background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, OCTOBER 2008, 59, 5, 447—460

www.geologicacarpathica.sk

Quantitative analyses of calcareous nannoplankton

assemblages from the Baden-Sooss section

(Middle Miocene of Vienna Basin, Austria)

STJEPAN ĆORIĆ

1

 and JOHANN HOHENEGGER

2

1

Geological Survey of Austria, Neulinggasse 38, A-1030 Vienna, Austria;  stjepan.coric@geologie.ac.at

2

Institute of Paleontology, Vienna University, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna, Austria;  johann.hohenegger@univie.ac.at

(Manuscript received December 13, 2007; accepted in revised form June 12, 2008)

Abstract: Quantitative analyses of calcareous nannofossils were carried out on 102 Middle Miocene samples from the
scientific borehole at Baden-Sooss (Vienna Basin). All the samples can be assigned to nannoplankton Zone NN5. The
content of Helicosphaera walbersdorfensis allows correlation with the Mediterranean nannoplankton Subzone MNN5a.
Typical near-shore forms such as small reticulofenestrids followed by Umbilicosphaera jafarii, Reticulofenestra haqii,
Coccolithus pelagicus
 and Reticulofenestra pseudoumbilica dominate the calcareous nannoplankton assemblages. In-
ter-species correlations and correlations to stable isotopes and magnetic susceptibility together with multivariate statis-
tical methods (Cluster analysis, Indicator value method, nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling) enabled the reconstruc-
tion of trends in the paleoenvironment of the upper water mass during this part of the Badenian. Low variations in
abundance of ecologically sensitive species suggest relatively low fluctuating environments. The deeper part of the core
(40 to 102 m) shows opposite oscillating trends (with long periods) in salinity and temperature. Around 70 m of the core
the salinity maximum is combined with a temperature minimum, while a salinity minimum and temperature maximum
can be found around 50 m. Trends in the upper core part are more discontinuous, possibly due to gaps in the sedimen-
tation record caused by intensified tectonics. Generally, a linear trend towards slightly increasing salinity, eutrophica-
tion and lowered temperatures could be documented for the upper core part.

Key  words:  Lower  Badenian,  Central  Paratethys,  Vienna  Basin,  multivariate  statistics,  calcareous  nannofossils,
nannoplankton Zone NN5.

Introduction

Detailed investigation of calcareous nannoplankton from the
scientific borehole Baden-Sooss was carried out to document
the stratigraphic position and paleoecological changes with-
in  nannofossil  assemblages  in  Middle  Miocene  sediments
from the southern part of the Vienna Basin (Fig. 1).

The  first  report  about  calcareous  nannoplankton  from  the

Vienna  Basin  is  from  Gümbel  (1870).  Kamptner  (1948)  in-
vestigated the “Badener Tegel” from the former brickyard at
Baden and described 8 new species. He recognized the bios-
tratigraphical  and  paleoecological  importance  of  this  group
for Miocene sediments. Further studies were focused on the
nannofossil  biostratigraphy  from  different  localities  in  the
Austrian part of the Vienna Basin (Fuchs & Stradner 1977;
Stradner & Fuchs 1978; Wessely et al. 2007), but they lack,
quantitative information, which could lead to a better under-
standing of the calcareous nannoplankton paleoecology dur-
ing  the  Middle  Badenian.  Numerous  publications  were
dealing  with  the  Miocene  stratigraphy  and  paleoecology
from  the  Mediterranean  bioprovince  based  on  quantitative
investigations  of  the  calcareous  nannoplankton  (Fornaciari
&  Rio  1996;  Fornaciari  et  al.  1996;  Sprovieri  et  al.  2002,
etc.).  Quantitative  analysis  allows  the  identification  of
events, which can be used for paleoecological interpretation
and can be helpful for biostratigraphic correlation.

Calcareous nannoplankton assemblages were newly investi-

gated  from  the  outcrop  at  the  type  locality  of  the  Badenian
stage, the former brickyard of the Wienerberger Company at
Baden-Sooss (Rögl et al. 2008). Biostratigraphic investigation
on foraminifera indicates the lower part of the local Upper La-
genidae Zone. The absence of Helicosphaera ampliaperta and
the  presence  of  Sphenolithus  heteromorphus  in  the  studied
material allow an attribution to the calcareous nannoplankton
standard Zone NN5 (Martini 1971). The important short-range
species  Helicosphaera  waltrans,  occurring  in  the  lowermost
part  of  NN5  could  not  be  identified  in  the  investigated  sam-
ples.  This  species  was  found  in  the  Grund  Formation  of  the
Alpine Carpathian Foredeep and in some localities in the Vi-
enna  Basin  and  thus  indicates  an  Early  Badenian  age  corre-
sponding to the Langhian. The borehole Baden-Sooss can be
stratigraphically correlated with the overlying interval of Heli-
cosphaera waltrans
 horizon (Sphenolithus heteromorphus ho-
rizon)  described  by  Švábenická  (2002)  in  the  Carpathian
Foredeep.  According  to  the  biostratigraphic  and  cyclostrati-
graphic dating (Hohenegger et al. 2008), this borehole can be
positioned  between  —14.379  and  —14.142 Myr,  which  coin-
cides  with  the  lower  part  of  the  Sphenolithus  heteromorphus
Zone (NN5, Martini 1971).

The calcareous nannoplankton as photosynthetic haptophyte

algae live in the upper euphotic zone that is directly influenced
by  ecologic  factors  such  as  water  temperature,  light  and  inor-

background image

448

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER

ganic nutrient supply (nitrate, phosphate, trace elements and vi-
tamins).  Generally  they  flourish  in  warm,  well-stratified,  olig-
otrophic, mid-ocean environments, although numerous species
have a broad ecological tolerance (Bown & Young 1998).

Material and methods

The  Baden-Sooss  scientific  borehole  penetrates  a  102 m

succession  of  intensively  bioturbated  Middle  Miocene  sedi-
ments  at  the  type  locality  of  the  Badenian.  The  calcareous
nannoplankton distribution in this borehole was studied from
the whole section (8 m to 101.82 m). Sediments were sampled
approximately from each meter, whereas from the lowermost
part (100 to 101.82 m) samples were taken at 20 cm intervals.

Smear slides were prepared for all samples using standard

procedures and examined under light microscope (cross and
parallel nicols) with 1000

× magnification. In total, 102 sam-

ples were analysed.

Quantitative data were obtained according to two methods:
1. counting at least 300 specimens from each smear slide;
2. counting 50 helicoliths from each sample.
A further 100 view squares were checked for important spe-

cies  to  interpret  the  biostratigraphy  and  paleoecology  of  the
calcareous  nannoplankton.  Among  reticulofenestrids  the  fol-
lowing  species  were  distinguished:  Reticulofenestra  minuta
(reticulofenestrids  < 3 µm),  R.  haqii  (reticulofenestrids  3  to

5 µm), R. pseudoumbilica 5 to 7 µm and R. pseudoumbilica
> 7 µm.  On  the  basis  of  changing  abundances  of  different
nannoplankton  taxa,  the  whole  section  could  be  subdivided
into intervals by eye. For each interval the arithmetical mean
and median is given (Tables 1 to 6).

Complex  statistical  investigations  were  performed  on  per-

centages  of  the  most  important  and  predominating  species.
For the use of parametrical statistics like the product-moment
correlation (Table 9), proportions had to be linearized, where-
by  the  arcsine-root  transformation  (Linder  &  Berchthold
1976)  was  used  because  of  including  zero-values.  Inter-spe-
cies  correlations  and  correlations  between  each  species  and
magnetic  susceptibility  as  well  as  stable  isotopes,  obtained
from  the  planktonic  foraminifer  Globigerinoides  trilobus,
were  calculated.  Clustering  of  samples  was  performed  by
Ward’s  method  based  on  standardized  Euclidean  distances
with  a  subsequent  determination  of  species  that  is  indicative
for the obtained clusters (Indicator value method by Dufrêne
&  Legendre  1997).  Nonmetrical  Multidimensional  Scaling
(nMDS), also based on standardized Euclidean distances, was
used  for  the  representation  of  relations  between  samples  and
species in a low-dimensional space. The grade of changes in
floral composition along the core could be measured as distanc-
es between subsequent samples in the low dimensional charac-
ter  space  gained  by  nMDS.  Large  distances  indicate  a  strong
turnover in floral composition and longer intervals of large dis-
tances are typical for intensive environmental oscillations.

Fig. 1. a – Tectonic map of the
Vienna  Basin  and  location  of
the  studied  borehole  Baden-
Sooss. b  Schematic sedimen-
tological  log  of  the  borehole
Baden-Sooss (after Hohenegger
et al. 2008).

background image

449

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON FROM BADEN-SOOSS SECTION (AUSTRIA)

The basic lists can be found as an Electronic Supplement of

this paper in web version at http://www.geologicacarpathica.sk.
Simple  statistical  analyses  were  calculated  with  EXCEL,
while  for  complex  analyses  the  program  packages  SPSS
(2006) and PC-ORD (McCune & Mefford 1999) were used.

Results

Middle  Miocene  sediments  from  the  Baden-Sooss  core

generally contain very well-preserved and common calcare-
ous  nannoplankton  assemblages  (Fig. 2).  All  assemblages
are  dominated  by  Reticulofenestra  minuta.  Coccolithus  pe-
lagicus
,  helicoliths,  Reticulofenestra  gelida,  R.  haqii,  R.
pseudoumbilica
, and Umbilicosphaera jafarii occur less fre-
quently,  but  regularly  and  continually.  Helicosphaera  cart-
eri
  and  H.  walbersdorfensis  occur  regularly  among
helicoliths, whereas H. euphratis, H. minuta and H. wallichi
are  relatively  rare.  Rare  but  relatively  continual  are  Acan-
thoica cohenii
, Braarudosphaera bigelowii, Coccolithus mi-
opelagicus
, 

Coronocyclus 

nitescens, 

Coronosphaera

mediterranea, Criptococcolithus mediaperforatus, Cyclicar-
golithus  floridanus
,  Geminilithella  rotula,  Hayella  chalen-
geri
,  Holodiscolithus  macroporus,  Micrantholithus  vesper,
Pontosphaera  multipora,  Rhabdosphaera  sicca,  Spheno-
lithus heteromorphus 
and Sphenolithus moriformis. Rare and
irregularly found are Calcidiscus leptoporus, C. premacinty-
rei
, C. tropicus, Calciosolenia murrayi, Ilselithina fusa, Mi-
crantolithus 

articulatus, 

Perforocalcinella 

fusiformis,

Pontosphaera  discopora,  Syracosphaera  pulchra,  Thora-
cosphaera heimii
, Th. saxea and Triquetrorhabdulus milowii.

The distribution of autochthonous and reworked calcareous

nannofossils in the borehole Baden-Sooss is alphabetically ar-
ranged and listed in Table 7 (autochthonous nannofossils) and
Table 8a,b (reworked nannofossils).

Species distribution

Coccolithus pelagicus

The  abundance  pattern  of  C.  pelagicus  (Fig. 3a)  shows  6

distinct periods with abundance fluctuations. Abundances of
C. pelagicus vary between 0 and 9.7 % in intervals 2, 4 and 6
and are thus negatively correlated with magnetic susceptibil-
ity  (Fig. 3a,  Table 9).  Coccolithus  pelagicus  shows  higher
percentages  in  intervals 1,  3  and  5.  They  oscillate  here  be-
tween 0.9 % and 16 % getting maximum values in the upper
part of the core (interval 5). These intervals can be correlated
with lower values of magnetic susceptibility. Beside the neg-
ative  correlation  of  C.  pelagicus  to  magnetic  susceptibility,
this species is also negatively correlated with R. minuta, but
significant  positively  correlated  with  R.  haqii  and  the  re-
worked nannoplankton (Table 9).

