
dia ages are reported at two   levels. The measured U-Th-Pb
isotope data are summarized in Table 1.

Lu-Hf-isotope analyses were carried out with a New Wave

DUV  193 nm.  Laser-ablation  system  based  on  193 nm
COMPex-102  ArF  excimer  laser  and  a  multi-collector
ICPMS  Neptune  at  the  Centre  of  Isotopic  Research  of  the
All-Russian Geological Research Institute in St. Petersburg.
Faraday  cups  configuration  allowed  simultaneous  registra-
tion  of 

172

Yb, 

174

(Yb + Hf), 

175

Lu, 

176

(Hf + Yb + Lu), 

177

Hf,

178

Hf, 

179

Hf, 

180

Hf. 

175

Lu  and 

172

Yb  were  used  for  interfer-

ence correction of 

176

Lu and 

176

Yb on 

176

Hf. The laser spot

size was  ~ 50 µm in diameter and  ~ 30 µm depth. The repeti-
tion rate was 5—7 Hz, laser energies of  ~ 120 mJ/pulse; helium

Table 1:

 SHRIMP 

U-Th-Pb 

zircon 

data 

of 

the 

Rochovce 

biotite 

granite 

(KV

-3/1360 m 

sample).

background image

75

THE ROCHOVCE GRANITE  Re-Os AND U-Pb DATING (W CARPATHIANS)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 1, 71—79

was  used  as  a  carrier  gas  (1 l/min  He  through  the  ablation
chamber and then, after ablation chamber add  + 1 l/min of Ar
to sample line). The standard zircons Temora, Mud Tank and
GJ-1 (Morel et al. 2008; Yuan et al. 2008) were used in analyt-
ical session to confirm a normal 

176

Lu and 

176

Yb interferences

correction.  The  typical  LA-MC-ICPMS  analytical  procedure
was included: 40 seconds of blank (zero lines of Faraday cups
amplifiers) measurements, preablation time  ~ 9 seconds, abla-
tion (integrations) time  ~ 32 seconds. This time is sufficient to
obtain the internal standard errors of 

176

Hf/

177

Hf ratios about

0.01 % for references zircons, with weighted mean 

176

Hf/

177

Hf

of  0.282488 ± 12  (2  )  for  Temora  (n = 20)  and  0.282005 ± 9
(2  ) for GJ-1 (n = 26). The evolution line was calculated us-
ing the decay constant of 

176

Lu:  = 1.867*10

—11

 per year and

Primordial  composition 

176

Hf/

177

Hf = 0.27978.  The  Hf(t)

values  were  calculated  using  the  chondritic  Hf  data  of

176

Hf/

177

Hf = 0.28286 and 

176

Lu/

177

Hf = 0.0334. The Hf model

ages  [Hf

t(DM)

]  were  calculated  to  depleted  mantle  composi-

tion  with  value 

176

Hf/

177

Hf = 0.28325;  whereas  two-stage

[Hf

t(DM2st)

]  model  ages  were  calculated  to  DM  with  crustal

correction 

176

Lu/

177

Hf = 0.0093.  The  measured  Hf  isotope

data are given in Table 2.

Molybdenite is exceptionally suitable for the Re-Os dating

because it usually contains ppm level Re and essentially no
initial or common Os, making it a single mineral chronome-
ter.  General  principles  and  methodology  for  molybdenite
dating  are  outlined  in  Stein  et  al.  (2001,  2003)  and  Stein
(2006). Mineral separates were prepared and Re and Os con-
centrations were determined at AIRIE, Colorado State Univer-
sity. A Carius-tube digestion was used, whereby molybdenite
is dissolved and equilibrated with a Re-double Os spike (Mar-
key  et  al.  2003)  in  HNO

3

—HCl  (aqua  regia)  by  sealing  in  a

thick-walled  glass  ampoule  and  heating  for  12  hours  at
230 °C.  The  Os  is  recovered  by  distilling  directly  from  the
Carius tube aqua regia into HBr, and is subsequently purified

Sample 

Age 

176

Yb/

177

Hf 

176

Lu/

177

Hf 

176

Hf/

177

Hf 

Hf

(0)

 

Hf

(t)

 

t

(DM)

 

t

(DM2st)

 

