background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, DECEMBER 2008, 59, 6, 503—514

www.geologicacarpathica.sk

Stratiform manganese mineralization in the Paleogene and

Jurassic shale formations of the Western Carpathians:

mineralogy, geochemistry and ore-forming processes

IGOR ROJKOVIČ

1

, JÁN SOTÁK

2

, PATRIK KONEČNÝ

and PETER ČECH

3

1

Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovak Republic;  rojkovic@cem.sk

2

Geological Institute of the Slovak Academy of Science, Severná 5, 974 01 Banská Bystrica, Slovak Republic;  sotak@savbb.sk

3

State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava, Slovak Republic;  peter.cech@gssr.sk

(Manuscript received May 5, 2008; accepted in revised form September 29, 2008)

Abstract: Manganese mineralization is bound to Paleogene (Oligocene; Rupelian) and Jurassic (Toarcian, Aalenian
and Bathonian—Callovian) shales. Mineralization is represented by manganese carbonates (rhodochrosite, kutnohorite
and  Mn-calcite).  Mn-oxyhydroxides  (pyrolusite,  manganite  and  rancieite)  were  formed  later  during  supergene  pro-
cesses by oxidation of manganese carbonates. Paleogene and Jurassic black shales with abundant framboidal pyrite are
enriched in organic matter. The average content of organic carbon is 1.04 wt. % in Paleogene shale and 1.11 wt. % in
Jurassic  shale.  The  Si/Al  ratios  of  3.09  in  Paleogene  shale  and  4.04  in  Jurassic  shale  are  close  to  typical  marine-
sediments and hydrogeneous-detrital manganese accumulations. The distribution of the rare earth elements in the shale
suggests continental source and formation in more reducing environment than the Jurassic manganese crusts. Cobalt,
copper and nickel contents of mineralized shale are distinctly lower than in oxidic ores in the Jurassic manganese crusts
of Western Carpathians. Isotopic composition of calcite in sediments shows positive values 

δ

13

C in most samples of

Paleogene and Jurassic carbonates. Increased manganese content in Mn-carbonates is closely associated with distinctly
negative values of 

δ

13

C down to —9.9 in Paleogene carbonates and down to —11.2 in Jurassic carbonates. The dominant

negative 

δ

13

C composition suggests early-diagenetic origin of Mn-carbonates affected by organic carbon.

Key words: geochemistry, black shale, diagenetic carbonates, supergene oxyhydroxides, C and O isotopes.

Introduction

The origin of manganese deposits is closely related to marine
facies and it reflects important events in the geological histo-
ry  of  the  Earth  like  transgressions  and  anoxic  events  in  the
ocean (Pratt et al. 1991; Corbin et al. 2000). Mn-oxyhydrox-
ides  are  deposited  in  oxic  environment  of  shallow  water
close to shore while carbonates form in more off-shore envi-
ronment at reduced conditions of deeper ocean (Roy 1997).
Hence, manganese can be sensitive indicator of the oxic-an-
oxic conditions of the basin.

The manganese mineralization of the Western Carpathians

was  exploited  in  the  past.  Most  deposits  and  occurrences
were  studied  before  1960.  The  main  reason  for  this  study
was to provide new data and methods not used before.

The origin of Oligocene manganese ores was explained in

terms  of  re-deposition  of  clastic  or  pelitic  rocks  (Ilavský
1979),  chemical  precipitation  (Munk  1932;  Řezáč  1959;
Pícha  1964)  in  an  alkaline  environment  (Pouba  1956)  ac-
companied  by  biochemical  processes  (Munk  1932;  Řezáč
1959),  turbidite  currents  (Marschalko  1959),  and  a  tectonic
activity  (Pouba  1956).  A  possible  source  of  mineralization
was lateritic weathering (Pícha 1964), Permian basic volca-
nic  rocks  of  the  Hronic  Unit  (Ilavský  1950;  Cambel  1959),
granite  of  the  Nízke  and  Vysoké  Tatry  Mts  (Munk  1932),
and weathered siderite-sulphide deposits of the Spišsko-Ge-
merské Rudohorie Mts (Marschalko 1959; Řezáč 1959). Al-
ternation  of  oxidic  and  carbonate  ores  was  explained  in

terms of the allogenic origin of oxides and authigenic origin
of carbonate, as well as by the recurrent pH and oxic-anoxic
conditions (Pícha 1964).

The origin of Jurassic manganese ores near Borinka, Led-

nické Rovne and Zázrivá was mostly related to sedimentary
processes (Polák 1955, 1956, 1957). Despite the low content
of organic carbon, mineralization in Branisko was closely re-
lated to sedimentation in epicontinental anoxic environment
(Polák  &  Širáňová  1993).  The  oxidic  ore  of  the  Lednické
Rovne deposit was attributed to oxidation of primary rhodo-
chrosite (Kantor in Andrusov et al. 1955).

Manganese crusts and nodules, formed during ocean high-

stands  and  corresponding  to  recent  hard  grounds,  were  also
found in the Jurassic limestone of the West Carpathian Klip-
pen Belt (Rojkovič et al. 2003a).

Geological setting

The stratiform manganese deposits and occurrences of the

Western  Carpathians  are  hosted  in  the  Paleogene,  Jurassic
and  Paleozoic  black  shale  formations  (Fig. 1,  Table 1).  The
Paleogene  manganese  ore  occurs  in  the  Central  Carpathian
Paleogene  Basin  (CCPB),  overlying  pre-Tertiary  tectonic
units  south  of  the  Pieniny  Klippen  Belt.  The  flysch  sedi-
ments of the basin are represented mainly by shale and sand-
stone  with  conglomerate  layers  superimposed  on  the  pre-
Cenozoic tectonic units of the Inner Carpathians. The CCPB

background image

504

ROJKOVIČ, SOTÁK, KONEČNÝ and ČECH

accommodates a subsiding area of a destructive plate-margin
(Soták et al. 2001). The manganese layers are bound to a Low-
er Oligocene sequence (Soták et al. 2001, 2004). Their age is
defined by biostratigraphic Zones P18—P19 (Dentoglobigerina
tapuriensis
D.  selli)  and NP21—NP23  (Ericsonia  subdis-
ticha
Reticulofenestra  ornata).  The  position  of  the  manga-
nese layers is equivalent to large manganese deposits of the
Eastern Paratethys (Muzylev 1998; Varentsov 2002).

The manganese ore in a horizon up to 3 m thick was mined in

the  Poprad  Basin  in  the  Kišovce-Švábovce  area  (Fig. 2).  Thin

bands  of  oxidic  ore  with  pyrolusite,  manganite,  marcasite  and
clay-sandy  intercalations  alternate  here  with  carbonate  bands
composed of Mn-calcite, rhodochrosite, pyrite and clay miner-
als  due  to  rhythmic  sedimentation  (Konta  1951).  The  average
manganese  content  varied  from  10  to  23 wt. %  (Ilavský  &
Polák  1967).  Occurrences  of  the  manganese  ore  in  the  Lower
Oligocene sequence near Michalová, Konská, Stránske, Bziny,
Pucov and Ráztočno villages are less important.

The Jurassic manganese mineralization is related mostly to

Toarcian-Aalenian  shales.  The  Toarcian  dark  grey  to  black

Fig. 1. Deposits and occurrences of the manganese mineralization of the Western Carpathians. GPS locations and a complete list of samples
are enclosed in the Electronic Supplement of this paper (Annexes 1 and 2) at www.geologicacarpathica.sk.

Fig. 2. Geological cross-section of
the  Kišovce—Švábovce  deposit
(modified  according  to  Ilavský  &
Polák 1967). 1 – manganese ore,
2 – Oligocene shale, 3 – Eocene
conglomerate, 4 – Permian volca-
nic rocks, 5 – Permian sediments.

Period Epoch  Age 

Geological 

Unit 

Locality 

Paleogene 

Oligocene Rupelian  Central 

Carpathian 

Paleogene 

Kišovce-Švábovce, 
Konská, Stránske, Bziny, 
Pucov, Michalová 

Jurassic 

Middle Jurassic 

Bathonian–Callovian  

Klippen Belt 

Šarišské Jastrabie 

  Aalenian 

Klippen 

Belt 

Lednické Rovne,  
Zázrivá 2, 3 

 

Lower Jurassic 

Toarcian 

Tatricum envelope 

Borinka  

 

 

Toarcian 

Veporicum envelope 

Branisko, Dikula 

 

 

Toarcian 

Krížna Unit 

Zázrivá 1 

 

Table 1: Stratigraphic position of manganese mineralization in black shales of  Western Carpathians.

background image

505

MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

shale with beds of black sandy crinoid limestone with manga-
nese layers in the lower part are characteristic of the Marianka
Formation  (Plašienka  1987).  The  Marianka  Formation  be-
longs to the marginal halfgraben on the northern edge of the
Tatric Unit and it is analogous to the Lower Austroalpine mar-
gin of the Eastern Alps (Plašienka 1987). Its age corresponds
to Early to Middle Toarcian according to ammonites and be-
lemnites (Rakús 1994). The Toarcian age based on the struc-
tural  position  and  the  lithostratigraphic  content  is  presumed
also  for  the  grey  shale  near  Dikula  (Plašienka  1995)  and  the
Branisko  Mts  (Polgári  et  al.  1992;  Polák  &  Širáňová  1993).
The manganese mineralization in the black shale of the Klip-
pen Belt is younger. The manganese mineralization is bound
to  the  Skrzypny  Formation  of  Aalenian  age  near  Lednické
Rovne and Zázrivá (Wierzbowski et al. 2004), and to the Late
Bathonian—Early Callovian Sokolica Formation near Šarišské
Jastrabie village (Rojkovič et al. 2003b).

Methods

Outcroping  ore  layers  and  surrounding  rocks  were  sam-

pled  in  rock  profiles  near  Bziny,  Dikula,  Marianka,  Pucov,
Šarišské Jastrabie and Zázrivá villages. Other samples were
collected from old mining dumps or rare outcrops (Fig. 3).

A total of 120 samples were studied in polished thin sec-

tions using polarizing microscope in transmitted and reflect-
ed light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The car-
bonates  and  oxyhydroxides  were  analysed  in  the  polished
thin  sections  using  wave-dispersion  X-ray  microanalysis
(WDX). WDX analyses of Al, Ba, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Si
and  Sr  were  carried  out  using  a  CAMECA  SX100  electron
microprobe  at  the  State  Geological  Institute  of  Dionýz  Štúr
in Bratislava. The following natural and synthetic standards
were  used  for  calibration  to  calibrate  the  systems:  Al

2

O

3

,

BaSO

4

,  wollastonite,  hematite,  orthoclase,  MgO,  rhodonite,

albite, SiO

and SrTiO

3

.

 

Operating conditions were: 1—3 

µm

beam  diameter,  15—20 kV  accelerating  voltage,  19.9—20 nA

sample current. Detection limits were better than 0.1 wt. %.
The  relative  standard  deviation  ranged  from  ± 5 %  (for
1 wt. %) to  ± 25 % (for 0.1 wt. %). The raw data were con-
verted to oxides using PAP correction.

X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of a total of 67 samples of

separated mineral grains was done on a Phillips PW 1710 dif-
fractometer at the Geological Institute of the Slovak Academy
of  Science  in  Bratislava.  Samples  with  a  high  content  of  Fe
were  analysed  using  K

α  irradiation  (λα

1

= 1.78896 m

—10

,

λα

2

= 1.79285 m

—10

). The CuK

α irradiation (λα

1

= 1.54060 m

—10

,

λα

2

= 1.54439 m

—10

) was used for other samples. Accelerating

voltage 35 kV and beam current 20 mA were used in the range
from 4 to 60 °2

Θ with 0.02 °2Θ increment.

The  chemical  composition  of  a  total  of  108  rock  and  ore

samples was analysed by atomic emission spectroscopy with
inductively  coupled  plasma  (AES-ICP)  at  Geoanalytical
Laboratories of the State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr
in Spišská Nová Ves. Rare earth elements (REE) were analy-
sed  using  the  same  method  in  a  total  of  14  samples.  Rock-
Eval pyrolysis was used to determine organic carbon (TOC)
content  using  the  C-MAT  STROHLEIN  apparatus  at  the
Geological Institute of Slovak Academy of Science in Ban-
ská Bystrica in a total of 95 samples.

Carbon and oxygen isotopes were studied in a total of 53

samples. 20 mg of powdered rock was dissolved at 95 °C in
phosphorus acid with a density of 1.88 g/cm

3

 in a closed re-

action vessel (McCrea 1950). The released CO

2

 was cleaned

in  cooling  traps  and  sealed  in  glass  capillary.  The 

13

C/

12

C

and 

18

O/

16

O isotope ratios were measured using a Finnigan

MAT 250 mass spectrometer at State Geological Institute of
Dionýz  Štúr  in  Bratislava,  and  expressed  as  ‰  deviation
from  V-SMOW  (oxygen)  and  V-PDB  (carbon)  standards.
The oxygen isotope ratio was corrected to the chemical com-
position of carbonate and the fractionation between CO

2

 and

H

3

PO

4

 (Rosenbaum & Sheppard 1986).

Results

Petrology and mineralogy

The  mineralized  rocks  are  represented  mainly  by  shale,  in

which carbonates, quartz, micas, chlorite and clay minerals are
the  most  abundant  phases.  The  dominant  fine-grained  carbon-
ates  form  elongated  aggregates  or  thin  layers,  parallel  to  the
bedding and thin pyrite layers (Fig. 4). The fine-grained rocks
contain parallel oriented quartz, micas and chlorite. Thin sandy
intercalations  contain  fragments  of  quartz,  carbonates,  sericite
schist,  basalt,  quartzite,  plagioclase  and  muscovite.  Rounded
sections  of  foraminifers,  and  very  rare  fragments  of  coalified
plants were also found. Accessory tourmaline, rutile and zircon
were common. Carbonates and quartz also form veinlets.

The manganese ores in Oligocene and Jurassic shales are

composed  of  carbonates  and  oxyhydroxides.  The  primary
minerals  are  represented  by  Mn-calcite,  kutnohorite
and rhodochrosite.  The  Mn-oxyhydroxides  correspond  to
pyrolusite,  rancieite  and  manganite.  The  manganese  miner-
als  are  accompanied  by  pyrite,  marcasite,  goethite  and  iron
oxyhydroxides.

Fig. 3.  Outcrop  of  the  Paleogene  (Rupelian)  shale  with  layer  of
manganese mineralization (interval with manganese mineralization
is marked by arrows; samples By 9.4—9.5 m).

background image

506

ROJKOVIČ, SOTÁK, KONEČNÝ and ČECH

The carbonates are represented by calcite, Mn-calcite, do-

lomite,  kutnohorite  and  rhodochrosite.  Fine-grained  aggre-
gates  show  zoning  in  back-scattered  electron  images.  The
zoned  aggregates  are  composed  of  a  low-manganese  phase
in  cores  and  a  high-manganese  phase  in  rims.  The  central
part is composed of calcite, Mn-calcite or dolomite and the
external  part  of  kutnohorite  and  rhodochrosite  (Fig. 5).
These carbonates were also confirmed by X-ray diffraction.

Re-crystallized coarser grained carbonates often fill interi-

ors of foraminifers and radiolarians (Fig. 6). Veinlets of cal-
cite,  Mn-calcite  and  quartz  cut  older  lenticular  fine-grained
carbonate aggregates.

The carbonates of Jurassic and Paleogene manganese ores

show  large  variability  of  Ca  and  Mn  contents  (Table 2,
Fig. 7).  The  chemical  composition  of  rhodochrosite  corre-
sponds to Ca-rhodochrosite. The Mg content reflects the ra-

Fig. 4.  Oval  carbonate  aggregates  (light),  rare  quartz  fragments
(white)  and  foraminifers  (round  section)  in  shale.  Kišovce,  Kiš-3,
transmitted light, parallel nicols.

Fig. 6.  Calcite  (cal)  with  framboidal  pyrite  (py)  fill  foraminifera.
Zoned carbonate aggregates are represented by calcite (cal) and kut-
nohorite (kh) in the centre and by rhodochrosite (rh) in the margin.
Kišovce, Kiš-2, SEM-BEI.

Fig. 5.  Zoned  carbonates  consist  of  rhodochrosite  (rh)  on  the  pe-
riphery,  kutnohorite  (kh)  between  and  calcite  (cal)  in  the  centre.
Small  grains  of  pyrite  (py)  are  disseminated  in  the  rock.  Borinka,
Jurassic shale, HN1-6a, SEM, BEI.

Fig. 7.  The  chemical  composition  of  carbonates  in  Oligocene  and
Jurassic rocks.

background image

507

MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

tio of dolomite fragments observed in the core of carbonate
aggregates. Average MgO contents correspond to 2.19 wt. %
in the Paleogene ores and 2.38 wt. % of MgO in the Jurassic
ores.  The  Paleogene  and  the  Jurassic  carbonates  show  dis-
tinctly different Fe contents. While the average FeO content
is 1.13 wt. % in the Paleogene ores, the Jurassic ores are sig-
nificantly enriched up to 3.93 wt. %. The increased iron con-
tent  in  the  Jurassic  ores  may  reflect  an  enrichment  due  to
mobilization of iron from rock-forming minerals during the
Alpine orogeny.

Pyrolusite Mn

4+

O

2

 was identified in the reflected light by

the  highest  reflectivity  among  the  manganese  minerals,
strong  anisotropy  (yellow—dark  brown)  and  characteristic
yellow colour. Elongated grains, 0.01 to 0.1 mm in diameter,
are disseminated in rock or they form aggregates with radial
texture  and  veinlets,  replacing  carbonate  minerals  (Fig. 8).
Pyrolusite  also  forms  thin  crusts  along  fissures  and  on  the
surface of rocks. The average chemical composition of anal-
ysed  pyrolusite  (Table 3)  corresponds  to  the  formula:
Mn

4+

0.985

Ca

0.005

Fe

3+

0.004

Mg

0.003

Si

0.006

Al

O.002

O

2

.

Rancieite  (Ca,  Mn

2+

)Mn

4+

4

O

9

· 3(H

2

O)  and  pyrolusite  are

the  most  abundant  secondary  manganese  minerals.  Rancieite
was firstly described in the Liassic shale of the Branisko Mts
by Polgári et al. (1992). Rancieite shows distinct bireflectance

Table 2:  Chemical  composition  of    carbonates  (WDX  analyses  in
weight %)*.

 

Paleogene Jurassic 

average  minimum maximum average  minimum maximum 

CaO 

    36.24        5.68 

    56.40 

    29.86        0.55 

    59.42 

MgO        2.20        0.11 

    22.10 

      2.40        0.00 

    21.65 

FeO 

      1.12        0.00 

      6.46 

      3.92        0.00 

    32.79 

MnO      17.09        0.00 

    54.59 

    21.64        0.00 

    53.74 

SrO 

      0.10        0.00 

      0.70 

      0.13        0.00 

      2.51 

BaO 

      0.01        0.00 

      0.11 

      0.01        0.00 

      0.34 

CO

2

 

    42.17      37.39 

    48.63 

    41.94      36.61 

    48.69 

Total      98.93   

 

    99.90   

 

  104 

 

 

  164 

 

 

  n — number of analyses.  * — complete list of analyses is involved as Elec- 
  tronic Supplement of this paper (Table 2a,b) at www.geologicacarpathica.sk.  

Ranciete Pyrolusite 

Manganite 

 

average  minimum  maximum  average minimum maximum average minimum maximum 

MnO

2

 

79.57 75.69 

84.98  98.11 94.72 100.00 

 

 

 

Mn

2

O

3

 

 

    

  

88.83 

88.06 

89.91 

CaO 

6.53 

2.68  11.40 0.35 

0.00 1.70 0.10 

0.00 0.25 

Fe

2

O

3

 

1.01 

0.24  6.82 0.37 

0.14 3.09 0.19 

0.15 0.23 

MgO 

0.81 

0.00  3.16 0.03 

0.00 0.29 0.02 

0.00 0.03 

SiO

2

 

0.25 

0.00  3.36 0.40 

0.07 0.92 0.47 

0.21 0.84 

Na

2

0.14 

0.00 

0.71  

   

  

K

2

0.48 

0.08  1.13 0.01 

0.00 0.03 0.00 

0.00 0.02 

BaO 

0.06 

0.00  0.49 0.00 

0.00 0.01 0.00 

0.00 0.01 

SrO 

0.11 

0.00 

0.30  

   

  

Al

2

O

3

 

0.19 

0.00  1.83 0.13 

0.00 0.41 0.07 

0.01 0.21 

P

2

O

5

 

0.03 

0.00 

0.29  

    

  

Total 

89.55 

   

99.40 

  

89.69 

  

   129 

 

 

   44 

 

 

     9 

 

 

n — number of analyses.  * — complete list of analyses is involved as Electronic Supplement of this paper (Table 3a,b,c) at www.geologicacarpathica.sk.  