Reticulofenestra pseudoumbilica

Fornaciari et al. (1996, 1997) showed that R. pseudoumbilica

with a diameter of 5 to 7 µm commonly occurs within the NN5
nannoplankton  Zone  of  the  Mediterranean  region.  They  used

the first common occurrence (FCO) of larger R. pseudoumbili-
ca
 (with diameter  > 7 µm) for subdividing the nannoplankton
Zone MNN6 into Subzones MNN6a and MNN6b.

Sediments from Baden-Sooss contain a very few larger R.

pseudoumbilica  and  therefore  they  were  combined  with  the
smaller  species.  According  to  the  abundance  pattern  of  R.
pseudoumbilica
, the borehole Baden-Sooss can be subdivid-
ed  into  three  intervals  (Fig. 3b,  Table 2).  Intervals 1  (mean
4.87, median 4.61) and 3 (mean 2.66, median 2.50) contain
lower percentages of R. pseudoumbilica with values between
0  %  and  8.8  %.  Additionally,  interval 3  can  be  subdivided
into  4  subunits:  3A  and  3C  are  characterized  by  lower  and
3B  and  3D  by  higher  concentrations  of  R.  pseudoumbilica.
The  interval 2  (from  55.0  m  to  80.02 m)  contains  samples
with  higher  percentages  of  R.  pseudoumbilica  between  4.8
and  19.4 %  (mean  9.29 %,  median  8.74 %).  This  species  is
negatively correlated with R. minuta and shows a single but
insignificant positive correlation to U. jafarii (Table 9).

Reticulofenestra minuta

Reticulofenestra  minuta  and  R.  haqii  dominate  in  the

Baden-Sooss  core,  with  participation  in  nannoplankton  as-
semblages between 44.7 and 94.1 %. On the basis of varia-
tion  in  the  content  of  small  reticulofenestrids,  the  scientific
borehole at Baden-Sooss can be subdivided into six intervals
(Fig. 3c, Table 3). Samples from intervals 2, 4 and 6 contain
lower  numbers  of  small  reticulofenestrids,  which  vary  be-
tween  41.4  and  74.2  %.  Intervals 1,  3  and  5  contain  in-
creased percentages of R. minuta oscillating between 46.6 %
and  89 %.  Reticulofenestra  minuta  is  significant  negatively
correlated  with  all  other  species  (except  H.  walbersdorfen-
sis
) and the reworked nannoplankton (Table 9). Peaks in the
abundance of R. haqii (Fig. 3d) coincide with maximum val-
ues of magnetic susceptibility.

Umbilicosphaera jafarii

On  the  basis  of  the  abundance  of  U.  jafarii,  six  intervals

can  be  distinguished  in  the  Baden-Sooss  core  (Fig. 3e,  Ta-
ble 4).  Intervals 1,  4  and  6  contain  lower  percentages  (0  to
13.8 %),  whereas  intervals 3  and  5  are  characterized  by  a
higher  amount  (1.9  to  29.3 %).  Umbilicosphaera  jafarii  in-
creases gradually in interval 2 from 1.9 % to 12.5 %. An ex-
tremely  significant  negative  correlation  could  be  observed
between U. jafarii and R. minuta (Table 9).

Sphenolithus heteromorphus

Sphenoliths  are  represented  by  Sphenolithus  heteromor-

phus, S. milanetti and S. moriformis. The biostratigraphically
important species S. heteromorphus is scarce and varies from
0  to  3.58 %.  This  species  was  not  observed  in  the  interval
from 51.0 to 59.02 m. Figure 3f illustrates the abundance pat-
tern of S. heteromorphus and S. moriformis in the core. Both
species  demonstrate  similar  changes  in  their  abundances.  In-
tervals 1, 4 and 6 contain lower concentrations of sphenoliths,
which vary from 0 to 1.3 % (Table 5). Percentages of S. hetero-
morphus
 and S. moriformis increased in the interval 6 from  8

background image

450

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER

Fig. 2.

background image

451

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON FROM BADEN-SOOSS SECTION (AUSTRIA)

Fig. 2. 12 – Cryptococcolithus mediaperforatus (Varol, 1991) de Kaenel & Villa, 1996. Sample 54.00—54.02 m. 3 –  Hayella challengeri
(Müller, 1974) Theodoridis, 1984. Sample 39.20—39.22 m. 4 – Hughesius tasmaniae (Edwards & Perch-Nielsen, 1975) de Kaenel & Villa,
1996. Sample 39.20—39.22 m. 5, 6 – Umbilicosphaera jafarii Müller, 1974. Sample 39.20—39.22 m. 7 – Reticulofenestra minuta Roth, 1970.
Sample 99.00—99.02 m. 8, 16 – Reticulofenestra pseudoumbilica (Gartner, 1967) Gartner, 1969. Sample 99.00—99.02 m. 9, 10 – Spheno-
lithus heteromorphus
 Deflandre, 1953. Sample 39.20—39.22 m. 11 – Rhabdosphaera clavigera Murray & Blackman, 1898. Sample 36.00—
36.02 m.  1214  –  Rhabdosphaera  sicca  Stradner,  1963.  Sample  78.00—78.02 m.  15  –  Cyclicargolithus  floridanus  (Roth  &  Hay,  1967)
Bukry, 1971. Sample 36.00—36.02 m. 17 – Reticulofenestra gelida (Geitzenauer, 1972) Backman, 1978. Sample 99.00—99.02 m. 18, 19 – a
– Pontosphaera multipora (Kamptner, 1948) Roth, 1970; b – Cryptococcolithus mediaperforatus (Varol, 1991) de Kaenel & Villa, 1996.
Sample 78.00—78.02 m. 20, 21, 27, 28 – Coronocyclus nitescens (Kamptner, 1963) Bramlette & Wilcoxon, 1967. Sample 69.20—30.22 m.
22 – Micrantholithus flos Deflandre, 1950. Sample 99.00—99.02 m. 23 – Helicosphaera euphratis Haq, 1966. Sample 39.20—39.22 m.
24 – Micrantholithus sp. Sample 99.00—99.02 m. 25 – Helicosphaera walbersdorfensis Müller, 1974. Sample 99.00—99.02 m. 26 – Holo-
discolithus macroporus
 (Deflandre, 1954) Roth, 1970. Sample 60.00—60.02 m. 29, 30 – Discoaster kuepperi Stradner, 1959. Sample 99.00—
99.02 m. 31, 32 – Helicosphaera carteri (Wallich, 1877) Kamptner, 1954. Sample 99.00—99.02 m. 33, 34 – Coccolithus pelagicus (Wallich,
1871) Schiller, 1930. Sample 60.00—60.02 m. 35, 36 – Geminilithella rotula Kamptner, 1956. Sample 60.00—60.02 m. 37, 38 – Coccolithus
miopelagicus
 Bukry, 1971. Sample 60.00—60.02 m. 3941 – Discoaster sanmiguelensis Bukry, 1981. Sample 60.00—60.02 m. 42 – Discoast-
er variabilis
 Martini & Bramlette, 1963. Sample 60.00—60.02 m. 43 – Discoaster exilis Martini & Bramlette, 1963. Sample 60.00—60.02 m.
44, 45 – Braarudosphaera bigelowii (Gran & Braarud, 1935) Deflandre 1947. Sample 39.20—39.22 m.

to  31.2 m.  Sphenolithus  heteromorphus  was  not  observed  in
interval 4.  Intervals 2  and  5  are  characterized  by  the  highest
percentages of sphenoliths with maximum values of 2.9 % in
interval  2  and  4.2 %  in  interval  5.  A  stepwise  decrease  from
1.6  to  0 %  was  noted  in  interval 3.  Maximal  abundances  of
sphenoliths can be correlated with highest values of magnetic
susceptibility, which is also expressed in the high positive cor-
relation (Table 9). Lower, but still significant correlations are
found between S. heteromorphus and R. haqii (positively cor-
related) and between S. heteromorphus and R. minuta (nega-
tively correlated; Table 9).

Helicoliths

In  the  Baden-Sooss  core,  Helicosphaera  carteri  and  H.

walbersdorfensis  occur  regularly  but  in  low  percentages.
Helicosphaera carteri (Fig. 3h), a cosmopolitan species, oc-
curs in low percentages from 0 to 5.8 % (in sample 34.0 to
34.02 m). A slight enrichment of this species in three inter-
vals (from 72.00 to 77.02 m, 33.2 to 36.02 m and from 8 to
17.23 m)  is  remarkable.  Helicosphaera  walbersdorfensis,  a
small form, which decreases in abundance along the core is
used  to  define  the  Middle  Miocene  MNN5a/MNN5b  Sub-
zones  in  the  Mediterranean  region  (Fornaciari  et  al.  1996).
Samples  from  Baden-Sooss  contain  low  percentages  with
higher proportions in the lowermost part of the core showing
a  maximum  of  14.5 %  in  sample  100.80—100.83 m.  Heli-
cosphaera walbersdorfensis
 is replaced by H. carteri, which
shows  increasing  values  within  the  counted  50  helicoliths
(Fig. 3g) that can be correlated with higher magnetic suscep-
tibility. This replacement is also found in the significant neg-
ative  correlation  between  the  two  helicolith  species
(Table 9).

Reworking

Reworked  specimens  were  counted  through  the  borehole

Baden-Sooss  and  alphabetically  listed  in  Table 2.  They  are
represented  by  the  Late  Cretaceous  taxa  Arkhangelskiella
cymbiformis,  A.  maastrichtiana
,  Biscutum  ellipticum,  Broin-
sonia parka constricta
, Watznaueria barnesae etc. Reworked

Paleogene  to  Early  Miocene  specimens  are  more  common:
Chiasmolithus grandis, Discoaster kuepperi, D. lodoensis, D.
multiradiatus
,  Ericsonia  formosa,  Helicosphaera  mediterra-
nea
Reticulofenestra bisecta, R. dictyoda, Sphenolithus radi-
ans
, Toweius spp., Zygrhablithus bijugatus etc.

Different concentrations of reworked taxa allow us to dis-

tinguish  six  intervals  in  the  Baden-Sooss  core  (Fig. 3j,  Ta-
ble 6):  intervals 2,  4  and  6  with  higher  percentages  and
intervals 1,  3  and  5  with  lower  percentages.  The  intervals
can be positively correlated with magnetic susceptibility. Es-
pecially  higher  percentages  of  reworking  in  interval 6  and
the prominent peak in interval 5 (sample 22.00—22.03 m) in-
dicate higher tectonic activity.

Discoasterids

Discoasterids  are  well  preserved,  but  they  occur  sporadi-

cally  in  very  low  percentages,  which  do  not  exceed  1.86 %
(Sample  10.00—10.03 m).  They  are  represented  by  Disco-
aster  adamanteus
,  D.  deflandrei,  D.  exilis,  D.  formosus,  D.
musicus
, D. sanmiguelensis, D. variabilis and Discoaster sp.

Multivariate analyses

Cluster  analysis  by  Ward’s  method  differentiated  4  clus-

ters  (Fig. 4).  All  characteristic  species  are  present  in  Clus-
ter 1
 demonstrating high indicator values (IV) from 15 to 32
(Table 10). The most significant species are Reticulofenestra
haqii
  (IV 32)  and  Helicosphaera  walbersdorfensis  (IV 30)
followed after a gap by R. minuta (IV 26). The central posi-
tion of Cluster 1 within the remaining classes is demonstrat-
ed by nMDS (Fig. 5), where samples belonging to Cluster 1
intermingle with Cluster 2, while the broad contact to Clus-
ter 4 and the narrow contact to Cluster 3 are contiguous.

Therefore, the separation of Cluster 2 from the former is arti-

ficial caused by the necessity of creating distinct classes in hier-
archical classification (Fig. 4). Nevertheless, the second cluster
differs from the former in two respects. First, a single species
(R. minuta) has as indicator values (IV 29) distinctly higher than
in  other  species;  second,  Sphenolithus    heteromorphus  is  ex-
tremely rare. In nMDS, samples belonging to this cluster are lo-

background image

452

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER

cated on the left side of the first axis and range in the sec-
ond axis from the centre to the lower part (Fig. 5).

