background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, JUNE 2005, 56, 3, 205–221

www.geologicacarpathica.sk

Exotic orthogneiss pebbles from Paleocene flysch of the Dukla

Nappe (Outer Eastern Carpathians, Poland)

KRZYSZTOF B¥K

1

 and ANNA WOLSKA

2

1

Institute of Geography, Cracow Pedagogical University, Podchor¹¿ych 2, 30-084 Kraków, Poland; sgbak@cyf-kr.edu.pl

2

Institute of Geological Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Oleandry 2a, 30-063 Kraków, Poland;

wolska@ing.uj.edu.pl

(Manuscript received December 16, 2003; accepted in revised form September 29, 2004)

Abstract: Crystalline exotic pebbles have been found in the deep-water flysch of the Cisna Beds, in the Dukla Nappe,

Polish part of the Outer Western Carpathians. Most of them occur in a layer, which extends over a distance of at least

3 km within the SE limb of the Chryszczata–Wo³osañ–Ma³a Rawka anticline. The dimensions of the pebbles vary be-

tween  2  and  18 cm  (middle  axis).  The  exotic  pebbles  consist  of  three  types  of  granite  derived  orthogneisses:  1 —

medium-grained, medium-banded orthogneiss with alkali feldspar porphyroblasts showing structural features of foliated

granitic-gneiss, 2 — medium-banded, medium-layered orthogneiss containing small microcline porphyroblasts and show-

ing structural features of foliated granitic-gneiss, and 3 — strongly cataclastic granitic-gneiss with chess-board albite

porphyroblasts showing properties of partly mylonitized granite. The chemical composition of the orthogneisses indi-

cates that the protolith was represented by peraluminous, poorly-evolved, S-type granites exhibiting features of orogen-

related crustal granites. The discrimination shows that the protolith of the studied rocks evolved in active continental

margin or continental collision environments. The biostratigraphical data on deep-water agglutinated Foraminifera sug-

gest the position of the exotic-bearing layer in the lowermost part of the Rzehakina fissistomata Zone corresponding to

the lowermost Paleocene. Petrographic affinities between orthogneissic pebbles and mineral/rock fragments grains of

the Cisna-type sandstones show that they have the same provenance. These deposits were transported from the NE

extension of the Marmarosh massif, which had the character of a continental bearing source cordillera, formed mainly by

orthogneissic and granitic rocks.

Key  words:  Paleocene,  Outer  Carpathians,  Dukla  Nappe,  provenance,  stratigraphy,  geochemistry,  petrography,

orthogneissic pebbles.

Introduction

Crystalline  exotic  pebbles  have  been  found  within  the  thick

series of deep-water, Maastrichtian-Paleocene flysch deposits

of  the  Dukla  Nappe  in  the  Polish  part  of  the  Outer  Eastern

Carpathians.  These  flysch  series,  called  the  Cisna  Beds,  be-

long to the northern part of the Dukla Nappe, outcropping in

the  Bieszczady  Mountains,  close  to  the  state  boundary  be-

tween Poland and Ukraine (Fig. 1).

The exotics from the Cisna Beds have not been described in

the Polish part of the Dukla Nappe, however, a single bed of

gravelstone  with  quartz,  quartzite  and  phyllite  pebbles  was

noted in Slovakia (Medzilaborce area, Kamjan Mt; Koráb &

Ïurkoviè 1978).

The exotic rocks, presented here, have been found during

geological mapping by the first author (Ustrzyki Górne sheet

(1058)  for  the  Detailed  Geological  Map  of  Poland,  scale

1:50,000; Haczewski et al. submit.). They have been found

as loose pebbles in the channels of several left tributaries of

the Wo³osatka stream in the Bieszczady Mts, Poland. Their

abundant  occurrences  in  several  neighbouring,  parallel

creeks suggest the same stratigraphic position of the exotic

occurrences.