Table 3: Chemical composition of ranciete, pyrolusite and manganite (WDX analyses in weight %)*.

Fig. 8.  Aggregate  of  pyrolusite  (pl)  in  goethite  (goe).  Borinka,
Toarcian shale, BaCDH1, SEM-BEI.

Fig. 9. Radial aggregates of needle-shaped rancieite (light grey) as-
sociated  with  goethite  (white).  Bziny,  Oligocene  shale,  sample
By 9,5b, SEM-BEI.

background image

508

ROJKOVIČ, SOTÁK, KONEČNÝ and ČECH

and  strong  anisotropy  (bright  yellow—dark  grey).  Colloform
zoned aggregates, as well as needle-shaped radial aggregates
fill cavities and fissures in rocks and replace zoned carbonate
aggregates (Fig. 9). Their average chemical composition cor-
responds  to  the  formula:  Mn

total

4.099

  Ca

0.521 

Fe

3+

 

0.057 

Mg

0.090

Si

0.019

Na 

0.020

K

0.046

Ba 

0.002

Sr

0.005

Al

0.017

P

0.002

O

9.000

.  Mn

4+ 

and

Mn

2+ 

were not distinguished by WDX and they are involved

together  as  total  Mn.  X-ray  diffraction  analysis  (XRD)  con-
firmed only the strongest lines of rancieite in a few samples.

Manganite Mn

3+

O(OH) shows reflectance lower than that

of pyrolusite, and strong anisotropy. Aggregates of elongat-
ed and isometric grains (0.05 to 0.3 mm in size) fill fissures.
Its  chemical  composition  corresponds  to  the  formula:
Mn

3+

1.973

Ca

0.003

Fe

3+

0.004

Si

0.014

Al

0.002

O

3

.  Mn

3+

 

represents  to-

tal Mn.

Pyrite

 FeS

2

 forms framboids, spheroids, euhedral grains (0.05

to 2 mm in size), zoned aggregates and thin veinlets. Framboids
and re-crystallized spherical grains are frequently disseminated
or form clusters. Pyrite grains and aggregates are concentrated
into thin bands rarely up to 10 cm thick. Pyrite forms pseudo-
morphs after foraminifers, replacing and rimming them.

Marcasite  FeS

2

  forms  lath-shaped  crystals  along  fissures

in pyrite aggregates.

Goethite

 

α-Fe

3+

O(OH)  and iron  oxyhydroxides  often  in-

tergrow or rim manganese oxyhydroxides. They fill fissures
and  cavities.  They  replace  or  rim  carbonates  and  pyrite.
Their chemical composition shows large variability of man-
ganese and iron content due to the close intergrowths of their
oxyhydroxides.

Geochemistry of manganese ores

The dominant components of the Jurassic and the Paleogene

shale are Al

2

O

3

, SiO

and CaO (Table 4). SiO

2

 content in the

shale varies from 3.42 to 49.99 wt. % (average 27.60 wt. % in
the  Paleogene  shale  and  28.35 wt. %  in  the  Jurassic  shale).
Al

2

O

3

  varies  from  0.60  to  17.12 wt. %  in  the  shale  (average

7.90 wt. % in the Paleogene shale and 6.20 wt. % in the Juras-
sic  shale).  The  Si/Al  ratio  corresponds  to  3.09  in  the  Paleo-
gene shale and 4.04 in the Jurassic shale (Fig. 10). The MnO
content  in  the  Jurassic  manganese  ores  reaches  up  to
34.06 wt. % and up to 43.23 wt. % in the Paleogene ores.

The  Fe

2

O

content  (total  Fe  including  Fe

2+ 

and  Fe

3+

)

reaches  up  to  25.28 wt. %  in  the  Paleogene  shale  and
35.67 wt. % in the Jurassic shale (average 7.38 wt. % in the
Paleogene  shale  and  8.49 wt. %  in  the  Jurassic  shale).  The

Paleogene shale 

Jurassic shale 

average  

average 

 

 

Mn < 1% 

Mn > 1% 

total 

minimum 

maximum 

Mn < 1% 

Mn > 1% 

total 

minimum

maximum 

SiO

2

 

  35.92 

  23.12 

  27.60 

    3.42 

    49.99 

    35.93  

  23.91 

  28.35 

    4.55 

    49.12 

TiO

2

 

    0.50 

    0.31 

    0.37 

    0.07 

      0.7 

      0.47  

    0.20 

    0.30 

    0.04 

      0.73 

Al

2

O

3

 

  10.60 

    6.38 

    7.90 

    1.57 

    17.12 

    10.29  

    3.81 

    6.20 

    0.6 

    15.73 

Fe

2

O

3

total 

    5.52 

    8.75 

    7.38 

    2.16 

    25.28 

      4.64  

    9.97 

    8.49 

    0.98 

    35.67 

MnO 

    0.43 

  15.44 

    8.86 

    0.04 

    43.23 

      0.23  

  14.41 

    9.17 

    0.132 

    34.06 

MgO 

    2.75 

    2.31 

    2.42 

    0.55 

    14.91 

      2.48  

    3.26 

    2.97 

    0.15 

      9.79 

CaO 

  20.40 

  17.80 

  18.30 

    2.29 

    39.66 

    22.36  

  18.15 

  19.70 

    1.31 

    40.22 

Na

2

    0.63 

    0.34 

    0.44 

    0.06 

      2.37 

      0.71  

    0.35 

    0.48 

    0.02 

      1.38 

K

2

    2.03 

    1.17 

    1.48 

    0.22 

      3.3 

      1.97  

    0.73 

    1.19 

    0.03 

      5.52 

P

2

O

5

 

    0.15 

    0.39 

    0.28 

    0.06 

      2.56 

      0.15  

    0.47 

    0.31 

    0 

      2.56 

H

2

O- 

    1.49 

    2.29 

    1.89 

    0.08 

      7.81 

      0.32  

    0.98 

    0.74 

    0.01 

      8.5 

LOI 

  20.87 

  22.70 

  21.24 

  11.18 

    40.28 

    20.46  

  23.20 

  22.19 

    9.52 

    38.67 

  19 

  97 

  92 

  10 

  245 

    92 

  75 

  77 

    2 

  357 

Ba 

335 

352 

334 

  20 

1354 

  202 

346 

293 

  15 

2119 

Co 

  16 

  29 

  23 

    2 

    88 

    17 

  49 

  37 

    3 

  191 

Cr 

  79 

  72 

  73 

  22 

  155 

    58 

  27 

  39 

    3 

    93 

Cu 

  42 

  34 

  36 

    6 

    82 

    42 

  30 

  34 

    2 

    84 

La 

  27 

  26 

  26 

    9 

    83 

    22 

  56 

  40 

    9 

  186 

Mo 

    2 

    9 

    9 

    2 

  111 

      2 

    4 

    3 

    2 

    13 

Ni 

  54 

  71 

  62 

    8 

  186 

    47 

  37 

  41 

    4 

  108 

Pb 

  16 

  18 

  16 

    3 

    43 

    27 

  23 

  25 

    6 

    75 

Sr 

602 

664 

619 

218  1147 

1422 321  779 136 2750 

121 

100 

106 

  27 

  274 

    91 

  55 

  68 

    3 

  253 

  23 

  24 

  23 

    7 

    39 

    22 

  36 

  32 

  10 

    98 

Zr 

  97 

  78 

  89 

  18 

  299 

    74 

  81 

  86 

  10 

  290 

Th 

    9 

    9 

    9 

    2 

    17 

      9 

    7 

    8 

    2 

    14 

    4 

    4 

    4 

    2 

      9 

      3 

    3 

    3 

    2 

      6 

TC 

    5.32 

    5.36 

    5.35 

    0.12 

    11.13 

      5.77 

    6.46 

    6.21 

    0.12 

    11.62 

TOC 

    0.70 

    1.17 

    1.04 

    0.005 

      5.27 

      0.67 

    1.37 

    1.11 

    0.1 

      4.42 

TIC 

    4.62 

    4.19 

    4.31 

    0 

    10.93 

      5.10 

    5.07 

    4.67 

    0.04 

    11.12 

CO

2

 carb 

  16.93 

  13.46 

  14.04 

    0.03 

    40 

    18.68 

  17.08 

  18.34 

    7.649 

    30.27 

  26 

  36 

  62 

 

 

    17 

  19 

  46 

 

 

Fe

2

O

3

total — total Fe including Fe

2+ 

and Fe

3+

LOI — loss of ignition, — number of analyses, TC — total carbon, TOC — organic carbon,TIC — inor- 

ganic carbon.  * — complete list of analyses is involved as Electronic Supplement of this paper (Table 4a,b) at www.geologicacarpathica.sk. 

Table 4: Chemical composition of  the Paleogene and Jurassic shale with manganese mineralization (oxides and C in weight %, elements in
ppm)*.

background image

509

MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

Fig. 10. A plot of Si and Al concentrations, showing an average Si/Al
ratio 3.1 for Paleogene shale and 4.0 for Jurassic shale. The bound-
ary between hydrothermal deposits and hydrogeneous detrital sedi-
ments according to Crerar et al. (1982).

Fig. 11. Average contents of elements and oxides in the studied rocks.

Fig. 12.  The  distribution  pattern  of  REE  in  the  Jurassic  mineralized
shale. Ba – Borinka, Dik – Dikula, LR – Lednické Rovne, Ma – Ma-
rianka, SJ – Šarišské Jastrabie, Za – Zázrivá potok, ZaK –  Záz-
rivá, Kozinská. Chondrite values according to Evensen et al. (1978).

Fig. 13. The distribution pattern of REE in the Oligocene mineral-
ized  shale.  By  –  Bziny,  Kiš  –  Kišovce,  Ko  –  Konská,  Ra  
Ráztočno,  St – Stránske. Chondrite values according to Evensen
et al. (1978).

Fe content reflects mostly presence of pyrite and goethite in
the manganese ores bound to the Jurassic and the Paleogene
shale  (Table 4).  The  Mn/Fe  ratio  in  the  Paleogene  is  1.33
and in the Jurassic shale is 1.20.

Black and dark grey shales are enriched in organic matter

with the average content of organic carbon corresponding to
1.04 wt. % in the Paleogene strata and 1.11 wt. % in the Ju-
rassic strata (Fig. 11).

Trace  elements  are  bound  in  alumosilicates,  carbonates  or

accessory minerals. V, Cr are related to alumosilicates, Zr,

 

Ti,

Th, B to clastic accessory minerals (e.g. rutile, monazite, tour-
maline) and  Sr to calcite due to isomorphism with Ca. Shales
show low contents of Ni, Co and Cu (total 121 ppm in the Pa-
leogene  shale  and  112  ppm  in  the  Jurassic  shale).  The  rare
earth  elements  (REE)  distribution  pattern  shows  only  weak
positive or absent Ce-anomaly (Figs. 12, 13, Table 5).

Stable isotopes

The stable isotope composition of carbonates reflects vari-

ability in their origin and development (Table 6). The carbon
isotope  composition  reflects  different  formation  conditions
of  carbonates  and  manganese.  Calcite  shows 

δ

13

C  values

close  to  0  in  Paleogene  as  well  as  in  Jurassic  samples.  The
Mn-carbonates  represented  mainly  by  rhodochrosite
and kutnohorite  are  characterized  by  more  distinct  negative
δ

13

C values (down to —9.9 in the Paleogene shale and —11.2

in the Jurassic shale). The correlation coefficient of 

δ

13

C val-

ues to MnO corresponds to —0.76. Negative 

δ

13

C values are

characteristic  for  Mn-carbonates  in  all  stratigraphic  levels
(Fig. 14).

Discussion

The  Central  Carpathian  Paleogene  Basin  is  related  to  the

maximum of the Early Oligocene transgression, a global an-
oxic  event  and  the  beginning  of  the  isolation  of  the  Para-
tethys  (Soták  et  al.  2001).  The  Sinemurian-Toarcian  north-
west  Neotethyan  margins  with  adjacent  grabens  were  filled
with  deep-water  black  mudstone  and  organic-rich  shale  fa-

sample/chondrite

background image

510

ROJKOVIČ, SOTÁK, KONEČNÝ and ČECH

cies (Golonka & Ford 2000). Dark grey Toarcian shale with
manganese layers in the lower part of the Marianka Forma-
tion belongs to marginal halfgraben of the northern edge of
the  Tatricum  and  is  analogous  to  the  Lower  Austroalpine
margin  of  the  Eastern  Alps  (Plašienka  1987).  During  Toar-
cian times, the anoxic environment was formed in the Tethys

Table 5:  REE content in Jurassic and Paleogene mineralized shales (in ppm).

Ocean (Bellanca et al. 1999; Corbin et al. 2000). Manganese
horizons related to the black shale were formed in rift basins
of the continental margin, occurring recently also in Austria,
Germany,  Hungary,  Italy  and  Switzerland  (German  1972;
Cseh-Németh  et  al.  1980;  Jenkyns  et  al.  1991).  The  deposits
on  the  margins  of  black  shale  facies  formed  during  high  sea
level stands in narrow time intervals, when ocean anoxia was
widespread (Force & Cannon 1988).

The  studied  Jurassic  and  Paleogene  shales  contain  abun-

dant  carbonate  aggregates  often  elongated  along  bedding,
parallel  to  thin  pyrite  layers.  The  carbonate  aggregates  are
zoned with the central part represented by calcite, Mn-calcite
or  dolomite  and  the  external  part  composed  of  kutnohorite
and  rhodochrosite.  Mn-enrichment  in  external  phases  sug-
gests later diagenetic enrichment. Primary rhodochrosite can
be formed in a transition zone to deeper sea, under more re-
ducing  conditions  in  shale,  sandstone  and  bituminous  shale
with pyrite (Borchert 1980).

Pyrite  framboids  are  often  concentrated  into  thin  bands  or

form pseudomorphs after foraminifers, replacing and rimming
them. It also suggests formation during diagenesis in a reduc-
ing environment. The framboidal texture suggests a diagenetic
origin in sense of the “organic globule” model (Rickard 1970).
The origin of the framboidal pyrite is associated with consid-

 

Jurassic shale with manganese mineralization 

Sample 

Ba 1 

Dik 7 

LR 2 

Ma-P-2m 

SJ 1 

Za 6 

ZaK 9 

 59.00 19.00 21.00 18.00 79.00  98.00 

La 

27.00 70.00 28.00 16.00 57.00 93.00  93.00 

Ce 

97.00  85.00  84.00  47.00 204.00 417.00  330.00 

Pr 

5.00 14.20  5.00  6.00 19.00 26.00  28.00 

Nd 

17.00 46.20 18.00 16.00 81.00 

115.00 116.00 

Sm 

6.00 11.20  8.00  3.80 24.00 26.00  32.00 

Eu 

1.00 2.30 0.80 0.70 6.10 7.90  9.80 

Gd 

5.90 10.10  5.20  3.30 28.30 29.50  41.90 

Tb 

0.70 1.40 0.70 0.60 3.50 3.50  5.10 

Dy 

5.30  5.30  4.70  2.30 22.80 26.50  38.80 

Ho 

1.00 1.30 0.90 0.60 4.20 5.30  7.20 

Er 

2.50 3.50 2.30 1.80 8.50 

10.80 14.50 

Tm 

0.25 0.30 0.50 0.10 1.00 1.30  1.60 

Yb 

2.20 2.20 2.40 1.30 6.60 7.00  8.50 

Lu 

0.33 0.26 0.37 0.23 1.03 0.95  1.13 

Paleogene shale with manganese mineralization 

Sample By 

1  By-P-9,50 By-P-11  Kiš-1 

Ko-1 

Ra-2 

St-5 

31.00 39.00 36.00 

 

37.00 22.00 32.00 

La 

29.00 30.00 29.00  9.00 48.00 24.00 25.00 

Ce 

111.00 106.00 160.00  20.00  76.00  62.00 120.00 

Pr 

4.90 5.80 5.70 2.00 9.00 5.50 5.00 

Nd 

16.00 18.90 15.40 

 

33.00 14.60 15.70 

Sm 

3.40 4.30 3.80 4.00 

10.00 3.60 3.50 

Eu 

0.80 1.10 0.80 0.20 1.60 0.70 0.80 

Gd 

3.60 4.70 3.60 1.60 8.90 3.20 3.90 

Tb 

0.50 0.70 0.60 0.25 1.10 0.60 0.60 

Dy 

9.00 3.60 2.00 1.70 7.60 4.90 3.50 

Ho 

0.60 0.80 0.40 0.30 1.50 0.60 0.70 

Er 

1.80 2.40 1.10 0.80 4.00 1.80 2.20 

Tm 

0.30 0.20 0.10 0.25 0.60 0.10 0.20 

Yb 

1.70 1.50 0.50 0.70 3.20 1.30 1.50 

Lu 

0.25 0.24 0.04 0.11 0.55 0.20 0.25 

Jurassic: Ba — Borinka, Dik —  Dikula, LR — Lednické Rovne, Ma — Marianka (non-mineralized shale), SJ — Šarišské Jastrabie, Za — Zázrivá 
potok, ZaK — Zázrivá Kozinská. Paleogene: By — Bziny, Kiš — Kišovce, Ko — Konská, Ra — Ráztočno, St — Stránske. 

Fig. 14. Correlation of carbon isotope ratios and MnO contents.

background image

511

MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

Table 6: Isotopic composition of oxygen and carbon in carbonates of the manganese ores and accompanying rocks.