All  species  again  are  present  in  Cluster 3,  but  with

other  species  possessing  high  indicator  values  (Ta-
ble 10).  Coccolithus  pelagicus  (IV 36)  is  accompanied
by H. carteri (IV 33), thus both are separated from the
remaining  species  that  possess  IV’s  less  than  25.  But
the most significant components are ‘reworked species’
with  a  IV  of  38.  Samples  of  Cluster 3  are  located  in
nMDS in the centre of the first axis similar to Cluster 1,
but in contrast to the latter they are concentrated in the
upper part of the second axis (Fig. 5).

All  species  can  be  found  in  Cluster 4  (Fig. 4,  Ta-

ble 10), with Umbilicosphaera jafarii as the main indica-
tor  species  (IV 43),  accompanied  by  R.  pseudoumbilica
(IV 32). While in nMDS samples belonging to Cluster 4
are positioned in the centre of the second axis, they dom-
inate the right part of the first axis (Fig. 5).

The  sequence  of  clusters  along  the  core  is  shown  in

Fig. 6b, where intensities of changes in the floral com-
position  are  also  figured  (Fig. 6c).  The  first  interval
(Period 1) from 77 to 102 m is characterized by samples
alternating  between  Clusters 1  and  2.  It  can  be  parti-
tioned into three sections, where in the first section (Pe-
riod 1.1
)  between  94  and  102 m  the  samples  behave
constantly and are located in nMDS in the intermingling
zone  between  Clusters 1  and  2  (Fig. 5).  The  following
Period 1.2  between  88  and  94 m  is  characterized  by
stronger  sample  oscillations  between  Clusters 1  and  2.
The  last  subinterval  (Period 1.3)  between  77  and  88 m
remains  more  or  less  constantly  with  a  dominance  of
samples belonging to Cluster 2. After a strong change at
77 m the next interval (Period 2) shows samples mainly
belonging to Cluster 3 (Fig. 6c). Period 2 is abruptly fin-
ished at 71 m.  Period 3 starts with strong sample alter-
ations  between  Clusters 2  and  4  in  the  first  3  meters,
afterwards  remaining  constant  until  61 m  with  samples
belonging  to  Cluster 4.  The  following  interval  between
41  and  61 m  (Period 4)  shows  a  differentiation  into  3
sub-intervals. Period 4.1 ranging from 54 to 61 m is dis-
tinguished by low oscillating samples belonging to Clus-
ter 2.  Strong  oscillations  within  Cluster 2  and  some
contact  to  Cluster 3  marks  samples  of  the  interval  be-
tween 48 and 54 m (Period 4.2). The last interval (Peri-
od 4.3
) is characterized by a minor trend in samples from
Cluster 2 to Cluster 1. The strongest oscillations in nan-
noplankton compositions can be found in the interval be-
tween 34 and 41 m (Period 5), where samples belonging
to  Clusters 1,  3  and  4  alternate  intensively  (Fig. 5c).
Samples of the following Period 6 from 23 to 34 m be-
have  more  constantly  showing  a  slight  tendency  from
Clusters 3 and 2 to Cluster 1. This tendency is abruptly
interrupted  at  22 m  (the  single  sample  belongs  to  Clus-
ter 3) followed by Period 7, where all samples belong to
Cluster 2. This period again is abruptly finished at 14 m
(the single sample belongs to Cluster 4) and samples of
the  following  Period 8  (from  10  to  13 m)  are  members
of  Cluster 3.  The  last  2  samples  (8  and  9 m)  belong  to
Clusters 1 and 2.

Interval 

Depth in m  

(samples) 

C. pelagicus  

Mean

% 

Median

% 

                  8 to 22.00–22.03  

3.6 to 9.7 

7.12  

6.37  

22.00–22.03 to 37.20–37.22 

1.3 to 16 

8.09 

7.47  

37.20–37.22 to 48.00–48.02 

0.8 to 9.6 

4.62  

3.58  

48.00–48.02 to 78.00–78.02 

0.9 to 12.3 

5.54  

5.03  

78.00–78.02 to 98.00–98.02 

   0 to 5.4 

3.12  

3.27  

98.00–98.02 to 101.80–101.82 

2.7 to 14.8 

5.40  

4.26  

 

Section 

Depth in m  

(samples) 

Reticulofenestra 

pseudoumbilica % 

Mean

% 

Median

% 

3D                    8 to 21.20 

   0 to 7.1  

2.51  

1.86  

3C             21.20 to 34.00–34.02 

0.3 to 2.3  

1.14  

0.97  

3B 

34.00–34.02 to 48.00–48.02 

0.9 to 7.8  

4.57  

3.92  

3A  48.00–48.02 to 55.00–55.02 

0.9 to 4.8  

2.48  

2.48  

55.00–55.02 to 80.00–80.02 

3.9 to 19.4  

9.29  

8.74  

80.00–80.02 to 101.80–101.82 

0.6 to 8.8  

4.87  

4.61  

 

Interval 

Depth in m 

(samples) 

Reticulofenestra

minuta % 

Mean 

% 

Median

% 

                  8 to 15.20–15.22 

48.8 to 74.2  

60.69 

61.01  

15.20–15.22 to 31.20–31.23 

56.7 to 85.1  

72.53 

73.35  

31.20–31.23 to 42.00–42.02 

42.9 to 65.2  

55.58 

58.02  

42.00–42.02 to 60.00–60.02 

63.1 to 89  

75.32 

76.44  

60.00–60.02 to 78.00–78.02 

41.4 to 70.9  

55.47 

53.75  

78.00–78.02 to 101.80–101.82 

46.6 to 86.5  

69.98 

70.49  

 

Interval 

Depth in m 

(samples) 

Umbilicosphaera

jafarii % 

Mean 

% 

Median

% 

                  8 to 36.00–36.02 

   0 to 13.8  

  4.43     4.15  

36.00–36.02 to 43.00–43.02 

6.4 to 23.6  

12.79   10.48  

43.00–43.02 to 61.00–61.02 

   0 to 9.9  

  1.67 

  0.78  

61.00–61.02 to 70.00–70.02 

1.9 to 29.3  

15.31   16.19  

70.00–70.02 to 88.00–88.02 

1.9 to 12.5  

  6.97     7.39  

88.00–88.02 to 101.80–101.82 

   0 to 4.9  

  1.71     1.04  

 

Interval 

Depth in m 

(samples) 

Sphenolithus 

heteromorphus + 

S. moriformis % 

Mean 

% 

Median

% 

                  8 to 31.20–31.23 

0 to 2.9  

0.81  

0.45  

31.20–31.23 to 49.00–49.02 

0 to 4.2  

1.47  

1.49  

49.00–49.02 to 61.00–61.02 

0 to 0.6  

0.26  

0.30 

61.00–61.02 to 79.00–79.02 

0 to 1.6  

0.55  

0.33  

79.00–79.02 to 93.00–93.02 

0 to 2.9  

1.27  

1.17  

93.00–93.02 to 101.80–101.82 

0 to 1.3  

0.29  

0.12  

 

Interval 

Depth in m  

(samples) 

Reworked  

Mean 

% 

Median 

% 

                  8 to 15.20–15.22 

0.3 to 17.8      10.6 

   13.77  

15.20–15.22 to 28.00–28.02 

   0 to 19.6        3.55       2.5  

28.00–28.02 to 48.00–48.02 

 0 to 8.4  

     2.65       1.76  

48.00–48.02 to 81.00–81.02 

 0 to 2.5  

     1.07       0.95  

81.00–81.02 to 94.00–94.02 

   0 to 4.04        1.44       1.5  

94.00–94.02 to 101.80–101.82 

 0 to 0.9  

     0.38       0.33  

 

Table 2:  Subdivision  of  the  borehole  Baden-Sooss  based  on  the  abun-
dance pattern of Reticulofenestra pseudoumbilica.

Table 1:  Subdivision  of  the  borehole  Baden-Sooss  based  on  the  abun-
dance pattern of Coccolithus pelagicus.

Table 3:  Subdivision  of  the  borehole  Baden-Sooss  based  on  the  abun-
dance pattern of Reticulofenestra minuta.

Table 4:  Subdivision  of  the  borehole  Baden-Sooss  based  on  the  abun-
dance pattern of Umbilicosphaera jafarii.

Table 5:  Subdivision  of  the  borehole  Baden-Sooss  based  on  the  abun-
dance patterns of S. heteromorphus and S. moriformis.

Table 6:  Subdivision  of  the  borehole  Baden-Sooss  based  on  the  abun-
dance pattern of reworked specimens.

background image

453

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON FROM BADEN-SOOSS SECTION (AUSTRIA)

Fig. 3. a—j – Distribution patterns of selected calcareous nannofossils in the Baden-Sooss core, plotted versus depth and their relation to
magnetic susceptibility.

Discussion

In a first step, the environmental behaviour of the promi-

nent  species  will  be  discussed.  Among  the  nannoplankton,
Coccolithus pelagicus

 is well known as an important paleo-

ecologic  marker.  This  species  as  an  r-strategist  is  abundant
in cold water (Okada & McInyre 1979; Winter et al. 1994).
A high amount of C. pelagicus indicates higher nutrient lev-
els  and  eutrophic  conditions.  This  species  occurs  at  water
temperatures  between  —1.5°  and  +15 °C,  with  the  highest

background image

454

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER

Fig. 4. Dendrogram of sample clusters resulting from Ward’s method.

Fig. 5. Nonmetrical Multidimensional Scaling (nMDS) of samples and position of species in the axes system.

background image

455

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON FROM BADEN-SOOSS SECTION (AUSTRIA)

Table 7: The distribution of autochthonous calcareous nannofossils in the borehole Baden-
Sooss, alphabetically arranged.

Species 

Specimen

number 

Number of

samples 

Acanthoica cohenii (Jerkovic, 1971) Aubry, 1999 

      85 

  41 

Braarudosphaera bigelowii (Gran & Braarud, 1935) Deflandre, 1947 

      57 

  39 

Calcidiscus leptoporus (Murray & Blackman, 1898) Loeblich & Tappan, 1978 

      31 

  22 

Calcidiscus premacintyrei Theodoridis, 1984 

        6 

    3 

Calcidiscus tropicus Kamptner, 1956 

        2 

    2 

Calciosolenia murrayi Gran, 1912 

        1 

    1 

Coccolithus miopelagicus Bukry, 1971 

      25 

  20 

Coccolithus pelagicus (Wallich, 1871) Schiller, 1930 

  1855 

100 

Coccolithus sp. 

        9 

    9 

Coronocyclus nitescens (Kamptner, 1963) Bramlette & Wilcoxon, 1967 

      40 

  30 

Coronosphaera mediterranea (Lohmann, 1902) Gaarder, 1977 

    202 

  78 

Cryptococcolithus mediaperforatus (Varol, 1991) de Kaenel & Villa, 1996  

      82 

  36 

Cyclicargolithus floridanus (Roth & Hay, 1967) Bukry, 1971 

    243 

  68 

Discoaster adamanteus Bramlette & Wilcoxon, 1967 

        8 

    8 

Discoaster deflandrei Bramlette & Riedel, 1954 

        4 

    4 

Discoaster exilis Martini & Bramlette, 1963 

        5 

    5 

Discoaster formosus Martini & Worsley, 1971  

        6 

    4 

Discoaster musicus Stradner, 1959 

      11 

    9 

Discoaster sanmiguelensis Bukry, 1981 

        3 

    2 

Discoaster variabilis Martini & Bramlette, 1963 

      20 

  15 

Discoaster sp. 

        8 

    7 

Geminilithella rotula Kamptner, 1956 

    150 

  63 

Hayella challengeri (Müller, 1974) Theodoridis, 1984 

      32 

  23 

Helicosphaera carteri (Wallich, 1877) Kamptner, 1954 

    446 

  90 

Helicosphaera euphratis Haq, 1966 

        6 

    6 

Helicosphaera granulata (Bukry & Percival, 1971) Jafar & Martini, 1975 

        1 

    1 

Helicosphaera minuta Müller, 1981 

      74 

  45 

Helicosphaera vedderi Bukry, 1981 

        3 

    3 

Helicosphaera walbersdorfensis Müller, 1974 

    625 

  93 

Helicosphaera wallichi (Lohmann, 1902) Boudreaux & Hay, 1969 

        3 

    2 

Helicosphaera sp. 