The aim of this paper is to characterize the exotics and to

detect their provenance. Thus the petrographical characteris-

tics  obtained  for  these  pebbles  are  compared  with  the  data

from the exotic-bearing layer and surrounding series, as well

as with data available in literature. The chemical characteris-

tics  of  the  crystalline  exotics  and  their  radiometric  age  are

used to discriminate their protolith.

Geological setting

The described exotic rocks occur in the Dukla Nappe, which

belongs to the Fore-Magura group of nappes and is exposed at

the surface mainly in the Eastern Carpathians, within the Pol-

ish, Slovak and Ukrainian territories.

The studied area occurs to the south of the main overthrust

of the Dukla Nappe, in a zone to the south of Ustrzyki Górne

village,  close  to  the  state  boundary  with  Ukraine  (Fig. 1B).

The  deposits  are  exposed  within  the  Wo³osañ–Chryszczata–

Ma³a  Rawka  anticline,  the  northernmost  tectonic  unit  of  the

Dukla Nappe in its Polish part. The NE limb of this fold has

been strongly tectonized, contrary to the SW limb (partly in

the  Ukrainian  territory)  which  presents  a  continuous  section

background image

206                                                                                            B¥K and WOLSKA

(Fig. 2A). The deposits in this limb include Upper Campanian

through middle Eocene deep-water flysch strata (Koszarski et

al. 1961; Œl¹czka 1971; B¹k 2004). The lithostratigraphic in-

ventory  starts  with  the  Upper  Campanian-Maastrichtian

£upków  Beds,  and  includes  the  Upper  Maastrichtian-Pale-

ocene Cisna Beds, the Upper Paleocene Majdan Beds and the

uppermost  Paleocene-Eocene  Hieroglyphic  Beds.  The  total

thickness of the Dukla sedimentary sequence reaches 2600 m

in the studied part of the Bieszczady Mts.

The described exotic rocks come from the outcrops of the

Cisna Beds, which are the thickest unit in this part of the Duk-

la Nappe (about 1100–1250 m).

The most characteristic feature of the Cisna Beds is the oc-

currence of grey (grey-brown on weathered surfaces), thick-

bedded  (even  more  than  3 m),  fine-  to  coarse-grained,

polymictic  sandstones  with  calcareous-siliceous  cement  (so-

called Cisna-type sandstones). The thickness of the thick-bed-

ded sandstone packages reaches up to 50 m; it decreases up-

wards to a few meters in the uppermost part of the member.

Shales are a subordinate component in the Cisna Beds. Most

of them are dark grey, black, sandy, non-calcareous shales, oc-

curring in packages 10–40 cm thick.

Fig. 1. Position of the studied area in relation to the main geologi-

cal units. A — Outer Carpathians (O.C.) against the background of a

simplified geological map of the Alpine orogens and their foreland;

I.C.  —  Inner  Carpathians,  C.F.  —  Carpathian  Foredeep.  B  —

Dukla Nappe against the background of the eastern part of the Out-

er Carpathians.

The  thick-bedded  packages  are  intercalated  with  thin-  to

medium-,  rarely  thick-bedded  (up  to  150 cm;  mean  —  30–

60 cm)  sandstones,  thin-bedded  mudstones  and  sandy,  non-

calcareous shales. The grey-yellow colour of weathered sur-

faces  is  a  very  characteristic  feature  of  the  sandstone  and

mudstone beds. The sandstones are medium- to fine-grained,

have calcareous or calcareous-siliceous cement, with frequent

lamination of various types. The proportion of shales is higher

than in the thick-bedded packages, and it increases upwards.

The shales are non-calcareous, dark grey, brown, black, and

rarely green.

Calcareous spotty marls and calcareous mudstones, 4–7 cm

thick, so-called fucoid marls, occur in the upper part of the Ci-

sna Beds. Brown, ferrous coats cover the surface of the marls.

The  marls  occur  in  packages  40–60 cm  thick,  together  with

brown, non-calcareous shales.