KV–3/1.1 

564 

0.032587 ± 2118 

0.001562 ± 56 

0.282632 ± 38 

  –8.1 

  7.4 

  899 

  992 

KV–3/2.1 

  81 

0.026890 ± 1159 

0.001123 ± 11 

0.282639 ± 30 

  –7.8 

–2.9 

  877 

1105 

KV–3/3.1 

  81 

0.058380 ± 1529 

0.002497 ± 09 

0.282575 ± 51 

–10.1 

–5.2 

1007 

1226 

KV–3/4.1 

  82 

0.019412 ± 2191 

0.000848 ± 48 

0.282726 ± 47 

  –4.7 

  0.2 

  747 

  945 

KV–3/4.2 

  81 

0.044856 ± 2019 

0.001833 ± 39 

0.282615 ± 37 

  –8.6 

–3.8 

  929 

1151 

 

Table 2: Lu-Hf isotopic results from studied zircons of the Rochovce biotite granite.

Table 3: Re-Os data for molybdenites from the Rochovce samples Ro-3/398.5 m and Ro-3/676.6 m.

by micro-distillation. The Re is recovered by anion exchange.
The Re and Os are loaded onto Pt filaments and isotopic com-
positions are determined using NTIMS on NBS 12-inch radi-
us,  68°  and  90°  sector  mass  spectrometers  at  Colorado  State
University. Two in-house molybdenite standards, calibrated at
AIRIE,  are  run  routinely  as  an  internal  check  (Markey  et  al.
1998). The Re-Os data, analytical details, and blank informa-
tion are given as footnotes in the data table (Table 3).

Results

The euhedral transparent and semitransparent zircon crys-

tals of 0.15 to 0.45 mm in size are enclosed mainly by bio-
tites, whereas in feldspars and quartz they were observed in a
lesser  amount  in  the  Rochovce  granite.  The  studied  zircons
according to zircon typology (Pupin 1980) correspond mainly
to  P

1

—P

3

,  G

1

  and  S

4

—S

5

  subtypes  with  medium  temperature

and a high (Na + K)/Al ratio in magma during zircon crystal-
lization  typical  for  the  alkaline  type  of  magma.  Cathodolu-
minescence  (CL)  and  back-scattered  electron  (BSE)  images
of  zircon  crystals  reveal  their  magmatic  oscillatory  zoning
partly  with  several  luminescent  areas  and  local  presence  of
old,  inherited  cores  (Fig. 3).  SHRIMP  analysed  spot  ages
vary in the narrow interval from 82.6 ± 0.9 Ma to 80.9 ± 1.6 Ma
(Table 1),  forming  the  concordia  intercept  point  age  of
81.5 ± 0.7 Ma (Fig. 4). The inherited cores indicate partial con-
tribution  of  the  Neoproterozoic—Ediacaran  (564 Ma)  source
material at the genesis of the Rochovce granite.

LA-ICPMS  Lu-Hf-isotope  analyses  realized  close

SHRIMP spot ones show little variation in Hf isotopic com-
position.  The 

176

Hf/

177

Hf  ratio  ranges  from  0.282575  to

0.282726 (Table 2), while recent   Hf values range from —4.7
to —10.1. This indicates a crustal origin of the magma, and the
t

(DM)

  ages  give  a minimum  age  for  the  source  material  of

background image

76

KOHÚT, STEIN, UHER, ZIMMERMAN and HRAŠKO

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 1, 71—79

Fig. 4. SHRIMP U-Th-Pb zircon data of the Rochovce biotite granite
(KV-3/1360 m sample).

about  747—1007 Ma.  The  crustal  model  ages  t

(DM2st)

  range

from 945 to 1105 Ma. However, an inherited core in a zircon
grain  from  the  Rochovce  granite  shows  much  more  radio-
genic Hf isotope signature with  Hf

(t)

= + 7.4 indicating former

mantle character of the source, whereas the majority of analy-
ses from the Upper Cretaceous homogenized parts of zircons
(t = 82—81 Ma)  have  Hf

(t)

= — 5.2  to  + 0.2  indicating  rather  a

lower crustal origin.

Detailed  microscopy  and  electron  microprobe  studies  re-

veal  that  molybdenites  occurred  not  only  as  visually  ob-
served  (1—3 mm)  disseminated  inclusions  in  the  second
intrusive  phase,  but  they  were  spotted  as  minute  grains  in
both  petrographic  varieties  (coarse-grained  monzogranites
and  medium-grained  porphyries)  of  the  1

st

  intrusive  phase

(Fig. 2D). Other ore minerals like magnetite, pyrite, chalco-
pyrite,  galena,  sphalerite,  and  fluorite  were  also  identified.

