background image

www.geologicacarpathica.sk

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

, AUGUST 2012, 63, 4, 257—266                                                     doi: 10.2478/v10096-012-0021-7

Introduction

This paper discusses the results of the first systematic studies
of the gravels comprised within Neogene and Quaternary fill
of  the  Orava-Nowy  Targ  Intramontane  Basin  (ONT).  The
ONT  is  an  important  structure  of  the  Western  Carpathians.
First,  the  ONT  is  the  only  basin,  except  the  Vienna  Basin,
which straddles across the junction of the Inner and Outer Car-
pathians (Fig. 1A). Therefore, the Neogene through Quaterna-
ry  infill  of  the  ONT  records  the  behaviour  of  major  tectonic
units  of  the  Western  Carpathians  during  regional  collapse,
which  represents  the  last  stage  of  the  structural  development
of  the  Carpathians  (Zuchiewicz  et  al.  2002  and  references
therein; Zattin et al. 2011 and references therein). Second, the
ONT is located at the NE termination of the Mur-Žilina fault
zone of  prominent  historical  seismic  activity  (Lenhardt  et  al.
2007). The NE segment of the zone corresponds to the Vienna
Basin Fault System, which had been locus of sinistral strike-
slip  from  17 Ma  until  9—8 Ma,  and  again  since  the  middle
Pleistocene times (Fodor 1995; Decker et al. 2005). The activ-
ity of this fault zone has been essential for the structural devel-
opment  of  the  Outer  Western  Carpathians  and  Carpathian
Foredeep (Márton et al. 2011). The Neogene to recent tectonic
activity within the ONT is attested by: (1) occurrence of frac-
tured  clasts  (Tokarski  &  Zuchiewicz  1998;  Kukulak  1999)

Quaternary exhumation of the Carpathians: a record from

the Orava-Nowy Targ Intramontane Basin, Western

Carpathians (Poland and Slovakia)

ANTEK K. TOKARSKI

1

, ANIA ŚWIERCZEWSKA

2

, WITOLD ZUCHIEWICZ

2

, DUŠAN STAREK

3

and LÁSZLÓ FODOR

4,5

1

Institute of Geological Sciences, Polish Academy of Sciences, Research Centre in Kraków, Senacka 1, 31-002 Kraków, Poland;

ndtokars@cyf-kr.edu.pl

2

AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, Al. Mickiewicza 30,

30-059 Kraków, Poland;  swiercze@agh.edu.pl;  witoldzuchiewicz@geol.agh.edu.pl

3

Geological Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 840 05 Bratislava, Slovak Republic;  dusan.starek@savba.sk

4

Geological Institute of Hungary (MAFI), Stefania 14, 1143 Budapest, Hungary;  fodor@mafi.hu

5

Geological, Geophysical and Space Science Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences at Eötvös University,

Pázmány P. sétány 1/C, 1117 Budapest, Hungary

(Manuscript received November 22, 2011; accepted in revised form March 13, 2012)

Abstract: The Neogene-Quaternary infill of the Orava-Nowy Targ Intramontane Basin comprises two tiers showing
contrasting lithologies. The Neogene tier is largely composed of claystones and siltstones, whereas the Quaternary tier
is dominated by gravels. The two sequences are separated by an erosional surface underlain by a regolith. Deposition of
the Neogene sequence took place during subsidence of the basin. No prominent relief existed in the area of the present-
day mountains actually surrounding the basin at that time. The regolith started to form at the onset of basin inversion.
Still, no prominent relief existed in the present-day mountains. The onset of deposition of Quaternary gravels in the
basin corresponds to acceleration of uplift of the surrounding mountains, which has been continuing until now. The
Pieniny Klippen Belt has been subject to erosion, at least locally, from the deposition of the basal part of the Neogene
sequence filling the Orava-Nowy Targ Basin until present times. In contrast, the Paleogene cover of the Tatra Mts was
removed only during the Quaternary.

Key words: Neogene, Quaternary, Western Carpathians, Orava-Nowy Targ Basin, exhumation, gravels.

within  the  Neogene  strata  and  small-scale  normal  faults  cut-
ting  the  latter  (Pešková  et  al.  2009),  (2)  moderate  rotations
around the vertical axis of Neogene strata (Baumgart-Kotarba et
al. 2004), and (3) moderate historical seismic activity (Guterch
2006, 2009). Unfortunately, the geology of the ONT is poorly
known to international geological society. This is because the
relevant  information  on  the  basin  has  been  published  largely
in Polish and Slovak, usually in low-circulation journals.

Geological setting

The Orava-Nowy Targ Intramontane Basin straddles across

major  tectonic  units  of  the  Western  Carpathians  (from  the
south to the north): the Inner Carpathians, the Pieniny Klippen
Belt and the Outer Carpathians (Fig. 1). The Inner Carpathians
comprise  a  number  of  north-verging  nappes  composed  of
metamorphic and plutonic Paleozoic rocks and largely unmeta-
morphosed  Paleozoic  to  Cretaceous  strata.  The  nappes  were
formed during the Late Jurassic through Late Cretaceous times
(Froitzheim et al. 2008 and references therein). Subsequently,
the Inner Carpathians were covered by the Upper Cretaceous,
Paleogene  and  lowermost  Neogene  strata  (mostly  of  flysch
type),  which  are  partially  preserved  in  several  intramontane
basins. Within the study area, the Inner Carpathian nappes are

background image

258

TOKARSKI, ŚWIERCZEWSKA, ZUCHIEWICZ, STAREK and FODOR

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2012, 63, 4, 257—266

covered by Paleogene strata of the Podhale Flysch Basin. The
Outer  Carpathians  are  composed  of  several  north-verging
nappes  consisting  largely  of  Lower  Cretaceous  to  Lower
Miocene  flysch.  The  innermost  of  the  nappes  is  the  Magura
Nappe,  which  was  largely  formed  during  Eocene  times
(Świerczewska & Tokarski 1998). The Inner Carpathians are
separated from the Outer Carpathians by the Pieniny Klippen
Belt,  which  is  a  narrow  zone  of  extreme  shortening  and
wrenching  (Birkenmajer  1986).  Tectonic  development  of  the
belt is a subject of debate. According to Birkenmajer (1986),
the  belt  was  folded  twice,  during  the  Late  Cretaceous  and
Tertiary times, whereas Oszczypko et al. (2010) state that the
belt was being deformed continuously from the Late Creta-
ceous  until  the  late  Miocene.  Finally,  Plašienka  &  Mikuš
(2010) demonstrated Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene thrust-
ing, followed by post-Paleogene transpression.