Moreover, single beds (30–50 cm thick on average) of grey-

green,  fine-grained,  muscovite-rich,  siliceous  sandstones  oc-

cur in the upper part of the Cisna Beds. Abundant plant detri-

tus covers their upper surfaces.

Localities with exotic rocks

Most exotic pebbles have been found in the bedrock of five

parallel  creeks  (Fig. 2A),  left  tributaries  of  the  Wo³osatka

stream, which cross the SE limb of the Chryszczata–Wo³osañ–

Ma³a Rawka anticline. Most pebbles have been found in the

upper reaches of the creeks, along a straight line parallel to the

local structural grain. The exotic-bearing layer does not out-

crop there from beneath the thick alluvium in these sections of

the creeks. The supposed position of the exotic-bearing layer

is  marked  there  by  the  occurrence  of  numerous  crystalline

pebbles  over  small  alluvial  sections  of  the  creeks  (ca.  5–10

pebbles per 10 square meters). Additionally, no exotic pebbles

have been found in the higher parts of the creeks, where the

bedrock is exposed over a distance of at least 100–200 m.

Several exotic pebbles and a block of sandstone with exotic

pebbles have been also found in other creeks, located west of

the Semenowa Mount. This area also lies within the SE limb

of the Chryszczata–Wo³osañ–Ma³a Rawka anticline. The ex-

otic finds in individual creeks are not aligned; hence the posi-

tion of the supposed exotic-bearing layer has not been estab-

lished there.

The first author collected dozens of exotic pebbles from the

described  outcrops.  Their  dimensions  vary  between  2  and

18 cm (middle axis), 3–10 cm on average. The largest of the

exotic  clasts,  found  in  the  Szczawianka  creek  measured

20 ×18 ×12 cm.

The  exotic-bearing  layer  has  not  been  found  in  situ  but  a

fragment  of  a  sandstone  bed  (30×15×7 cm)  with  gneissic

clasts  (Fig. 3.1),  found  as  a  loose  block  in  the  Semenowa

creek, has been accepted as a sample of this bed.

The exotic pebbles have various degrees of roundness, gen-

erally moderate to high. Their roundness is probably original,

as indicated by the pebbles in the mentioned fragment of the

sandstone bed with clasts (cf. Fig. 3.1).

Taking into account the dips of the beds, the stratigraphic

position  of  the  supposed  exotic-bearing  layer  occurs  550 m

background image

EXOTIC ORTHOGNEISS PEBBLES FROM PALEOCENE FLYSCH OF THE DUKLA NAPPE                             207

Fig. 2.  A — Geological map of the Dukla Nappe in the Wo³osatka drainge basin (Bieszczady Mts, Poland) with suggested position of the

exotic-bearing layer (map after B¹k in Haczewski et al. submit.). B — Lithological profile of the £upków Beds and the Cisna Beds in the

studied area, with suggested position of the exotic-bearing layer and position of micropaleontological samples. C — Geological cross-sec-

tion along the Kañczowa stream with suggested position of the exotic-bearing layer.

above the base of the Cisna Beds (Fig. 2B–C). The same posi-

tion in the parallel creeks may suggest that the layer represents

a continuous horizon, at least 3 km long within the southern

limb of the Wo³osañ–Chryszczata–Ma³a Rawka anticline.

Methods of investigations

The JEOL 5410 electron microscope equipped with an ener-

gy spectrometer Voyager 3100 (NORAN) was used to micro-

probe chemical analyses of rock-forming minerals. The mea-

surements  were  carried  out  using  a  spot  method.  Samples

representing three types of gneissic pebbles (Szcz-1/99, Wo³-

13c/99  and  Kañcz-12/98)  were  analysed  in  the  Activation

Laboratories  Ltd.  in  Canada  by  means  of  the  following

geochemical methods: ICP (major elements), INAA (trace ele-

ments  including  REE)  and  XRF  (Nb).  The  largest  pebble

(Szcz-1c/98) was relaid to K/Ar isotope studies (for details see

Poprawa et al. 2004).