These  minerals  occur  in  small  quantities  even  though  the  first

intrusive phase is not regarded as ore-bearing. The rocks of
the 2

nd

 intrusive phase contain increased contents of hydro-

thermal-stage minerals (molybdenite, chalcopyrite, pyrite, ga-
lena,  sphalerite,  and  fluorite).  The  molybdenite  and  pyrite
also  constitute  disseminated  and  veinlet  mineralization
(veins to several cm  ± dm) exclusively associated with exo-
contact  of  the  fine-grained  leucogranites  and  porphyries  in
the  host  rock  phyllites  (Fig. 2E).  Due  to  their  fractionated—

evolved character, the granites of the second phase have de-
creasing contents or absence of accessory magnetite, allanite
and titanite, what are typical for the first intrusive phase. Gen-
erally,  the  Rochovce  granite  related  Mo-W  deposit  consists
of two individual zones (Mo- and W-zone) that partly over-
lap (Fig. 1C). In the Mo-zone the main mineral is molybden-
ite, distinctively associated to exocontact of the granite body
and/or  disseminated  inclusions  directly  in  the  granite-por-
phyry.  Molybdenite-quartz  veinlets  are  of  cm  scale  rarely  of
dm scale, and this mineralization can be defined as stockwork
type. The contents in the distinctively mineralized veinlets are
in the range 0.1—0.7 wt. % Mo, rarely up to 1 or 2 wt. % Mo.
The main economic mineral of the W-zone is scheelite, in less
amount ferberite. A characteristic feature of the W-zone is the
intensive  pyritization  in  the  stockwork.  The  highest  content
found was 0.4—0.7 wt. % W.

The  Re-Os  data  are  shown  in  Table 3.  Two  molybdenite

separates  from  the  distinct  representative  samples  of  the
Rochovce  Mo-W  mineralization  (granite-porphyry  and  host
rock  stockwork  mineralization)  yield  Re-Os  ages  of
81.6 ± 0.3  and  81.4 ± 0.3 Ma  respectively.  Analytical  uncer-
tainties are given at the 2-sigma level and include the error in
the 

187

Re decay constant, thereby permitting direct compari-

son  with  ages  based  on  other  isotopic  methods,  as  cited  in
this paper.

Discussion

The  Late  Cretaceous  age  of  the  Rochovce  granite  magma-

tism was determined by Hraško et al. (1999) using U-Pb zir-
con  conventional  (multi-grains)  dating  with  the  lower
intercept (LI) concordia age 82 ± 1 Ma.  The  discordant  U-Pb
isotope  results  of  analysed  zircons  and  their  BSE  images
document participation of an old source material forming the
upper intercept (UI) age 2123 ± 89 Ma. Poller et al. (2001) us-
ing the U-Pb zircon single-grain method, when checked each
grain  by  CL  and  BSE  before  its  dissolutions  and  measure-
ments  in  mass  spectrometry,  obtained  LI  age  75.6 ± 1.1 Ma
and UI age 1203 ± 500 Ma. Although Poller et al. (l.c.) selected
only  homogeneous  zircon  grains  for  TIMS  analysis,  to  ob-
tain concordant age, which can reflect a time of real magmatic
crystallization,  acquired  age  (75.6  Ma)  is  slightly  younger
than published Hraško et al. (1999) and results presented in
this  paper.  This  age  is  surprisingly  younger  than  the  age  of
81.3 ± 3 Ma (weighted mean age) from four biotite K/Ar cool-
ing ages in Kantor & Rybár (1979). Comparison of all zircon
U-Pb data from various laboratories and methodics used for
determination  the  Rochovce  granite  magmatic  age  is  pre-
sented in Fig. 5. Previous datings (Hraško et al. 1999; Poller
et al. 2001) brought discordant results with a large scatter in
UI,  which  can  indicate  absence  of  larger  inherited  compo-
nents. Our recent dating employing two independent methods
(SHRIMP zircon U-Th-Pb & molybdenite Re-Os) proved the
Campanian  (81.5 Ma)  age  of  the  Rochovce  granite  magma-
tism  and  mineralization.  Participation  of  the  Neoproterozoic
source material (t = 564 Ma; Table 1) is very common for the
Western Carpathians (e.g. Kohút et al. 2009; Putiš et al. 2009).
It is noteworthy that our limited study did not confirm the ef-