The Orava-Nowy Targ Intramontane Basin

The architecture of the ONT is fairly well known owing to

geological  mapping  and  drillings  (Watycha  1975,  1976b,

1977a—d;  Pulec  1976;  Gross  et  al.  1993)  supplemented  by
the  results  of  gravity  and  electric  resistivity  studies
(Pomianowski  1995,  2003).  The  basin  is  filled  by  Neogene
terrestrial  and  freshwater  sequence,  up  to  1300 m  thick
(Watycha 1977a). The sequence is largely composed of clay-
stones  and  siltstones  with  subordinate  intercalations  of
sands,  gravels  (Fig. 2A)  and  conglomerates  and  occasional
intercalations  of  brown  coal.  Only  locally,  in  the  Rogoźnik
Stream catchment area (Fig. 1B), the sequence is dominated
by  gravels.  The  Neogene  sequence  is  considered  to  be
Miocene  or  Miocene  to  Pliocene  in  age  (Birkenmajer  2009
and references therein). The oldest strata filling the ONT are
considered  to  be  Karpatian—Badenian  (Watycha  1976a;
Oszast  &  Stuchlik  1977;  Worobiec  1994;  Potfaj  2003)  or
Sarmatian (Nagy et al. 1996) in age. The sequence is usually
mantled by a regolith topped by ferruginous crust (Fig. 2D).
The latter is up to 30 cm thick. The Neogene sequence is dis-
cordantly  covered  (Watycha  1977a;  Kukulak  1999;  Birken-
majer  2009  and  references  therein)  by  Quaternary  to  recent
fluvial  strata,  composed  mostly  of  gravels  (Watycha  1973,
1976b,  1977b,d)  (Figs. 2C,  4).  The  latter  are  at  least  117 m
thick (Watycha 1973).

Fig. 1. Orava-Nowy Targ Intramontane Basin (ONT). A – position of the ONT within the Carpathian-Alpine orogenic system; Vienna Basin
Fault System after Hinsch & Decker (2011); B – geological sketch-map of the ONT and adjacent tectonic units showing location of localities
where clasts were studied; asterisk marks the location of a small-scale fault (Fig. 2B) at the southern boundary of the ONT. OAL – Orava ar-
tificial lake. CAL – Czorsztyn artificial lake. Geology after Lexa et al. (2000), simplified.

background image

259

QUATERNARY EXHUMATION OF THE CARPATHIANS (POLAND AND SLOVAKIA)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2012, 63, 4, 257—266

Fig. 2. Neogene strata within the ONT. A – Neogene gravel at site 21; B – fault contact (arrowed) between Oligocene flysch strata and
Neogene claystone; C – contact between the Neogene claystone and Quaternary gravel, exposure is 4.5 m high; D – ferruginous crust at
the top of Neogene claystone, hammer for scale; E – Neogene gravel at site 4, note numerous limestone clasts (white), hammer for scale;
for location of A, B and  E see Fig. 1.

The architecture of the ONT  is, however, a subject of de-

bate.  According  to  the  results  of  geological  mapping  and
drillings,  the  sedimentary  infill  of  the  ONT  represents  an
open  syncline  (Fig. 4)  whereas  the  results  of  geophysical
studies (Pomianowski 1995, 2003; cf. also Baumgart-Kotarba
1991—1992,  1996  and  references  therein;  Nagy  et  al.  1996)

imply that the basin is a composite graben. During the field-
work discussed in this paper we observed a normal fault in the
Czarny Dunajec River valley on the southern boundary of the
ONT (Fig. 1B). The fault separates Neogene strata of the basin
from Oligocene flysch of the Podhale Flysch Basin (Fig. 2B)
(cf. Birkenmajer 1979; Kukulak 2011). The strata in the cen-

background image

260

TOKARSKI, ŚWIERCZEWSKA, ZUCHIEWICZ, STAREK and FODOR

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2012, 63, 4, 257—266

tral part of the basin dip sub-horizontally, whereas those close
to the basin borders dip moderately towards the basin centre.
The  flat-lying  Neogene-Quaternary  infill  of  the  ONT  discor-
dantly  overlies,  from  the  south  to  the  north,  (1)  open-folded
Eocene to Oligocene (Gedl 2000) strata filling the intramon-
tane Podhale Flysch Basin, (2) tightly folded Jurassic to Low-
er Miocene strata of the Pieniny Klippen Belt (Oszczypko et
al. 2010), and (3) tightly folded Cretaceous to Lower Miocene
flysch of the Magura Nappe (Oszczypko & Oszczypko-Clowes
2010 and references therein). The origin of the ONT is widely
believed to be related to strike-slip faulting in the basement of
the basin (see discussion in Golonka et al. 2005).

Material  filling  the  ONT  has  been  derived  from  areas

which  surround  the  basin.  These  source  areas  (Fig. 1)  are
built up of different lithologies: (1) pre-Tertiary rocks of the

Fig. 3. Views out of the ONT. A – towards the south; B – towards the north.

Fig. 4. Geological section across the Orava-Nowy Targ Intramontane Basin (adapted from Watycha
1977b). For location see Fig. 1.

and Birkenmajer (2009 and references therein), whereas the
results  of  semi-quantitative  analysis  of  Quaternary  gravels
were presented by Watycha (1973).