Sample Locality 

Age  Rock 

δ

18

O

PDB

 

δ

 13

C

PDB

 

δ

 18

O

SMOW

 MnO 

Ba  4 

Borinka Toarcian marl 

shale 

–7.2 

–11.2 

23.4 

24.66 

Ba  5 

Borinka Toarcian marl 

shale 

–4.7 

–10.0 

26.1 

21.14 

Ba  6a, 

Borinka Toarcian marl 

shale 

–6.2 

–1.6 

24.5 

3.66 

ByP  1 

Bziny Oligocene 

shale 

 

–4.3 

–2.2 

26.4 

1.00 

ByP11, 10 

Bziny Oligocene 

shale 

 

–3.7 

–1.1 

27.0 

0.65 

ByP 14 

Bziny Oligocene 

shale 

 

–7.7 

1.4 

22.9 

0.94 

ByP 18 

Bziny Oligocene 

shale 

 

–3.8 

–0.6 

27.0 

0.45 

ByP 5 

Bziny Oligocene 

shale 

 

–6.3 

–3.0 

24.4 

1.28 

ByP 7 

Bziny Oligocene 

shale 

 

–4.0 

–1.0 

26.7 

0.51 

ByP 8 

Bziny Oligocene 

shale 

 

–5.0 

–2.4 

25.7 

1.31 

ByP 9,5 

Bziny Oligocene 

shale 

 

–8.0 

–6.4 

22.6 

14.09 

Kiš  1 

Kišovce Oligocene 

shale 

–2.9 

–3.3 

27.9 

29.88 

KišHo1 

Hozelec Oligocene shale 

–3.7 

–9.9 

27.1 

29.15 

KišŠv  2 

Švábovce Oligocene  shale –2.3 

–1.9 

28.4 

21.65 

KišŠv  7 

Švábovce Oligocene  shale –4.0 

–5.8 

26.3 

32.57 

LR 3 

Lednické Rovne 

Aalenian 

marl shale 

–2.0 

4.0 

28.8 

3.08 

Ma  0 m 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.4 

1.3 

23.2 

0.16 

Ma  1, 5 m 

Marianka Toarcian  limestone 

–7.5 

1.3 

23.1 

0.28 

Ma  P  1 m 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.3 

1.3 

23.3 

0.17 

Ma  P  2 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–4.4 

–1.0 

26.3 

0.23 

Ma  P  3 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.2 

1.3 

23.4 

0.18 

Ma  P  3, 4  

Marianka Toarcian  limestone 

–6.5 

1.3 

24.1 

0.26 

Ma  P  4 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.3 

1.3 

23.3 

0.18 

Ma  P  5 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.4 

1.3 

23.2 

0.19 

Ma  P  6 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.3 

1.2 

23.3 

0.17 

Ma  P  7 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.4 

1.3 

23.2 

0.17 

Ma  P  8 m 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.1 

1.3 

23.5 

0.13 

Ma  P  8, 10  

Marianka Toarcian  limestone 

–7.7 

1.2 

23.0 

0.27 

Ma  P  9 m 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.2 

1.1 

23.5 

0.16 

Ma  9.5 m 

Marianka Toarcian  marl 

shale 

–7.5 

1.2 

23.1 

0.21 

Mich  11 

Michalová Oligocene  shale  –3.3 

–9.5 

27.5 

30.54 

P1 

Pucov Oligocene 

marl 

–4.3 

0.5 

26.5 

0.06 

P2 

Pucov Oligocene 

marl 

–5.1 

0.8 

25.7 

0.05 

P3 

Pucov Oligocene 

marl 

–5.2 

0.2 

25.5 

0.08 

P4 

Pucov Oligocene 

marl 

–4.4 

0.4 

26.4 

0.04 

P5 

Pucov Oligocene 

marl 

–6.3 

0.0 

24.4 

0.06 

P6 

Pucov Oligocene 

shale 

–4.2 

–0.1 

26.5 

0.20 

P7 

Pucov Oligocene 

shale 

–5.3 

–1.4 

25.4 

0.19 

P8 

Pucov Oligocene 

shale 

–5.0 

–0.7 

25.8 

0.39 

P9 

Pucov Oligocene 

shale 

–5.1 

–0.7 

25.7 

0.31 

P10 

Pucov Oligocene 

shale 

–4.3 

–0.9 

26.5 

0.74 

P11 

Pucov Oligocene 

shale 

–4.4 

–0.8 

26.3 

0.86 

P11a 

Pucov Oligocene 

shale 

 

–4.1 

–8.0 

26.7 

1.21 

P  12a  

Pucov Oligocene 

shale 

 

–2.1 

–6.0 

28.7 

8.52 

P  13a 

Pucov Oligocene 

shale 

 

–4.5 

–0.9 

26.2 

1.63 

Ra  1 

Ráztočno Oligocene shale 

 

–4.2 

–0.9 

26.5 

0.73 

Ra  2 

Ráztočno Oligocene shale 

 

–4.2 

–1.1 

26.5 

5.95 

ŠJ 9 

Šarišské Jastrabie 

Bathonian–Callovian 

shale 

–1.6 

–7.5 

29.2 

20.59 

ŠJ  16 

Šarišské Jastrabie 

Bathonian–Callovian 

shale 

–1.9 

–7.2 

28.9 

29.72 

Za  1 

Zázrivá Toarcian marl 

shale 

–5.3 

0.6 

25.4 

9.11 

Za  6 

Zázrivá Toarcian marl 

shale 

–5.2 

–9.9 

25.5 

13.17 

ZaH  11 

Zázrivá 2 

Aalenian 

marl shale 

–5.4 

–2.7 

25.3 

0.68 

ZaH 19 

Zázrivá 2 

Aalenian 

marl shale 

–3.4 

–6.9 

27.3 

14.20 

 

erable  concentration  of  hydrogen  sulphide  derived  from  de-
composition  of  organic  matter  or  bacterial  activity  (Kříbek
1977). Honjo et al. (1965) confirmed an influence of gravita-
tion on framboids of the early-diagenetic stage. Concentration
of the framboidal pyrite in the bottom of foraminifers is evi-
dent (Fig. 6).

The average chemical composition of the Jurassic Western

Carpathians manganese ores is similar to the chemical com-
position  of  the  primary  carbonate  ores  in  Alps  (German
1972) and to the Úrkút deposit in Hungary (Cseh-Németh et
al.  1980).  An  average  Si/Al  ratio  corresponding  to  3.09  in

the Paleogene and 4.04 in Jurassic shales are close to marine
sediments with an average Si/Al=3 according to Turekian &
Wedepohl (1961). The Si/Al ratio is much higher for manga-
nese crusts of hydrothermal origin. Crerar et al. (1982) report
on  the  Si/Al  ratio  of  about  6  for  the  boundary  between  hy-
drothermal and hydrogeneous-detrital manganese accumula-
tions,  and  the  Si/Al  ratio  of  about  35  for  manganiferous
cherts of the Franciscan assemblage. However, Toth (1980)
determined the Si/Al ratio of 5.1 for Fe-Mn crusts of proba-
ble  hydrothermal  origin.  The  studied  samples  show  larger
dispersion  of  the  Si/Al  values  even  in  the  same  locality.  A

background image

512

ROJKOVIČ, SOTÁK, KONEČNÝ and ČECH

few samples overlap the field of hydrothermal deposits, but
most  samples  from  the  same  locality  are  consistent  with  a
hydrogeneous-detrital  origin.  Increased  Si  content  in  some
samples may indicate some distal influence of hydrothermal
source  which  was  suggested  in  a  Toarcian  manganese  car-
bonate-silicate deposit of the Krížna Unit in the Polish Tatra
Mountains  (Jach  &  Dudek  2005).  The  REE  distribution  is
very close to that of manganese ores in the Jurassic shale of
the  Northern  Calcareous  Alps  (Rantitsch  et  al.  2003).  The
REE  distribution  pattern  with  absent  negative  Ce-anomaly
suggests  sedimentation  in  seawater  and  continental  sources
(Ohta  et  al.  1999).  Distinctly  higher  La/Ce  ratio  of  manga-
nese ores in the Jurassic (La/Ce = 0.366) as well as in the Pa-
leogene shale (0.343) compared to the manganese crusts on
the  Jurassic  limestone  (0.121)  suggests  reducing  conditions
of  manganese  ores  hosted  in  shales  (Fig. 15).  La/Ce  ratio
0.25  was  recorded  in  the  sub-marine  manganese-iron  crusts
enriched by Ce

4+ 

(Toth 1980). Both types are far away from

the La/Ce ratio of 2.8 diagnostic of sea-water and typical of
hydrothermal deposits (Nath et al. 1997).

The manganese ores of the Paleogene and Jurassic shales

can be distinguished according to 10-times lower content of
Ni,  Co  and Cu  compared  to  the  oxidic  manganese  nodules
and  crusts  on  the  Jurassic  limestone  of  the  Western  Car-
pathians containing up to 1255 ppm (Rojkovič et al. 2003a).
Similar low content of Ni, Co, Pb and Cu suggests sedimen-
tation of the manganese ore in a shallow sea (Roy 1980). Mn
content is higher than that of iron in the studied ores (aver-
age Mn/Fe = 1.33 in the Paleogene shale and 1.20 in the Ju-
rassic shale). This is in agreement with diagenetic origin and
sedimentation  in  a  shallow  sea.  In  contrast,  higher  Mn/Fe,
Mn/Co, Mn/Ni, Mn/Cu and Mn/Pb ratios are diagnostic of
the open-sea sediments (Roy 1980).

The shales associated with manganese mineralization rep-

resent sedimentary rocks enriched with organic matter, with
the  average  content  of  organic  carbon  1.04 wt. %  in  Paleo-

gene  and  1.11 wt. %  in  Jurassic  shales.  Oxidic  manganese
ore  in  nodules  and  crusts  on  the  Jurassic  limestone  showed
only 0.20 wt. % of C

org

. This corresponds to an average con-

tent  of  organic  carbon  about  2.1 wt. %  in  the  continental
shelf  and  0.17 wt. %  in  deep  ocean  nodules  (Manheim
1965).  The  reducing  environment  of  the  Paleogene  and  Ju-
rassic shales was confirmed by the association of manganese
carbonates, the presence of framboidal pyrite and mainly by
the increased content of organic carbon.

Manganese carbonates are characterized by distinct nega-

tive values of 

δ

13

C (up to —11 ‰) in the Paleogene and Ju-

rassic  shales.  The  negative  values  of 

δ

13

C  in  carbonates  of

the black shale (—9.9 in Paleogene and —11.2 in Jurassic car-
bonates) are related to increased Mn contents (Fig. 14). The
manganese rich carbonates were formed with the distinct as-
sistance of organic carbon.

The isotopic composition is similar to that of the early-di-

agenetic  Lower  Oligocene  ores  at  Nikopol  in  Ukraine  with
δ

13

C  values  from  —4.9  to  —26.4 ‰  (Kuleshov  2003).  The

younger  generation  of  the  late-diagenetic  (catagenetic)  car-
bonates enriched in 

12

C is more significantly affected by the

organic  matter,  as  known  in  the  Chiaturi  and  Mangyshlak
deposits, where the values of —34.5 and —32.9 m, respective-
ly,  have  been  reported  (Kuleshov  2003).  Such  values  have
not been determined in the West Carpathian manganese ores.
The  carbon  isotope  composition  of  the  studied  manganese
ores  suggests  formation  during  early-diagenetic  processes,
similar to that in the Nikopol manganese deposit. No signifi-
cant  difference  in  the  oxygen  isotopic  composition  was  ob-
served  in  the  studied  ores,  similar  to  the  Mn  ores  of  the
Black Sea coast (Kuleshov 2003).

The early-diagenetic formation of Mn-carbonates resulting

from bacterial reduction of manganese in a near-surface en-
vironment  was  confirmed  by  negative 

δ

13

C  values  in  the

Lower  Jurassic  manganese  ore  of  the  Krížna  Unit  of  the
Tatra Mountains in Poland (Krajewski et al. 2001). Similar-
ly,  Polgári  et  al.  (1991)  suggest  bacterial  reduction  during
very  early  burial  for  the  Jurassic  manganese  carbonates  at
Úrkút in Hungary. Okita et al. (1988) documented a correla-
tion between 

δ

13

C values and manganese content of carbon-

ates  from  the  Molango  deposit  in  Mexico.  The  manganese
content  increased  with  decreasing 

δ

13

C  values  from  normal

seawater values in calcite close to 0 ‰ to as low as —16 ‰
for rhodochrosite. These data were interpreted as those rep-
resenting manganese reduction via organic matter oxidation
(Okita 1992). The manganese ore of the Taoijang deposit in
China with negative 

δ

13

C values also suggests biogeochemi-

cal  enrichment  during  diagenesis  (Fan  et  al.  1992).  More
negative 

δ

13

C  values  in  rhodochrosite  compared  to  those  in

kutnohorite  or  calcite  are  similar  to  the  manganese  ores  of
the south-western Taurides in Turkey (Öztrük & Hein 1997).

The above mentioned data suggest an early-diagenetic for-

mation of the studied manganese carbonates in the reducing
conditions of black shales. Abundant organic detritus caused
reduction  of  Mn

4+

  and  Fe

3+ 

to  Mn

2+

  and  Fe

2+

,  which  dis-

solved  in  pore  water  and  ascended  to  the  sediment-water
boundary (Huckriede & Meischner 1996).

Manganese carbonates were formed due to early-diagenet-

ic microbial reduction of manganese oxides by organic mat-

Fig. 15. Correlation of La and Ce in mineralized Jurassic shale and
crusts, and in Oligocene shale (modified after Toth 1980).

background image

513

MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

ter (Okita 1992; Öztürk & Frakes 1995; Roy 1997; Öztürk &
Hein 1997; Gutzmer & Beukes 1998; Tang & Liu 1999).

The Mn-carbonates were later replaced by oxyhydroxides

during  weathering  of  the  primary  carbonate  mineralization.
Hence, they represent secondary mineralization, formed due
to the oxidation of primary carbonates, as in the Alps (Beran
et al. 1983).

Conclusions

The  manganese  mineralization  of  Paleogene  and  Jurassic

shales is bound to horizons with increased content of organic
carbon  formed  in  an  anoxic  environment.    The  mineraliza-
tion is represented by manganese carbonates (rhodochrosite,
kutnohorite and Mn-calcite). Mn-oxyhydroxides (pyrolusite,
manganite and rancieite) were formed later during supergene
processes by oxidation of the Mn-carbonates.

The Si/Al ratios are close to marine-sediments and hydro-

geneous-detrital manganese accumulations. The distribution
of rare earth elements confirms manganese sedimentation in
sea  from  a  continental  source  in  a  reducing  environment.
Low  Ni,  Co  and Cu  contents,  increased  organic  carbon  and
isotopic  composition  suggest  early-diagenetic  accumulation
accompanied by bacterial activity.

The isotopic composition of Paleogene and Jurassic calcite

mostly  shows  positive 

δ

13

C  values.  Manganese  carbonates

hosted  in  shales  of  the  same  ages  are  typical  of  distinctly
negative 

δ

13

C values in all stratigraphic levels. The dominant

negative 

δ

13

C values corroborate the early-diagenetic origin

of manganese carbonates affected by organic carbon.

Acknowledgments:  This  study  was  supported  by  Project
No. 0503  of  the  Ministry  of  the  Environment  of  the  Slovak
Republic and by Project VEGA No. 1/1026/04. We thank E.
Harčová  for  help  with  isotope  analysis.  The  critical  com-
ments of M. Polgári (Institute for Geochemical Research of
HAS,  Budapest,  Hungary),  J.  Hladil  (CAS,  Prague,  Czech
Republic)  and  an  anonymous  reviewer  significantly  im-
proved the manuscript.

References

Andrusov D., Gorek A. & Nemčok A. 1955: Manganese deposits of

Slovakia  II.  Manganese  ores  of  the  Klippen  Belt  and  Middle
Váh Valley. Geol. Zbor. SAV VI., 1—2, 104—114 (in Slovak).

Bellanca A., Masetti D., Neri R. & Venezia F. 1999: Geochemical

and sedimentological evidence of productivity cycles recorded
in  Toarcian  black  shales  from  the  Belluno  basin,  southern
Alps, northern Italy. J. Sed. Res. 69, 466—476.

Beran A., Faupl P. & Hamilton W. 1983: Die Manganschiefer der

Strubbergschichten (Nördliche Kalkalpen, Österreich) – eine
diagenetisch geprägte Mangankarbonatvererzung. Tschermaks
Mineral. Petrogr. Mitt.
 31, 175—192.

Borchert  H.  1980:  On  the  genesis  of  manganese  ore  deposits.  In:

Varentsov  I.M.  &  Grasselly  Gy.  (Eds.):  Geology  and
geochemistry  of  manganese.  Akadémiai  Kiadó,  Budapest,
Vol. II, 13—44.

Cambel  B.  1959:  Die  metallogenen  Hauptprovinzen  der  Slowakei

und die Probleme der Metallogenesis der Westkarpaten. Wiss.

Z. Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Math.-Naturwiss. 8,
2, 181—196.

Corbin  J.C.,  Person  A.,  Iatzoura  A.,  Ferré  B.  &  Renard  M.  2000:

Manganese in Pelagic carbonates: indication of major Tectonic
events during the geodynamic evolution of a passive continen-
tal margin (the Jurassic European Margin of the Tethys-Liguri-
an Sea). Paleogeogr. Paleoclimatol. Paleoecol. 156, 123—138.

Crerar  D.A.,  Namson  J.,  Chyi  S.,  Williams  L.  &  Feigenson  M.D.

1982: Manganiferous cherts of the Franciscan Assemblage. I.
General geology, ancient and modern analogues, and implica-
tions  for  hydrothermal  convection  at  oceanic  spreading  cen-
ters. Econ. Geol. 77, 519—540.

Cseh-Németh  J.,  Konda  J.,  Grasselly  Gy.  &  Szabó  Z.  1980:  Sedi-

mentary manganese deposits of Hungary. In: Varentsov I.M. &
Grasselly  Gy.  (Eds.):  Geology  and  geochemistry  of  manga-
nese. Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Vol. II, 199—221.

Evensen  N.M.,  Hamilton  P.J.  &  O’Nions  R.K.  1978:  Rare-earth

abundances  in  chondritic  meteorites.  Geochim.  Cosmochim.
Acta 
42, 1199—1212.

Fan D., Liu T. & Ye J. 1992: The process of formation of manga-

nese  carbonate  deposits  hosted  in  black  shale  series.  Econ.
Geol.
 87, 1419—1429.

Force E.R. & Cannon W.F. 1988: Depositional model for shallow-

marine manganese. Deposits around black shale basins. Econ.
Geol.
 83, 93—117.

German K. 1972: Verbreitung und Entstehung Mangan-reicher Gest-

eine  im  Jura  der  Nördlichen  Kalpalken.  Tschermaks  Mineral.
Petrogr. Mitt.
 17, 123—150.

Golonka J. & Ford S.D. 2000: Pangean (Late Carboniferous—Mid-

dle Jurassic) palaeoenvironment and lithofacies. Palaeogeogr.
Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol.
 161, 1—34.

Gutzmer  J.  &  Beukes  N.J.  1998:  The  manganese  formation  of  the

Neoproterozoic Penganga Group, India – revision of an enig-
ma. Econ. Geol. 93, 1091—1102.

Honjo S., Fischer A.G. & Garrison R. 1965: Geopetal pyrite in fine-

grained limestones. J. Sed. Petrology 35, 480—488.

Huckriede  H.  &  Meischner  D.  1996:  Origin  and  environment  of

manganese-rich sediments within black-shale basins. Geochim.
Cosmochim. Acta
 60, 1399—1413.

Ilavský  J.  1950:  Geology  of  Švábovce  area.  Geol.  Sbor.  2—3—4,

232—242 (in Slovak).

Ilavský J. 1979: Metallogenése de l’Europe alpine central et du sud-

est. Geol. Ústav D. Štúra, Bratislava, 1—413.

Ilavský  J.  &  Polák  S.  1967:  Manganese  ores.  In:  Slávik  J.  (Ed.):

Mineral  resources  of  Slovakia.  Slovenské  vydavate stvo  tech-
nickej literatúry
, Bratislava, 118—127 (in Slovak).

Jach R. & Dudek T. 2005: Origin of a Toarcian manganese carbon-

ate/silicate  deposists  from  the  Krížna  Unit,  Tatra  Mountains,
Poland. Chem. Geol. 224, 136—152.

Jenkyns H.C., Geczy B. & Marshall J.G. 1991: Jurassic manganese

carbonates  of  central    Europe  and  the  Early  Toarcian  anoxic
event. J. Geol. 99, 137—149.

Konta J. 1951: Thermical study of the sedimentary manganese rock

from Švábovce. Sbor. Ústř. Úst. Geol. 18, 601—619 (in Czech).

Krajewski K.P., Lefeld J. & Lacka B. 2001: Early diagenetic pro-

cesses  in  the  formation  of  carbonate-hosted  Mn  ore  deposits
(Lower Jurassic, Tatra Mountains) as indicated from its carbon
isotopic record. Bull. Polish Acad. Sci. 49, 13—29.

Kříbek B. 1977: Origin of framboidal pyrite. Časopis pro minera-

logii a geologii 22, 11—18.

Kuleshov V.N. 2003: Isotopic composition (

δ

13

C, 

δ

18

O) and origin

of manganese carbonate ores from the Early Oligocene depos-
its, the Eastern Paratethys. Chem. Erde 63, 329—363.

Manheim F.T. 1965: Manganese-iron accumulations in the shallow-

marine environment. Narragensett Marine Lab. Publ. 3, Univ.
of Rhode Island,
 217—276.

background image

514

ROJKOVIČ, SOTÁK, KONEČNÝ and ČECH

Marschalko  R.  1959:  Contribution  to  origin  of  Mn  oxid-carbonate

deposit  Švábovce  in  the  southern  part  of  Levočské  Mts.  Acta
Geol. Geogr. Univ. Comen
. 2, 221—230 (in Slovak).

McCrea J.M. 1950: On the isotope geochemistry of carbonates and

a paleotemperature scale. J. Chem. Phys. 18, 849—857.

Munk R. 1932: Deposit of the manganese ore near Kišovce in Slo-

vakia and its origin. Prometheus, Praha, 1—76 (in Czech).

Muzylev  N.G.  1998:  Upper  Eocene  and  Lower  Oligocene  nanno-

plankton.  In:  Krshennikov  V.A.  &  Akhmetiev  M.A.  (Eds.):
Late Eocene-Early Oligocene geological and biotical events on
the territory of the former Soviet Union. Part II. The geologi-
cal and biotical events. Transactions of the Russian Academy
of Sciences Geological Institute. GEOS, Moscow, 507, 16—18
(in Russian).