The foraminiferal samples were collected from exposures of

the uppermost part of the £upków Beds and a lower part of the

Cisna  Beds,  along  several  creeks  in  areas,  where  the  exotic

pebbles  have  been  found.  For  micropaleontological  studies,

the samples were dried, weighed (most of them weighed 500–

750 g)  and  disintegrated  in  a  solution  of  sodium  carbonate.

Then the material was washed through sieves with mesh diam-

eters of 0.63 mm. At least 300 foraminiferal tests were picked

from fraction 0.63–1.500 mm, or until all tests were removed

from the residue. The foraminiferal slides are housed in the In-

stitute of Geography, Cracow Pedagogical University (Collec-

tion No. 09Du).

Petrographic composition of exotics

All of the exotics are fragments of orthogneissic rocks. Po-

larizing  microscope  investigations  and  chemical  microprobe

analyses  of  rock-forming  minerals  revealed  the  presence  of

background image

208                                                                                            B¥K and WOLSKA

three  types  of  orthogneisses,  differing  in  colour,  structural

properties (porphyroblasts sizes, thickness of layers) and min-

eral composition.

The first type represents a medium-grained, medium-band-

ed porphyroblast gneiss showing structural features of foliated

granitic-gneiss (samples: Szcz-1/99, Wo³-1/99 and Kañcz-11/

99). It is greyish in colour, though smaller pebbles are beige

coloured  with  creamy  tint.  The  bands  are  usually  2–5 mm,

sporadically up to 2 cm thick (Fig. 3.2). The grey colouration

of bands is due to the presence of biotite. When the biotite is

altered, brownish stripes appear and these zones are beige or

creamy in colour (s. Wo³-1/99). The porphyroblasts are white-

Fig. 3.  1 — Medium- to coarse-grained, non-calcareous sandstone (Cisna Beds) with orthogneiss pebbles (gn); white arrows mark the holes

after exotic pebbles; Semenowa stream. 2, 3 — Orthogneiss pebbles from the Cisna Beds: 2 — Po³oninka stream; 3 — Kañcz-12/00, pol-

ished slab. 4 — Myrmekite intergrowths in marginal part of alkali feldspar augen, Wo³-1/99, crossed nicols. 5 — Strongly altered plagioclas-

es (albite or oligoclase) with poorly visible repeated lamellar twinning within alkali feldspar porhpyroblast, Szcz-1/99, crossed nicols. 6 —

Porphyroblast composed of chess-board albite (upper part) and asymmetrical fabric of S-C type, Kañcz-12/98, crossed nicols. 7 — Porphy-

roblast of oligoclase showing repeated lamellar albite twinning and inclusions of light micas in central part, Kañcz-12/98, crossed nicols.

8 — Porphyroblast of small microcline showing typical twinning of cross-hatched or “tartan” type twinning, Wo³-13c/99, crossed nicols.

9  —  Laminae  consisting  of  pleochroic  biotite  flakes  and  crystals  of  quartz  (mosaic  and  with  undulatory  extinction),  Szcz-1/99,  crossed

nicols. 10 — Crystals of quartz (mosaic and with undulatory extinction), Kañcz-12/98, crossed nicols.

background image

EXOTIC ORTHOGNEISS PEBBLES FROM PALEOCENE FLYSCH OF THE DUKLA NAPPE                             209

creamy and, in general, 3–8 mm and even up to 1.5 cm in size

(Fig. 3.3).

The porphyroblasts consist of alkali feldspars (Or

93–85

 Ab

7–11

)

containing  about  1.5 wt. %  BaO  and  showing  poorly  visible

perthite structures. Some alkali feldspars contain plate shaped

inclusions  of  plagioclase  —  albite  (An

3–9

)  (s.  Wo³-1/99)  or

oligoclase  (An

12

)  (s.  Szcz-1/99;  Fig. 3.5).  These  plagioclase

crystals are strongly sericitized, displaying a greyish surface

and poorly visible repeated lamellar albite twinning. Only one

sample (Kañcz-11/99) contains a completely ordered variety

of alkali feldspar (microcline), showing repeated lamellar albi-

te and pericline twinning, well-known as typical cross-hatched

or “tartan” type twinning.