        4 

    3 

Holodiscolithus macroporus (Deflandre, 1954) Roth, 1970 

      55 

  39 

Ilselithina fusa Roth, 1970 

      19 

  14 

Lithostromation perdurum Deflandre, 1942 

        2 

    2 

Micrantholithus articulatus Bukry & Percival, 1971 

      14 

  13 

Micrantholithus flos Deflandre, 1954 

      11 

    9 

Micrantholithus vesper Deflandre, 1950 

      50 

  37 

Perforocalcinella fusiformis Bona, 1964 

        4 

    4 

Pontosphaera discopora Schiller, 1925 

        2 

    2 

Pontosphaera multipora (Kamptner, 1948) Roth, 1970 

      94 

  56 

Pyrocyclus orangensis (Bukry, 1971) Backman, 1980 

        3 

    2 

Reticulofenestra gelida (Geitzenauer, 1972) Backman, 1978 

    279 

  82 

Reticulofenestra haqii Backman, 1978 

  2596 

102 

Reticulofenestra minuta Roth, 1970 

22467 102 

Reticulofenestra pseudoumbilicus (Gartner, 1967) Gartner, 1969 

  1685 

  99 

Reticulofenestra sp. 

      83 

  33 

Rhabdosphaera clavigera Murray & Blackman, 1898  

      10 

    9 

Rhabdosphaera pannonica Báldi-Beke, 1960 

        2 

    2 

Rhabdosphaera procera Martini, 1969 

        2 

    2 

Rhabdosphaera sicca Stradner, 1963 

    110 

  58 

Rhabdosphaera sp. 

        6 

    6 

Sphenolithus abies Deflandre, 1954 

        2 

    2 

Sphenolithus heteromorphus Deflandre, 1953 

    140 

  57 

Sphenolithus milanetti Olafsson & Rio 

        3 

    3 

Sphenolithus moriformis (Brönnimann & Stradner, 1960)                                   

Bramlette & Wilcoxon, 1967  

    129 

 

  59 

 

Sphenolithus sp. 

      13 

  11 

Syracosphaera pulchra Lohmann, 1902 

      51 

  36 

Thoracosphaera heimii (Lohmann, 1919) Kamptner, 1941 

        5 

    5 

Thoracosphaera saxea Stradner, 1961 

        7 

    7 

Triquetrorhabdulus challengeri Perch-Nielsen, 1971 

        1 

    1 

Triquetrorhabdulus milowii Bukry, 1971 

        4 

    4 

Triquetrorhabdulus sp. 

        1 

    1 

Umbilicosphaera jafarii Müller, 1974 

  1828 

  96 

 

concentration  found  between  + 2°
and  + 12 °C.  Higher  percentages  of
C. pelagicus were documented in the
Lower  Miocene  (Karpatian,  Laa  Fm)
and the lowermost part of the Middle
Miocene  (clastic  sequence  of  the
Lower  Badenian)  from  the  borehole
Roggendorf-1  in  the  neighbouring
Molasse  Basin  (Ćorić  &  Rögl  2004).
Higher percentages of C. pelagicus in
nannoplankton  assemblages  during
intervals 1,  3  and  5  indicate  cooling,
whereas lower values in intervals 2, 4
and 6 point to slight warming during
these periods.

Haq  (1980)  concluded  that  small

reticulofenestrids  dominate  nanno-
plankton  assemblages  along  conti-
nental  margins.  They  were  used  for
the  paleoecological  interpretation  of
Lower/Middle  Miocene  sediments
from  the  borehole  Roggendorf-1  in
the Austrian Alpine-Carpathian Fore-
deep  (Molasse  Basin;  Ćorić  &  Rögl
2004).  Blooms  of  Reticulofenestra
minuta
 

in  Badenian  sediments  were

interpreted as indicators of a warmer,
better-stratified water column in con-
trast  to  Karpatian  assemblages  with
dominance  of  C.  pelagicus.  High
numbers  of  small  reticulofenestrids
(Reticulofenestra  minuta)  were  also
documented by Tomanová Petrová &
Švábenická  (2006)  in  the  Carpathian
Foredeep, Moravia in the Lower Bad-
enian  strata.  Wade  &  Bown  (2006)
investigated the co-occurrence of dia-
toms  and  abundant  Reticulofenestra
minuta 
in extreme paleoenvironments
during the Messinian salinity crises in
the Polemi Basin (Cyprus). They con-
cluded  that  this  species  tolerates
brackish  to  hypersaline  environments.
Abundant  R.  minuta  in  low  diversity
assemblages  occurs  there  before  and
after  the  deposition  of  evaporates
(Wade & Bown 2006).

Umbilicosphaera  jafarii

  is  wide-

spread  in  Badenian  sediments  from
the  Central  Paratethys.  The  paleo-
ecology  of  this  form  is  not  well
known  yet.  Wade  &  Bown  (2006)
found  that  U.  jafarii  flourishes  in
shallow  water  and  the  dominance  in
nannoplankton assemblages points to
hypersaline  paleoconditions.  Higher
percentages of U. jafarii in the inter-
vals 3  and  5  could  point  to  slightly
increased salinity.

background image

456

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER

 

Species 

Specimen 

number 

Number of

samples 

Biantholithus sp. 

1 1 

Blackites sp. 

2 1 

Chiasmolithus grandis (Bramlette & Riedel, 1964) Radomski, 1968 

3 2 

Chiasmolithus sp. 

3 3 

Clausiococcus fenestratus (Deflandre & Fert, 1954) Prins, 1979  

2 2 

Cribrocentrum reticulatum (Gartner & Smith, 1967) Perch-Nielsen, 1971 

1 1 

Cruciplacolithus sp. 

1 1 

Discoaster barbardiensis Tan, 1927 

2 2 

Discoaster gemmeus Stradner, 1959 

3 3 

Discoaster kuepperi Stradner, 1959 

17 12 

Discoaster lodoensis Bramlette & Riedel, 1954 

22 18 

Discoaster mirus Deflandre, 1954 

3 3 

Discoaster multiradiatus Bramlette & Riedel, 1954 

19 16 

Discoaster tanii Bramlette & Riedel, 1954 

1 1 

Discoaster sp. 

19 11 

Ellipsolithus macellus (Bramlette & Sullivan, 1961) Sullivan, 1964 

2 2 

Ericsonia formosa (Kamptner, 1954) Haq, 1971 

20 17 

Ericsonia robusta (Bramlette & Sullivan, 1961) Edwards & Perch-Nielsen, 1975 

2 2 

Fascicullithus sp. 

1 1 

Helicosphaera lophota Bramlette & Sullivan, 1961 

3 3 

Helicosphaera mediterranea Müller, 1981 

1 1 

Neochiastozygus sp. 

3 3 

Pontosphaera duocava (Bramlette & Sullivan, 1961) Romein, 1979 

1 1 

Prinsius martinii (Perch-Nielsen, 1969) Haq, 1971 

14 13 

Reticulofenestra bisecta (Hay, 1966) Roth, 1970 

6 6 

Reticulofenestra dictyoda (Deflandre, 1954) Stradner, 1968 

11 6 

Sphenolithus conicus Bukry, 1971 

1 1 

Sphenolithus disbelemnos Fornaciari & Rio, 1996 

2 2 

Sphenolithus editus Perch-Nielsen, 1978 

1 1 

Sphenolithus furcatolithoides Locker, 1967 

1 1 

Sphenolithus radians Deflandre, 1952 

23 18 

Sphenolithus spiniger Bukry, 1971 

2 2 

Toweius sp. 

234 53 

Tribrachiatus orthostylus Shamarai, 1963 

11 10 

Zygrhablithus bijugatus (Deflandre, 1954) Deflandre, 1959 

44 26 

 

Table 8: a – The distribution of calcareous nannofossils reworked from the Paleogene/Early Neogene in the borehole Baden-Sooss, alpha-
betically arranged. – The distribution of calcareous nannofossils reworked from the Cretaceous in the borehole Baden-Sooss, alphabeti-
cally arranged.

a

b

Species 

Specimen

number 

Number of 

samples 

Arkhangelskiella cymbiformis Vekshina, 1959 

12 9 

Arkhangelskiella maastrichtiana Burnett, 1998 

2 2 

Biscutum ellipticum (Górka, 1957) Grün, 1975 

9 5 

Broinsonia parca (Stradner, 1963) Bukry, 1969 ssp. constricta Hattner et al. 1980 

4 4 

Calculites obscurus (Deflandre, 1959) Prins & Sissingh, 1977 

6 5 

Ceratolithoides sesquipedalis Burnett, 1998 

2 1 

Cribrosphaerella ehrenbergii (Arkhangelsky, 1912) Deflandre, 1952 

6 3 

Cyclagelosphaera reinhardtii (Perch-Nielsen, 1968) Romein, 1977 

5 5 

Eiffellithus gorkae Reinhardt, 1965 

13 12 

Eiffellithus turriseiffelii (Deflandre, 1954) Reinhardt, 1965 

3 3 

Lucianorhabdus cayexii Deflandre, 1959 

1 1 

Microrhabdulus decoratus Deflandre, 1959 

3 3 

Micula decussata Vekshina, 1959 

47 21 

Placozygus fibuliformis (Reinhardt, 1964) Hoffmann, 1970 

8 8 

Prediscosphaera cretacea (Arkhangelsky, 1912) Gartner, 1968 

33 16 

Reinhardtites levis Prins & Sissingh, 1977 

4 3 

Retecapsa crenulata (Bramlette & Martini, 1964) Grün, 1975 

4 4 

Uniplanarius gothicus (Deflandre, 1959) Hattner & Wise, 1980 

2 2 

Watznaueria barnesae (Black, 1959) Perch-Nielsen, 1968 

192 70 

Watznaueria biporta Bukry, 1969 

2 2 

Watznaueria britannica (Stradner, 1963) Reinhardt, 1964 

7 7 

Watznaueria fossacincta (Black, 1971) Bown, 1989 

12 10 

Zeugrhabdotus diplogramus (Deflandre, 1954) Burnett, 1996 

4 4 

 

background image

457

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON FROM BADEN-SOOSS SECTION (AUSTRIA)

Fig. 6. a – Sedimentary characteristic of the core. b – Cluster sequence along the core. c – Dissimilarities in community composition
between subsequent samples. d – Sequence of sample values in axis 1 of nMDS and fit by sinusoidal regression. e – Sequence of sample
values in axis 2 of nMDS and fit by sinusoidal regression.

The main and extremely significant negative correlation of

U. jafarii with R. minuta confirms the response of U. jafarii to
elevated  salinity  conditions  in  contrast  to  R.  minuta,  which
seems to be characteristic for slightly lowered salinities.

Perch-Nielsen (1985) concluded that sphenoliths occurred

in shallow environments. Generally they preferred warm wa-
ters. They were common in oligotrophic environments.

Helicoliths are common in shallow, near continental envi-

ronments  indicating  an  upwelling  regime  (Perch-Nielsen
1985). A slight enrichment of Helicosphaera carteri in three
intervals points to turbulent water during these periods. This
is  also  indicated  by  the  high  correlation  with  C.  pelagicus
and  the  ‘reworked  nannoplankton’  together  with  the  strong
negative correlation to R. minuta, because the latter indicates
quieter conditions (Table 9).

Discoasterids are directly related to water temperature. This

K-selected group is generally common in oligotrophic, warm
and deep oceanic water. Discoasterids characterize stable pa-
leoenvironments  (Lohmann  &  Carlson  1981;  Aubry  1992;
Young  1998).  Thus  the  highest  diversifications  of  discoast-

erids within thanatocoenoses usually correspond to a warmer
climate.  Low  percentages  of  these  forms  without  abundance
oscillations point to a sedimentation milieu close to the coast.