Material and methods

We  examined  the  lithology  of  Neogene  and  Quaternary

gravels  at  18  localities  where,  altogether,  gravels  at  25  sites
were  analysed  (Fig. 1B,  Appendix 1),  comprising  5  Neogene
sites, 7 Pleistocene sites, 9 Holocene sites, and 4 present-day
gravel  bar  sites.  At  each  site,  a  population  of  at  least  100
clasts, more than 1 cm large, was studied. The only exception
is site 52/10 where only 58 clasts were examined. Additional-
ly, at some of the sites we studied the size of clasts as well.

Inner  Carpathians  –  mostly
crystalline ones (Paleozoic), and
some 

quartzites 

(lowermost

Triassic) and limestones (Meso-
zoic),  presently  exposed  in  the
Tatra Mts (Fig. 3A); (2) largely
Oligocene  flysch  strata  of  the
Podhale Flysch Basin, presently
exposed in the Spiš-Gubałówka
Foothills;  (3)  Jurassic  to  Mio-
cene  strata  of  the  Pieniny
Klippen  Belt  (largely  lime-
stones), presently exposed in the
Pieniny Mts; and (4) Cretaceous
to  Miocene  flysch  strata  of  the
Magura  Nappe,  presently  ex-
posed  in  the  Beskidy  Mts
(Fig. 3B). Material derived from
these  source  areas  has  been
transported  at  first  towards  the
axis  of  the  ONT  and,  after-
wards, out of the basin, both to-
wards  the  east  (Dunajec  River)
and the west (Orava River).

State of research

Up  to  now,  the  lithology  of

gravels  within  the  ONT  infill
has  been  studied  in  detail  at
one site (site 1) only (Fig. 1B),
where  quantitative  study  of
Pleistocene  gravels  was  under-
taken  by  Baumgart-Kotarba  et
al.  (1996).  In  addition,  data
based  on  qualitative  studies  of
the  lithology  of  Neogene  and/
or  Quaternary  gravels  were
published  by  Plewa  (1969),
Niedzielski  (1971),  Watycha
(1976b,  1977b,d),  Baumgart-
Kotarba (1991—1992 and refer-
ences therein), Kukulak (1998),

background image

261

QUATERNARY EXHUMATION OF THE CARPATHIANS (POLAND AND SLOVAKIA)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2012, 63, 4, 257—266

Lithology of gravels

The following classes of clast lithology were distinguished

for  provenance  studies:  crystalline  rocks,  quartzite,  flysch
sandstone  and  mudstone,  limestone,  and  others  (Figs. 5,  6).
The amount of clasts of the last class is negligible (0—5 %),
with  the  exception  of  site  1  where  the  share  of  these  clasts
amounts to 22 %. This class will not be discussed in the fol-
lowing text.

The  clasts  in  Neogene  gravels  (Fig. 5)  are  composed  ex-

clusively  of  flysch  sandstone  and  mudstone,  except  site  4
where the share of limestone clasts amounts to 29 %, crystal-
line rocks to 2 %, and quartzite to 1 %. In contract, clasts in
Quaternary and present-day gravels (Fig. 6) are largely com-
posed of: (1) flysch sandstone and mudstone (up to 100 %),
(2)  crystalline  rocks  (up  to  73 %),  and  (3)  quartzites  (up  to
65 %), with a minor share of limestone (up to 31 %). Propor-
tions between shares of clasts of particular classes differ both
between particular river and stream valleys and within these
valleys. Therefore, descriptions of clast lithology will be pre-
sented separately for the following river and stream valleys:
(1) Oravica Stream, (2) Jeleśnia Stream and Czarny Dunajec
River,  (3)  Piekielnik  Stream,  (4)  Rogoźnik  Stream,  and  (5)
Biały Dunajec River and Białka River valleys.

In the Oravica Stream valley (Fig. 6A), gravels were stud-

ied  at  one  site  (site  1)  only.  These  are  Pleistocene  gravels
composed  of:  limestone  (31 %),  quartzite  (24 %),  flysch
sandstone and mudstone (21 %), and crystalline rocks (2 %).

In the valleys of Jeleśnia Stream and Czarny Dunajec River

(Fig. 6B),  gravels  were  examined  at  11  sites.  Two  of  these
sites  are  located  in  the  Jeleśnia  Stream  valley.  These  are
present-day gravel bar (site 3) and Pleistocene (site 2) gravel.
At  both  sites,  quartzite  clasts  are  most  common  ( > 60 %).
Pleistocene  gravel  contains:  (1)  less  flysch  sandstone  and
mudstone clasts (3 %) than the present-day gravel (15 %), and
(2)  more  clasts  of  crystalline  rocks  (32 %)  than  the  present-
day  gravel  (18 %).  In  the  valley  of  Czarny  Dunajec  River,
Pleistocene to present-day gravels were studied at 4   localities
where, altogether, 9 sites were analysed (sites 7—14, 17). The
share of crystalline rocks and quartzite clasts are similar at all
sites,  being  58—73 %  and  11—23 %,  respectively.  In  contrast,
the share of flysch sandstone and mudstone clasts varies both
with the age of gravel and along the river valley. At the upper-
most  sites  (sites  7—12),  the  share  of  these  clasts  increases
from 7—10 % in the Pleistocene gravel to 16—21 % in the Ho-
locene  and  present-day  bar  gravels.  Farther  downstream
(sites 13, 14), the share of the clasts increases from 15 % in
Pleistocene gravel to 18 % in Holocene gravel. Furthermore,
the share of flysch sandstone and mudstone clasts in the Ho-
locene  and  present-day  gravels  decreases  downstream  from
16—21 %  (9—14)  to  9 %  (17).  In  most  of  the  studied  sites,
gravels are devoid of limestone clasts or these clasts appear
in minor quantities. The only exception is site 17 where the
share of limestone clasts amounts to 12 %. The size of clasts
was  studied  at  sites  7—12  only.  The  size  of  clasts  increases
there  from  1 cm  (Pleistocene)  to  10 cm  (Holocene),  and  up
to 12 cm (present-day gravel bar).