Fig. 3.  Zircon  CL  images  of  the  Rochovce  granite  sample  KV-3/
1360 m with location of the SHRIMP dating spots.

background image

77

THE ROCHOVCE GRANITE  Re-Os AND U-Pb DATING (W CARPATHIANS)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 1, 71—79

Fig. 5. Comparison of the Rochovce U-Pb zircon data from all pub-
lished sources.

fect of the Variscan metamorphic/magmatic processes on the
studied  zircons,  whereas  the  Variscan  granitic  and  meta-ig-
neous rocks are common in the south Veporic Zone (Putiš et
al. 2009; Kohút et al. 2010; Broska et al. 2011). This could be
explain  in  two  ways:  i)  the  source  of  the  Rochovce  granite
was  from  the  deeper  part  of  the  lower  crust  not  significantly
influenced  by  the  Variscan  orogenesis  or  ii)  due  to  limited
study  from  three  analysed  zircon  cores,  only  one  was  older
than Cretaceous, but not Variscan, and a random feature is a
matter  of  statistics,  therefore  this  question  remains  open  for
future study. The Hf isotope signature (Table 2) of the studied
zircons with  Hf

(81)

= — 5.2 to  + 0.2 call for lower crustal meta-

igneous  source  provenance  of  the  Rochovce  granite  magma,
whereas  the  inherited  core  with  Hf

(564)

= + 7.4  indicates  a

former  mantle  contribution  to  its  source.  This  is  in  accor-
dance  with  negative  values  Nd

(81)

= — 3.0  to  —2.4  (Hraško  et

al. 1998), which suggests that a lower crustal protolith is more
probable  than  an  upper  crustal  metasedimentary  or  mantle
source.  There  are  comparable  Hf  model  ages  t

(DM2st)

  ranging

from 945 to 1105 Ma, whereas the Nd model ages t

(DM2st)

 are

994 ~ 1115 Ma.

The  Alpine-Balkan-Carpathians-Dinaride  (ABCD)  oro-

genic  belt  and/or  metallogenic  province  is  part  of  the  Al-
pine-Himalayan  orogenic  system  that  resulted  from
convergence  of  the  African,  Arabian  and  Indian  plates  and
their  collision  with  Eurasia,  mainly  from  the  Cretaceous  to
the  recent  (Heinrich  &  Neubauer  2002;  Neubauer  2002).
Major  ore  deposits  within  the  ABCD  are  mostly  related  to
calc-alkaline magmatism, which was associated with transi-

tional  subduction-collision  processes  followed  by  extension
during the Late Cretaceous and Oligocene to Neogene peri-
ods. Late Cretaceous magmatism/volcanism dominates mostly
in the eastern part of the ABCD metallogenic belt, often de-
noted  as  the  Banatitic  Magmatic  and  Metallogenetic  Belt
(BMMB – Berza et al. 1998; Ciobanu et al. 2002 and cita-
tion  therein)  or  Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie  belt
(ABTS – Popov & Popov 2000; von Quadt et al. 2005 and
citation  therein)  occurred  in  Romania,  Serbia  and  Bulgaria.
Although granitic rocks – “banatites” and their characteris-
tics are similar within this belt, there are mutual differences
in  type  of  mineralization,  for  example,  the  porphyry-type
Cu ± Au ± Mo  deposits,  associated  epithermal  massive  sul-
phides,  and  Fe-Cu  skarn.  The  Late  Cretaceous  ore-bearing
magmatism  lasted  over  25 Ma  (from  ca.  92  to  65 Ma)  and
more than 50 important deposits and occurrences are geneti-
cally and spatially associated with “banatites” (see reviews:
Ciobanu  et  al.  2002;  von  Quadt  et  al.  2005;  Zimmerman  et
al.  2008).  However,  Late  Cretaceous  magmatism  is  scarce
within the western part of the ABCD belt where only minor
aplite and pegmatite veins are reported to accompany Cre-
taceous  metamorphism  in  the  Alps  and  mineral  deposits
contrast  with  contemporaneous  metamorphogenic  siderite/
magnesite/talc and hydrothermal Cu vein deposits exposed in
the Eastern Alps and Western Carpathians (Neubauer 2002).
It is noteworthy that the Rochovce granite (81.5 Ma in age) to-
gether with its porphyry and stockwork mineralization forms
the northernmost continuation of the BMMB or ABTS belt.