In  all  samples,  where  plagioclase  (albite–oligoclase)  is  in

contact  with  alkali  feldspar  in  marginal  parts  of  porphyro-

blasts myrmekite form intergrowths (Fig. 3.4) as products of

release of silica (quartz) during replacement of potassium feld-

spar by plagioclases (Hatch et al. 1961). The evolved potassi-

um reacts with alumina and silica to form white mica (pheng-

ite), which occurs close to the feldspar porphyroblasts. Deer et

al. (1962) attributed the formation of myrmekite to the break-

down  of  plagioclases  during  metamorphism.  However,  its

common occurrence in the studied rock is more probably due

to strain (cf. Simpson 1985).

The quartz, occurring in the bands is represented by mosaic

type crystals and show undulatory extinction between crossed

polars. Apart from quartz crystals, bands contain perthitic al-

kali  feldspars  Or

89–90

  Ab

10–8 

(consisting  of  host  K-feldspar

with  irregular  albite  inclusions  of  replacement  type)  and

strongly  altered  plagioclases  (andesine-oligoclase  An

30–16

)

with  repeated  lamellar  albite  twinning.  Biotite  occurring  in

bands  (Fig. 3.9)  is  pleochroic,  from  α  pale  yellow  to  γ  red

brownish (s. Szczaw-1/99) and chloritized to various degrees

(ss. Wo³-1/99 and Kañcz-11/99). The chemical composition of

well-preserved biotite is Fe-rich characterized by atomic ratio

Si/Al 2 :1 and Fe/Mg from 2.87 to 2.34. The MnO content is

0.5 wt. % and TiO

2

 from 3.22 to 2.91 wt. %. Phengite is inter-

grown with biotite and chlorite. The Si/Al ratio in its tetrahe-

dral sites amounts to 3.89–3.66, whilst the Fe/Mg ratio in oc-

tahedral sites varies from 1.45 to 2.17. The content of TiO

is

low, ranging from 0.29 to 0.93 wt. %.

The second type is represented by medium-grained, medi-

um-banded  orthogneiss  containing  small  porphyroblasts  and

showing structural features of foliated granitic-gneiss (s. Wo³-

13c/99).  Megascopically,  pale  creamy  quartz-feldspar  bands

are  3–4 mm  thick,  whereas  quartz  bands  of  similar  size  are

dark grey. White porphyroblasts are up to 5–6 mm in size.

The  investigations  using  optical  and  electron  microscopes

have shown that the porphyroblasts consist of large alkali feld-

spar  crystals  showing  highly  ordered  structure  of  microcline

type, characterized by typical twinning of cross-hatched or “tar-

tan” type, occurring sectorially in various parts of this mineral.

Moreover, these large crystals can be overgrown by fine-blastic

microcline. Some porphyroblasts can be “aggregate” in charac-

ter  and  consist  of  small  microcline  crystals  (Fig. 3.8).  Micro-

cline (Or

91

Ab

9

) contains up to 1.75 wt. % BaO.

Quartz bands are characterized by mosaic crystals and crys-

tals exhibiting undulatory extinction. Apart from quartz, they

contain small plagioclase crystals (An

35

 — andesine) showing

repeated lamellar twinning. Small white mica flakes occur in

their central parts. The process of K-feldspathization of pla-

gioclases  is  also  recorded  (irregular,  replacement  type  per-

thites  including  K-feldspar).  Some  alkali  feldspar  (Or

93

Ab

6

)

crystals  occurring  in  matrix  consist  of  host  K-feldspar.  The

feldspars contain replacement type inclusions which show the

composition of pure albite (Ab

97

An

2

Or

1

). In the groundmass,

small nests occur, filled with fine-blastic microcline, showing

characteristic twinning of cross-hatched or “tartan” type. Bi-

otite is usually decolourized and altered into hydrobiotite or

completely  transformed  into  iron-rich  chlorite  (showing  Fe/

Mg  ratio  about  2.8).  White  mica  (phengite)  occurs  close  to

large microcline augen. The atomic Si/Al ratio in tetrahedral

sites amounts to ca. 5.32, whilst the Fe/Mg atomic ratio in oc-

tahedral sites varies from 0.9 to 1.00.