According  to  these  environmental  demands  of  the  nanno-

plankton  dominating  in  the  core,  the  obtained  clusters  can
now interpreted as follows:

Cluster 1: This cluster seems to characterize intermediate,

‘normal’  conditions  of  the  environment  in  the  Baden-Sooss
core, because all species can be found in this class, but with
different proportions. Beside R. minuta that is abundant in the
whole core, R. haqii and H. walbersdorfensis characterize this
cluster due to higher percentages. The rare S. heteromorphus
gets the highest indicator values within all classes (Table 10).
This cluster gradually merges with Cluster 2 as demonstrated
by nMDS (Fig. 5).

Cluster 2:  The  dominance  of  R.  minuta  and  the  virtually

complete disappearance of S. heteromorphus hints at a pale-
oenvironment  slightly  deviating  from  conditions  found  in
Cluster 1.  According  to  the  environmental  demands  of  R.
minuta
 and the lowered percentages of the other species, this

background image

458

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER

cluster may indicate a marginally lowered sa-
linity and slightly elevated temperatures.

Cluster 3: Lowered temperatures and high-

er  nutrient  levels  characterizing  a  shift  to
eutrophic  conditions  are  indicated  by  high
proportions of C. pelagicus (Table 10). There-
fore,  this  cluster  may  indicate  non-stratified
turbulent water masses.

Cluster 4:  The  main  species  in  this  cluster

is U. jafarii demonstrating the highest indica-
tor  values  within  all  species  (Table 10).  The
opposite role of U. jafarii to R. minuta is first
demonstrated by the highest negative correla-
tion  within  all  comparisons  between  species
(Table 9) and second by the opposite positions
within nMDS axis 1 (Fig. 5). This confirms the
interpretation of Wade & Bown (2006) that U.
jafarii
  preferred  hypersaline  conditions,  and
so  Cluster 4  may  indicate  slightly  elevated  sa-
linity caused by well-stratified water masses.

According  to  the  environmental  interpreta-

tions of Cluster 1 to 4, their position within the
nMDS axis allows an interpretation of axes as
environmental gradients (Fig. 5). The position
of the characteristic species R. minuta at lower
values of Axis 2 and C. pelagicus at the higher
values allows an equalization of Axis 2 with a
decreasing  temperature  gradient,  where  the
range  of  this  gradient  does  not  seem  to  be
enormous.  Similar  to  this  interpretation,  the
positions of R. minuta and U. jafarii on oppo-
site sides of Axis 1 (Fig. 5) allows its equaliza-
tion  with  an  increasing  salinity  gradient.
Again,  the  range  in  salinity  should  be  within
euhaline conditions.

Values of the nMDS-axes can now be used

for  determining  trends  in  salinity  and  paleo-
temperature  along  the  core  (Fig. 5d  and  5e),
which  also  explains  the  changes  in  different
periods:

During Period 1 (77 to 102 m) a salinity in-

crease is coupled with rising temperatures that
peak in Subperiod 1.2. While during Subperi-
od 1.3 salinity continues to increase, tempera-
ture  slightly  decreases.  Salinity  still  increases
during Period 2 (71 to 77 m), but temperature
declines  to  a  local  minimum  in  the  tempera-
ture curve (Fig. 6) that is reached at the bound-
ary to the following interval. This minimum is
expressed  in  the  higher  proportion  of  C.  pe-
lagicus
.  The  salinity  maximum  can  be  found
in  Period 3  (61  to  71 m),  while  temperature
starts to increase at the beginning of this peri-
od  (Fig. 6).  The  dominance  of  Cluster  4  with
U. jafarii is characteristic. Salinity is low dur-
ing Period 4 (41 to 61 m), where it reaches the
absolute minimum in the middle of this period
(Subperiod 4.2), starting to increase in the last
Subperiod 4.3  (Fig. 6).  Temperature  demon-

Table 9:

 Correlation matrix between physical-chemical parameters and na

nnoplankton groups. Below the correlation coefficients the prob

ability of non-correlation is marked. Signifcant corre-

lations 

in 

bold 

numbers.

 

magn

etic

 sus

cepti

bility 

δ

13

C 

δ

18

O 

Coccol

ithus

 pelagicu

s  

Reti

culof

en

est

ra  

    

pseu

doum

bilic

a 

Reti

culof

en

est

ra  

 

minuta

 

Reti

cul

ofe

nest

ra haq

ii  

Um

bilic

osph

aer

a   

jafar

ii 

Sphe

nolit

hus     

       

hete

rom

orp

hus 

Hel

ico

sphaer

a carteri 

Hel

ico

sph

aer

a    

   

walber

sdor

fen

sis

 

rew

orke

–0

.226

 

0.

16

2 0.

20

–0

.1

80

 

–0

.264

 

–0

.1

48

 –0

.0

94

 

0.

03

0.

46

–0

.179

 

0.

50

Co

cc

ol

ith

us

 pe

la

gi

cu

0.

05

0.

17

0.

08

 0.

13

0 0.

02

5 0.

21

0.

43

3 0.

77

0.

00

0 0.

13

0.

00

0.

02

1 –0

.0

95

 

–0

.0

01

 

–0

.1

80

 

–0

.331

 

–0

.0

03

 

0.

19

3 –0

.0

28

 

–0

.0

52

 

–0

.0

39

 –0

.1

72

 

Ret

icu

lof

en

es

tr

a ps

eu

do

um

bi

lic

0.

83

6 0.

42

0.

99

0.

13

  

0.

00

4 0.

98

0.

10

4 0.

81

0.

66

0.

74

5 0.

14

–0

.1

93

 –0

.0

46

 

0.

11

–0

.264

 

–0

.331

 

–0

.471

 

–0

.715

 –

0.

257

 

–0

.358

 

–0

.046

 

–0

.359

 

R

eti

cu

lo

fe

ne

st

ra

 m

inuta

 

0.

10

5 0.

70

0.

33

0.

02

0.

00

4  

0.

00

0.

00

0 0.

03

0.

00

2 0.

70

0.

00

0.

17

8 –0

.1

38

 

–0

.0

62

 

–0

.1

48

 

–0

.0

03

 

–0

.471

 

1 0.

18

0.

25

–0

.1

74

 0.

03

0.

02

Ret

icu

lof

en

es

tr

a h

aqi

0.

13

5 0.

24

0.

60

0.

21

0.

98

0.

00

  0.

11

0.

02

8 0.

14

0.

78

0.

84

0.

22

0.

09

4 –0

.1

57

 

–0

.0

94

 

0.

19

–0

.715

 

0.

18

1 0.

19

0.

21

0.

03

0 0.

08

U

m

bi

lic

os

ph

ae

ra

 ja

fa

ri

0.

06

4 0.

43

1 0.

18

0.

43

0.

10

0.

00

0 0.

11

 0.

10

0.

07

0.

80

2 0.

48

0.

41

–0

.0

76

 –0

.1

88

 

0.

03

–0

.0

28

 

–0

.2

57

 0.

25

0.

19

5 1 

–0

.0

13

 

–0

.0

49

 

0.

11

Sp

he

nol

ithus he

te

ro

m

or

phus 

0.

00

0.

52

0.

11

0.

77

9 0.

81

7 0.

03

0 0.

02

0.

10

  

0.

91

0.

68

5 0.

34

–0

.0

10

 0.

01

–0

.1

01

 

0.

46

–0

.052

 

–0

.358

 

–0

.1

74

 0.

21

–0

.0

13

 

–0

.253

 

0.

45

H

el

ic

osph

aer

a car

ter

0.

93

3 0.

87

9 0.

39

0.

00

0 0.

66

0.

00

2 0.

14

0.

07

6 0.

91

 

0.

03

0.

00

0.

08

5 –0

.0

62

 –0

.0

97

 

–0

.1

79

 

–0

.0

39

 

–0

.0

46

 

0.

03

0.

03

–0

.0

49

 

–0

.253

 

1 –0

.1

02

 

H

eli

co

sp

ha

er

a wa

lb

er

sd

or

fe

ns

is

 

0.

47

0.

60

0.

41

0.

13

3 0.

74

5 0.

70

1 0.

78

0.

80

2 0.

68

0.

03

  0.

39

0.

22

0.

16

0 –0

.0

94

 

0.

50

–0

.172

 

–0

.359

 

0.

02

4 0.

08

0.

11

0.

45

–0

.1

02

 1 

re

wo

rk

ed

 

0.

05

3 0.

18

0.

43

0.

00

0 0.

14

0.

00

2 0.

84

0.

48

1 0.

34

0.

00

0 0.

39

 

 

background image

459

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON FROM BADEN-SOOSS SECTION (AUSTRIA)

strates the opposite trend by reaching a local maximum during
Subperiod 4.2.  Period 5  (34  to  41 m)  resembles  Period  3  in
having a salinity maximum at the beginning of the period, but
temperature behaves opposite to Period 3 in this period by be-
coming colder. The strong oscillations between clusters within
this period (Fig. 6c) could be affected by the loss of sedimen-
tation (and time) in the upper core part due to high tectonic ac-
tivity  (Hohenegger  et  al.  2008).  Salinity  decreases  at  the
beginning of Period 6 (23 to 34 m) and remains constant dur-
ing Periods 7 and 8 until the end of the core. This trend posi-
tively  deviates  at  14,  making  a  clear  boundary  between
Periods 7  and  8.  This  extreme  deviation  at  a  single  sample
could also be based on tectonics affecting a loss in sedimenta-
tion.  This  assumption  is  supported  by  high  dissimilarities  in
community composition both to the preceding and subsequent
sample (Fig. 6c). The temperature increases constantly during
Period 6, but is interrupted by a significant falling off at 22 m,
again caused by sedimentation loss, marking the border to the
following period. Salinity shows a local minimum during Pe-
riod 7  
(15  to  21 m),  while  temperature  decreases  slightly
(Fig. 6).  Salinity  remains  constant  at  a  medium  level  during
Period 8  (10  to  13 m),  but  temperature  shows  a  local  mini-
mum  returning  to  ‘normal’  conditions  in  the  two  uppermost
core meters.

Conclusions

All  investigated  samples  from  the  scientific  borehole

Baden-Sooss  contain  common  and  well-preserved  nanno-
plankton  assemblages  dominated  by  the  genera  Reticu-
lofenestra
, Coccolithus and Umbilicosphaera.

Biostratigraphically, the borehole Baden-Sooss can be as-

signed to nannoplankton Zone NN5 (S. heteromorphus Zone
of Martini 1971), indicating an Early Badenian age. The low
concentration of H. walbersdorfensis allows correlation with
the MNN5a (S. heteromorphus—H. walbersdorfensis Interval
Subzone of Fornaciari et al. 1996).

The  following  calcareous  nannoplankton  species  were

analysed  for  paleoecogical  interpretation:  C.  pelagicus,  dis-
coasterids,  helicoliths,  reticulofenestrids  (R.  minuta,  R.
pseudoumbilicus
),  sphenoliths  (S.  heteromorphus,  S.  mori-
formis
), U. jafarii, and the participation of reworked nanno-
plankton  from  older  strata.  Coccolithus  pelagicus  is
negatively  correlated  with  magnetic  susceptibility,  thus

Table 10: Indicator values of species for clusters obtained by Ward’s method based on standardized Euclidean Distances. Highest indicator
values in bold numbers.

higher  percentages  of  this  form  coincide  with  lower  values
of magnetic susceptibility and suggest lower water tempera-
ture.  On  the  other  hand,  lower  percentages  of  C.  pelagicus
can  be  correlated  with  peaks  of  magnetic  susceptibility.
These periods suggest warmer water due to the higher inso-
lation.  Periods  of  colder,  non-stratified  water  containing
higher  proportions  of  C.  pelagicus  are  concentrated  in  the
deeper  core  between  71  and  77 m,  when  it  was  replaced  in
the following period by stratified, higher salinity and warmer
water.  A  slight,  but  continual  temperature  decrease  starting
from  50 m  core-depth  upwards  results  in  an  abundance  in-
crease of C. pelagicus also signalizing an eutrophication trend.