The  Rochovce  granite  was  intruded  to  a  relative  shallow

level.  The  ultimate  depth  of  the  granite  emplacement  esti-
mated  on  the  basis  of  contact  metamorphism  should  be  be-
tween  200—100 MPa  (Korikovsky  et  al.  1986;  Vozárová
1990). Our Re-Os molybdenite data confirm shallow granite
emplacement  with  rapid  cooling  because  granite-porphyry
mineralization shows identical age to stockwork mineraliza-
tion  in  host  rock  schists  and  phyllites,  and/or  K/Ar  cooling
ages on the granite biotites (Kantor & Rybár 1979) are com-
parable to our results from both isotope systems. Albeit sec-
ond-boiling  reaction  and  hydrothermal  processes  at  the
granite  exocontact  are  limited  by  granite  body  dimension,
the  diameter  of  the  intrusion  is  less  than  3 km.  However,
apart  from  the  contact  metamorphism,  regional  metamor-
phism  is  known  in  connection  with  the  development  of  a
metamorphic  core  complex  during  Cretaceous  orogenic
events (Janák et al. 2001). Recent 

40

Ar/

39

Ar laser-probe dat-

ing of white micas from metapelites of the SE part of the Ve-
poric Unit 77—72 Ma (Janák et al. l.c.) indicates that cooling
below  the  blocking  temperature  in  different  parts  of  the  SE
Veporic  territory  was  not  instantaneous.  On  the  other  hand
Dallmeyer  et  al.  (1996)  published  a  muscovite  plateau  age
(86.9 ± 0.2 Ma)  from  the  Late  Paleozoic/Triassic  Veporic
cover  sequence  from  the  contact  zone  between  the  Veporic
and  Gemeric  Units.  This  in  part  higher  age  can  be  affected
by excess argon, as the authors supposed termination of re-
gional  compressional  tectonics  at  82 Ma.  Late  Cretaceous
exhumation  of  these  metamorphic  terrains  is  interpreted  in
terms  of  post-collisional,  orogen-parallel  extension  and  un-
roofing  along  low-angle  detachment  faults  (Plašienka  et  al.
1999).  The  following  scenario  for  the  generation  and  em-

background image

78

KOHÚT, STEIN, UHER, ZIMMERMAN and HRAŠKO

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 1, 71—79

placement of the Rochovce granite was inferred (Poller et al.
2001):  in  the  Late  Jurassic—Early  Cretaceous,  continental
collision and crustal stacking followed the closure of the Me-
liata  Ocean.  Crustal  thickening  together  with  some  heat  in-
put from the mantle triggered partial melting and generation
of granite in the lower crust. During the middle Cretaceous
period,  shortening  and  crustal  stacking  continued  and  pro-
graded  outwards.  Shortening  in  the  rear  of  the  Veporic
wedge  triggered  its  exhumation  and  orogen-parallel  exten-
sion.  During  the  final  stages  of  exhumation,  the  Rochovce
granite  was  emplaced  into  the  extensional  shear  zones.  The
sources  of  the  Rochovce  granitic  melts  can  be  seen  in  the
lower crustal meta-igneous root, not exposed on the surface.

Conclusion

New  SHRIMP  zircon  U-Pb  and  Re-Os  molybdenite  ages

presented in this paper bring detailed information concerning
the age of granite related mineralization from the contact zone
between the Gemeric and Veporic Units in the Rochovce area.
It is obvious that calc-alkaline granite magmatism and associ-
ated porphyry-type and stockwork mineralization from this lo-
cality  are  Late  Cretaceous  in  age  and  were  formed  81.5 Ma.
Our data attest instantaneous cooling of a shallow level granite
intrusion  due  to  rapid  exhumation  as  a  consequence  of  post-
collisional, orogen-parallel extension and unroofing. The Cre-
taceous  Rochovce  granite  with  typical  Mo-W  mineralization
is unique in the Western Carpathians and represents the north-
ernmost  continuation  of  mineralization  associated  with  the
Cretaceous  calc-alkaline  magmatism  within  the  Alpine-Bal-
kan-Carpathians-Dinaride  metallogenic  belt.  The  Hf  isotope
study from zircons confirmed the lower crustal source mate-
rial of the Rochovce granite.