The third type is represented by strongly cataclastic granit-

ic-gneiss showing properties of partly mylonitized granite (s.

Kañcz-12/98). Megascopically, grey bands are 2–5 mm (up to

8 mm)  thick,  and  marked  by  parallel  distribution  of  white

mica.  Pale  grey  porphyroblasts,  3–10 mm  in  size,  are  com-

posed of feldspars.

The porphyroblasts consist of chess-board albite (An

8

) con-

taining  up  to  5 wt. %  K

2

O  (Fig. 3.6).  The  bands  consist  of

quartz with mosaic crystals and crystals with undulatory ex-

tinction (Fig. 3.10). There are also crystals of rather well pre-

served oligoclases (An

15–17

) showing no zonality, displaying

repeated  lamellar,  albite  twinning  and  containing  numerous

inclusions of white micas in their central parts (Fig. 3.7). The

crystals of host oligoclases contain irregular “spotty” replace-

ment perthites of K-feldspar and quartz veinlets. Asymmetri-

cal fabric of S-C type is observed (Fig. 3.6). Phengite is char-

acterized by atomic Si/Al ratio in tetrahedral sites from 3.87 to

3.67 and atomic Fe/Mg ratio in octahedral sites amounting to

3.05. The content of TiO

2

 is constant (1.10–1.15 wt. %) whilst

that  of  MnO  does  not  exceed  0.07 wt. %.  Phengite  is  inter-

grown with strongly altered biotite (hydrobiotite) and chlorite.

This  mineral  is  pleochroic  from  pale  yellow  (α)  to  intense

green (γ) and distinctly enriched in iron.

Geochemical characteristics of exotics

Three  types  of  orthogneissic  pebbles  distinguished  on  the

basis of structural and petrographic investigations were analy-

sed for major, trace and REE elements (Table 1). The first and

third  distinguished  types  of  orthogneisses  (medium-grained

orthogneiss, with alkali feldspars porphyroblasts and granitic-

gneiss  with  chess-board  albite  porphyroblasts,  respectively)

exhibit similar contents of major elements; only the contents

of MgO, CaO and Na

2

O display small differences. The second

type of orthogneiss (medium-grained  orthogneiss with small

microcline porphyroblasts) differs from other types by higher

content of SiO

2

, lower contents of Al

2

O

3

, TiO

2

, Fe

2

O

3

, MgO

and a low Na

2

O/K

2

O ratio.

The  proportions  of  [(Al+Fe+Ti/3)–K]  versus  [(Al+Fe+Ti/

3)–Na] (after Moine & de La Roche 1968) allowed us to de-

fine a kind of protolith of the studied types of gneisses as the

orthogneisses (Fig. 4A) — the granite and rhyolite field in the

diagram.  Another  plutonic  rock  classification  diagram  ex-

background image

210                                                                                            B¥K and WOLSKA

pressing  the  balance  between  R1  [4Si–11(Na+K)–2(Fe+Ti)]

and R2 [6Ca+2Mg+Al] parameters (de La Roche et al. 1980)

shows the position of studied rocks in the fields of granodior-

ite, monzogranite and syenogranite (Fig. 4B). These geochem-

ical differences of granitoid protolith between the orthogneiss-

es are connected with the above mentioned different amounts

of SiO

2

, alkalis and Na

2

O/K

2

O ratio.

Taking  into  consideration  the  molar  proportions  of  A/NK

and A/CK, the protolith granitoids had a peraluminous charac-

ter (Maniar & Piccoli 1989; Fig. 5A).