In the Piekielnik Stream valley (Fig. 6C), clasts were stud-

ied at two localities where three sites were analysed (sites 5,
15, 16). The share of quartzite clasts increases there both up
the  stratigraphic  sequence,  from  24 %  in  Pleistocene  gravel
(15A)  to  34 %  in  the  present-day  gravel  bar  (site  16)  and,
downstream, from 24 % (site 15) and 34 % (site 16) to 41 %
(sites  11/10).  The  share  of  flysch  sandstone  and  mudstone
clasts is considerably larger at site 5 (28 %) than at sites 15
(7 %) and 16 (6 %).

In  the  Rogoźnik  Stream  valley  (Fig. 6D),  clasts  were  ex-

amined at two sites. Holocene gravel at site 20 is composed
exclusively of flysch sandstone and mudstone clasts, where-
as Holocene gravel at site 22 contains, besides flysch clasts,
a minor amount of limestone (4 %) and quartzite (4 %) clasts
as well.

In valleys of the Biały Dunajec and Białka rivers (Fig. 6E),

clasts in Quaternary gravels were studied at three sites (23—25).
At all sites gravels show a considerable share of flysch sand-
stone  and  mudstone  clasts  (28—57 %).  Both  sites  located  in
the Dunajec River valley contain a minor share of limestone
(6 %) as well.

Discussion and conclusions

The lithology of clasts within the Neogene and Quaternary

gravels  studied  in  particular  valleys  of  streams  and  rivers
flowing  towards  the  axis  of  the  ONT  corresponds  to  the  li-
thology  of  rocks  exposed  in  respective  drainage  basins  (cf.
Baumgart-Kotarba et al. 1996). For example, the Quaternary

Fig. 5. Lithology of clasts in the Neogene gravels. For location of
studied sites see Fig. 1.

background image

262

TOKARSKI, ŚWIERCZEWSKA, ZUCHIEWICZ, STAREK and FODOR

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2012, 63, 4, 257—266

to present-day gravels studied in the Rogoźnik Stream valley
(Fig. 6D)  are  composed  either  exclusively  of  flysch  clasts
derived from the Spiš-Gubałówka Foothills (site 20) or also
contain clasts derived from the Pieniny Mts (site 22). In con-
trast, gravels of the same age studied in the Czarny Dunajec

Fig. 6. Lithology of clasts in the Quaternary and present-day gravels.
For location of studied sites see Fig. 1.

River  valley  (Fig. 6B)  comprise,  besides  flysch  clasts  de-
rived from the Spiš-Gubałówka Foothills and clasts derived
from  the  Pieniny  Mts,  also  crystalline  rocks,  and  quartzite
and  limestone  clasts  derived  from  the  Tatra  Mts.  It  follows
that the drainage basin of the Rogoźnik Stream during Qua-

background image

263

QUATERNARY EXHUMATION OF THE CARPATHIANS (POLAND AND SLOVAKIA)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2012, 63, 4, 257—266

ternary times was restricted to the Spiš-Gubałówka Foothills
and Pieniny Mts, whereas that of the Czarny Dunajec River
also comprised part of the Tatra Mts during these times.

The  Pleistocene  to  present-day  gravels  studied  in  the

Piekielnik Stream valley (Fig. 6C) contain exceptionally large
shares of quartzite clasts. Moreover, the number of these clasts
increases up the section. Within the study area, quartzite clasts
are  most  resistant  to  erosion.  We  believe,  therefore,  that  a
large  share  of  the  quartz  clasts  in  the  gravels  studied  in  the
Piekielnik Stream valley is due to redeposition, possibly mul-
tiple redeposition of the gravels (cf. Watycha 1977d).

The Quaternary to present-day gravels studied in valleys of

streams and rivers flowing from the south towards the axis of
ONT show considerable share of flysch clasts.  In the Czarny
Dunajec  River  valley,  the  number  of  these  clasts  decreases
downstream  from  16—21 %  (sites  7—12,  13  and  14)  to  9 %
(site 17). We believe, therefore, that these flysch clasts are de-
rived exclusively from the Spiš-Gubałówka Foothills. On the
other  hand,  the  Quaternary  to  present-day  gravels  studied  at
the outlet of the Piekielnik Stream to the Czarna Orava River
(site  5)  and  close  to  the  outlets  of  the  Białka  and  Biały
Dunajec  rivers  to  the  Dunajec  River  (sites  23—25)  show  very
large shares of flysch clasts (28—57 %). We infer that the flysch
clasts  in  gravels  studied  at  the  latter  sites  are  derived  not
only  from  the  Spiš-Gubałówka  Foothills,  but  also  from  the
Beskidy Mts (cf. Niedzielski 1971; Watycha 1973, 1976b).

At  all  the  studied  sites,  Neogene  gravels  are  devoid  of

clasts derived from the Tatra Mts (Fig. 5). It follows that dur-
ing Neogene times the pre-Paleogene rocks of the Tatra Mts
were still covered by strata of the Podhale Flysch Basin. This
conclusion  confirms  the  opinion  of  Birkenmajer  (2009  and
references therein).

Neogene  gravels  studied  at  site  4  contain  a  considerable

share  of  limestone  clasts  derived  from  the  Pieniny  Mts
(Fig. 2E),  which  measure  up  to  40 cm  (cf.  Watycha  1976b,
1977b,d). The site is located at the base of the Neogene se-
quence. It follows that during deposition of the basal part of
the Neogene sequence, the Pieniny Mts were already subject
to erosion, at least locally.

quence. It is likely that during Quaternary times the southern
part of the Neogene fill of the ONT was eroded. On the other
hand,  at  some  of  the  studied  sites  (13,  17,  22,  23,  24),  the
Pleistocene to present-day gravels contain limestone clasts de-
rived from the Pieniny Mts. We believe, therefore, that during
Quaternary times the Pieniny Mts were subject  to erosion.