Small  reticulofenestrids,  which  occupy  marine  environ-

ments along continental margins, dominate the nannoplank-
ton  assemblages  in  the  core.  Oscillations  in  abundances  of
these  species  could  signalize  changes  in  temperature  infer-
ring warmer, stratified water and lower salinity.

Sphenoliths  can  also  be  used  as  temperature  indicators.

Therefore,  higher  percentages  of  S.  heteromorphus  and  S.
moriformis
 coincide with increased magnetic susceptibility.

Umbilicosphaera  jafarii  is  common  in  shallow  environ-

ments;  and  the  abundance  peaks  reflect  a  slight  increase  in
salinity. The transition from a community with abundant C.
pelagicus
  to  U.  jafarii  needs  a  slight  temperature  increase,
thus these transitions are often found in the core. Transitions
from communities with abundant U. jafarii to communities,
where R. minuta dominates, are discontinuous needing larger
and abrupt environmental changes.

The higher erosion rate on the continent is documented by

high  percentages  of  reworked  calcareous  nannoplankton.
This can be correlated with the intensified input of magnetic
particles as documented by magnetic susceptibility.

Low percentages of discoasterids point to a sedimentation

milieu close to the shoreline.

The  low  variation  in  nannofossil  assemblages  of  the

Baden-Sooss  core  suggests  relatively  low  fluctuating  envi-
ronments during this part of the Lower Badenian. Changes in
the structure of nannoplankton assemblages occurred in peri-
ods that could be related to fluctuations in the Milankovich
astronomical  cycles.  In  the  upper  core  (8  to  40 m)  diminu-
tion  of  the  sediment  record  due  to  tectonics  is  pictured,  on
the  one  side,  in  higher  cluster  oscillations  between  34  and
40 m and, on the other, in the abrupt intercalation of samples
(at 22 m and 14 m) distinctly deviating from samples that are
homogeneous or continually changing within periods.

Cluster 1 

Cluster 2 

Cluster 3 

Cluster 4 

  

  

24 samples 

43 samples 

20 samples 

15 samples 

Coccolithus pelagicus 

21 21 36 

21 

Reticulofenestra pseudoumbilica 

20 21 25 32 

Reticulofenestra minuta 

26 

29 

23 22 

Reticulofenestra haqii 

32 

19 24 25 

Umbilicosphaera jafarii 

19 12 24 43 

Sphenolithus heteromorphus 

22 

  7 

14 

20 

Helicosphaera carteri 

15 17 33 

28 

Helicosphaera walbersdorfensis 

30 

18 25 19 

reworked 20 

19 

38 

22 

 
 
 
 

background image

460

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER

Acknowledgments: This study was financially supported by
the Austrian Science Foundation FWF Project P16793-B06.
Thanks  are  due  to  the  whole  group  working  in  the  above
project,  especially  to  Christian  Rupp  (Geological  Survey,
Wien), Peter Pervesler, Karl Stingl (Institute of Palaeontolo-
gy, Universität Wien), Fred Rögl (Natural History Museum,
Wien),  Anna  Selge,  Robert  Scholger  (Institute  of  Geophys-
ics, Montan Universität Leoben), Maksuda Khatun, Michael
Wagreich (Department of Geodynamics and Sedimentology,
Universität  Wien)  and  Nils  Andersen  (Leibniz  Laboratory,
CAUniversity Kiel).

References

Aubry M.P. 1992: Late Paleogene calcareous nannoplankton evolu-

tion: a tale of climatic deterioration. In: Prothero D.R. & Berg-
gren  W.A.  (Eds.):  Eocene-Oligocene  climatic  and  biotic
evolution. Princeton University Press, 272—309.

Bown P.R. & Young J.R. 1998: Introduction. In: Bown P.R. (Ed.):

Calcareous  nannofossil  biostratigraphy.  Kluwer  Academic
Publications
, Dordrecht, 1—15.

Ćorić S. & Rögl F. 2004: Roggendorf-1 borehole, a key section for

Lower  Badenian  transgressions  and  the  stratigraphic  position
of the Grund Formation. Geol. Carpathica 55, 2, 165—178.

Dufrêne M. & Legendre P. 1997: Species assemblages and indicator

species: The need for a flexible asymmetrical approach.  Eco-
logical Monographs
 67, 3, 345—366.

Fornaciari E. & Rio D. 1996: Latest Oligocene to early middle Mi-

ocene  quantitative  calcareous  nannofossil  biostratigraphy  in
the Mediterranean region. Micropaleontology 42, 1, 1—37.

Fornaciari E., Di Stefano A., Rio D. & Negri A. 1996: Middle Mi-

ocene calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy in the Mediterra-
nean region. Micropaleontology 42, 1, 37—63.

Fornaciari E., Rio D., Ghibaudo G., Massari F. & Iaccarino S. 1997:

Calcareous plankton biostratigraphy of the Serravallian (Mid-
dle Miocene) stratotype section (Piedmont Tertiary Basin, NW
Italy). Mem. Sci. Geol. 49, 127—144.

Fuchs  R.  &  Stradner  H.  1977:  Über  Nannofossilien  im  Badenien

(Mittelmiozän)  der  Zentralen  Paratethys.  Beitr.  Paläont.  Ös-
terr.
 2, 1—58.

Gümbel C.W. 1870: Über Nulliporenkalk und Coccolithen. Verh. K.

Kön. Geol. Reichsanst. Wien, 201—203.

Haq B.U. 1980: Biogeographic history of Miocene calcareous nan-

noplankton  and  paleocaenography  of  the  Atlantic  Ocean.  Mi-
cropaleontology
 26, 414—443.

Hohenegger J., Ćorić S., Khatun M., Pervesler P., Rögl F., Rupp C.,

Selge A., Uchman A. & Wagreich M. 2008: Cyclostratigraphic
dating in the Lower Badenian (Middle Miocene) of the Vienna
Basin  (Austria)  –  the  Baden-Sooss  core.  Int.  J.  Earth  Sci.
DOI 10.1007/s00531-007-0287-7.

Kamptner  E.  1948:  Coccolithen  aus  dem  Torton  des  Inneralpinen

Wiener  Beckens.  Sitz.-Ber.  Österr.  Akad.  Wiss.,  Math.-Natur-
wiss. Kl., Abt. 1, 
157, 1—16.

Linder A. & Berchthold W. 1976: Statistische Auswertung von Pro-

zentzahlen. UTB Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel and Stuttgart, 1—232.

Lohmann G.P. & Carlson J.J. 1981: Oceanographic significance of

Pacific late Miocene calcareous nannoplankton. Mar. Micropa-
leontology
 6, 553—579.

Martini E. 1971: Standard Tertiary and Quartenary calcareous nanno-

plankton  zonation.  In:  Farinacci  A.  (Ed.):  Proceedings  of  the
Second  Planktonic  Conference,  Roma  1970.  Edizioni  Tecno-
scienza
, Roma, 739—785.

McCune B. & Mefford M.J. 1999: PC-ORD. Multivariate analysis

of ecological data, version 4. MjM Software Design, Gleneden
Beach, Oregon, USA, 1—237.

Okada H. & McInyre A. 1979: Seasonal distribution of the modern

Coccolithophores  in  the  western  North  Atlantic  Ocean.  Mar.
Biology
 54, 319—328.

Perch-Nielsen K. 1985: Cenozoic calcareous nannofossils. In: Bolli

H.M.,  Saunders  J.B.  &  Perch-Nielsen  K.  (Eds.):  Plankton
stratigraphy. Cambridge University Press, 427—554.

Rögl F., Ćorić S., Harzhauser M., Kroh A., Schultz O., Wessely G.

&  Zorn  I.  2008:  The  Badenian  stratotype  at  Baden-Sooss,
Lower Austria. Geol. Carpathica 59, 5, 367—374.

Sprovieri R., Bonomo S., Caruso A., di Stefano A., di Stefano E.,

Foresi L.M., Iaccarino S.M., Lirer F., Mazzei R. & Salvatorini
G.  2002:  An  integrated  calcareous  plankton  biostratigraphic
scheme and biochronology for the Mediterranean Middle Mi-
ocene. Riv. Ital. Paleont. Stratigr. 108, 2, 337—353.

SPSS 15.0 for Windows, 2006: Release 15.0.0. SPSS Inc.
Stradner H. & Fuchs R. 1978: Das Nannoplankton in Österreich. In:

Papp A., Cicha I., Seneš J. & Steininger F. (Eds.): Chronostrati-
graphie  und  Neostratotypen:  Miozän  der  Zentralen  Paratethys.
Bd. VI. M

4

, Badenien (Moravien, Wielicien, Kosovien). VEDA

SAV, Bratislava, 489—532.

Švábenická L. 2002: Calcareous nannofossils of the Upper Karpa-

tian and Lower Badenian deposits in the Carpathian Foredeep,
Moravia (Czech Republic). Geol. Carpathica 53, 3, 197—210.

Tomanová Petrová P. & Švábenická L. 2006: Lower Badenian bios-

tratigraphy and paleoecology: a case study from the Carpathian
Foredeep (Czech Republic). Geol. Carpathica 58, 4, 333—352.

Wade  B.S.  &  Bown  P.R.  2006:  Calcareous  nannofossils  in  ex-

treme  environments:  The  Messinian  Salinity  Crisis.  Polemi
Basin,  Cyprus.  Palaeogeogr.  Palaeoclimatol.  Palaeoecol.
233, 271—286.

Wessely G., Ćorić S., Rögl F., Draxler I. & Zorn I. 2007: Geologie

und  Paläontologie  von  Bad  Vöslau  (Niederösterreich).  Jb.
Geol. Bundesanst
. 147, 1—2, 419—448.

Winter A., Jordan R. & Roth P. 1994: Biogeography of living Coc-

colithophores  in  ocean  waters.  In:  Winter  A.  &  Siesser  W.
(Eds.):  Coccolithophores.  Cambridge  University  Press,  Cam-
bridge, 13—37.

Young J.R. 1998: Neogene nannofossils. In: Bown P.R. (Ed.): Cal-

careous Nannofossil Biostratigraphy. Kluwer Academic Publi-
cations
, Dordrecht, 225—265.

background image

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

           Table  1:  Autochthonous calcareous nannoplankton from the Baden-Sooss core. Part 1 from 6.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

De

pt

h (m) 

Aca

nth

oi

ca

 coh

eni

Br

aa

rud

osp

ha

er

a b

igel

owii

 

Ca

lcidi

sc

us

 le

ptopo

ru

Ca

lcidi

sc

us

 pr

em

acint

yrei

 

Ca

lcidi

sc

us

 tr

opi

cus

 

Ca

lcios

ol

en

ia

 m

ur

ra

yi

 

Co

ccol

it

hus

 mio

pe

la

gi

cus

 

Co

ccol

it

hus

 p

ela

gi

cus

 

Co

ccol

it

hus

 sp

. 

Cor

onocyc

lus nites

ce

ns  

Co

ron

osp

ha

era

 m

edi

ter

ran

ea

 

Cr

yp

to

co

ccol

it

hus

 m

ed

iap

erfo

rat

us

 

Cycli

ca

rgo

li

thu

s f

lor

id

anu

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 a

da

m

an

te

us 

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 de

fl

an

dr

ei

 

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 exi

li

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 fo

rm

os

us 

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 m

us

ic

us 

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 s

an

m

ig

ue

le

ns

is

 

D

is

co

ast

er

 var

iab

ili

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 sp

. 