Acknowledgments:  The  authors  are  indebted  to  Prof.  J.
Balintoni and an anonymous reviewer for constructive review
as  well  as  to  the  handling  editor  Dr.  I.  Petrík  for  suggesting
improvements  to  the  manuscript  and  editorial  assistance.
Molybdenite samples dating were funded by a US National
Science  Foundation  Grant  (EAR-0087483)  to  H.  Stein.  This
study was partly financed by the Slovak Research and Devel-
opment Agency Grant (APVV-549-07) to M. Kohút.

References

Berza T., Constantinescu E. & Vlad S.N. 1998: Upper Cretaceous

magmatic  series  and  associated  mineralisation  in  the  Car-
pathian—Balkan Orogen. Resource Geology 48, 291—306.

Black  L.P,  Kamo  S.L.,  Allen  C.M.,  Aleinikoff  J.N.,  Davis  D.W.,

Korsch R.J. & Foudoulis C. 2003: TEMORA 1: a new zircon
standard  for  Phanerozoic  U-Pb  geochronology.  Chem.  Geol.
200, 155—170.

Broska I., Majka J., Shlevin Y.B. & Petrík I. 2011: Devonian/Missis-

sippian  I-type  granitic  magmatism  in  the  Western  Carpathian
sector  of  the  Variscan  Orogen  (Slovakia).  Mineralogia,  Spec.
Pap.
 38, p. 78.

Cambel B., Bagdasarjan G.P., Veselský J. & Gukasjan R.Ch. 1989:

Rb-Sr  geochronology  of  the  leucocratic  granitoid  rocks  from

the Spišsko-Gemerské Rudohorie. Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath.
40, 323—332.

Ciobanu  C.L.,  Cook  N.J.  &  Stein  H.  2002:  Regional  setting  and

geochronology of the Late Cretaceous banatitic magmatic and
metallogenetic belt. Mineralium Depos. 37, 541—567.

Filo M., Obernauer D. & Stránska M. 1974: Geophysical research of

the  Tatroveporic  crystalline  basement  –  the  Krá ova  ho a  and
Kohút areas. Open File ReportGeofond, Bratislava (in Slovak).

Határ J., Hraško  . & Václav J. 1989: Hidden granite intrusion near

Rochovce with Mo-(W) stockwork mineralization (First object
of its kind in the West Carpathians). Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath.
5, 621—654.

Heinrich C.A. & Neubauer F. 2002: Cu-Au(-Pb-Zn-Ag) metallogeny

of  the  Alpine-Balkan-Carpathian-Dinaride  geodynamic  prov-
ince: introduction. Mineralium Depos. 37, 533—540.

Hraško  ., Kotov A.B., Salnikova E.B. & Kovach V.P. 1998: En-

claves  in  the  Rochovce  granite  intrusion  as  indicators  of  the
temperature  and  origin  of  the  magma.  Geol.  Carpathica  49,
125—138.

Hraško  ., Határ J., Huhma H., Mäntäri I., Michalko J. & Vaasjoki

M. 1999: U/Pb zircon dating of the Upper Cretaceous granite
(Rochovce  type)  in  the  Western  Carpathians.  Krystalinikum
25, 163—171.

Janák M., Plašienka D., Frey M., Cosca M., Schmidt S.Th., Lupták B.

& Méres Š. 2001: Cretaceous evolution of a metamorphic core
complex, the Veporic unit, Western Carpathians (Slovakia): P—T
conditions  and  in  situ 

40

Ar/

39

Ar  UV  laser  probe  dating  of

metapelites. J. Metamorph. Geology 19, 2, 197—216.

Kantor J. & Rybár M. 1979: Radiometric ages and polyphase character

of Gemeride granites. Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath. 4, 433—448.

Klinec  A.,  Ivanov  M.,  Planderová  E.,  Beňka  J.,  Pulec  M.,  Hanzel

V., Obernauer D., Noghe V., Stránska M., Dávidová Š., Krist
E.  &  Siegel  K.  1979:  The  structural  borehole  KV-3  –  Final
Report. Open File ReportGeofond, Bratislava (in Slovak).

Klinec A., Macek J., Dávidová Š. & Kamenický L. 1980: Rochovce

granite in the contact zone between the Veporicum and Gemer-
icum Units. Geol. Práce Spr. 74, 103—112 (in Slovak with En-
glish summary).

Kohút M., Nabelek P.I. & Recio C. 2001: A stable isotope study. In:

Petrík I., Kohút M. & Broska I. (Eds.): Granitic plutonism of
the  Western  Carpathians.  Veda  –  Publishing  House  of  the
SAS, Monograph
, 33—35.