Nath  B.N.,  Plüger  W.L.  &  Roelandts  I.  1997:  Geochemical  con-

straints on the hydrothermal origin of ferromanganese encrusta-
tions  from  the  Rodrigues  Triple  Junction,  Indian  Ocean.  In:
Nicholson K., Hein J.R., Bühn B. & Dasgupta S. (Eds.): Manga-
nese mineralization: geochemistry and mineralogy of terrestrial
and marine deposits. Geol. Soc., Spec. Publ. 119, 119—211.

Ohta A., Ishii S., Sakakibara M., Mizuno A. & Kawabe I. 1999: Sys-

tematic correlation of the Ce anomaly with the Co/(Ni + Cu) ra-
tio  and  Y  fractionation  from  Ho  in  distinct  types  of  Pacific
deep-sea nodules. Geochemical J. 33, 399—417.

Okita  P.M.  1992:  Manganese  carbonate  mineralization  in  the  Mo-

lango District, Mexico. Econ. Geol. 87, 1345—1366.

Okita P.M., Maynard J.B., Spiker E.C. & Force E.R. 1988: Isotopic

evidence for organic matter oxidation by manganese reduction
in  the  formation  of  stratiform  manganese  carbonate  ore.
Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 52, 2679—2685.

Öztürk H. & Frakes L.A. 1995: Sedimentation and diagenesis of an

Oligocene  manganese  deposit  in  a  shallow  subbasin  of  the
Paratethys: Thrace Basin, Turkey. Ore Geol. Rev. 10, 117—132.

Öztrük  H.  &  Hein  J.R.  1997:  Mineralogy  and  stable  isotopes  of

black  shale  hosted  manganese  ores,  Southwestern  Taurides,
Turkey. Econ. Geol. 92, 733—744.

Pícha E. 1964: Manganese ores in the Paleogene of the Central Car-

pathians and their origin. Věst. Ústř. Úst. Geol. 39, 4, 251—258
(in Czech).

Plašienka  D.  1987:  Lithologic-sedimentologic  and  paleotectonic

character  of  Borinka  Unit  in  the  Malé  Karpaty  Mts.  Miner.
Slovaca
 19, 3, 217—230 (in Slovak).

Plašienka  D.  1995:  Cleavages  and  folds  in  changing  tectonic  re-

gimes: the Ve ký Bok Mesozoic Cover Unit of the Veporicum
(Nízke Tatry Mts., Central Western Carpathians). Slovak Geol.
Magazine
 1, 2, 92—113.

Polák S. 1955: Primary manganese ore in the Lednické Rovne de-

posit. Geol. Práce, Zpr. 2, 48—59 (in Slovak).

Polák  S.  1956:  Zázrivá.  Final  report  on  exploration  in  1953,  1954

and 1955; Manuscript. Geofond, Bratislava, 1—112 (in Slovak).

Polák  S.  1957:  Manganese  ores  of  the  Malé  Karpaty  Mts.  Geol.

PráceZošit 47, 39—83 (in Slovak).

Polák M. & Širáňová V. 1993: Manganese mineralization in the Li-

assic  cabonate  sediments  of  Branisko  Mts.  Geol.  Práce,  Spr.
97, 47—51.

Polgári M., Okita P.M. & Hein J.R. 1991: Stable isotope evidence

for the origin of the Úrkút manganese ore deposit, Hungary. J.
Sed. Petrology
 61, 384—393.

Polgári M., Molák B. & Surová E. 1992: An organic geochemical

study  to  compare  Jurassic  black  shale-hosted  manganese  car-

bonate  deposits:  Úrkút,  Hungary,  and  Branisko  Mountains,
east Slovakia. Explor. Mining Geol. 1, 63—67.

Pouba Z. 1956: Manganese ores in Czechoslovakia. In: Symposium

sobre yacimientos de manganese, 20. Congreso Geologico In-
ternational Mexico
 5, 19—23.

Pratt L.M., Force E.R. & Pomerol B. 1991: Coupled manganese and

carbon-isotopic  events  in  marine  carbonates  at  the  Cenonian-
Turonian boundary. J. Sed. Petrology 61, 370—383.

Rakús  M.  1994:  Revision  of  ammonites  from  Marianka  shales.

Miner. Slovaca 2, 118—5.

Rantitsch  G.,  Melcher  F.,  Meisel  Th.  &  Rainer  Th.  2003:  Rare

earth,  major  and  trace  elements  in  Jurassic  manganese  shales
of the Northern Calcareous Alps: hydrothermal versus hydro-
geneous  origin  of  stratiform  manganese  deposits.  Miner.  Pe-
trology
 77, 109—127.

Rickard D.T. 1970: The origin of framboids. Lithos 3, 269—293.
Rojkovič I., Aubrecht R. & Mišík M. 2003a: Mineral and chemical

composition of manganese hardgrounds in Jurassic limestones
of the Western Carpathians. Geol. Carpathica 54, 5, 317—328.

Rojkovič I., Ožvoldová L. & Sýkora M. 2003b: Manganese mineral-

ization near Šarišské Jastrabie. Slovak Geol. Magazine 9, 51—64.

Rosenbaum J. & Sheppard S.M. 1986: An isotopic study of sider-

ites,  dolomites  and  ankerites  at  high  temperatures.  Geochim.
Cosmochim. Acta
 50, 1147—1150.

Roy  S.  1980:  Genesis  of  sedimentary  manganese  formations.  Pro-

cesses and products in recent and older geological ages. In: Var-
entsov I.M. & Grasselly Gy. (Eds.): Geology and geochemistry
of manganese. Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, Vol. II, 13—44.

Roy S. 1997: Genetic diversity of manganese deposition in the ter-

restrial geological record. In: Nicholson K., Hein J.R., Bühn B.
& Dasgupta S. (Eds.): Manganese mineralization: geochemis-
try  and  mineralogy  of  terrestrial  and  marine  deposits.  Geol.
Soc. Spec. Publ.
London 119, 5—27.

Řezáč B. 1959: Hydrogeological study of mining area Švábovce-Ki-

šovce near Poprad. Věst. Ústř. Úst. Geol. 34, 2, 99—107 (in Czech).

Soták  J.,  Pereszlenyi  M.,  Marschalko  R.,  Milička  J.  &  Starek  D.

2001:  Sedimentology  and  hydrocarbon  habitat  of  the  subma-
rine-fan  deposits  of  the  central  Carpathian  Paleogene  Basin
(NE Slovakia). Mar. Petrol. Geol. 18, 87—114.

Soták J., Majdová M. & Starek D. 2004: Biostratigraphic determina-

tion of the Eocene/Oligocene boundary in section Pucov – its
effect  on  age  interpretation  of  the  Pucov  Conglomerate  and
sedimentary rocks of the Palaeogene Central Carpathian basin.
Miner. Slovaca 36, 2, 24 (in Slovak).

Tang S.Y. & Liu T.B. 1999: Origin of the early Sinian Minle man-

ganese  deposit,  Hunan  Province,  China.  Ore  Geol.  Rev.  15,
71—78.

Toth J.R. 1980: Deposition of submarine crusts rich in manganese

and iron. Bull. Geol. Soc. Amer. 91, 44—54.

Turekian K.K. & Wedepohl K.H. 1961: Distribution of the elements

in some major units  of the earth’s crust. Bull. Geol. Soc. Amer.
12, 175—191.

Varentsov I.M. 2002: Genesis of the Eastern Paratethys manganese

ore  giants:  impact  of  events  at  the  Eocene/Oligocene  bound-
ary. Ore Geol. Rev. 20, 65—82.

Wierzbowski A., Aubrecht R., Krobicki M., Matyja B.A. & Schlögl

J. 2004: Stratigraphy and palaeographic position of the Juras-
sic Czertezik Succession, Pieniny Klippen belt (Western Car-
pathians)  of  Poland  and  Eastern  Slovakia.  Ann.  Soc.  Geol.
Polon.
 74, 237—256.

background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 59, 6 (2008); ROJKOVIČ et al.: STRATIFORM MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN     

THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALE FORMATIONS OF THE WESTERN CARPATHIANS: MINERALOGY, 

GEOCHEMISTRY AND ORE-FORMING PROCESSES; ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT, E1–E16 

www.geologicacarpathica.sk 

 
 

Annexe 1: Localization of stratiform manganese mineralization of the Western Carpathians. 

Locality Description 

Longitude 

Latitude 

Borinka — Pod 
Zámčiskom 

Gamekeeper’s lodge, E of Borinka village, 200 m N old mining works 

17º06´29´´ 
17º06´31´´ 

48º15´20´´ 
48º15´24´´ 

Borinka — Červený 
domček 

3.5 km N of Borinka village, 50 m E of source Červený domček 17º04´55´´ 

48º17´46´´ 

Borinka — Lipníky 

6.5 km NNE from Borinka village, 5.5 km ESE from Lozorno village, 800 m NE  
of Lipníky dam 

17º06´58´´ 48º18´59´´ 

Bziny 

Area “Ohrady”, 1 km SE of the church in Bziny village, outcrop  

19º19´50´´ 

49º13´22´´ 

Kišovce — (Hozelec) 

500 m E of eastern margin of Gánovce village. Dump 300 m S of ground elevation 
700.9 and 100 m NE of travertine occurrence 

20º20´19´´ 49º01´40´´ 

Kišovce — (Hôrka) 

900 m N of road Poprad — Spišská Nová ves, dump W of mining building  

20º23´19´´ 

49º01´07´´ 

Konská 

200 m WSW from the church in Konská village 

18º41´21´´ 

49º06´46´´ 

Lednické Rovne 

W of Lednické Rovne village, 750 m NW of St. Anna church and 500 m SW from 
Sedlačka hill 387.3 m. Old mining works 

18º14´42´´ 49º05´34“ 

Mariánka 

Outcrop 1.4 km ENE from church in Marianka village 

17º04´25´´ 

48º15´01´´ 

Michalová 

Kubická, dump of “New adit”, 30 m S of brook, 100 m NE of railway 

19º45´38´´ 

48º46´32´´ 

Michalová 

Kubická, dump of “Manganese adit” N of brook and 200m NNE of “New adit”,  
250 m NE of railway 

19º45´32´´ 48º46´34´´ 

Pucov 

Outcrop 600 m N of Pucov village, 500 m SE of Muráň hill 719.5 m  

19º22´51´´ 

49º13´24´´ 

Ráztočno 

Outcrop NE of village Ráztočno 150 m 

18º46´15´´ 48º46´18´´ 

Stránske 

20 m W of SW margin of cemetery in Stránske village,  fragments in field-path 

18º41´59´´ 49º06´58´´ 

Šarišské Jastrabie 

Outcrop in Vesné brook, 200 m E of Šarišské Jastrabie, 150 m NNW of ground 
elevation 605.5 m 

20º55´32´´ 49º14´28´´ 

Švábovce 

Dump, on SE margin of abandoned mining plant  

20º22´12´´ 49º02´06´´ 

Zázrivá 1, Zázrivská 
dolina 

Outcrop on the eastern bank of Zázrivá Brook, 5.5 km S of the church in Zázrivá 
village  

19º09´39´´ 49º13´42´´ 

Zázrivá 2 — Kozinská  Dump, 250 m E of Zázrivá village, 500 m NW of the Hryzeň hill 779.8 m    

19º11´49´´ 

49º17´32´´ 

Zázrivá 3 — Havrania  Dump, 500 m SE from cross-road in Havrania village 19º11´27´´ 

49º17´45´´ 

 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                            ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT  

              E2 

 

Annexe 2: List of samples. Part 1 from 3.  

No. 

Locality 

No. of Sample 

Source Description 

Results 

   

 

 

 

polished 

thin section 

(TS) 

AES-ICP 

(ICP) 

C, REE 

  1  Borinka-Pod Zámčiskom 

Ba1 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

  2  Borinka-Pod Zámčiskom Ba4 

dump 

Mn 

ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

  3  Borinka-Červený domček Ba5 

dump 

Mn 

ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

  4  Borinka (Lozorno-Lipníky) 

Ba6a 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

  5  Borinka (Lozorno-Lipníky) 

Ba6b 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

ICP 

  6  Borinka-Červený domček BaČD1 dump  Mn 

ore  N,TS   

 

  7  Borinka-Červený domček  

BaČD5 dump  Mn 

ore  TS   

 

  8  Borinka-Červený domček BaČD7 dump  Mn 

ore  TS   

 

  9 

Červený domček, Mn pingy,  
70 m E, of source 

BaČD8 dump  Mn-ore  TS   

 

10 

Červený domček, Mn old  
mine-works, 70 m E of source 

BaČD9 dump  Mn-ore  TS   

 

11  Borinka-Červený domček BaČD H14 

dump 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

12  Borinka-Červený domček BaČD H29 

dump 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

13  Borinka-Pod Zámčiskom 

BaHN 6A 

dump 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

14  Borinka-Pod Zámčiskom BaHR26 

dump 

Mn 

ore 

TS 

 

 

15  Borinka-Pod Zámčiskom BaHR28 

dump 

Mn 

ore 

TS 

 

 

16  Borinka (Lozorno-Lipníky) 

BaL4 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

17  Borinka (Lozorno-Skala) 

BaSA 4 

dump 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

18  Bziny 

By 1 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS3x 

ICP 

C, REE 

19 

Bziny, profil, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-O outcrop marl 

shale 

 AES-ICP C 

20 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-1 outcrop marl 

shale  TS 

AES-ICP 

21 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-2 outcrop marl 

shale 

 AES-ICP 

22 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-3 outcrop marl 

shale 

 AES-ICP 

23 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-4 outcrop marl 

shale 

 AES-ICP 

24 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-5 outcrop marl 

shale  TS 

AES-ICP 

25 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-6 outcrop marl 

shale 

 AES-ICP 

26 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-7 outcrop marl 

shale  TS 

AES-ICP 

27 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-8 outcrop sandy 

shale  TS 

AES-ICP 

28 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-9 outcrop marl 

shale 

 AES-ICP 

29 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-9,40 outcrop 

marl shale with 

Mn oxides 

TS AES-ICP C, 

30 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-9,50 outcrop 

marl shale with 

Mn oxides 

 AES-ICP 

C, 

REE 

31 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-10 outcrop  marl 

shale 

  AES-ICP C 

32 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-11 outcrop 

marl shale with 

Mn oxides 

TS AES-ICP 

C, 

REE 

33 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-11,10 outcrop  marl 

shale 

TS  AES-ICP  C 

34 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-12 outcrop  marl 

shale 

  AES-ICP C 

35 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-13 outcrop  marl 

shale 

  AES-ICP C 

36 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-14 outcrop  marl 

shale  TS AES-ICP C 

37 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-15 outcrop  marl 

shale 

  AES-ICP C 

38 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-16 outcrop  marl 

shale 

  AES-ICP C 

39 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-17 outcrop  marl 

shale 

  AES-ICP C 

Explanations: TS — polished thin section, V — thin section, AES-ICP — atomic emission spectroscopy with induction coupled plasma, C — rock-
Eval pyrolysis for organic carbon, REE — rare earth elements analysed by atomic emission spectroscopy with induction coupled plasma. 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E3

 

 

Annexe 2: Continued. Part 2 from 3.  

No. 

Locality 

No. of Sample 

Source Description 

Results 

   

 

 

 

polished 

thin section 

(TS) 

AES-ICP 

(ICP) 

C, REE 

40 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-18 outcrop  marl 

shale 

  AES-ICP C 

41 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-19 outcrop  marl 

shale 

  AES-ICP C 

42 

Bziny, profile, 1 km SE from church, 
field path 

By-P-20 outcrop  marl 

shale 

  AES-ICP C 

43  Dikula, Baniská 

Dik 1 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

44  Dikula, Baniská 

Dik 2 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

45  Dikula, Baniská 

Dik 3 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

46  Dikula, Baniská 

Dik 4 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

47  Dikula, Baniská 

Dik 5 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

48  Dikula, Baniská 

Dik 6 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

49  Dikula, Baniská 

Dik 7 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

50  Kišovce (Hozelec) 

Ho 1 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

51  Kišovce (Hozelec) 

Ho 2 

dump 

sandstone 

TS 

ICP 

52  Kišovce (Hozelec) 

Ho  3 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

ICP 

53  Kišovce (Hozelec) 

Ho 4 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

54  Kišovce 

Kiš 1 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

55  Kišovce 

Kiš 2 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

56  Kišovce 

Kiš 3 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

57  Kišovce 

Kiš 10 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

58  Kišovce 

Kiš 11 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

59  Kišovce 

Kiš 12 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

ICP,C 

60  Kišovce 

Kiš 13 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

61  Kišovce Kiš 

14 

dump 

sandstone 

TS 

 

 

62  Kišovce 

Kiš 15 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

63  Kišovce 

Kiš 16 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

64  Kišovce (Švábovce) 

ŠV 1 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

65  Kišovce (Švábovce) 

Šv 2 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

66  Kišovce (Švábovce) 

Šv 4 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

67  Kišovce (Švábovce) 

Šv 5 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

68  Kišovce (Švábovce) 

Šv 6 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

69  Kišovce (Švábovce) 

Šv 7 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

70  Kišovce (Švábovce) 

Šv 8 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

71  Kišovce (Švábovce) 

Šv 9 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

72  Konská 

Ko-1 

debris 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

73  Konská Ko-2 

debris 

Mn 

ore 

TS 

 

 

74  Konská Ko 

debris 

shale 

TS 

 

 

75  Konská Ko 

debris 

sandstone 

TS 

 

 

76  Konská Ko 

debris 

shale 

TS 

 

 

77  Konská Ko 

debris 

shale 

TS 

 

 

78  Konská Ko 

debris 

shale 

TS 

 

 

79  Konská Ko 

debris 

shale 

 

 

 

80 

Konská, 200 m W from church road,  
20 m S, path and W outcrop  

Ko-9 outcrop 

sandy 

shale TS   

 

81 

Konská, 200 m W from church road,  
11 m S, path and W outcrop 

Ko-10 outcrop sandy 

shale   

 

 

82  Lednické Rovne 

LR 1 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

83  Lednické Rovne 

LR 2 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

84  Lednické Rovne 

LR 3 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS2x 

AES-ICP 

85  Lednické Rovne 

LR 4 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS3x 

 

 

86  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-0m 

outcrop 

black shale, 

direction 134/35º 

 AES-ICP C 

87  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-1m 

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

88  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-1.5–1.6m 

outcrop 

limestone 

TS 

AES-ICP 

89  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-2m 

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

90  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-3m 

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

91  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-3.4–3.43m 

outcrop 

limestone 

TS 

AES-ICP 

92  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-4m 

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

  93  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-5m 

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

  94  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-6m 

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

  95  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-7m 

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

Explanations: TS — polished thin section, V — thin section, AES-ICP — atomic emission spectroscopy with induction coupled plasma, C — rock-
Eval pyrolysis for organic carbon, REE — rare earth elements analysed by atomic emission spectroscopy with induction coupled plasma. 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E4

 

 

Annexe 2: Continued. Part 3 from 3.  

No. 