Summing up, it appears that from the deposition of the basal

part  of  the  Neogene  sequence  until  the  present  time,  the
Pieniny Mts have been subject to erosion. Moreover, the size
of limestone clasts derived from these mountains at Quaternary
sites is considerably smaller than that of the clasts in the Neo-
gene  gravels  (site 4).  It  follows  that  the  relief  of  the  Pieniny
Mts was more prominent during deposition of the basal part of
the Neogene sequence than during Quaternary times.

On  the  other  hand,  during  Neogene  times,  the  pre-Paleo-

gene  rocks  of  the  Tatra  Mts  were  still  overlain  by  their
Paleogene  cover.  This  cover  was  removed  only  during
Quaternary  times.  At  the  same  time,  the  Neogene  strata  in
the  southern  part  of  the  ONT  became  eroded.  We  suggest
that removal of the Paleogene cover from the Tatra Mts and
removal of Neogene strata from the southern part of the ONT
resulted from uplift of the area.

The  Neogene-Quaternary  fill  of  the  ONT  comprises  two

tiers  showing  contrasting  lithologies.  The  Neogene  tier  is
largely composed of claystones and siltstones (except locally)
whereas Quaternary tier is dominated by gravels. The top sur-
face  of  the  Neogene  complex  shows  subdued  topography
(Fig. 4), whereas the overlying Quaternary complex comprises
a flight of river terraces (Fig. 7).

The  present-day  structure  of  the  Neogene-Quaternary  fill

of the ONT was formed during three successive stages.

(i)  Deposition  of  the  Neogene  sequence  took  place  dur-

ing  subsidence  of  the  ONT.  This  subsidence  was  al-
ready  inferred  by  Nagy  et  al.  (1996)  from  the  results
of  vitrinite  reflectance  study.  The  dominantly  fine-
grained  lithology  of  the  Neogene  sequence  implies
that  no  prominent  relief  existed  either  in  the  area  of
the present-day Tatra Mts and Spiš-Gubałówka Foot-

Fig. 7. Idealized stratigraphic scheme of fluvial terraces preserved in the SW part of the ONT, based
on Baumgart-Kotarba (1991—92, 1996, 2001); stratigraphic control of these terraces is very poor,
except the lowermost terrace (VI) which dates probably from MOIS 5d-2.

In contrast to the Neogene grav-

els,  the  Pleistocene  to  present-day
gravels of most of the studied sites
(Fig. 6A—C, E) 

display 

large

shares  of  crystalline  rocks  and
quartzite  clasts  derived  from  the
Tatra  Mts  (cf.  Niedzielski  1971;
Watycha  1973,  1976b,  1977b,d;
Baumgart-Kotarba 1991—1992 and
references  therein;  Kukulak  1998;
Birkenmajer  2009  and  references
therein). It follows that during the
Pleistocene  times  the  Paleogene
cover of the Tatra Mts was already
largely removed.

In the Czarny Dunajec River and

Jeleśnia Stream valleys, within the
Pleistocene  to  present-day  se-
quence, both the share and size of
flysch  clasts  increase  up  the  se-

background image

264

TOKARSKI, ŚWIERCZEWSKA, ZUCHIEWICZ, STAREK and FODOR

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2012, 63, 4, 257—266

hills  (except  locally)  or  in  the  present-day  Beskidy
Mts (Fig. 8a). Local alluvial fans (Kukulak 1998 and
references  therein)  indicate  only  locally  dissected
topography.

(ii) The beginning of formation of the regolith at the top

of the Neogene sequence is related to the onset of in-
version  of  the  ONT  (cf.  Nagy  et  al.  1996).  Still,  no
prominent relief existed in the present-day Tatra Mts,
Spiš-Gubałówka Foothills, and Beskidy Mts (Fig. 8b).

(iii) The  onset  of  deposition  of  Quaternary  gravels  in  the

ONT  corresponds  to  uplift  of  the  Tatra  Mts,  Spiš-
Gubałówka  Foothills  and  Beskidy  Mts  (Fig. 8c).
Coarsening  of  clasts  derived  from  the  Tatra  Mts  and
Spiš-Gubałówka Foothills up the Quaternary sequence
suggests  continuation  of  the  uplift  after  Pleistocene
times, at least of the latter areas (Fig. 8d). The Quater-
nary uplift could have been differentiated due to normal
faulting (Fig. 2B).

We conclude that at least the stages (ii) and (iii) took place

during  regional  collapse  of  the  Western  Carpathians
(Zuchiewicz et al. 2002 and references therein; Zattin et al.
2011  and  references  therein).  Moreover,  the  proposed  sce-
nario  of    vertical  movements  in  the  ONT  and  surrounding

Fig. 8. Cartoon showing inferred vertical movements in the Orava-Nowy Targ Intramontane Basin (ONT) and adjoining areas in the eastern
and western parts of the basin (A) and in the central part of the basin (B); PKB – Pieniny Klippen Belt; thick broken line at the top of the
ONT denotes ferruginous crust; locations of faults separating: (1) Tatra Mts from Spiš-Gubałówka Foothills and (2) ONT from Beskidy
Mts are arbitrary; timing of uplift of the Beskidy Mts is based on the results of smectite-illite analysis (Świerczewska 2005).

areas fits very well into a concept of worldwide acceleration
of uplift since the Middle Pleistocene times, documented by
Bridgland & Westaway (2008) and is in accord with promi-
nent  Quaternary  normal  faulting  in  the  Inner  Western
Carpathians  (Vojtko  et  al.  2011a,b).  The  amount  of  Neo-
gene-Quaternary  uplift,  calculated  for  the  discussed  part  of
the Spiš-Gubałówka Foothills and Tatra Mts based on the re-
sults of illite-smectite studies (Środoń et al. 2006), is around
4 km.  It  is  likely  that  considerable  part  of  this  uplift  took
place during Quaternary times.