Kohút M., Uher P., Putiš M., Ondrejka M., Sergeev S., Larionov A.

&  Paderin  I.  2009:  SHRIMP  U-Th-Pb  zircon  dating  of  the
granitoid  massifs  in  the  Malé  Karpaty  Mountains  (Western
Carpathians):  evidence  of  Meso-Hercynian  successive  S-  to
I-type granitic magmatism. Geol. Carpathica 60, 5, 345—350.

Kohút M., Uher P., Putiš M., Broska I., Siman P., Rodionov N. &

Sergeev  S.  2010:  Are  there  any  differences  in  age  of  the  two
principal  Hercynian  (I-  &  S-)  granite  types  from  the  Western
Carpathians?  –  A  SHRIMP  approach.  In:  Kohút  M.  (Ed.):
Dating  of  minerals  and  rocks,  metamorphic,  magmatic  and
metallogenetic  processes,  as  well  as  tectonic  events.  Confer-
ences, Symposia & Seminars, ŠGÚDŠ
, Bratislava, 17—18.

Korikovsky  S.P., Janák  M. &  Boronikhin  V.A.  1986:  Geothermo-

metry  and  phase  equilibria  during  recrystallization  of  garnet
micachists to cordierite hornfelses in the aureole of Rochovce
granite,  Slovenské  rudohorie  Mts,  area  Rochovce-Chyžné.
Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath. 37, 607—633.

Ludwig K.R. 2000: SQUID 1.00, A User’s Manual. Berkeley Geo-

chronology Center, Spec. Publ. No. 2, 2455, Ridge Road, Ber-
keley, CA 94709, USA.

Magna T., Janoušek V., Kohút M., Oberli F. & Wiechert U. 2010:

Fingerprinting sources of granitic rocks with lithium isotopes
and  the  link  to  subduction-related  origin  of  A-type  granites.
Chem. Geol. 274, 94—107.

background image

79

THE ROCHOVCE GRANITE  Re-Os AND U-Pb DATING (W CARPATHIANS)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2013, 64, 1, 71—79

Markey R.J., Stein H.J. & Morgan J.W. 1998: Highly precise Re-Os

dating  of  molybdenite  using  alkaline  fusion  and  NTIMS.  Ta-
lanta
 45, 3, 935—946.

Markey R.J., Hannah J.L., Morgan J.W. & Stein H.J. 2003: A double

spike  for  osmium  analysis  of  highly  radiogenic  samples.
Chem. Geol. 200, 395—406.

Morel M.L.A., Nebel O., Nebel-Jacobsen Y.J., Miller J.S. & Vroon

P.Z. 2008: Hafnium isotope characterization of the GJ-1 zircon
reference material by solution and laser-ablation MC-ICPMS.
Chem. Geol. 255, 231—235.

Neubauer  F.  2002:  Contrasting  Late  Cretaceous  to  Neogene  ore

provinces  in  the  Alpine-Balkan-Carpathian-Dinaride  collision
belt.  In:  Blundell  D.J.,  Neubauer  F.  &  von  Quadt  A.  (Eds.):
The  timing  and  location  of  major  ore  deposits  in  an  evolving
orogen. Geol. Soc. London, Spec. Publ. 204, 81—102.

Plašienka D., Grecula P., Putiš M., Kováč M. & Hovorka D. 1997:

Evolution  and  structure  of  the  Western  Carpathians:  an  over-
view. In: Grecula P., Hovorka D. & Putiš M. (Eds.): Geologi-
cal  evolution  of  the  Western  Carpathians.  Miner.  Slovaca,
Monograph, 1—24.

Plašienka D., Janák M., Lupták B., Milovský R. & Frey M. 1999:

Kinematics and metamorphism of a Cretaceous core complex:
the  Veporic  unit  of  the  Western  Carpathians.  Physics  and
Chemistry of the Earth
 (A) 24, 651—658.

Poller U., Uher P., Janák M., Plašienka D. & Kohút M. 2001: Late

Cretaceous age of the Rochovce granite, Western Carpathians,
constrained by U-Pb single-zircon dating in combination with
cathodoluminiscence imaging. Geol. Carpathica 52, 41—47.