Locality 

No. of Sample 

Source Description 

Results 

   

 

 

 

polished 

thin section 

(TS) 

AES-ICP 

(ICP) 

C, REE 

  96  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-8 m  

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

  97  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-8.10–8.16 m 

outcrop 

limestone 

TS 

AES-ICP 

  98  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-9 m 

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

99  Marianka, outcrop 

Ma-P-9.5 m 

outcrop 

black shale 

 

AES-ICP 

100  Marianka 

Ma 11 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

101  Marianka 

Ma 12 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

 

AES-ICP 

102  Michalová Mich 

dump 

sandstone 

TS 

 

 

103  Michalová Mich 

dump 

shale 

TS 

 

 

104  Michalová Mich 

dump 

shale 

TS 

 

 

105  Michalová Mich 

dump 

shale 

TS 

 

 

106  Michalová 

Mich 8 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

107  Michalová 

Mich 9 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

108  Michalová 

Mich 11 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

109  Pucov P11R1 

outcrop 

Mn 

ore 

TS 

 

110  Pucov P11R2 

outcrop 

Mn 

ore 

TS 

 

111 

Ráztočno, 150 m from northern 
margin of village, NE from parting of 
footpath, direction 60 degree,  100 m  

Ra-1 outcrop 

Fe-Mn oxides in 

shale 

TS AES-ICP C 

112 

Ráztočno, 150 m from northern 
margin of village, NE from parting of 
footpath, direction 20 degree,  90 m  

Ra-2 outcrop 

Fe-Mn oxides in 

shale 

TS AES-ICP 

C, 

REE 

113  Stránske 

St 1 

debris 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

114  Stránske 

St 2 

debris 

Mn ore 

 

 

 

115  Stránske, 20 m SW from cemetery  

St-3 

fragments 

marl shale with 

Mn-Fe oxides 

 

 

 

116  Stránske, 20 m SW from cemetery  

St-4 

fragments 

“ 

 

 

 

117  Stránske, 20 m SW from cemetery  

St-5 

fragments 

“ 

TS 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

118  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 1 

outcrop 

shale 

N, TS 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

119  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ-2 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

120  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ-3 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

121  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 5 

outcrop 

radiolarite 

TS 

AES-ICP 

122  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 6 

outcrop 

radiolarite 

TS 

 

 

123  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 7 

outcrop 

radiolarite 

TS 

 

 

124  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 8 

outcrop 

shale 

TS 

AES-ICP 

125  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 9 

outcrop 

shale 

TS 

AES-ICP 

126  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 10 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

127  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 11 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

128  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 13 

outcrop 

radiolarite 

TS 

 

 

129  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 14 

outcrop 

radiolarite 

TS 

AES-ICP 

130  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 15 

outcrop 

shale 

TS 

AES-ICP 

131  Šarišské Jastrabie 

ŠJ 16 

outcrop 

shale 

TS 

AES-ICP 

132  Zázrivská dolina 

Za 1 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

133  Zázrivská dolina 

Za 2 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

134  Zázrivská dolina 

Za 4 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS2x 

 

 

135  Zázrivská dolina 

Za 5 

outcrop 

shale 

TS 

 

 

136  Zázrivská dolina 

Za 6 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

137  Zázrivská dolina 

Za 7 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

138  Zázrivská dolina 

Za 8 

outcrop 

shale 

TS 

 

 

139  Zázrivská dolina 

Za 10 

outcrop 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

140  Zázrivá-Kozinská 

Za 9 K 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

C, REE 

141  Zázrivská dolina 

Za 3 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

142  Zázrivá-Kozinská ZaK 

15 

dump 

shale 

TS 

 

 

143  Zázrivá-Havrania 

ZaH 11 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS2x 

AES-ICP 

144  Zázrivá-Havrania 

ZaH 12 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

145  Zázrivá-Havrania 

ZaH 13 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

146  Zázrivá-Havrania ZaH 

16 

dump 

shale 

TS 

 

 

147  Zázrivá-Havrania ZaH 

17 

dump 

shale 

TS 

 

 

148  Zázrivá-Havrania ZaH 

18 

dump 

shale 

TS 

 

 

149  Zázrivá-Havrania 

ZaH 19 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

AES-ICP 

150  Zázrivá-Havrania 

ZaH 20 

dump 

Mn ore 

TS 

 

 

Explanations: TS — polished thin section, V — thin section, AES-ICP — atomic emission spectroscopy with induction coupled plasma, C — rock-
Eval pyrolysis for organic carbon, REE — rare earth elements analysed by atomic emission spectroscopy with induction coupled plasma. 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E5

 

 
 

Table 2a: Chemical composition of the Jurassic carbonates (WDX analyses in weight %). Part 1 from 3. 

No. Sample 

CaO 

MgO 

FeO 

MnO 

SrO 

BaO 

CO

2

 Total 

Dik5.1 

54.46 1.12 0.00 0.07 

0.00 

0.00 44.01 99.66 

Dik5.2 

28.18 6.51 5.96 16.65 

0.03 

0.02 43.23 

100.59 

Dik5.3 

17.16 1.08 0.49 43.14 

0.04 

0.00 41.73 

103.64 

Dik5.4 

17.94 1.47 0.64 39.36 

0.00 

0.00 40.49 99.90 

Dik5.5 

17.57 1.30 1.20 38.61 

0.03 

0.00 39.91 98.62 

Dik5.6 

28.96 6.96 5.88 15.74 

0.00 

0.01 43.69 

101.24 

dik5.7 

27.74 5.80 5.43 17.14 

0.04 

0.01 42.08 98.24 

Dik5.7a 

27.21 5.90 5.80 19.11 

0.00 

0.00 43.21 

101.22 

Dik5.8 

53.04 3.11 0.15 0.30 

0.00 

0.00 45.30 

101.90 

10 

Dik5.11 

47.32 0.78 1.12 8.76 

0.14 

0.00 44.17 

102.29 

11 

Dik5.12 

54.17 0.87 0.07 0.10 

0.00 

0.00 43.57 98.78 

12 

Dik5.13 

48.58 0.87 1.20 8.68 

0.08 

0.00 45.23 

104.64 

13 

Dik5.14 

50.12 0.98 0.84 6.56 

0.03 

0.00 44.99 

103.51 

14 

Dik5.15 

49.61 0.63 0.81 7.08 

0.11 

0.00 44.56 

102.80 

15 

Dik5.16 

53.72 1.09 0.09 0.24 

0.13 

0.00 43.61 98.88 

16 

Ba1.1 

18.67 1.46 1.03 38.88 

0.07 

0.00 41.02 

101.13 

17 

Ba1.2 

6.46 0.46 0.57 53.74 

0.00 

0.00 39.27 

100.50 

18 

Ba1.3 

10.41 0.76 0.80 49.49 

0.04 

0.00 40.21 

101.71 

19 

Ba1.4 

30.42 1.63 0.40 26.26 

0.13 

0.00 42.24 

101.08 

20 

Ba1-11 

27.81 1.38 0.55 28.80 

0.14 

0.00 41.60 

100.28 

21 

Ba1-12-s 

9.58 0.68 0.86 49.61 

0.05 

0.04 39.60 

100.42 

22 

Ba1-13-n 

9.79 1.32 4.19 45.54 

0.07 

0.05 39.99 

100.95 

23 

Ba1-14-n  30.90 21.65 0.23 0.72 

0.11 

0.00 48.53 

102.14 

24 

Ba1-15-n  31.93 20.61 0.23 0.68 

0.00 

0.00 48.13 

101.58 

25 

Ba1-16-s  14.50 1.08 0.75 42.75 

0.00 

0.00 39.54 98.62 

26 

Ba1-17-s  24.13 1.81 1.19 30.84 

0.02 

0.02 40.79 98.80 

27 

Ba1-18 

p  27.11 3.35 6.74 20.12 

0.19 

0.04 41.64 99.19 

28 

Ba1-19-t 

28.40 1.54 0.87 26.75 

0.04 

0.00 41.11 98.71 

29 

Ba1-20-s  19.61 1.25 0.87 36.78 

0.00 

0.01 40.11 98.63 

30 

Ba5.1 

15.43  1.11 11.06 33.64 0.05 0.00 40.99 102.28 

31 

Ba5.2 

8.02  0.58 16.06 40.39 0.04 0.00 41.83 106.91 

32 

Ba5.4 

53.60 0.02 0.57 0.52 

0.39 

0.04 42.93 98.07 

33 

Ba5.5 

6.80  1.49 10.33 44.08 0.00 0.02 40.65 103.38 

34 

Ba5.6 

16.02 1.26 1.57 40.83 

0.08 

0.00 40.28 

100.04 

35 

Ba6.1 

49.55 0.45 2.15 7.49 

0.35 

0.01 45.49 

105.48 

36 

Ba6.2 

46.34 0.56 2.77 9.48 

0.31 

0.00 44.69 

104.14 

37 

Ba6.3 

50.10 0.56 2.56 9.03 

0.32 

0.00 47.24 

109.81 

38 

Ba6.4 

51.81 0.38 1.80 2.66 

0.76 

0.00 44.15 

101.56 

39 

BaCDD1.1  55.85 0.36 0.00 0.00 

0.00 

0.00 44.22 

100.43 

40 

BaCDD1.2  55.46 0.35 0.02 0.00 

0.00 

0.00 43.92 99.75 

41 

BaCDD5-1  55.30 0.46 0.00 0.11 

0.05 

0.00 43.99 99.91 

42 

BaCDD5-2  51.70 0.28 0.12 3.11 

0.02 

0.00 42.89 98.12 

43 

BaCDD5-3  54.34 0.31 0.00 3.33 

0.00 

0.00 45.05 

103.03 

44 

BaCDD5-3  54.47 0.25 0.11 1.01 

0.08 

0.00 43.75 99.67 

45 

Ba-CDH14  28.26  5.17 11.69 11.86 0.15 0.00 42.41  99.54 

46 

BsCD-H14  21.78 2.99 6.43 26.25 

0.08 

0.00 40.62 98.15 

47 

BaHn1-5.  28.03 1.36 1.44 27.06 

0.07 

0.00 41.18 99.14 

48 

BaHN1-5.  7.29 0.79 0.75 50.90 

0.09 

0.00 38.66 98.48 

49 

BaHN1-5.  7.68 0.86 0.73 50.12 

0.04 

0.00 38.52 97.95 

50 

BaHn1-5.  19.91 1.24 0.75 35.99 

0.04 

0.00 39.78 97.71 

51 

BaHn1-5. 

7.80 0.76 0.74 50.12 

0.00 

0.00 38.50 97.92 

52 

BaHn1-6a  20.09 1.25 0.87 36.61 

0.05 

0.01 40.40 99.27 

53 

BaHn1-6a  7.57 0.95 2.24 49.53 

0.07 

0.03 39.12 99.51 

54 

BaHn1-6a  8.82 1.00 6.81 43.41 

0.03 

0.00 39.13 99.20 

55 

BaHn1-6a  26.58 2.84 7.91 19.71 

0.06 

0.02 41.07 98.19 

56 

BaHn1-6a  20.91 1.14 1.04 34.38 

0.00 

0.00 39.62 97.09 

57 

BaHn1-6a  31.85 0.36 0.09 24.90 

0.00 

0.00 40.89 98.09 

58 

BaHn1-6a  17.96 1.63 2.18 35.98 

0.01 

0.00 39.54 97.29 

59 

BaHn1-6a  26.74 1.44 0.53 28.13 

0.11 

0.03 40.39 97.37 

60 

BaHn1-6a  18.48 1.08 0.72 38.45 

0.05 

0.00 40.00 98.78 

61 

BaHn1-6a  8.53 0.87 2.54 48.26 

0.05 

0.03 39.17 99.45 

62 

BaHN1-6a  22.31 1.43 1.55 32.49 

0.12 

0.04 40.24 98.18 

63 

BaSa2-2.  24.35 1.37 0.84 30.91 

0.11 

0.00 40.34 97.92 

64 

BaSa2-2.  54.73 0.00 0.23 0.53 

0.38 

0.00 43.58 99.45 

65 

LR1 

51.92 0.00 0.70 1.71 

0.00 

0.00 42.24 96.57 

66 

LR2 

55.61 0.00 0.00 0.00 

0.00 

0.00 43.64 99.25 

67 

LR3 

33.23 17.86 0.77 1.36 

0.00 

0.00 46.90 

100.12 

68 

LR3.1 

25.41 1.38 0.50 31.00 

0.05 

0.01 41.01 99.36 

69 

LR3.2 

23.60 1.26 0.82 32.91 

0.07 

0.06 40.87 99.60 

70 

LR3.3 

51.60 1.06 2.41 5.38 

0.99 

0.00 46.89 

108.34 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E6

 

 
 

Table 2a: Continued. Part 2 from 3. 

No. Sample 

CaO 

MgO 

FeO 

MnO 

SrO 

BaO 

CO

2

 Total 

71 

LR3.4 

17.49 1.77 1.89 36.57 

0.08 

0.01 39.55 97.36 

72 

LR3.5 

14.09 2.19 3.65 40.03 

0.01 

0.01 40.53 

100.51 

73 

LR3.6 

30.64 1.87 0.76 27.09 

0.08 

0.04 43.41 

103.91 

74 

LR3.7 

16.27 1.69 2.12 40.30 

0.14 

0.02 40.99 

101.54 

75 

LR3.8 

35.78 16.17 3.33 0.30 

0.05 

0.00 47.98 

103.60 

76 

LR3.9 

6.94  9.80 24.62 15.64 0.04 0.16 40.99  98.18 

77 

LR3.10 

7.00  7.43 20.49 20.10 0.05 0.06 38.66  93.79 

78 

LR3.11 

52.99 0.66 2.07 5.58 

0.32 

0.01 47.18 

108.81 

79 

LR3.12 

14.96 1.51 2.24 39.25 

0.05 

0.06 39.15 97.21 

80 

LR3.13 

54.99 0.28 1.12 3.87 

0.20 

0.00 46.64 

107.10 

81 

LR3.14 

20.62 1.16 0.58 37.10 

0.06 

0.06 40.86 

100.44 

82 

Za1zilka 

50.05 0.40 0.96 5.37 

0.00 

0.00 43.63 

100.41 

83 

Za1tmelt  48.99 0.54 0.40 5.74 

0.00 

0.00 42.84 98.51 

84 

Za 1 sve 

31.29 

4.66 

5.41 

12.59 

0.00 

0.00 

40.77 

94.72 

85 

Za1 

svet 

31.45 4.36 5.31 13.14 

0.00 

0.00 40.85 95.11 

86 

Za2.1 

8.51  7.89 13.66 27.41 0.00 0.11 40.70  98.29 

87 

Za2.2 

18.30 1.08 0.32 40.00 

0.00 

0.01 40.56 

100.27 

88 

Za2.3 

19.14 1.14 0.31 39.51 

0.02 

0.03 40.99 

101.16 

89 

Za2.4 

30.17 15.84 3.95 4.58 

0.18 

0.34 46.40 

101.45 

90 

Za2.5 

50.44 0.86 0.81 9.77 

0.08 

0.00 47.12 

109.09 

91 

Za2.6 

29.35 15.37 4.63 4.73 

0.15 

0.25 45.73 

100.21 

92 

Za2.7 

17.14 1.39 1.44 41.78 

0.11 

0.04 41.84 

103.74 

93 

Za2.8 

23.04 1.03 0.40 34.60 

0.09 

0.03 40.97 

100.18 

94 

Za2.9 

20.92 1.38 0.84 35.99 

0.05 

0.02 40.78 99.97 

95 

Za2.10 

11.47 1.54 2.20 46.82 

0.08 

0.07 41.14 

103.32 

96 

ZA5.1 

47.25 0.77 0.65 7.37 

0.11 

0.00 42.94 99.09 

97 

Za5.2sv 

31.42 4.03 5.36 16.34 

0.02 

0.00 42.49 99.66 

98 

Za5.3 

tm  46.57 0.92 0.88 7.59 

0.13 

0.00 42.85 98.94 

99 

Za5.4 

sv 

19.30 1.05 0.37 38.35 

0.00 

0.04 40.32 99.43 

100 

Za5.5 

sv 

16.03 1.23 0.50 40.81 

0.00 

0.00 39.55 98.12 

101 

Za5.6 

tm  18.34 1.34 0.55 38.13 

0.00 

0.01 39.85 98.22 

102 

Za5.7 

sv 

17.39 0.95 0.33 39.76 

0.07 

0.05 39.60 98.15 

103 

Za6 

kt 

23.10 1.79 0.81 30.18 

0.00 

0.00 39.30 95.18 

104 

Za6kt 

19.77 1.20 0.56 36.42 

0.04 

0.00 39.78 97.77 

105 

Za6kt 

23.32 1.62 1.00 30.17 

0.06 

0.00 39.43 95.60 

106 

Za6ka 

52.48 1.41 0.35 3.04 

0.19 

0.00 44.91 

102.38 

107 

Za6ka 

46.53 0.69 0.71 10.35 

0.25 

0.00 44.23 

102.76 

108 

Za6ka 

49.89 0.49 0.81 5.53 

0.24 

0.00 43.72 

100.68 

109 

Za6ka 

51.44 0.82 0.73 8.82 

0.00 

0.00 47.18 

108.99 

110 

ZaK9.1 

19.74 2.16 0.38 34.19 

0.05 

0.00 39.32 95.84 

111 

Za11.1 

59.42 0.78 0.60 1.29 

0.10 

0.00 48.69 

110.88 

112 

Za12.1 

8.73  3.02 10.67 35.71 0.06 0.04 38.88  97.11 

113 

Za12.2 

26.77 1.44 1.07 28.14 

0.06 

0.00 40.72 98.20 

114 

Za12.3 

32.08 18.89 0.39 3.76 

0.51 

0.00 48.59 

104.22 

115 

Za12.4 

48.23 1.36 3.56 4.85 

0.60 

0.00 44.78 

103.38 

116 

Za12.5 

30.35 18.57 0.73 3.55 

0.04 

0.00 46.76 

100.00 

117 

Za12.6 

10.11  4.09 13.67 30.81 0.00 0.07 39.91  98.66 

118 

Za12.7 

54.28 0.12 0.87 0.53 

0.10 

0.00 43.63 99.53 

119 

Za12.8 

11.85 1.41 1.96 43.99 

0.02 

0.01 39.34 98.58 

120 

Za12.9 

9.42  5.20 19.27 24.76 0.03 0.09 40.27  99.04 

121 

Za12.10 

28.63 1.68 1.56 25.75 

0.11 

0.00 41.28 99.01 

122 

Za15.1 

52.43 0.49 0.95 3.30 

0.03 

0.00 44.32 

101.52 

123 

Za15.2 

54.21 0.68 0.25 0.91 

0.06 

0.00 44.03 

100.14 

124 

Za17.1 

51.60 3.41 0.09 0.06 

0.20 

0.00 44.40 99.76 

125 

Za17.2 

49.10 0.60 1.30 4.21 

0.00 

0.00 42.60 97.81 

126 

Za17.3 

51.66 0.71 0.69 2.54 

0.36 

0.00 43.47 99.43 

127 

Za17.4 

55.61 0.28 0.00 0.05 

0.03 

0.02 44.00 99.99 

128 

Za17.5 

54.77 0.01 0.18 0.16 

0.15 

0.00 43.27 98.54 

129 

Za17.6 

14.77 0.97 0.22 43.87 

0.01 

0.03 40.02 99.89 

130 

Za17.7 

11.79 1.72 0.69 44.14 

0.12 

0.00 38.99 97.45 

131 

Za17.8 

14.18 0.88 0.33 44.57 

0.00 

0.00 39.94 99.90 

132 

Za17.9 

22.78 1.33 0.36 31.99 

0.06 

0.12 39.46 96.10 

133 

Za17.10 

21.09 1.31 0.32 34.60 

0.07 

0.11 39.70 97.20 

134 

Za17.11 

54.03 0.02 0.30 0.04 

0.27 

0.00 42.75 97.41 

135 

Za17.12 

27.80 1.86 0.37 28.51 

0.10 

0.00 41.80 

100.44 

136 

ZaH19svf 

5.09  6.88 27.46 17.19 0.00 0.00 38.99  95.61 

137 

ZaH19tm  29.95 1.48 0.64 25.76 

0.21 

0.00 41.58 99.62 

138 

ZaH19tm  32.01 1.32 0.83 22.29 

0.06 

0.00 40.92 97.43 

139 

ZaH19tm  28.59 1.33 1.38 25.88 

0.13 

0.00 40.85 98.16 

140 

ZaH19tm  28.14 1.73 1.39 25.62 

0.09 

0.00 40.76 97.73 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E7

 

 
 

 

Table 2a: Continued. Part 3 from 3. 