Acknowledgments:  Our  research  within  the  Orava-Nowy
Targ  Intramontane  Basin  was  inspired  by  the  late  Maria
(Myszka) Baumgart-Kotarba. This work was financially sup-
ported by joint projects of the Hungarian and Polish Acade-
mies  of  Sciences  and  by  Slovak  and  Polish  Academies  of
Sciences, as well as by the Grant No. 6PO 4E 020 08 of the
Polish  State  Committee  for  Scientific  Research  (to  Maria
Baumgart-Kotarba).  The  remarks  of  Dušan  Plašienka on  an
early draft of this paper are gratefully acknowledged. We are
also indebted to Jasiek Golonka and an Anonymous Reviewer
for constructive suggestions.

background image

265

QUATERNARY EXHUMATION OF THE CARPATHIANS (POLAND AND SLOVAKIA)

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2012, 63, 4, 257—266

References

Baumgart-Kotarba M. 1991—1992: The geomorphological evolution

of  the  intramontane  Orava  Basin  associated  with  neotectonic
movements  (Polish  Carpathians).  Stud.  Geomorphologica
Carpatho-Balcanica
 25—26, 3—26 (in Polish, English summary).

Baumgart-Kotarba M. 1996: The origin and age of the Orawa Basin,

West Carpathians. Stud. Geomorphologica Carpatho-Balcanica
30, 101—116.

Baumgart-Kotarba  M.  2001:  Continuous  tectonic  evolution  of  the

Orava Basin (Northern Carpathians) from Late Badenian to the
present-day? Geol. Carpathica 52, 103—110.

Baumgart-Kotarba M., Michalik M., Paszkowski M., Świerczewska

A., Szulc J. & Uchman A. 1996: Provenance and age of coarse
clastic alluvial deposits at Čimhova in the Orava Basin, Western
Carpathians, Slovakia. Polish Miner. Soc., Spec. Pap. 7, 68—72.

Baumgart-Kotarba M., Marcak H. & Márton E. 2004: Rotation along

the  transverse  transforming  Orava  strike-slip  fault:  based  on
geomorphological,  geophysical  and  paleomagnetic  data  (West-
ern Carpathians). Geol. Carpathica 55, 219—226.

Birkenmajer K. 1979: Geological Guidebook of the Pieniny Klippen

Belt. Wydaw. Geol., Warszawa, 1—236 (in Polish).

Birkenmajer  K.  1986:  Stages  of  structural  evolution  of  the  Pieniny

Klippen Belt, Carpathians. Stud. Geol. Pol. 88, 7—32.

Birkenmajer  K.  2009:  Quaternary  glacigenic  deposits  between  the

Biała Woda and the Filipka valleys, Polish Tatra Mts, in the re-
gional context. Stud. Geol. Pol. 132, 91—115.

Bridgland  D.  &  Westaway  R.  2008:  Climatically  controlled  river

staircases:  A  worldwide  Quaternary  phenomenon.  Geomor-
phology 
98, 285—315.

Decker K., Peresson H. & Hinsch R. 2005: Active tectonics and Qua-

ternary  basin  formation  along  the  Vienna  Basin  Transform
Fault. Quat. Sci. Rev. 44, 305—320.

Fodor L. 1995: From transpression to transtension: Oligocene-Miocene

structural evolution of the Vienna Basin and the Eastern Alpine-
Western Carpathian junction. Tectonophysics 242, 151—182.

Froitzheim N., Plašienka D. & Schuster R. 2008: Alpine tectonics of

the  Alps  and  Western  Carpathians.  In:  McCann  T.  (Ed.):  The
Geology  of  Central  Europe.  Vol. 2.  Mesozoic  and  Cenozoic.
Geol. Soc. London, 1141—1232.

Gedl P. 2000: Podhale biostratigraphy and palaeoenvironment of the

Podhale Palaeogene (Inner Carpathians, Poland) in the light of
palynological studies. Part II. Summary and systematic descrip-
tions. Stud. Geol. Pol. 117, 155—303.

Golonka J., Aleksandrowski P., Aubrecht M., Chowaniec J., Chrustek

M.,  Cieszkowski  M.,  Florek  R.,  Gawęda  A.,  Jarosiński  M.,
Kępińska B., Krobicki M., Lefeld J., Lewandowski M., Marko
F.,  Michalik  M.,  Oszczypko  N.,  Picha  F.,  Potfaj  M.,  Słaby  E.,
Ślączka A., Stefaniuk M., Uchman A. & Żelaźniewicz A. 2005:
Orava Deep Drilling Project and the Post Paleogene tectonics of
the Carpathians. Ann. Soc. Geol. Pol. 75, 211—248.

Gross P., Köhler E., Mello J., Haško J., Halouzka R., Nagy A., Kováč

P., Filo I., Havrila M., Maglay J., Salaj J., Franko O., Zakovič
M., Pospíšil L., Bystrická H., Samuel O. & Snopková P. 1993:
Geology of Southern and Eastern Orava. Dionýz Štúr Inst. Geol.,
Bratislava, 1—319 (in Slovak).

Guterch  B.  2006:  Seismic  events  in  the  Orava-Nowy  Targ  Basin,

Western  Carpathians.  November  30,  2004—December  2005.
Acta Geodynamica et Geomaterialia 3, 3 (143), 85—95.

Guterch  B.  2009:  Seismicity  of  Poland  in  the  light  of  historical  re-

cords. Przegl. Geol. 57, 513—520 (in Polish, English summary).

Hinsch R. & Decker K. 2011: Seismic slip rates, potential subsurface

rupture areas and seismic potential of the Vienna Basin Trans-
form Fault. Int. J. Earth Sci. 100, 1925—1935.

Kukulak J. 1998: Sedimentary characteristics of the topmost deposits,

Domański Wierch alluvial cone (Neogene/Pleistocene),  Orawa
Depression, Polish Carpathians. Stud. Geol. Pol. 111, 93—111
(in Polish, English summary).