Popov P. & Popov K. 2000: General geologic and metallogenic fea-

tures  of  the  Panagyurishte  ore  region.  In:  Strashimirov  S.  &
Popov P. (Eds.): Geology and metallogeny of the Panagyurishte
Ore Region (Srednogorie Zone, Bulgaria). Guide to Excursions
A  and  C,  ABCD-GEODE  2000  Workshop
,  Borovets,  Sofia
University, Bulgaria, 1—7.

Pupin J.P. 1980: Zircon and granite petrology. Contr. Mineral. Pe-

trology 73, 207—220.

Putiš M., Ivan P., Kohút M., Spišiak J., Siman P., Radvanec M., Uher

P.,  Sergeev  S.,  Larionov  A.,  Méres  Š.,  Demko  R.  &  Ondrejka
M.  2009:  Meta-igneous  rocks  of  the  West-Carpathians  base-
ment  as  an  indicator  of  Early  Paleozoic  extension-rifting/
breakup events. Bull. Soc. Géol. France 180, 6, 461—471.

Săndulescu  M.  1984:  Geotectonica  României.  Editura  Tehnică,

Bucure ti, 1—336 (in Rumanian).

Selby D. & Creaser R.A. 2001: Re-Os geochronology and system-

atics in  molybdenite from the Endako porphyry molybdenum
deposit, British Columbia, Canada. Econ. Geol. 96, 197—204.

Selby D., Creaser R.A., Stein H.J., Markey R.J. & Hannah J.L. 2007:

Assessment of the 

187

Re decay constant by cross calibration of

Re—Os molybdenite and U-Pb zircon chronometers in magmatic
ore systems. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 8, 1999—2013.

Smoliar  M.I.,  Walker  R.J.  &  Morgan  J.W.  1996:  Re-Os  isotope

constraints on the age of Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, and IVB iron
meteorites. Science 271, 1099—1102.

Stein  H.J.  2006:  Low-rhenium  molybdenite  by  metamorphism  in

northern  Sweden:  recognition,  genesis,  and  global  implica-
tions. Lithos 87, 300—327.

Stein H.J., Markey R.J., Morgan J.W., Du A. & Sun Y. 1997: Highly

precise and accurate Re-Os ages for molybdenite from the East
Quinling  Molybdenum  Belt,  Shaanxi  Province,  China.  Econ.
Geol.
 92, 827—835.

Stein H.J., Markey R.J., Morgan J.W., Hannah J.L. & Scherstén A.

2001: The remarkable Re-Os chronometer in molybdenite: how
and why it works. Terra Nova 13, 479—486.

Stein H.J., Scherstén A., Hannah J. & Markey R. 2003: Sub-grain

scale decoupling of Re and 

187

Os and assessment of laser abla-

tion  ICP-MS  spot  dating  in  molybdenite:  Geochim.  Cosmo-
chim. Acta
 67, 19, 3673—3686.

von  Quadt  A.,  Moritz  R.,  Peytcheva  I.  &  Heinrich  C.  2005:  Geo-

chronology  and  geodynamics  of  Late  Cretaceous  magmatism
and  Cu-Au  mineralization  in  the  Panagyurishte  region  of  the
Apuseni-Banat-Timok-Srednogorie  belt,  Bulgaria.  Ore  Geol.
Rev.
 27, 95—126.

Vozárová A. 1990: Development of metamorphism in the Gemeric/

Veporic contact zone (Western Carpathians). Geol. Zbor. Geol.
Carpath
. 41, 475—502.

Vozárová A. & Vozár J. 1982: New lithostratigraphical division of

the  South  Veporic  cover  –  basal  part.  Geol.  Práce  Spr.  78,
169—195 (in Slovak with English summary).

Yuan  H.L.,  Gao  S.,  Dai  M.N.,  Zong  C.L.,  Günther  D.,  Fontaine

G.H., Liu X.M. & Diwu C.R. 2008: Simultaneous determina-
tions of U-Pb age, Hf isotopes and trace element compositions
of  zircon  by  excimer  laser-ablation  quadrupole  and  multiple-
collector ICP-MS. Chem. Geol. 247, 100—118.

Zimmerman A., Stein H.J., Hannah J.L., Koželj D., Bogdanov K. &

Berza  T.  2008:  Tectonic  configuration  of  the  Apuseni-Banat-
Timok-Srednogorie  belt,  Balkans-South  Carpathians,  con-
strained by high precision Re-Os molybdenite ages. Mineralium
Depos.
 43, 1, 1—21.