No. Sample 

CaO 

MgO 

FeO 

MnO 

SrO 

BaO 

CO

2

 Total 

141 

ZaH19pre  23.74 1.28 0.66 31.11 

0.15 

0.00 39.80 96.74 

142 

ZaH19sv  24.60 1.35 0.39 30.51 

0.00 

0.00 39.95 96.80 

143 

SJ2 

3.52  1.89 20.90 33.34 0.00 0.00 38.31  97.96 

144 

SJ2 

3.52  1.89 20.90 34.34 0.00 0.00 38.93  99.58 

145 

SJ9-19 

0.55  2.01 32.79 23.42 0.00 0.00 37.24  96.01 

146 

SJ9-18 

4.31  1.99 21.18 30.62 0.00 0.00 37.52  95.61 

147 

SJ16-11 

2.15  2.04 28.48 24.57 0.00 0.00 36.61  93.86 

148 

SJ9 

3.23  1.97 22.83 31.62 0.00 0.00 38.29  97.94 

169 

SJ10.1 

4.63  2.04 23.05 30.95 0.01 0.00 39.19  99.87 

150 

SJ10.2 

3.50  1.97 22.43 33.00 0.01 0.00 39.12 100.03 

151 

SJ16.1 

10.20 1.93 2.16 43.13 

0.01 

0.00 38.20 95.63 

152 

SJ16.2 

3.09  2.04 30.54 26.51 0.00 0.00 39.81 101.99 

153 

SJ16.3 

6.67  2.00 13.12 37.75 0.02 0.00 38.88  98.44 

154 

SJ16.4 

2.36  2.13 32.77 25.19 0.00 0.00 39.88 102.33 

155 

MaP1.5.1  51.68 0.53 0.78 0.28 

2.51 

0.00 42.85 98.63 

156 

MaP1.5.2  53.64 0.37 1.05 0.34 

0.20 

0.00 43.43 99.02 

157 

MaP1.5.3  53.69 0.34 1.14 0.34 

0.09 

0.00 43.45 99.05 

158 

MaP1.5.4  53.34 0.43 0.61 0.24 

1.57 

0.00 43.51 99.69 

159 

MaP1.5.5  53.90 0.26 0.96 0.47 

0.14 

0.00 43.52 99.24 

160 

MaP1.5.6  53.21 0.47 0.73 0.37 

1.78 

0.00 43.70 

100.26 

161 

MaP1.5.7  53.21 0.42 0.65 0.17 

1.83 

0.00 43.51 99.80 

162 

MaP7b.8s  55.98 0.07 0.28 0.18 

0.03 

0.00 44.30 

100.83 

163 

MaP7b.9s  53.14 1.51 0.16 0.00 

0.03 

0.00 43.47 98.31 

164 

MaP7b.10  54.14 0.54 0.61 0.13 

0.17 

0.00 43.60 99.19 

 

 

CaO MgO  FeO MnO SrO BaO  CO

2

 Total 

Average 

29.86 2.40 3.92 21.64 

0.13 

0.01 41.94 99.90 

minimum 

0.55 0.00 0.00 0.00 

0.00 

0.00 36.61 

 

maximum 

59.42 21.65 32.79 53.74 2.51 0.34 48.69 

 

 

     164 

     164 

     164 

     164 

  164 

  164 

     164 

 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E8

 

 

             Table 2b: Chemical composition of the Paleogene carbonates (WDX analyses in weight %). 
                              Part 1 from 2. 

No. Sample  CaO  MgO  FeO  MnO  SrO BaO  CO

2

 Total 

Ra2a.3 

56.40 0.13 0.01  0.04 

0.00 

0.00  44.44 

101.03 

Ra1.2 

56.00 0.33 0.02  0.01 

0.00 

0.00  44.32 

100.68 

Ho3.3 

sv  13.11 1.27 0.31  44.98 

0.00 

0.00  39.77 99.44 

Ho3.5 

sv  11.40 1.81 0.98  43.83 

0.00 

0.00  38.72 96.74 

Ho3.8 tm 

30.54 

22.10 

0.13 

0.63 

0.00 

0.00 

48.57 

101.97 

MnKis1/1  29.47 2.16 0.00  23.38 

0.00 

0.00  39.99 95.00 

MnKis1/3  25.64 1.71 0.00  28.42 

0.00 

0.00  39.62 95.39 

MnKis1/5  24.54 1.96 0.59  29.97 

0.00 

0.00  40.35 97.41 

Sv7sv 

10.97 1.09 0.57  45.06 

0.00 

0.00  38.10 95.79 

10 

Sv8.2 

sv 

6.41 0.99 0.65  51.88 

0.00 

0.05  38.71 98.69 

11 

Sv8.5 

tm 

30.50 20.45  0.18 

1.17 0.00 0.00  47.10 99.40 

12 

Sv8.6 

st 

31.73 1.83 0.19  22.46 

0.00 

0.10  40.98 97.29 

13 

Sv8.7 tm 

30.58 

21.49 

0.12 

0.37 

0.00 

0.02 

47.77 

100.35 

14 

Sv8.9 

sv 

9.04 1.73 0.83  46.53 

0.00 

0.00  38.36 96.49 

15 

Ko2-klas 

31.76 20.28  0.00 

0.00 0.00 0.00  47.07 99.11 

16 

Ko2-karb  48.04 0.48 3.24  3.15 

0.00 

0.00  42.16 97.07 

17 

Ko3-1 

54.14 0.82 0.07  0.03 

0.00 

0.00  43.44 98.50 

18 

Ko3-2 

53.96 0.38 1.37  0.62 

0.00 

0.00  43.99 

100.32 

19 

Mich11bt  45.14 1.95 2.45  8.18 

0.00 

0.00  44.13 

101.85 

20 

Mich11bs 

6.58 1.14 1.47  48.73 

0.00 

0.00  37.54 95.46 

21 

Mich11b  46.77 1.69 2.02  8.05 

0.00 

0.00  44.78 

103.31 

22 

Mich11b  46.30 1.97 2.20  8.35 

0.00 

0.00  45.01 

103.83 

23 

ByP9.5b 

55.95 0.35 0.33  0.09 

0.00 

0.00  44.55 

101.26 

24 

ByP9.5b 

55.65 0.33 0.14  0.03 

0.00 

0.00  44.14 

100.29 

25 

P11R1 

16.02 1.61 2.31  38.44 

0.00 

0.00  39.59 97.96 

26 

P11R1 

21.14 1.62 2.47  33.18 

0.00 

0.00  40.46 98.87 

27 

ByP9.5c 

55.20 0.41 0.16  0.05 

0.00 

0.00  43.89 99.70 

28 

ByP5.7 

56.12 0.24 0.10  0.06 

0.01 

0.00  44.41 

100.93 

29 

Ho3.6 

sv  11.87 1.52 1.03  44.92 

0.02 

0.01  39.49 98.86 

30 

Kis2-105  11.38 1.84 1.07  43.46 

0.02 

0.01  38.57 96.35 

31 

Kis10.9 

20.08 1.66 0.36  35.58 

0.02 

0.00  39.87 97.57 

32 

P11R1 

18.52 2.13 5.02  32.07 

0.02 

0.01  39.84 97.61 

33 

ByP9.5c 

50.58 0.63 1.24  2.01 

0.03 

0.01  42.40 96.89 

34 

ByP5.5a 

53.65 0.71 0.71  0.11 

0.03 

0.00  43.40 98.61 

35 

Ra2a.2 

54.25 0.78 0.95  0.12 

0.03 

0.00  44.10 

100.23 

36 

Kis2-105  14.38 1.66 0.41  41.10 

0.03 

0.03  38.87 96.48 

37 

Sv8.10 

15.49 1.54 0.64  40.32 

0.03 

0.00  39.26 97.28 

38 

Sv8.11 

5.68 0.96 0.53  53.68 

0.03 

0.02  39.15 

100.05 

39 

Ko3-3 

54.36 0.38 1.27  0.70 

0.03 

0.00  44.30 

101.04 

40 

By3 

55.55 0.46 0.78  0.11 

0.03 

0.00  44.66 

101.59 

41 

By3 

44.76 0.72 3.85  2.02 

0.03 

0.02  39.54 90.94 

42 

P11R1 

19.49 1.81 4.99  32.61 

0.03 

0.01  40.58 99.52 

43 

ByP5.1 

8.87 0.56 1.44  49.67 

0.03 

0.11  39.31 

100.00 

44 

Ra2a.4 

54.19 0.17 0.22  0.08 

0.04 

0.01  42.91 97.62 

45 

Sv8.8sv 

9.21 1.31 0.40  48.56 

0.04 

0.00  39.05 98.57 

46 

Mich11bs 

6.07 1.71 3.04  46.55 

0.04 

0.00  37.39 94.80 

47 

Ra2a.5 

54.21 0.73 0.48  0.51 

0.05 

0.00  43.96 99.93 

48 

Ho1tm 

43.49 2.07 2.40  10.44 

0.05 

0.00  44.36 

102.81 

49 

Kis2-105  41.63 1.56 1.80  10.36 

0.05 

0.00  41.93 97.33 

50 

Sv7tm 

42.66 2.82 1.88  10.76 

0.05 

0.00  44.41 

102.58 

51 

Mich11b 

6.24 1.16 1.65  48.97 

0.05 

0.00  37.58 95.65 

52 

By3 

55.24 0.75 0.06  0.02 

0.05 

0.00  44.24 

100.36 

53 

Ra1.1 

54.88 0.84 0.10  0.09 

0.06 

0.00  44.13 

100.11 

54 

Ho3.7 

st 

29.29 2.17 0.13  25.50 

0.07 

0.00  41.29 98.45 

55 

Kis10.2 

40.06 2.65 2.46  11.15 

0.07 

0.00  42.79 99.18 

56 

P11R1 

25.74 1.44 3.00  28.42 

0.07 

0.00  41.27 99.94 

57 

Ho3.4 

st 

26.23 1.67 0.32  29.74 

0.08 

0.00  41.09 99.13 

58 

Kis2-105  40.49 1.78 2.14  9.55 

0.08 

0.02  40.99 95.05 

59 

Kis10.8 

19.56 1.93 0.37  35.27 

0.08 

0.00  39.60 96.81 

60 

P11R1 

47.92 1.74 3.82  5.27 

0.08 

0.02  45.16 

104.01 

61 

Ho3.1 

tm  44.55 1.31 1.48  7.12 

0.09 

0.00  41.75 96.30 

62 

Kis2-105  26.51 2.03 0.11  27.53 

0.09 

0.00  40.21 96.48 

63 

Kis10.5 

38.91 1.92 0.12  14.26 

0.09 

0.00  41.59 96.89 

64 

Sv8.12 

6.79 0.57 0.48  54.59 

0.09 

0.02  40.16 

102.70 

65 

Ra1.3 

54.47 0.88 0.20  0.09 

0.09 

0.00  43.93 99.66 

66 

Sv7tm 

32.55 1.65 0.14  23.20 

0.10 

0.00  41.87 99.51 

67 

Sv8.3 

st 

26.58 1.68 0.31  28.60 

0.10 

0.00  40.67 97.94 

68 

ByP5.5 

53.35 1.25 0.42  0.29 

0.11 

0.00  43.72 99.14 

69 

Kis2-120  52.73 0.26 0.30  0.00 

0.11 

0.00  41.90 95.30 

70 

Kis10.1 

39.59 2.75 2.47  11.17 

0.11 

0.00  42.56 98.65 

 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E9

 

 

              Table 2b: Continued. Part 2 from 2. 

No. Sample  CaO  MgO  FeO  MnO  SrO BaO  CO

2

 Total 

71 

Sv8.4 tm 

30.72 

21.08 

0.08 

2.27 

0.11 

0.00 

48.63 

102.89 

72 

Ra2a.1 

49.76 0.23 4.88  0.41 

0.12 

0.00  42.59 97.99 

73 

Kis10.3 

50.47 2.04 1.17  4.91 

0.12 

0.00  45.65 

104.36 

74 

Mich4-1 

47.28 0.14 6.46  0.58 

0.12 

0.00  41.63 96.21 

75 

By3 

52.03 0.37 0.87  2.75 

0.12 

0.00  43.53 99.67 

76 

Sv7tm 

15.33 2.34 0.79  37.59 

0.13 

0.00  38.45 94.63 

77 

Sv8.1 

st 

32.49 2.02 0.17  21.72 

0.13 

0.00  41.34 97.87 

78 

Ho1sv 

13.72 1.53 0.52  42.18 

0.14 

0.00  38.98 97.07 

79 

Ho3.9 

st 

30.59 2.17 0.19  23.45 

0.14 

0.00  41.10 97.64 

80 

Michh11b  49.19 1.40 1.91  8.21 

0.14 

0.00  46.45 

107.30 

81 

By3 

51.92 0.36 1.03  2.88 

0.14 

0.00  43.62 99.95 

82 

ByP5.4 

54.40 0.15 0.47  0.45 

0.15 

0.02  43.49 99.12 

83 

Kis2-105 

9.86 1.22 0.24  46.31 

0.15 

0.01  38.01 95.80 

84 

By1c 

54.58 1.02 0.12  0.00 

0.15 

0.00  44.08 99.95 

85 

Kis10.4 

48.23 1.61 1.05  4.37 

0.16 

0.00  43.03 98.45 

86 

Kis10.10  20.96 1.56 0.41  38.06 

0.16 

0.00  42.08 

103.23 

87 

Sv7tm 

35.53 2.10 0.09  18.85 

0.16 

0.00  41.99 98.72 

88 

Ho3.2 

tm  45.98 1.43 1.87  7.25 

0.17 

0.00  43.36 

100.06 

89 

Sv7sv 

10.85 0.98 0.56  47.45 

0.18 

0.00  39.44 99.46 

90 

Mich4-2 

54.10 0.35 0.88  0.32 

0.18 

0.01  43.66 99.50 

91 

Ho1tm 

43.30 2.34 2.83  11.28 

0.20 

0.00  45.35 

105.30 

92 

Kis10.7 

38.82 1.73 0.16  14.57 

0.21 

0.03  41.59 97.11 

93 

Ho1sv 

12.72 1.84 1.27  40.85 

0.22 

0.00  38.21 95.11 

94 

Kis10.6 

39.04 1.82 0.12  13.66 

0.24 

0.00  41.28 96.16 

95 

ByP9.5c 

50.92 0.54 1.70  3.12 

0.24 

0.02  43.63 

100.17 

96 

Kis2-105  54.70 0.11 0.12  0.46 

0.25 

0.01  43.52 99.17 

97 

ByP9.5c 

51.47 1.28 0.58  2.57 

0.25 

0.00  43.85 

100.00 

98 

P11R1 

50.99 0.41 1.28  3.43 

0.29 

0.00  43.50 99.90 

99 

Ho1tm 

41.73 2.20 2.51  10.83 

0.31 

0.00  43.54 

101.12 

100 

ByP5.9 

50.58 0.26 0.70  3.32 

0.33 

0.06  42.63 97.88 

101 

ByP5.11 

51.58 0.38 1.08  1.94 

0.56 

0.00  42.99 98.53 

102 

ByP5.6 

51.47 0.40 0.94  2.35 

0.56 

0.00  43.10 98.82 

103 

ByP5.10 

51.47 0.36 1.08  2.58 

0.59 

0.00  43.30 99.38 

104 

ByP5.8 

51.20 0.41 1.03  2.37 

0.70 

0.00  43.01 98.71 

3769.12 228.63 116.65  1777.61 10.21  0.63  4386.38 

 
 

 

CaO MgO FeO MnO SrO 

BaO CO

2

 Total 

Average 

36.24 

    2.20    

1.12 

17.09 

0.098 

0.006 

42.17 

98.92 

minimum 

5.68 

0.11 

0.00 

0.00      0.00      0.00 

37.39 

maximum 

56.40 

22.10 

6.46 

54.59      0.70      0.11 

48.63 

 

      104 

 

 

 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E10

 

 
 

Table 3a: Chemical composition of rancieite (weight %). Part 1 from 2. 

No. Sample  MnO

2

 CaO Fe

2

O

3

 MgO  SiO

2

 