Kukulak J. 1999: Orientation of joints and faults in the SE part of the

Orawa Depression. Przegl. Geol. 47, 1021—1026 (in Polish, En-
glish summary).

Kukulak  J.  2011:  Boundary  faults  of  the  Orava  Basin  close  to

Chochołów  (Podhale).  In:  Zuchiewicz  W.  (Ed.):  Neotektonika
Karpat  i  Polski  pozakarpackiej:  podobieństwa  i  różnice.  IX
Ogólnopolska  Konferencja  z  cyklu  “Neotektonika  Polski”,
Kraków, 24—25 czerwca 2011 r. Materiały konferencyjne. Ko-
misja Neotektoniki Komitetu Badań Czwartorzędu PAN, Wyd-
ział Geologii, Geofizyki i Ochrony Środowiska AGH
, Kraków,
27—28 (in Polish).

Lenhardt W.A., Švancara J., Melichar P., Pazdírková J., Haviř J. &

Sýkorová  Z.  2007:  Seismic  activity  of  the  Alpine-Carpathian-
Bohemian Massif region with regard to geological and potential
field data. Geol. Carpathica 58, 397—412.

Lexa J., Bezák V., Elečko M., Mello J., Polák M., Potfaj M. & Vozár

J. (Eds.) 2000: Geological map of Western Carpathians and ad-
jacent areas 1 : 500,000. Ministry of Environment of Slovak Re-
public, Geological Survey of Slovak Republic
.

Márton E., Tokarski A.K., Krejčí O., Rauch M., Olszewska B., To-

manová Petrová P. & Wójcik A. 2011: “Non European” palaeo-
magnetic  directions  from  the  Carpathian  Foredeep  at  the
southern margin of the European plate. Terra Nova 23, 134—144.

Nagy A., Vass D., Petrík F. & Pereszlényi M. 1996: Tectonogenesis

of the Orava Depression in the light of latest biostratigraphic in-
vestigations  and  organic  matter  alteration  study.  Slovak  Geol.
Mag
. 1, 49—58.

Niedzielski H. 1971: Tectonic origin of the eastern part of the Valley

of  Nowy  Targ.  Ann.  Soc.  Geol.  Pol.  41,  397—408  (in  Polish,
English summary).

Oszast J. & Stuchlik L. 1977: The Neogene vegetation in the Podhale,

West  Carpathians.  Acta  Palaeobotanica  18,  45—86  (in  Polish,
English summary).

Oszczypko  N.  &  Oszczypko-Clowes  M.  2010:  The  Paleogene  and

Early  Neogene  stratigraphy  of  the  Beskid  Sądecki  Range  and
Lubovianska  Vrchovina  (Magura  Nappe,  Western  Outer  Car-
pathians). Acta Geol. Pol. 60, 317—348.

Oszczypko  N.,  Jurewicz  E.  &  Plašienka  D.  2010:  Tectonics  of  the

Klippen Belt and Magura Nappe in the eastern part of the Pieni-
ny  Mts.  (Western  Carpathians,  Poland  and  Slovakia)  –  New
approaches and results. Sci. Ann., School. Geol., Aristotle Uni-
versity of Thessaloniki, Spec. Vol.
 100, 221—229.

Pešková  I.,  Vojtko  R.,  Starek  D.  &  Sliva  L.  2009:  Late  Eocene  to

Quaternary deformation and stress field evolution of the Orava
region (Western Carpathians). Acta Geol. Pol. 59, 73—91.

Plašienka D. & Mikuš V. 2010: Geological settings of the Pieniny and

Šariš sectors of the Klippen Belt between Litmanová and Drienica
villages in eastern Slovakia. Miner. Slovaca 42, 155—178.

Plewa  K.  1969:  An  analysis  of  gravel  covers  in  the  Domański

Wierch Fan. Folia Geographica, Series Geographica-Physica
3, 101—115 (in Polish, English summary).

Pomianowski P. 1995: Structure of the Orava Basin in the light of

selected geophysical data. Ann. Soc. Geol. Pol. 64, 67—80 (in
Polish, English summary).

Pomianowski P. 2003: Tectonics of the Orava-Nowy Targ Basin –

results of the combined analysis of the gravity and geoelectrical
data. Przegl. Geol. 51, 498—506 (in Polish, English summary).

Potfaj  M.  2003:  Geology  of  the  Slovakian  part  of  the  Orava  –  an

overview. In: Golonka J. & Lewandowski M. (Eds.): Geology,
geophysics,  geothermics  and  deep  structure  of  the  West  Car-
pathians  and  their  basement.  Publ.  Inst.  Geophys.,  Pol.  Acad.
Sci., Monographic Volume
, M-28, 363, 51—56.

Pulec M. 1976: Final report from the drillhole OH-1 (Hladovka –

background image

266

TOKARSKI, ŚWIERCZEWSKA, ZUCHIEWICZ, STAREK and FODOR

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 2012, 63, 4, 257—266

Appendix 1

Location of studied sites.

Orava Basin). Manuscript, Archive of Dionýz Štúr Inst. Geol.,
Bratislava (in Slovak).

Środoń J., Kotarba M., Biroň A., Such P., Clauer N. & Wójtowicz

A.  2006:  Diagenetic  history  of  the  Podhale-Orava  Basin  and
the  underlying  Tatra  sedimentary  structural  units  (Western
Carpathians): evidence from XRD and K-Ar of illite-smectite.
Clay Miner. 41, 751—774.

Świerczewska A. 2005: The interplay of the thermal and structural

histories  of  the  Magura  Nappe  (Outer  Carpathians)  in  Poland
and Slovakia. Mineralogia Polonica 36, 91—144.

Świerczewska  A.  &  Tokarski  A.K.  1998:  Deformation  bands  and

the  history  of  folding  in  the  Magura  Nappe,  Western  Outer
Carpathians (Poland). Tectonophysics 297, 73—90.