The calculated molar [Al/(Na+K+Ca/2)] parameter, whose

values exceed 1.05 for all types of the studied orthogneisses

(1.54, 1.24  and  1.37  for  the  first,  second  and  third  type  of

gneiss,  respectively),  indicates  an  S-type  granitic  protolith

(Pitcher 1982). A similar suggestion may be expressed if dis-

crimination indexes, such as prevalence of Na

2

O over K

2

O (cf.

Hovorka  &  Petrík  1992),  low  iron  content  versus  SiO

2

  (cf.

Broska & Uher 2001), low Rb content versus Sr (Fig. 5B), and

low  Y  content  versus  high  SiO

content  (Fig. 5C)  are  taken

into  account.  The  indexes  resemble  those,  calculated  for  S-

type West-Carpathian granites (Petrík et al. 1994; Broska &

Uher  2001),  however,  their  values  are  transitional  to  the  in-

dexes  of  I-type  granites  (Fig. 5B–D).  The  S-type  West-Car-

pathian granites, the most abundant type in this region, repre-

sent  peraluminous  biotite  two-mica  granites  to  granodiorites

(for summary of their petrography and chemistry — see Bros-

ka & Uher 2001).

Chondrite-normalized  trace  and  REE  element  data  show

positive (+) anomalies for Ba, K, Sr, Hf and Y, and negative (–)

anomalies for Rb, Nb, Nd, Sm and Ti (Fig. 6). These samples

exhibit enrichment in more mobile LIL (large ion lithophile)

(Ba, K, Sr) and less mobile HFS (high field strength) (Hf, Y)

elements,  as  well  as,  impoverishment  in  LIL  (Rb)  and  HFS

Table 1: Chemical composition of three types of orthogneissic pebbles: first type — Szcz-1/99, second type — Wo³-13c/99, third type —

Kañcz-12/98. Chromium, molybdenum, tantalum, tin, vanadium, uranium, terbium, wolfram are present below their respective limits (Cr,

Ta<1, Sn, Mo, V<5, U, Tb<0.5, W<3).

 

                                                Major elements (wt. %) 

 

 

 

 

Type of 

orthogneiss 

SAMPLE 

SiO

2

 

TiO

2

 

Al

2

O

3

 

Fe

2

O

3

 

MnO 

MgO 

CaO 

Na

2

K

2

P

2

O

5

 

LOI  Total 

First type 

Szcz-1/99 

74.10 

0.155 

14.60 

1.56 

0.022 

0.35 

2.01 

4.10 

1.96 

0.07 

1.05  99.99 

Second type 

Wo³-13c/99 

77.17 

0.026 

13.07 

0.39 

0.002 

0.04 

1.10 

3.47 

3.49 

0.03 

0.73  99.51 

Third type 

Kañcz-12/98 

71.94 

0.136 

14.91 

1.45 

0.016 

0.53 

1.15 

4.96 

1.51 

0.07 

1.50  98.17 

  

                               Trace elements (ppm) 

 

 

 

 

Type of 

orthogneiss 

SAMPLE 

Ag 

Ba 

Be 

Cd 

Co 

Cs 

Cu 

Ga 

Hf 

Nb 

Ni 

First type 

Szcz-1/99 

1.4 

  683 

0.7 

1.0 

0.0 

18 

2.5 

10 

Second type 

Wo³-13c/99 

2.0 

2553 

0.3 

0.0 

1.4 

13 

0.7 

  2 

Third type 

Kañcz-12/98 

1.3 

  747 

0.0 

1.0 

0.9 

19 

2.3 

10 

 

 

             Trace elements (ppm) 

 

 

 

Type of 

orthogneiss 

SAMPLE 

Pb 

Rb 

S (wt. 