K

2

O BaO Al

2

O

3

 SrO  P

2

O

5

 Na

2

O Total 

Dik7.3 

83.60 4.39 0.75 1.32 0.07 0.27 0.01 0.51 0.17 0.00 0.13  91.22 

Dik7.5 

81.40 4.28 3.49 1.23 0.13 0.21 0.00 0.34 0.05 0.04 0.19  91.35 

Dik7.6 

85.02 4.64 0.52 1.26 0.02 0.23 0.00 0.19 0.06 0.04 0.18  92.16 

Dik7.7 

84.56 4.68 0.88 1.24 0.06 0.25 0.00 0.13 0.08 0.00 0.22  92.10 

Dik7.8 

83.66 4.61 1.12 1.25 0.26 0.24 0.00 0.22 0.07 0.00 0.17  91.59 

Dik6b.1 

82.29 4.33 1.20 1.86 0.03 0.47 0.00 0.18 0.00 0.01 0.20  90.57 

Dik6b.2 

83.37 2.68 0.80 3.16 0.29 0.50 0.03 0.24 0.05 0.03 0.33  91.48 

Dik6b.3 

83.60 6.82 1.04 1.47 1.23 0.38 0.00 0.67 0.01 0.02 0.03  95.28 

Dik6b.4 

83.15 7.17 1.47 1.44 0.59 0.21 0.00 0.35 0.06 0.04 0.01  94.50 

10 

Dik6b.5 

79.98 6.25 0.63 1.36 3.36 0.25 0.01 1.28 0.00 0.02 0.02  93.16 

11 

Dik5.10 

82.91 4.21 0.33 1.70 0.06 0.67 0.19 0.18 0.25 0.00 0.22  90.72 

12 

Ba-6b 

ana1 

sv 

82.05 5.26 0.66 1.37 0.02 0.19 0.01 0.02 

0.00  89.58 

13 

Ba-6b 

ana3 81.20 5.04 1.24 1.23 0.03 0.18 0.00 0.06 

0.00  88.98 

14 

Ba-6b 

ana4 82.48 5.20 0.65 1.20 0.01 0.17 0.00 0.02 

0.00  89.73 

15 

Ba-6b 

ana5 84.26 5.31 0.61 1.10 0.03 0.19 0.00 0.01 

0.00  91.51 

16 

Ba-6b 

ana6 83.96 5.15 0.61 1.11 0.00 0.17 0.00 0.02 

0.00  91.02 

17 

Ba-6b 

ana7 74.23 4.72 8.39 1.01 0.37 0.14 0.02 0.25 

0.00  89.13 

18 

CD-D7 

an1 77.07 7.57 0.45 0.78 0.10 0.52 0.09 0.05 

0.00  86.63 

19 

CD-D7 

an2 77.35 7.74 0.40 0.69 0.23 0.54 0.01 0.04 

0.00  87.00 

20 

CD-D7 

an3 77.67 7.12 0.57 0.83 0.23 0.48 0.13 0.03 

0.00  87.06 

21 

CD-D7 

an4 78.15 7.67 0.46 0.72 0.08 0.51 0.07 0.05 

0.00  87.71 

22 

CD-D7 

an5 80.80 6.96 0.42 0.94 0.08 0.76 0.07 0.00 

0.00  90.03 

23 

CD-D7 

an6 79.26 7.01 0.55 1.01 0.36 0.64 0.14 0.06 

0.00  89.03 

24 

CD-D7 

an7 79.95 6.93 0.41 1.02 0.67 0.49 0.15 0.43 

0.00  90.05 

25 

CD-D7 

an8 76.24 8.57 2.16 0.51 0.27 0.52 0.03 0.10 

0.00  88.40 

26 

CD-D7 

an9 72.93 6.30 5.94 0.99 0.63 0.53 0.08 0.24 

0.00  87.64 

27 

CD-D7 

an10 

78.42 7.55 0.60 0.79 0.15 0.53 0.08 0.06 

0.00  88.18 

28 

CD-D7 

an11 

80.29 5.24 0.83 1.31 0.17 1.02 0.22 0.00 

5.00  94.08 

29 

CD-D7 

an12 

81.01 5.15 0.82 1.40 0.12 1.13 0.15 0.00 

0.00  89.78 

30 

CD-D7 

an13 

80.52 5.62 1.01 1.27 0.15 0.99 0.19 0.08 

0.00  89.83 

31 

CD-D7 

an14 

78.02 8.42 0.83 0.60 0.16 0.67 0.02 0.04 

0.00  88.76 

32 

CD-D7 

an15 

78.50 8.24 0.95 0.59 0.11 0.46 0.05 0.02 

0.00  88.92 

33 

CD-D7 

an16 

72.38 5.96 8.45 1.00 1.01 0.45 0.09 0.28 

0.00  89.62 

34 

CD-D7 

an17 

80.33 4.78 3.64 1.44 0.30 0.98 0.03 0.03 

0.00  91.53 

35 

CD-D7 

an18 

81.68 4.39 0.98 1.61 0.14 1.08 0.07 0.02 

0.00  89.97 

36 

CD-D7 

an19 

79.79 4.71 2.18 1.50 0.29 1.05 0.08 0.03 

0.00  89.63 

37 

CD-H1 

an1 83.80 3.32 0.65 0.90 0.10 0.60 0.00 0.41 

0.00  89.78 

38 

CD-H1 

an2 88.50 3.23 0.20 0.63 0.06 0.53 0.00 0.04 

0.00  93.19 

39 

CD-H1 

an3 84.19 3.63 0.49 0.97 0.04 0.46 0.01 0.17 

0.00  89.96 

40 

CD-H1 

an4 85.18 3.55 0.62 0.93 0.06 0.57 0.00 0.55 

0.00  91.46 

41 

CD-H1 

an5 86.72 3.62 0.22 0.57 0.06 0.57 0.00 0.03 

0.00  91.79 

42 

CD-H1 

an6 85.69 3.28 0.25 0.72 0.06 0.63 0.00 0.35 

0.00  90.98 

43 

CD-H1 

an7 80.26 3.18 3.92 0.87 0.27 0.58 0.00 0.82 

0.00  89.90 

44 

CD-H1 

an8 83.39 3.27 0.59 1.15 0.06 0.74 0.00 0.16 

0.00  89.36 

45 

CD-H1 

an9 82.61 3.63 1.22 0.97 0.37 0.71 0.00 0.47 

0.00  89.98 

46 

ČD-H1 

84.98 3.58 0.42 0.00 0.02 0.53 0.00 0.34 

0.00  89.87 

47 

ČD-H1 

85.31 3.54 0.38 0.00 0.00 0.56 0.04 0.09 

0.00  89.92 

48 

ČD-D7 

80.56 4.73 3.14 0.00 0.18 0.90 0.07 0.07 

0.00  89.65 

49 

ČD-D7 

77.68 7.74 0.56 0.00 0.02 0.48 0.07 0.07 

0.00  86.62 

50 

CDD7.1 

78.08 7.60 0.44 0.80 0.11 0.55 0.08 0.06 

0.03  87.75 

51 

CDD7.2 

75.80 7.53 0.69 0.81 0.17 0.51 0.08 0.08 

0.03  85.70 

52 

CDD7.3 

78.70 7.26 0.41 0.93 0.09 0.76 0.06 0.06 

0.05  88.32 

53 

CDD7.4 

74.11 8.42 2.75 0.56 0.39 0.46 0.04 0.13 

0.07  86.93 

54 

CDD7.5 

76.70 8.76 0.76 0.51 0.17 0.45 0.02 0.06 

0.11  87.54 

55 

CDD7.6 

75.96 8.68 0.46 0.46 0.24 0.45 0.00 0.09 

0.04  86.38 

56 

CDD7.7 

78.14 9.18 0.92 0.48 0.15 0.46 0.02 0.26 

0.04  89.65 

57 

CDD7.8 

71.76 9.58 2.06 0.40 0.28 0.42 0.00 0.30 

0.11  84.91 

58 

CDH1.2 

79.88 3.62 2.56 0.86 0.24 0.43 0.00 0.85 

0.11  88.55 

59 

CDH1.3 

81.99 3.13 2.77 0.98 0.15 0.71 0.00 0.25 

0.39  90.37 

60 

CDH1.4 

79.41 3.41 3.92 0.91 0.34 0.48 0.06 0.76 

0.38  89.67 

61 

CDH1.5 

84.55 3.36 0.43 0.71 0.09 0.66 0.00 0.38 

0.70  90.88 

62 

CDH1.6 

85.31 3.54 0.93 0.56 0.02 0.54 0.00 0.09 

0.94  91.93 

63 

CDH1.7 

84.01 3.57 0.47 0.83 0.09 0.59 0.00 0.45 

0.71  90.72 

64 

LR2.1 

80.02 8.40 0.00 0.00 0.18 0.35 0.00 0.00 

0.00  88.95 

65 

LR2.1svf  81.08 6.39 1.91 0.00 0.33 0.55 0.30 0.00 

0.00  90.56 

66 

LR2.3 

80.53 10.10 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.23 0.00 0.00 

0.00  90.86 

67 

LR2.4 

78.56 6.00 1.88 0.00 0.20 0.58 0.00 0.00 

 

0.00 87.22 

68 

LR1 

81.02 5.03 0.89 0.43 0.20 0.94 0.13 0.00 

 

0.00  88.64 

69 

By1a 

80.23 5.93 0.87 0.88 0.02 0.53 0.00 0.01 0.21 

0.16  88.85 

70 

By1a 

79.36 6.00 0.53 0.81 0.04 0.47 0.00 0.00 0.21 

 

0.15 87.58 

 

 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E11

 

 
 

Table 3a: Continued. Part 2 from 2. 

No. Sample  MnO

2

 CaO Fe

2

O

3

 MgO  SiO

2

 

K

2

O BaO Al

2

O

3

 SrO  P

2

O

5

 Na

2

O Total 

71 

By1a 

80.74 6.39 0.31 0.71 0.00 0.46 0.00 0.00 0.14 

0.12  88.88 

72 

By1a 

81.01 7.21 0.81 0.65 0.00 0.40 0.00 0.02 0.19 

0.11  90.39 

73 

By1a 

78.96 10.14 1.04 0.27 0.02 0.20 0.00 0.32 0.01 

0.07  91.04 

74 

By1c 

80.50 8.86 0.29 0.36 0.02 0.18 0.06 0.06 0.11 

0.04  90.47 

75 

By1c 

79.44 8.90 0.74 0.23 0.04 0.11 0.04 0.13 0.02 

0.03  89.69 

76 

By1c 

79.23 9.16 0.51 0.33 0.04 0.16 0.00 0.11 0.00 

0.05  89.61 

77 

By2a 

69.42 4.94 11.14 1.00 0.49 0.61 0.25 0.26 0.08 

0.08  88.27 

78 

By2a 

81.15 5.96 1.02 1.03 0.02 0.77 0.35 0.02 0.04 

0.09  90.44 

79 

By2a 

82.49 5.93 1.26 1.04 0.00 0.73 0.36 0.02 0.07 

0.15  92.06 

80 

By2b 

67.00 5.51 11.21 0.50 0.75 0.33 0.06 0.23 0.26 

0.04  85.88 

81 

By2b 

78.33 5.50 5.55 1.03 0.30 0.00 0.06 0.19 0.18 

0.07  91.19 

82 

By2b 

78.57 5.86 6.82 0.93 0.30 0.47 0.01 0.21 0.30 

 

0.04 93.50 

83 

ByP9.5b  80.92 5.50 0.60 1.06 0.04 0.72 0.11 0.00 0.26 0.00 0.12  89.33 

84 

ByP9.5b  80.80 5.49 0.34 1.16 0.02 0.75 0.10 0.00 0.30 0.00 0.10  89.08 

85 

ByP9.5b  79.12 5.95 0.45 0.96 0.01 0.66 0.12 0.01 0.24 0.01 0.09  87.61 

86 

ByP9.5b  81.50 5.18 0.52 1.18 0.01 0.76 0.12 0.01 0.30 0.01 0.11  89.69 

87 

ByP9.5b  81.01 5.87 1.13 0.98 0.02 0.50 0.01 0.00 0.22 0.00 0.10  89.85 

88 

ByP9.5b  64.89 7.21 13.13 0.45 0.49 0.17 0.01 0.59 0.17 0.59 0.06  87.18 

89 

ByP9.5b  70.51 7.41 6.62 0.53 0.24 0.26 0.01 0.25 0.16 0.25 0.07  86.07 

90 

ByP9.5b  78.95 7.46 0.36 0.72 0.04 0.40 0.02 0.04 0.20 0.04 0.10  88.29 

91 

ByP9.5a  80.22 7.81 0.36 0.67 0.03 0.42 0.02 0.05 0.18 0.05 0.13  89.90 

92 

ByP11a.2  81.15 5.98 0.54 0.91 0.24 0.60 0.24 0.09 0.16 0.09 0.17  90.13 

93 

ByP11a.2  79.16 5.77 0.64 0.87 0.15 0.60 0.26 0.19 0.18 0.19 0.15  88.01 

94 

ByP11a.2  79.43 7.01 0.43 0.61 0.00 0.50 0.15 0.07 0.23 0.07 0.10  88.53 

95 

ByP11a.2  79.51 7.27 0.32 0.57 0.01 0.47 0.02 0.02 0.18 0.02 0.18  88.57 

96 

ByP11a.3  80.62 5.99 0.51 0.85 0.04 0.63 0.10 0.05 0.28 0.05 0.17  89.25 

97 

ByP9c.31  75.69 8.08 0.48 0.61 2.05 0.49 0.10 1.83 0.09 1.83 0.05  89.48 

98 

ByP9.5c  73.87 7.76 0.47 0.75 1.39 0.32 0.05 0.96 0.12 0.96 0.07  85.78 

99 

ByP9.5c  78.91 8.19 0.61 0.46 0.01 0.17 0.01 0.12 0.06 0.12 0.01  88.56 

100 

ByP5.2 

72.37 10.57 0.98 0.61 0.89 0.13 0.11 2.29 0.06 2.29 0.00  88.02 

101 

St5.2 

84.80 7.64 1.03 0.54 0.24 0.40 0.03 0.19 0.07 0.05 0.06  95.05 

102 

St5.3 

78.62 8.61 1.30 0.35 0.32 0.15 0.00 0.13 0.21 0.29 0.06  90.03 

103 

St5.4 

76.44 8.76 2.65 0.42 1.15 0.19 0.05 0.59 0.13 0.29 0.04  90.71 

104 

St5.5 

80.42 9.86 0.76 0.61 1.51 0.31 0.03 0.83 0.10 0.05 0.13  94.62 

105 

Ra2b.1 

76.59 10.72 0.75 0.12 0.10 0.18 0.06 0.27 0.03 0.03 0.09  88.95 

106 

Ra2b.2 

77.77 10.59 0.60 0.13 0.06 0.20 0.06 0.22 0.02 0.04 0.04  89.73 

107 

Ra2b.3 

78.55 9.48 0.80 0.15 0.04 0.08 0.38 0.01 0.09 0.01 0.08  89.66 

108 

Ra2b.4 

81.67 11.18 0.55 0.10 0.10 0.07 0.05 0.20 0.01 0.01 0.05  94.05 

109 

Ra2b.5 

73.32 9.20 6.67 0.22 0.49 0.09 0.59 0.54 0.05 0.20 0.08  91.44 

110 

Ra2b.6 

75.69 11.40 1.44 0.15 0.21 0.27 0.49 0.21 0.07 0.22 0.04  90.02 

111 

Kis16–12  79.72 9.35 0.55 0.45 0.75 0.31 0.02 

91.11 

112 

Kis16–12  78.49 9.18 0.46 0.51 0.98 0.69 0.00 

89.93 

113 

Kis16–12  70.61 5.90 4.22 1.16 4.09 0.62 0.08 

86.75 

114 

Kis16–12  82.28 5.55 0.65 1.40 0.06 0.74 0.03 

90.59 

115 

Kis16–12  82.49 5.89 0.28 1.40 0.59 0.58 0.00 

91.39 

116 

kis16–12  82.03 6.42 0.34 1.16 0.02 1.10 0.00 

90.55 

117 

Mich9b-1  88.35 1.29 0.47 0.21 0.43 0.48 0.00 

91.85 

118 

Mich9b-1  89.45 1.99 0.89 0.25 0.26 0.44 0.05 

93.37 

119 

Mich9b-1  90.32 1.77 2.19 0.23 0.43 0.41 0.07 

95.45 

120 

Mich9b-1  90.31 1.17 0.80 0.37 0.85 0.55 0.05 

93.96 

121 

Mich9b-1  77.99 8.17 0.90 0.62 0.59 0.44 0.00 

88.82 

123 

Mich9b-1  77.57 8.23 0.59 0.62 0.67 0.33 0.03 

88.15 

124 

Mich9b-1  80.17 8.71 0.45 0.71 0.20 0.49 0.02 

90.59 

125 

Mich9b-1  77.60 8.67 0.60 0.63 0.50 0.17 0.02 

88.51 

126 

Mich9a-1  80.44 9.09 0.37 0.62 0.00 0.40 0.00 

90.69 

127 

Ko1-106  83.74 6.31 0.47 0.53 0.08 0.36 0.00 

91.53 

128 

Ko1-106  83.01 6.21 0.47 0.53 0.65 0.38 0.06 

91.29 

129 

Ko1-124  82.76 4.37 0.24 0.89 0.02 0.38 0.01 

 

88.67 

 

 

background image

ROJKOVIČ et al.: MANGANESE MINERALIZATION IN THE PALEOGENE AND JURASSIC SHALES;  

                                                                              ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

                                 

 

     

    E12 

 

 

Table 3b: Chemical composition of pyrolusite (weight %). 

No. Sample  MnO

2

 Fe

2

O

3

 SiO

2

 Al

2

O

3

 MgO  CaO  BaO  K

2

O Total 

Ba-1 

98.04 0.18 0.28 0.00 0.02 0.14 0.00 0.02  98.69 

Ba-1 

98.88 0.18 0.17 0.02 0.02 0.27 0.00 0.01  99.55 

Ba-1 

99.70 0.20 0.14 0.00 0.01 0.17 0.00 0.00 100.23 

Ba-1  100.07 0.19 0.09 0.02 0.01 0.19 0.00 0.01 100.58 

Ba-1 

98.97 0.16 0.17 0.08 0.02 0.41 0.00 0.01  99.82 

Ba-1 

98.81 0.15 0.44 0.00 0.02 0.01 0.00 0.00  99.42 

Ba-1 

98.56 0.16 0.33 0.00 0.03 0.13 0.00 0.00  99.22 

Ba-1  100.34 0.21 0.11 0.00 0.02 0.10 0.00 0.01 100.80 

Ba-1  100.42 0.22 0.07 0.00 0.01 0.08 0.00 0.01 100.80 

10 

Ba-1 

99.79 0.18 0.09 0.01 0.00 0.04 0.00 0.01 100.12 

11 

Ba-1 

98.25 0.20 0.26 0.04 0.02 0.18 0.00 0.00  98.95 

12 

Ba-1 

98.16 0.25 0.27 0.00 0.00 0.20 0.00 0.00  98.88 

13 

Ba-1  100.50 0.18 0.12 0.00 0.02 0.05 0.00 0.01 100.89 

14 

Ba-1 

98.22 0.17 0.24 0.03 0.01 0.17 0.00 0.00  98.84 

15 

Ba-5 

98.65 0.15 0.31 0.07 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00  99.18 

16 

Ba-5 

98.64 0.16 0.21 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.00 0.00  99.07 

17 

Ba-5 

99.02 0.21 0.46 0.05 0.00 0.04 0.00 0.00  99.78 

18 

Ba-5 

96.15 0.16 0.84 0.21 0.02 0.11 0.00 0.00  97.49 

19 

Ba-5 

95.91 0.22 0.79 0.10 0.03 0.25 0.00 0.00  97.31 

20 

Ba-5 

96.98 0.22 0.70 0.08 0.03 0.24 0.01 0.02  98.28 

21 

Ba-5 

98.46 0.23 0.29 0.03 0.02 0.09 0.00 0.00  99.11 

22 

Ba-5  100.07 0.18 0.26 0.04 0.01 0.03 0.00 0.00 100.58 

23 

Ba-5 

98.18 0.21 0.29 0.01 0.00 0.12 0.00 0.01  98.81 

24 

Ba-5 

98.54 0.19 0.34 0.06 0.02 0.05 0.00 0.00  99.21 

25 

Ba-6b  96.34 1.14 0.15 0.16 0.29 1.70 0.00 0.03  99.81 

26 

CD-H1  97.15 0.23 0.53 0.23 0.01 0.34 0.00 0.01  98.51 

27 

CD-H1  96.69 0.21 0.41 0.24 0.03 0.44 0.00 0.03  98.04 

28 

CD-H1  94.72 0.14 0.92 0.39 0.02 0.41 0.00 0.02  96.63 

29 

CD-H1  97.24 0.19 0.43 0.27 0.01 0.48 0.00 0.02  98.63 

30 

CD-H1  97.15 0.16 0.57 0.22 0.01 0.41 0.00 0.01  98.54 

31 

CD-H1  95.13 0.17 0.75 0.26 0.02 0.49 0.00 0.01  96.82 

32 

CD-H1  97.38 0.22 0.32 0.16 0.03 0.39 0.00 0.01  98.50 

33 

CD-H1  97.65 0.22 0.47 0.30 0.02 0.43 0.00 0.02  99.11 

34 

CD-D1  98.23 0.49 0.72 0.38 0.02 0.61 0.01 0.02 100.48 

35 

CD-D1  98.11 0.52 0.68 0.39 0.04 0.61 0.00 0.01 100.36 

36 

CD-D1  99.11 0.28 0.41 0.13 0.03 0.84 0.00 0.01 100.81 

37 

CD-D1  98.56 0.23 0.35 0.07 0.03 0.45 0.00 0.01  99.71 

38 

CD-D1  99.61 0.30 0.31 0.14 0.03 0.80 0.00 0.01 101.20 

39 

CD-D1  98.68 0.98 0.65 0.38 0.02 0.63 0.00 0.01 101.35 

40 

CD-D1  97.31 1.73 0.48 0.29 0.01 0.71 0.00 0.02 100.55 

41 

CD-D1  96.92 0.97 0.59 0.22 0.02 0.55 0.00 0.00  99.28 

42 

CD-D1  93.93 3.09 0.68 0.41 0.05 0.63 0.00 0.02  98.80 

43 

CD-D1  99.34 0.24 0.25 0.12 0.01 0.69 0.00 0.01 100.66 

44 

CD-D1  98.33 0.34 0.45 0.11 0.05 0.73 0.00 0.01 100.02 

 
   
 
 
 
                     

Table 3c: Chemical composition of manganite (weight %)

.

 

No. Sample  Mn

2

O

3

 Fe

2

O

3

 SiO

2

 Al

2

O

3

 MgO  CaO  BaO  K

2

O Total 

Ba-5-1  89.58  0.15 0.31 0.07 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 90.11 

Ba-5-2  89.56  0.16 0.21 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.00 0.00 90.00 

Ba-5-3  89.91  0.21 0.46 0.05 0.00 0.04 0.00 0.00 90.67 

Ba-5-4  87.30  0.16 0.84 0.21 0.02 0.11 0.00 0.00 88.64 

Ba-5-5  87.09  0.22 0.79 0.10 0.03 0.25 0.00 0.00 88.49 

Ba-5-6  88.06  0.22 0.70 0.08 0.03 0.24 0.01 0.02 89.35 

Ba-5-7  89.40  0.23 0.29 0.03 0.02 0.09 0.00 0.00 90.05 

Ba-5-8  89.14  0.21 0.29 0.01 0.00 0.12 0.00 0.01 89.78 

Ba-5-9  89.48  0.19 0.34 0.06 0.02 0.05 0.00 0.00 90.15 

 

background image

ROJKOVI

Č

 et al

.: MANGA

N

ESE 

MINERA

LI

ZA

TION IN

 THE PALEOGE

NE AND J

U

RASSIC SHALES;

 EL

ECT

R

ONIC

 SUPP

LEME

NT

             

             

   

   

 

      

     

    E13

 

 

Ta

ble 4

a: 

C

hemical co

m

po

sitio

of th

e Jurassic sh

ale 

with

  man

ga

ne

se

 m

in

eralizatio

n (ox

id

es in

 weigh

t %, 

 elem

en

ts i

pp

m

)

Part

 1 fr

om

 2.

 

No.

 

2 3 4 

5 6 7 

8 9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

Sa

m

p

le 

Ba 1 

Ba 4 

Ba 5 

Ba 6a 

Ba

Č

D-

H

14 

BaH

N

1-

6A 

BaL-4 

BaMA-

11 

BaMA-

12 

BaSA-

4

Dik 1 

Dik 2 

Dik 3 

Dik 4 

Dik 5 

Dik 6 

Dik 7 

LR 2 

LR 3 

Ma-

P

-0

m

 

Ma-

P

-1

m

 

M

a-P-1

.5

1.

6m

 

M

a-P-2

m

 

SiO

2

 

    

  7.

74 

    16.

55 

    25.

31 

    37.

99 

    23.

56 

    15.

22 

    37.

13 

    39.

24 

    38.

10 

    29.

50 

    22.

03 

    31.

30 

    39

.24 

    25.

20 

    

  9.

20 

    46.

00 

    11.

68 

    

 13.

95 

    

   8.

35 

    

 41.

78 

    

 39.

16 

    

 23.

21 

    

 29.

14 

TiO

2

 

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.4

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.3

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.6

    

  0

.5

    

  0

.4

    

  0

.0

57

    

  0.

069

    

  0.

253

    

  0.

093

    

  0.

389

    

  0.

194 

    

  0.

191 

    

   0.

34 

    

   0.

10 

    

   0.

688 

    

   0.

546 

    

   0.

181 

    

   0.

320 

Al

2

O

3

 

    

  2.

47 

    

  3.

02 

    

  6.

03 

    

  3.

87 

    

  7.

25 

    

  3.

22 

    

  5.