G

em

ini

li

th

el

la

 rot

ula 

  

  

  

  

  

  

14 

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

9.18–9.20 

  

  

  

18 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

10.0–10.03 

  

  

  

25 

  

  

14 

  

  

  

  

11.2–11.22 

  

  

  

20 

  

  

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

12.0–12.02 

  

  

  

31 

  

  

  

17 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

13.25–13.27 

  

  

  

  

30 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

14.0–14.02 

  

  

  

  

25 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

15.2–15.22 

  

  

  

  

  

  

16 

  

  

  

14 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

16.0–16.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

13 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

17.2–17.23 

  

  

  

  

32 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

18.0–18.02 

  

  

  

13 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

19.2–19.23 

  

  

  

  

18 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

20.0–20.04 

  

  

  

  

  

15 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

21.2 

  

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

22.0–22.03 

  

  

  

  

  

  

52 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

23.2–23.22 

  

  

  

  

  

  

18 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

24.0–24.04 

  

  

  

  

25 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

25.2–25.22 

  

  

  

15 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

26.0–26.02 

  

  

  

  

23 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

27.18–27.22 

  

  

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

28.0–28.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

30 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

29.2–29.23 

  

  

  

  

48 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

30.0–30.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

29 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

31.2–31.23 

  

  

  

  

  

17 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

32.0–32.02 

  

  

  

  

35 

  

  

  

  

  

  

33.2–33.22 

  

  

  

  

  

32 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

34.0–34.02 

  

  

  

  

47 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

35.2–35.22 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

36.0–36.02 

  

  

  

49 

17 

  

  

  

  

  

  

37.2–37.22 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

38.0–38.02 

  

  

  

  

  

20 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

39.2–39.22 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

40.0–40.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

32 

  

  

  

  

  

  

41.0–41.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

42.0–42.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

43.0–43.02 

  

  

  

  

  

16 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

44.0–44.02 

  

  

  

  

  

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

45.0–45.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

46.0–46.02 

  

  

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

47.0–47.02 

  

  

  

  

  

16 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

48.0–48.02 

  

  

  

  

  

39 

  

  

  

  

  

  

49.0–49.02 

 

 x 2  

   

   

 x 6  

   

 x x 1 x  

 x  

 x  

 x  

 x 

50.0–50.02 

  

  

  

  

27 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

51.0–51.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

52.0–52.02 

  

  

  

  

34 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

53.0–53.02 

  

  

  

  

  

18 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

54.0–54.02 

  

  

  

  

  

14 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

55.0–55.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

56.0–56.02 

  

  

  

  

10 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

57.0–57.02 

 

 x  

   

   

   

 x 14  

 1 1 2  

 x x x  

 1  

 x  

 x 

58.0–58.02 

  

  

  

  

  

25 

  

  

  

  

  

59.0–59.02 

  

  

  

  

19 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

60.0–60.02 

  

  

  

  

26 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 59, 5 (2008); ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER: QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON; 

ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT,  E1–E9

 

background image

 
 
 
 
 

 

            Table  1:  Continued.  Part 2 from 6.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

De

pt

h (m) 

Aca

nth

oi

ca

 coh

eni

Br

aa

rud

osp

ha

er

a b

igel

owii

 

Ca

lcidi

sc

us

 le

ptopo

ru

Ca

lcidi

sc

us

 pr

em

acint

yrei

 

Ca

lcidi

sc

us

 tr

opi

cus

 

Ca

lcios

ol

en

ia

 m

ur

ra

yi

 

Co

ccol

it

hus

 mio

pe

la

gi

cus

 

Co

ccol

it

hus

 p

ela

gi

cus

 

Co

ccol

it

hus

 sp

. 

Cor

onocyc

lus nites

ce

ns  

Co

ron

osp

ha

era

 m

edi

ter

ran

ea

 

Cr

yp

to

co

ccol

it

hus

 m

ed

iap

erfo

rat

us

 

Cycli

ca

rgo

li

thu

s f

lor

id

anu

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 a

da

m

an

te

us 

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 de

fl

an

dr

ei

 

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 exi

li

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 fo

rm

os

us 

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 m

us

ic

us 

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 s

an

m

ig

ue

le

ns

is

 

D

is

co

ast

er

 var

iab

ili

Di

sc

oa

st

er

 sp

. 

G

em

ini

li

th

el

la

 rot

ula 

61.0–61.02 

  

  

  

  

  

36 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

62.0–62.02 

  

  

  

  

21 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

63.0–63.02 

  

  

  

  

13 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

64.0–64.02 

  

  

  

  

  

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

65.0–65.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

66.0–66.02 

  

  

  

  

  

11 

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

67.0–67.02 

  

  

  

  

23 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

68.0–68.02 

  

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

68.4–68.42 

  

  

  

  

16 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

69.0–69.02 

  

  

  

  

  

21 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

70.0–70.02 

  

  

  

  

  

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

71.0–71.02 

  

  

  

  

  

34 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

72.0–72.02 

  

  

  

  

31 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

73.0–73.02 

  

  

  

  

24 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

74.0–74.02 

  

  

  

19 

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

75.0–75.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

76.0–76.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

31 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

77.0–77.02 

  

  

  

  

  

18 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

78.0–78.02 

  

  

  

  

  

10 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

79.0–79.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

80.0–80.02 

  

  

  

  

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

81.0–81.02 

  

  

  

  

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

82.0–82.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

83.0–83.02 

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

84.0–84.02 

  

  

  

  

  

20 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

84.8–84.82 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

85.0–85.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

86.0–86.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

87.0–87.02 

  

  

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

88.0–88.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

16 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

89.0–89.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

90.0–90.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

91.0–91.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

92.0–92.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

16 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

93.0–93.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

10 

  

  

10 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

94.0–94.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

15 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

95.0–95.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

96.0–96.03 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

97.0–97.02 

  

  

  

  

16 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

98.0–98.02 

  

  

  

  

47 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

99.0–99.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

20 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

100.0–100.02 

  

  

  

  

17 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

100.4–100.42 

  

  

  

  

  

  

16 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

100.6–100.62 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

100.8–100.83 

  

  

  

  

  

  

50 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

101.0–101.02 

  

  

  

  

  

  

17 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

101.2–101.22 

  

  

  

  

  

13 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

101.6–101.62 

  

  

  

  

  

21 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

101.8–101.82 

  

  

  

  

10 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER: QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON; ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

 

 

E2 

background image

 
 
 
 
 
 

Table  1: Continued. Part 3 from 6.

 

 
 

 
 
 

De

pt

h (m)

 

H

ayella

 chal

le

ng

er

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 ca

rt

eri

 

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 eup

hra

ti

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 g

ran

ul

ata

 

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 m

inu

ta

 

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 vedd

er

He

lic

os

ph

aer

a w

al

be

rs

dor

fe

ns

is 

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 wa

lli

ch

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 sp.

 

H

olo

dis

coli

thu

s m

acro

por

us

 

Il

seli

thi

na

 fus

Li

tho

st

roma

ti

on

 p

erdu

rum

 

Mi

cran

th

oli

thu

s a

rt

icu

lat

us

 

Mi

cran

to

lit

hus

 fl

os

 

Mi

cran

th

oli

thu

s vesper

 

P

erf

or

oc

al

ci

ne

ll

a fu

si

fo

rm

is

 

Po

nt

osp

ha

er

a di

sc

opo

ra

 

Po

nt

osp

ha

er

a ja

pon

ica

 

Po

nt

osp

ha

er

a mu

lt

ipo

ra

 

Pyr

ocyclus

 ora

ng

en

sis

 

6(50) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

9.18–9.20 

8(26) 

  

  

  

  

3(24) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

10.0–10.03 

5(28) 

0(1) 

  

  

  

6(20) 

0(1) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

11.2–11.22 

  

14(22) 

  

  

0(1) 

  

6(25) 

0(2) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

12.0–12.02 

  

6(34) 

  

1(1) 

  

5(15) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

13.25–13.27 

7(32) 

0(1) 

  

0(1) 

  

11(16) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

14.0–14.02 

  

14(45) 

  

  

  

  

0(5) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

15.2–15.22 

  

11(40) 

0(1) 

  

  

  

1(6) 

0(3) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

16.0–16.02 

  

9(40) 

0(1) 

  

  

  

1(9) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

17.2–17.23 

  

11(38) 

  

  

  

  

6(11) 

2(1) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

18.0–18.02 

  

7(40) 

  

  

  

  

1(10) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

19.2–19.23 

  

5(44) 

  

  

  

  

2(6) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

20.0–20.04 

  

3(48) 

  

  

  

  

0(2) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

21.2 

  

2(15) 

0(1) 

  

0(1) 

  

10(33) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

22.0–22.03 

9(14) 

  

  

1(2) 

  

14(34) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

23.2–23.22 

  

1(12) 

  

  

  

  

8(38) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

24.0–24.04 

3(15) 

  

  

  

  

4(33) 

0(2) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

25.2–25.22 

5(35) 

  

  

  

3(15) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

26.0–26.02 

  

2(18) 

  

  

  

  

12(32) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

27.18–27.22 

  

1(5) 

  

  

0(1) 

  

10(44) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

28.0–28.02 

  

2(24) 

0(1) 

  

3(4) 

  

5(20) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

29.2–29.23 

8(31) 

  

  

1(3) 

  

1(16) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

30.0–30.02 

  

7(44) 

  

  

  

  

0(6) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

31.2–31.23 

  

0(8) 

  

  

0(3) 

  

5(38) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

32.0–32.02 

  

2(16) 

0(2) 

  

1(4) 

  

5(28) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

33.2–33.22 

  

13(49) 

  

  

  

  

0(1) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

34.0–34.02 

  

21(47) 

  

  

  

0(1) 

1(2) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

35.2–35.22 

7(18) 

  

  

2(2) 

0(1) 

8(29) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

36.0–36.02 

  

14(42) 

  

  

  

2(8) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

37.2–37.22 

  

1(8) 

0(1) 

  

1(4) 

0(1) 

5(38) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

38.0–38.02 

5(32) 

  

  

2(4) 

  

3(14) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

39.2–39.22 

2(8) 

0(2) 

  

  

  

6(40) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

40.0–40.02 

0(7) 

0(1) 

  

3(8) 

  

2(33) 

  

0(1) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

41.0–41.02 

4(12) 

1(5) 

  

0(3) 

  

4(30) 

0(2) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

42.0–42.02 

1(19) 

0(2) 

  

1(2) 

  

10(27) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

43.0–43.02 

0(14) 

  

  

0(6) 

  

3(30) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

44.0–44.02 

  

4(18) 

  

  

2(2) 

0(1) 

4(29) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

45.0–45.02 

0(8) 

  

  

1(5) 

  

1(37) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

46.0–46.02 

3(35) 

0(1) 

  

0(5) 

0(1) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

47.0–47.02 

  

3(7) 

0(1) 

  

0(2) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

48.0–48.02 

2(44) 

  

  

  

3(6) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

49.0–49.02 

0(28) 

  

  

0(4) 

  

1(18) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

50.0–50.02 

  

3(46) 

0(2) 

  

  

  

0(2) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

51.0–51.02 

  

0(44) 

0(2) 

  

1(1) 

  

0(3) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

52.0–52.02 

  

5(49) 

  

  

  

  

1(1) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

53.0–53.02 

  

1(44) 

  

  

1(1) 

  

2(5) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

54.0–54.02 

1(42) 

  

  

  

  

1(8) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

55.0–55.02 

  

1(42) 

  

  

2(2) 

  

2(6) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

56.0–56.02 

  

3(47) 

  

  

0(1) 

  

2(2) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

57.0–57.02 

  

3(42) 

  

  

  

  

0(8) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

58.0–58.02 

  

1(45) 

  

  

0(2) 

2(3) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

59.0–59.02 

  

0(47) 

  

  

0(1) 

  

1(2) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

60.0–60.02   6(47)       

  0(2)  0(1)    x  x  1 x      2  

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER: QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON; ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

E3 

background image

 
 
 
 
 
 

Table  1:  Continued.  Part 4 from 6.

 

 
 

De

pt

h (m)

 

H

ayella

 chal

le

ng

er

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 ca

rt

eri

 

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 eup

hra

ti

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 g

ran

ul

ata

 

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 m

inu

ta

 

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 vedd

er

He

lic

os

ph

aer

a w

al

be

rs

dor

fe

ns

is 

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 wa

lli

ch

H

el

ic

os

pha

era

 sp.