Tokarski  A.K.  &  Zuchiewicz  W.  1998:  Fractured  clasts  in  the

Domański  Wierch  series:  Contribution  to  structural  develop-
ment of the Orawa Basin (Carpathians, southern Poland) dur-
ing  Neogene  through  Quaternary  times.  Przegl.  Geol.  46,
62—66 (in Polish, English summary).

Vojtko  R.,  Beták  J.,  Hók  J.,  Marko  F.,  Gajdoš  V.,  Rozimant  K.  &

Mojzeš A. 2011a: Pliocene to Quaternary tectonics in the Horná
Nitra  Depression  (Western  Carpathians).  Geol.  Carpathica
62, 381—393.

Vojtko  R.,  Marko  F.,  Preusser  F.,  Madarás  J.  &  Kováčová  M.

2011b:  Late  Quaternary  fault  activity  in  the  Western  Car-
pathians: evidence from the Vikartovce fault (Slovakia). Geol.
Carpathica
 62, 563—574.

Watycha L. 1973: Quaternary formations in borehole Wróblówka,

Podhale region. Kwart. Geol. 17, 335—345 (in Polish).

Watycha  L.  1975:  Detailed  Geological  Map  of  Poland  1 : 50,000.

Sheet Nowy Targ (1049). Polish Geol. Inst., Warsaw (in Polish).

Watycha L. 1976a: The Neogene of the Orawa-Nowy Targ Basin.

Kwart. Geol. 20, 575—587 (in Polish with English summary).

Watycha L. 1976b: Explanations to the Detailed Geological Map of

Poland 1 : 50,000. Sheet Nowy Targ (1049). Polish Geol. Inst.,
Warsaw, 1—101 (in Polish).

Watycha  L.  1977a:  Detailed  Geological  Map  of  Poland  1 : 50,000.

Sheet Czarny Dunajec (1048).  Polish Geol. Inst., Warsaw (in
Polish).

Watycha L. 1977b: Explanations to the Detailed Geological Map of

Poland 1 : 50,000. Sheet Czarny Dunajec (1048). Polish Geol.
Inst
., Warsaw, 1—102 (in Polish).

Watycha  L.  1977c:  Detailed  Geological  Map  of  Poland  1 : 50,000.

Sheet Jabłonka (1047). Polish Geol. Inst., Warsaw (in Polish).

Watycha L. 1977d: Explanations to the Detailed Geological Map of

Poland  1 : 50,000.  Sheet  Jabłonka  (1047).  Polish  Geol.  Inst.,
Warsaw, 1—72 (in Polish).

Worobiec G. 1994: Upper Miocene fossil plants from the outcrop of

Stare  Bystre  (Western  Carpathians,  Poland).  Acta  Palaeobo-
tanica
 32, 83—105.

Zattin M., Andreucci B., Jankowski L., Mazzoli S. & Szaniawski R.

2011: Neogene exhumation in the Outer Western Carpathians.
Terra Nova 23, 283—291.

Zuchiewicz  W.,  Tokarski  A.K.,  Jarosiński  M.  &  Márton  E.  2002:

Late Miocene to present day structural development of the Polish
segment of the Outer Carpathians. Stephan Mueller Spec. Publ.
Ser
. 3, 185—202.

Site 

Age 

Latitude N 

Longitude E 

  1 Oravica Stream 52.10 

Pleistocene 

49°21.554

’ 19°41.978’ 

  2 Jeleśnia Stream 10.10 

Pleistocene 

49°24.161

’ 19°41.455’ 

  3 Jeleśnia Stream 9A.10 

Present-day 

49°23.988

’ 19°41.616’ 

  4 Sylec Stream 4.95 

Neogene 

49°29.388

’ 19°39.398’ 

  5 Piekielnik Stream 11.10 

Holocene 

49°28.079

’ 19°41.410’ 

  6 Czarny Dunajec River 4.06A 

Neogene 

49°23.193

’ 19°48.494’ 

  7 Czarny Dunajec River 4.06 B 

Pleistocene 

49°23.193

’ 19°48.494’ 

  8 Czarny Dunajec River 4.06C 

Pleistocene 

49°23.185

’ 19°48.494’ 

  9 Czarny Dunajec River 4.06D 

Holocene 

49°23.190

’ 19°48.504’ 

10 Czarny Dunajec River 4.06E 

Holocene 

49°23.195

’ 19°48.505’ 

11 Czarny Dunajec River 4.06F 

Present-day 

49°23.193

’ 19°48.507’ 

12 Czarny Dunajec River 4.06G 

Present-day 

49°23.200

’ 19°48.502’ 

13 Czarny Dunajec River 9.10 

Holocene 

49°24.310

’ 19°49.889’ 

14 Czarny Dunajec River 8.10 

Pleistocene 

49°24.340

’ 19°49.992’ 

15 Piekielnik Stream 12.10A 

Pleistocene 

49°28.082

’ 19°41.418’ 

16 Piekielnik Stream 12.10B 

Present-day 

49°27.752

’ 19°46.410’ 

17 Czarny Dunajec River 7.10 

Neogene 

49°27.858

’ 19°52.180’ 

18 Rogoźnik Stream 5.05 

Neogene 

49°24.136

’ 19°52.180’ 

19 Rogoźnik Stream 5.95 

Neogene 

49°23.960

’ 19°53.117’ 

20 Rogoźnik Stream 53.10 

Holocene 

49°24.754

’ 19°53.401’ 

21 Rogoźnik Stream 2.95 

Neogene 

49°24.786

’ 19°53.233’ 

22 Rogoźnik Stream 54.10 

Holocene 

49°26.463

’ 19°56.412’ 

23 Biały Dunajec River 57.10 

Pleistocene 

49°27.928

’ 20°02.245’ 

24 Biały Dunajec River 58.10 

Holocene 

49°27.979

’ 20°02.256’ 

25 Białka River 55.10 

Holocene 

49°26.203

’ 20°09.024’