39 

    12.

62 

    11.

86 

    

  9.

10 

    

  1.

41 

    

  1.

45 

    

  4.

95 

    

  1.

81 

    

  4.

41 

    

  5.

50 

    

  4.

96 

    

   5.

06 

    

   1.

23 

    

 14.

07 

    

 11.

65 

    

   4.

50 

    

   7.

00

 

FeO 

    

  1

.1

 

 

    

  6

.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fe

2

O

3

 

    

  7

.5

 

 

    

  3

.2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fe

2

O

3

 to

ta

    

  8.

85 

    16.

18 

    11.

22 

    10.

68 

    

  7.

60 

    14.

38 

    

  9.

94 

    

  4.

95 

    

  5.

16 

    

  9.

38 

    

  0.

98 

    

  2.

35

 

    

  3

.2

    

  1

.9

    1

1.

29

 

    

  6

.9

    1

3.

09

 

    

 1

5.

23

 

    

   2

.9

    

   5

.6

    

   5

.0

    

   2

.9

    

   3

.7

MnO

 

    22.

84 

    24.

66 

    21.

14 

    

  3.

66 

    13.

81 

    20.

94 

    

  2.

62 

    

  0.

21 

    

  0.

18 

    15.

24 

    

  2.

054

    

  2.

299

    

  1.

870

    

  2.

305

    33.

22 

    15.

70 

    31.

12 

    

 34.

06 

    

   3.

08 

    

   0.

160 

    

   0.

170 

    

   0.

283 

    

   0.

234 

MgO

 

    

  3

.7

    

  1

.8

    

  1

.7

    

  5

.2

    

  3

.0

    

  1

.8

    

  6

.3

    

  3

.0

    

  2

.4

    

  1

.9

    

  1

.0

    

  0

.6

    

  2

.0

    

  0

.9

    

  2

.3

    

  1

.9

    

  2

.5

    

   0

.9

    

   9

.7

    

   3

.0

    

   2

.7

    

   1

.4

    

   

2.

03 

CaO 

    22.

95 

    15.

93 

    

  9.

06 

    16.

01 

    16.

40 

    14.

85 

    16.

52 

    17.

79 

    19.

76 

    10.

85 

    40.

22 

    34.

14 

    25

.27 

    37.

21 

    10.

52 

    

  7.

57 

    12.

31 

    

   5.

76 

    

 37.

49 

    

 15.

04 

    

 18.

98 

    

 36.

07 

    

 29.

62 

Na

2

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.5

    

  0

.6

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.6

    

  0

.6

    

  0

.9

    

  1

.3

    

  1

.2

    

  1

.2

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.6

    

  0

.0

    

   0

.2

    

   0

.5

    

   0

.6

    

   0

.6

    

   0

.3

    

   

0.

59 

K

2

    

  0

.4

    

  1

.1

    

  2

.0

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.8

    

  0

.4

    

  0

.1

    

  2

.4

    

  2

.3

    

  0

.8

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.3

    

  1

.2

    

  0

.4

    

  1

.1

    

  1

.0

    

  0

.9

    

   1

.0

    

   0

.6

    

   2

.4

    

   1

.9

    

   0

.7

    

   

1.

11 

P

2

O

5

 

    

  0

.6

    

  0

.4

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.3

    

  0

.5

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.3

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.7

    

  0

.5

    

  0

.9

    

   0

.2

 

    

   0

.1

    

   0

.1

    

   0

.1

    

   0

.1

H

2

O- 

    

  0

.6

    

  1

.8

    

  0

.9

    

  0

.3

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.3

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.4

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.3

    

  0

.3

    

  0

.2

    

  2

.2

    

  1

.8

    

  3

.6

    

   8

.5

    

   0

.0

    

   0

.5

    

   0

.4

    

   0

.2

    

   

0.

33 

*LO

    29.

72 

    17.

30 

    20.

92 

    19.

68 

    25.

73 

    27.

14 

    19.

84 

    17.

07 

    17.

90 

    20.

34 

    31.

67 

    27.

08 

    21.

38 

    29.

75 

    26.

44 

    13.

71 

    22.

06 

    

 14.

51 

    

 35.

66 

    

 16.

12 

    

 18.

78 

    

 29.

80 

    

 25.

74 

  164 

    48 

  118 

    16 

    33 

    38 

  <10 

    91 

    71 

  107 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 57 

    

 39 

 

 

 

 

Ba 

  245 

  <30 

  <30 

    66 

  102 

    53 

  <30 

  148 

  127 

  165 

    62 

    69 

  266 

    95 

  382 

  256 

  242 

   598 

 2119 

   308 

   256 

   101 

   152 

Co 

    18 

    95 

  191 

    27 

    62 

    48 

    18 

    12 

    10 

  122 

    

  4 

    14 

    13 

    12 

    78 

    64 

  119 

    

 93 

    

   3

 

    

 2

    

 2

    

 1

    

 1

Cr 

    2

    5

    5

    2

    3

    3

    3

    4

    4

    4

    

  8

 

    1

    3

    1

    3

    

  8

 

    1

    

 6

    

 1

    

 8

    

 7

    

 3

    

 3

Cu 

    2

    1

    3

    3

    3

    2

    3

    4

    4

    6

    

  4

 

    1

    2

    1

    4

    2

    6

    

 4

    

 1

    

 4

    

 3

    

 2

    

 3

La 

 

 

 

    1

 

 

 

 

 

 

    1

    2

    2

    1

    7

    4

    7

 

 

    

 2

    

 2

    

 1

    

 1

Mo 

 

 

 

    

  3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

  3

 

    

  3

 

    

  3

 

    

  3

 

    

  3

 

    

  3

 

    

  6

 

    

 1

 

    

   2

 

    

   2

 

    

   2

 

    

   2

 

Ni 

    19 

    23 

    92 

    40 

    48 

    21 

    20 

    39 

    38 

  102 

    13 

    19 

    28 

    14 

    60 

    46 

    73 

    

 25 

    

 1

    

 6

    

 5

    

 2

    

 4

Pb 

    2

    1

    3

    1

    2

    4

    1

    2

    2

    7

    

  6

 

    1

    1

    1

    2

    2

    2

    

 5

    

   8

 

    

 2

    

 2

    

 2

    

 3

Sr 

  480 

  406 

  175 

  525 

  239 

  211 

  401 

  330 

  312 

  223 

  500 

  348 

  226 

  384 

  318 

  182 

  271 

 1000 

   500 

 1258 

 1484 

 2202 

 2254 

    28 

    34 

    41 

    38 

    87 

    70 

    75 

  117 

  103 

  104 

    11 

    20 

    43 

    39 

    82 

    63 

    71 

    

 83 

   

  63 

   121 

    

 77 

    

 61 

    

 45 

 

    4

    4

    1

    3

    3

    3

    3

    2

    3

    1

    2

    1

    1

    5

    3

    5

    

 1

 

    

 2

    

 2

    

 1

    

 2

Zr

 

 

  274 

  290 

    62 

    69 

  160 

    82 

    37 

    41 

  137 

    10 

    18 

    50 

    19 

  109 

    44 

    71 

    

 97 

 

   114 

   

  9

    

 3

    

 6

Th 

 

    1

    1

 

    

  9

 

    1

    

  4

 

    1

    

  9

 

    1

    

  3

 

    

  4

 

    

  5

 

    

  3

 

    1

    

  7

 

    1

 

    

   4

 

    

 1

    

   8

 

    

   7

 

    

 1

 

    

  3

 

    

  3

 

 

    

  3

 

    

  2

 

    

  3

 

    

  2

 

    

  2

 

    

  3

 

    

  2

 

    

  2

 

    

  2

 

    

  2

 

    

  4

 

    

  2

 

    

  6

 

 

    

  2

 

    

   3

 

    

   3

 

    

   3

 

    

   3

 

TC%

 

    

  8

.5

    

  7

.6

    

  5

.8

    

  5

.9

    

  8

.8

    

  8

.7

    

  6

.5

    

  4

.5

    

  4

.4

 

    

  5

.3

    

  7

.3

    

  6

.2

    

  5

.0

    

  7

.0

    

  6

.1

    

  3

.6

    

  4

.8

 

    

   0

.3

    

 1

1.

05

 

    

   4

.0

    

   4

.9

    

   8

.3

    

   6

.9

 

TO

C%

 

    

  0

.9

    

  1

.6

    

  1

.2

    

  1

.1

    

  2

.6

    

  3

.2

 

    

  1

.7

 

    

  0

.9

    

  0

.6

    

  2

.6

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.1

 

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.1

    

  2

.2

    

  1

.0

    

  1

.6

    

   0

.2

    

   1

.8

    

   0

.4

    

   0

.3

    

   0

.3

 

    

   0

.4

TIC%

 

    

  6

.5

    

  6

.0

    

  4

.5

    

  4

.7

    

  6

.2

    

  5

.5

    

  4

.8

    

  3

.5

    

  3

.7

    

  2

.6

    

  7

.1

    

  6

.1

    

  4

.9

    

  6

.8

    

  3

.8

    

  2

.5

    

  3

.1

    

   0

.0

    

   9

.2

    

   3

.6

 

    

   4

.6

    

   8

.0

    

   6

.48 

CO

carb. 

 

    22.

07 

    16.

76 

  17.

422 

    22.

73 

    20.

35 

    17.

75 

    13.

03 

    13.

652

    

  9.

77 

    26.

132

    22.

582

    17.

971

    25

.034

    14.

127

    

  9.

26 

 

 

 

    

 13.

18 

    

 16.

98 

    

 29.

54 

    

 23.

72 

 

background image

ROJKOVI

Č

 et al

.: MANGA

N

ESE 

MINERA

LI

ZA

TION IN

 THE PALEOGE

NE AND J

U

RASSIC SHALES;

 EL

ECT

R

ONIC

 SUPP

LEME

NT

             

             

   

   

 

      

     

    E14 

 

 

   T

able 

4a:

 C

ont

in

ue

d. Part

 2 fr

om

 2. 

No.

 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

Sa

m

p

le M

a-P-3

m

 

M

a-P-3

.4

3.

43m

 

M

a-P-4

m

 M

a-P-5

m

 M

a-P-6

m

M

a-

P-7

m

M

a-P-8

m

M

a-P-8

.1

0–

8.

16m

 

Ma-

P

-9

m

M

a-

P

-9.

5m

ŠJ 1 

ŠJ 9 

ŠJ-

16 

Z

a 1 

Z

a 2 

Z

a 6 

Z

a 7 

Z

aK 9 

Z

aH-

11

Z

aH-

19

Z

aH-

20

Z

aH-

21

Z

aK-

22

SiO

2

 

    

  38.

16 

    

  27.

22 

    

  38.

17 

    

  36.

88 

    

  34.

64 

    

  39.

08 

    

  43.

69 

    

  23.

21 

    

  38.

72 

    

  31.

31 

    33.

12

    27.

94

    32.

87

    

   4.

55 

    

 10.

43 

    35.

05 

    19.

82 

    33.

15 

    49.

12 

    34.

    

 15.

44 

    39.

21 

    

  7.

23 

TiO

2

 

    

   

 0.

566 

    

   

 0.

144 

    

   

 0.

528 

    

   

 0.

519 

    

   

 0.

568 

    

   

 0.

539 

    

   

 0.

730 

    

   

 0.

137 

    

   

 0.

566 

    

   

 0.

372 

    

  0.

18

    

  0.

13

    

  0.

12

    

   0.

04 

    

   0.

04 

    

  0.

19 

    

  0.

18 

    

  0.

25 

    

  0.

41 

    

  0.

15 

    

   0.

174

    

  0.

286

    

  0.

128

Al

2

O

3

 

    

  12.

24 

    

   

 3.

54 

    

  11.

01 

    

  11.

17 

    

  12.

97 

    

  11.

43 

    

  15.

73 

    

   

 3.

45 

    

  12.

01 

    

   

 8.

14 

    

  8

.4

1

    

  2

.7

2

    

  2

.0

1

    

   0

.6

    

   0

.7

    

  3

.2

    

  2

.6

    

  4

.1

    1

1.5

    

  2

.8

    

   2

.6

    

  6

.5

    

  2

.8

FeO 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

  2

.5

6

 

 

 

    

   2

.1

 

 

 

 

    

  7

.7

 

 

 

Fe

2

O

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

  2

.3

8

 

 

 

    

   3

.4

 

 

 

 

    

  3

.2

82

 

 

 

Fe

2

O

3

 to

ta

    

   

 4

.7

    

   

 2

.3

    

   

 4

.7

    

   

 4

.6

    

   

 4

.9

    

   

 4

.1

    

   

 4

.6

    

   

 2

.6

    

   

 5

.1

    

   

 5

.07 

    

  5.

22

    23.

29

    20.

08

    

   5.

00 

    

   5.

91 

    

  9.

96 

    35.

67 

    14.

81 

    

  8.

34 

    11.

93 

    

   2.

85 

    16.

67 

    14.

23 

MnO

 

    

   

 0.

176 

    

   

 0.

255 

    

   

 0.

181 

    

   

 0.

190 

    

   

 0.

174 

    

   

 0.

166 

    

   

 0.

132 

    

   

 0.

271 

    

   

 0.

163 

    

   

 0.

209 

    18.

27

    20.

59

    29.

72

    

   9.

11 

    

   8.

03 

    13.

17 

    

  9.

16 

    11.

69 

    

  0.

68 

    14.

20 

    

   2.

49

8

    

  6.

069

    24.

66 

MgO

 

    

   

 3

.0

    

   

 3

.2

    

   

 2

.4

    

   

 2

.6

    

   

 3

.0

    

   

 2

.5

    

   

 2

.9

    

   

 1

.1

    

   

 2

.6

    

   

 1

.9

    

  0

.9

4

    

  1

.5

1

    

  0

.1

5

    

   9

.6

    

   8

.3

    

  2

.5

    

  1

.7

    

  2

.3

    

  1

.7

    

  2

.5

    

   8

.7

   

   3.

04 

    

  4.

61 

CaO 

    

  18.

97 

    

  32.

80 

    

  20.

77 

    

  21.

24 

    

  20.

49 

    

  19.

91 

    

  13.

39 

    

  37.

77 

    

  19.

28 

    

  27.

52 

    19.

11

    

  1.

89

    

  1.

31

    

 31.

65 

    

 29.

34 

    20.

64 

    11.

16 

    17.

91 

    10.

68 

    

  9.

25 

    

 30.

82 

    

  8.

22 

    11.

85 

Na

2

    

   

 0

.6

    

   

 0

.4

    

   

 0

.6

    

   

 0

.6

    

   

 0

.8

    

   

 0

.7

    

   

 0

.8

    

   

 0

.3

    

   

 0

.7

    

   

 0

.5

    

  0

.0

2

    

  0

.8

8

    

  0

.8

6

    

   0

.1

    

   0

.2

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.3

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.7

    

  0

.1

    

   0

.2

   

   0.

32 

    

  0.

11 

K

2

    

   

 2

.0

    

   

 0

.5

    

   

 1

.9

    

   

 1

.8

    

   

 2

.0

    

   

 1

.9

    

   

 2

.7

    

   

 0

.5

    

   

 1

.9

    

   

 1

.3

    

  0

.0

3

    

  0

.8

1

    

  0

.8

0

    

   0

.0

    

   0

.0

    

  1

.3

    

  1

.0

    

  1

.7

    

  5

.5

    

  0

.5

    

   0

.3

   

   1.

06 

    

  0.

42 

P

2

O

5

 

    

   

 0

.1

    

   

 0

.0

    

   

 0

.1

    

   

 0

.1

    

   

 0

.1

    

   

 0

.1

    

   

 0

.2

    

   

 0

.0

    

   

 0

.1

    

   

 0

.1

    

  2

.5

6

    

  0

.0

3

    

  0

.0

4

    

   0

.1

    

   0

.5

 

 

 

    

  0

.2

    

  0

.1

    

   0

.3

    

  0

.8

    

  1

.0

H

2

O- 

    

   

 0

.3

    

   

 0

.2

    

   

 0

.3

    

   

 0

.3

    

   

 0

.3

    

   

 0

.3

    

   

 0

.4

    

   

 0

.3

    

   

 0

.4

    

   

 0

.2

    

  0

.0

1

    

  0

.5

1

    

  2

.0

9

    

   0

.1

    

   0

.0

    

  0

.0

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.1

    

  0

.3

    

  0

.5

    

   0

.3

   

   1.

31 

    

  0.

75 

*LO

    

  18.

93 

    

  29.

20 

    

  19.

17 

    

  19.

84 

    

  19.

77 

    

  18.

99 

    

  14.

74 

    

  30.

21 

    

  18.

36 

    

  23.

02 

    14.

56

    19.

30

    

  9.

52

    

 38.

67 

    

 36.

72 

    13.

39 

    17.

61 

    13.

47 

    10.

17 

    21.

05 

    

 35.

60 

    17.

39 

    32.

68 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

  2 

  357 

    

  41 

    

 36 

    

 38 

    52 

    42 

  151 

  113 

    82 

 

 

 

Ba 

    276 

    

  81 

    237 

    235 

    268 

    255 

    350 

    

  75 

    252 

    187 

    15 

  127 

    

  42 

 1100 

 1286 

    20 

    

20 

    63 

  119 

  398 

 1133 

  220 

  839 

Co 

    

  19 

    

   

 7 

    

  19 

    

  15 

    

  19 

    

  27 

    

  19 

    

   

 7 

    

  18 

    

  19 

  106 

    30 

    

  21 

    

   6 

    

 1

    2

    6

    1

    3

    4

    

   9

 

    3

    6

Cr 

    

  6

    

  2

    

  6

    

  6

    

  7

    

  6

    

  9

    

  3

    

  7

    

  5

    2

    

   

 2

    

  5

    

   7

 

    

   4

 

    3

    1

    4

    5

    2

    

 2

    1

    

  3

 

Cu 

    

  4

    

  1

    

  4

    

  4

    

  4

    

  4

    

  5

    

  2

    

  5

    

  3

    

  2

 

    1

    

  3

    

 1

    

   7

 

    3

    4

    6

    8

    3

    

 2

    5

    2

La 

    

  30 

    

  12 

    

  27 

    

  18 

    

  26 

    

  32 

    

  27 

    

   

 9 

    

  28 

    

  22 

    61 

 

 

 

 

  186 

    82 

  151 

 

    2

    

 1

    4

    4

Mo 

    

   

 2

 

    

   

 2

 

    

   

 2

 

    

   

 2

 

    

   

 2

 

    

   

 2

 

    

   

 2

 

    

   

 2

 

    

   

 2

 

    

   

 2

 

    1

 

 

 

 

    

  4

 

    

  4

 

    

  6

 

 

    

  –

    

   7

 

    

  3

 

    

  3

 

Ni 

    

  7

    

  1

    

  4

    

  5

    

  5

    

  4

    

  6

    

  2

    

  5

    

  5

    5

    4

    

  2

    

   4

 

    

   5 

    19 

  108 

    31 

    42 

    34 

    

 25 

    44 

    36 

Pb 

    

  3

    

  1

    

  2

    

  2

    

  2

    

  2

    

  2

    

  1

    

  2

    

  3

    3

    2

    

  4

    

   7

 

    

 1

    1

    

  8

 

    2

    4

    2

    

 1

    2

    1

Sr 

  1426 

  2750 

  1392 

  1542 

  1449 

  1240 

    863 

  2384 

  1339 

  1665 

  227 

  192 

  >500 

   500 

   416 

  316 

  136 

  427 

  291

 

600 

   930 

  508 

  586 

    

  94 

    

  38 

    

  84 

    

  87 

    

  92 

    

  91 

    120 

    

  35 

    

  95 

    

  64 

    50 

    17 

    

  20 

    

   3 

    

 1

    47 

    12 

    59 

  221 

    53 

   253 

    77 

    45 

    

  1

    

  1

    

  2

    

  1

    

  1

    

  1

    

  2

    

  1

    

  2

    

  2

    1

    3

    

  3

 

 

    7

    2

    9

    4

    2

    

 1

    6

    4

Zr

 

    

  93 

    

  33 

    

  89 

    

  90 

    

  93 

    

  93 

    116 

    

  27 

    

  90 

    

  70 

    58 

  220 

    184 

 

 

    42 

    86 

    8

    7

    3

    

 4

    6

    3

Th 

    

  1

    

   

 6

 

    

   

 9

 

    

  1

    

  1

    

   

 9

 

    

  1

    

   

 7