 

H

olo

dis

coli

thu

s m

acro

por

us

 

Il

seli

thi

na

 fus

Li

tho

st

roma

ti

on

 p

erdu

rum

 

Mi

cran

th

oli

thu

s a

rt

icu

lat

us

 

Mi

cran

to

lit

hus

 fl

os

 

Mi

cran

th

oli

thu

s vesper

 

P

erf

or

oc

al

ci

ne

ll

a fu

si

fo

rm

is

 

Po

nt

osp

ha

er

a di

sc

opo

ra

 

Po

nt

osp

ha

er

a ja

pon

ica

 

Po

nt

osp

ha

er

a mu

lt

ipo

ra

 

Pyr

ocyclus

 ora

ng

en

sis

 

61.0–61.02 

10(43) 

0(1) 

  

  

  

1(6) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

62.0–62.02 

  

5(36) 

  

2(2) 

  

4(12) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

63.0–63.02 

  

5(22) 

  

  

1(4) 

  

6(24) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

64.0–64.02 

  

3(22) 

  

  

1(2) 

  

5(26) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

65.0–65.02 

4(38) 

  

  

3(2) 

  

2(9) 

  

0(1) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

66.0–66.02 

7(38) 

  

  

1(1) 

  

6(11) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

67.0–67.02 

  

5(34) 

  

  

2(3) 

  

2(13) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

68.0–68.02 

  

7(37) 

0(1) 

  

0(2) 

  

1(10) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

68.4–68.42 

  

5(37) 

0(1) 

  

0(5) 

  

4(7) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

69.0–69.02 

  

7(34) 

  

  

2(6) 

  

2(10) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

70.0–70.02 

  

3(43) 

  

  

0(3) 

0(4) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

71.0–71.02 

  

5(47) 

  

  

  

4(3) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

72.0–72.02 

  

12(38) 

0(1) 

  

0(1) 

  

3(10) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

73.0–73.02 

14(28) 

1(1) 

  

0(2) 

  

8(19) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

74.0–74.02 

  

1(23) 

  

  

3(14) 

  

6(12) 

0(1) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

75.0–75.02 

  

10(19) 

  

  

0(1) 

  

12(30) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

76.0–76.02 

6(34) 

  

  

  

8(16) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

77.0–77.02 

  

14(34) 

0(1) 

  

  

5(15) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

78.0–78.02 

2(23) 

  

  

  

2(27) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

79.0–79.02 

2(13) 

  

  

2(1) 

  

7(36) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

80.0–80.02 

  

5(22) 

  

  

  

  

9(28) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

81.0–81.02 

9(36) 

0(1) 

  

1(1) 

  

1(11) 

0(1) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

82.0–82.02 

6(21) 

  

  

1(1) 

6(28) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

83.0–83.02 

2(21) 

  

  

0(2) 

  

4(27) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

84.0–84.02 

6(33) 

  

2(17) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

84.8–84.82 

4(24) 

0(1) 

  

  

4(25) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

85.0–85.02 

2(9) 

  

  

0(2) 

  

4(39) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

86.0–86.02 

4(13) 

  

  

  

  

5(37) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

87.0–87.02 

1(11) 

  

  

  

  

11(39) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

88.0–88.02 

1(17) 

  

  

  

7(33) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

89.0–89.02 

1(11) 

  

  

  

  

1(39) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

90.0–90.02 

0(1) 

  

  

2(2) 

  

14(47) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

91.0–91.02 

1(3) 

  

  

2(1) 

  

10(46) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

92.0–92.02 

  

3(8) 

  

  

3(4) 

0(2) 

8(36) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

93.0–93.02 

0(6) 

  

  

  

  

8(44) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

94.0–94.02 

4(6) 

  

  

  

20(44) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

95.0–95.02 

  

  

  

11(50) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

96.0–96.03 

  

0(2) 

  

  

0(3) 

  

8(45) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

97.0–97.02 

  

1(26) 

  

0(1) 

  

7(23) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

98.0–98.02 

  

3(9) 

  

  

1(2) 

  

11(39) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

99.0–99.02 

  

3(7) 

  

  

1(3) 

  

16(40) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

100.0–100.02 

  

1(10) 

  

  

  

  

15(40) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

100.4–100.42 

  

1(3) 

  

  

1(2) 

  

24(45) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

100.6–100.62 

  

1(1) 

  

  

0(2) 

  

16(47) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

100.8–100.83 

3(2) 

  

4(2) 

49(46) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

101.0–101.02 

  

0(3) 

  

  

3(3) 

  

25(44) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

101.2–101.22 

  

1(1) 

  

  

0(2) 

  

26(47) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

101.6–101.62 

  

2(5) 

  

  

0(1) 

11(44) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

101.8–101.82 

  

2(3) 

  

  

0(2) 

15(45) 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 
 
 
 
 
 

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER: QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON; ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

E4 

background image

 
 
 
 

Table 1.  Continued.  Part 5 from 6. 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Depth (m) 

R

etic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a ge

li

da 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a ha

qii

 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a mi

nu

ta

 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a ps

eud

oum

bil

ic

us

 5–7

 µm

 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a ps

eud

oum

bil

ic

us

 >7 µm

 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a sp

. 

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a cl

avig

era

 

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a p

anno

ni

ca

 

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a p

ro

cer

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a s

icca 

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a sp.

 

Sp

he

no

li

thu

s a

bi

es

 

Sp

he

no

li

th

us he

ter

om

or

phu

Sp

he

no

li

thu

s m

ila

netti

 

Sp

he

no

li

thu

s mo

ri

form

is

 

Sp

he

no

li

thu

s sp.

 

Syr

ac

osp

ha

er

a pu

lc

hr

Tho

rac

os

phae

ar

a he

im

ii

 

Tho

rac

os

phae

ra

 s

axe

Tr

iqu

etro

rha

bdu

lus

 ch

all

eng

er

Tr

iqu

etro

rha

bdu

lus

 m

ilo

wii

 

Tr

iqu

etro

rha

bdu

lus

 sp

. 

Um

bi

li

co

sph

aera

 jaf

ar

ii

 

34 

219 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

20 

9.18–9.20 

18 

130 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

10.0–10.03 

24 

17 

157 

15 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

17 

11.2–11.22 

16 

181 

16 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

21 

12.0–12.02 

15 

191 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

18 

13.25–13.27 

12 

197 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

29 

14.0–14.02  3 20 

167 

11  

   

   

   

   

 1  

   

 x  

 3  

 2  

 x  

 1  

 43 

15.2–15.22 

221 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

14 

16.0–16.02 

  

258 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

17.2–17.23 

282 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

18.0–18.02 

11 

270 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

19.2–19.23 

240 

21 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

16 

20.0–20.04 

13 

18 

221 

18 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

13 

21.2 

260 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

19 

22.0–22.03 

36 

149 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

32 

23.2–23.22 

33 

256 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

24.0–24.04 

41 

216 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

27 

25.2–25.22 

39 

224 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

26.0–26.02 

20 

229 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

27.18–27.22 

57 

232 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

28.0–28.02 

31 

230 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

29.2–29.23 

18 

217 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

19 

30.0–30.02 

21 

261 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

31.2–31.23 

  

28 

228 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

12 

32.0–32.02 

  

36 

172 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

19 

33.2–33.22 

14 

195 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

24 

34.0–34.02 

  

17 

227 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

15 

35.2–35.22 

46 

196 

19 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

10 

36.0–36.02 

28 

150 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

37.2–37.22 

32 

207 

13 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

56 

38.0–38.02 

31 

201 

  

  

  

  

  

  

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

27 

39.2–39.22 

61 

142 

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

78 

40.0–40.02 

70 

150 

13 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

35 

41.0–41.02 

47 

149 

25 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

54 

42.0–42.02 

45 

188 

16 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

23 

43.0–43.02 

  

43 

235 

10 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

22 

44.0–44.02 

48 

246 

15 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

12 

45.0–45.02 

  

33 

281 

23 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

11 

46.0–46.02 

  

24 

262 

13 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

47.0–47.02 

21 

220 

23 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

48.0–48.02 

22 

200 

19 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

49.0–49.02 

  

23 

285 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

50.0–50.02 

13 

242 

10 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

51.0–51.02 

  

17 

300 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

52.0–52.02 

  

11 

239 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

53.0–53.02 

16 

250 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

54.0–54.02 

20 

212 

15 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

31 

55.0–55.02 

26 

295 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

56.0–56.02 

  

13 

245 

22 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

57.0–57.02 

24 

246 

27 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

58.0–58.02 

35 

237 

21 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

59.0–59.02 

32 

290 

18 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

60.0–60.02 

22 

230 

20 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

ĆORIĆ and HOHENEGGER: QUANTITATIVE ANALYSES OF CALCAREOUS NANNOPLANKTON; ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENT

E5 

background image

 
 
 
 

Table 1.  Continued.  Part 6 from 6.

 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

De

pt

h (m) 

R

etic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a ge

li

da 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a ha

qii

 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a mi

nu

ta

 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a ps

eud

oum

bil

ic

us

 5–7

 µm

 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a ps

eud

oum

bil

ic

us

 >7 µm

 

Ret

ic

ul

of

en

es

tr

a sp

. 

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a cl

avig

era

 

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a p

anno

ni

ca

 

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a p

ro

cer

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a s

icca 

Rh

ab

dos

pha

er

a sp.

 

Sp

he

no

li

thu

s a

bi

es

 

Sp

he

no

li

th

us he

ter

om

or

phu

Sp

he

no

li

thu

s m

ila

netti

 

Sp

he

no

li

thu

s mo

ri

form

is

 

Sp

he

no

li

thu

s sp.

 

Syr

ac

osp

ha

er

a pu

lc

hr

Tho

rac

os

phae

ar

a he

im

ii

 

Tho

rac

os

phae

ra

 s

axe

Tr

iqu

etro

rha

bdu

lus

 ch

all

eng

er

Tr

iqu

etro

rha

bdu

lus

 m

ilo

wii

 

Tr

iqu

etro

rha

bdu

lus

 sp

. 

Um

bi

li

co

sph

aera

 jaf

ar

ii

 

61.0–61.02 

30 

184 

54 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

62.0–62.02 

  

28 

179 

19 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

58 

63.0–63.02 

18 

172 

26 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

29 

64.0–64.02 

19 

169 

30 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

51 

65.0–65.02 

19 

173 

15 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

50 

66.0–66.02 

  

11 

140 

25 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

99 

67.0–67.02 

18 

154 

29 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

64 

68.0–68.02 

29 

171 

28 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

43 

68.4–68.42 

30 

221 

36 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

28 

69.0–69.02 

17 

252 

26 

  

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

70.0–70.02 

23 

161 

37 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

66 

71.0–71.02 

21 

185 

46 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

72.0–72.02 

19 

182 

58 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

22 

73.0–73.02 

14 

158 

60 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

14 

74.0–74.02 

28 

161 

40 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

23 

75.0–75.02 

  

23 

182 

28 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

39 

76.0–76.02 

15 

216 

17 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

32 

77.0–77.02 

13 

35 

177 

36 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

18 

78.0–78.02 

229 

37 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

11 

79.0–79.02 

21 

184 

23 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

35 

80.0–80.02 

36 

265 

14 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

11 

81.0–81.02 

18 

221 

28 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

15 

82.0–82.02 

18 

229 

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

28 

83.0–83.02 

23 

223 

15 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

36 

84.0–84.02 

15 

269 

12 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

21 

84.8–84.82 

19 

240 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

25 

85.0–85.02 

75 

205 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

26 

86.0–86.02 

38 

190 

10 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

26 

87.0–87.02 

36 

180 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

22 

88.0–88.02 

45 

190 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

89.0–89.02 

  

12 

295 

11 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

90.0–90.02 

65 

235 

15 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

10 

91.0–91.02 

22 

288 

25 

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

13 

92.0–92.02 

54 

205 

18