%) 

Sc 

Sr 

Th 

Zn 

Zr 

First type 

Szcz-1/99 

14 

60 

0.000 

2.1 

468 

5.2 

48 

106 

Second type 

Wo³-13c/99 

14 

84 

0.008 

0.2 

368 

1.4 

15 

  23 

Third type 

Kañcz-12/98 

  8 

43 

0.005 

2.4 

345 

5.3 

   0.8 

39 

  94 

 

 

REE (ppm) 

 

 

 

Type of 

orthogneiss 

SAMPLE 

La 

Ce 

Nd 

Sm 

Eu 

Yb 

Lu 

First type 

Szcz-1/99 

27.3 

45 

15 

2.5 

0.7 

0.5 

0.08 

Second type 

Wo³-13c/99 

  4.8 

10 

  0 

0.5 

0.5 

0.0 

0.00 

Third type 

Kañcz-12/98 

14.7 

27 

  9 

1.8 

0.4 

0.6 

0.08 

 

Fig. 4. The position of the granitic protolith on the petrological dia-

grams  for  gneissic  exotics.  A  —  Proportions  of  [(Al+Fe+Ti/3)–K]

vs. [(Al+Fe+Ti/3)–Na]; diagram after Moine & de La Roche (1968).

B  —  R1–R2  diagram  (after  de  La  Roche  et  al.  1980):  R1  =  4Si–

11(Na+K)–2(Fe+Ti), R2 = 6Ca+2Mg+Al (Ab = albite, An

50

 = pla-

gioclase An

50

, Or = orthoclase).

background image

EXOTIC ORTHOGNEISS PEBBLES FROM PALEOCENE FLYSCH OF THE DUKLA NAPPE                             211

(Nb, Ti) elements. A little different course of curve for the sec-

ond type of orthogneiss is observed, when compared with the

other two curves. It is expressed in deficiency of Nb, La, Ce,

Sm and Ti.

Foraminiferal assemblages in the vicinity of the

exotic-bearing layer

Stratigraphic  data  on  the  position  of  the  Cisna  Beds  are

known from the western part of the Dukla Nappe within Pol-

ish territory. Blaicher (in Œl¹czka 1971) and Olszewska (1980)

determined the age of these deposits on the basis of Foramin-

ifera as the Late Campanian–Early? Paleocene. They suggest-

ed  a  diachronism  of  their  lower  boundary.  Paleontological

data (based also on Foraminifera), obtained by the present au-

thor from the Bieszczady Mts have confirmed the suggested

age of the Cisna Beds (B¹k 2004). However, the lower bound-

ary  could  not  be  precisely  determined  (Upper  Campanian?–

Maastrichtian?), because of the lack of taxa diagnostic of age.

Eight samples taken for biostratigraphical study of micro-

fauna from the non-calcareous shales in the lower and middle

Fig. 6. Chondrite normalized spider diagram (after Tompson 1982)

for orthogneissic exotics.

Fig. 5. The position of the granitic protolith for the studied orthogneissic exotics within the discrimination diagrams for granites. A — The A/

NK (molar) vs. A/CNK (molar) (after Maniar & Piccoli 1989). B — Sr vs. Rb plot including data for various types of the Variscan West-Car-

pathian granitic rocks (after Broska & Uher 2001). C — Y vs. SiO

2

 plot including data for various types of the Variscan West-Carpathian granit-

ic rocks (after Broska & Uher 2001). D — Rb–Ba–Sr ternary discrimination diagram including data for various types of the Variscan West-Car-

pathian granitic rocks (after Broska & Uher 2001). 1 — poorly evolved granites, 2 — mildly evolved granites, 3 — highly evolved granites.

parts of the Cisna Beds include mainly deep-water agglutinat-

ed  Foraminifera  (DWAF)  (Fig. 7)  and  undeterminable  radi-

olarian moulds. The DWAF assemblage is poorly to moder-

ately-diversified  (Fisher’s  alpha  index:  3.1–9.1)  including

background image

212                                                                                            B¥K and WOLSKA

siliceous-walled forms with several species of limited strati-

graphical significance. The lower part of the Cisna Beds, close

to the contact with the £upków Beds, probably represents the

upper  part  of  Caudammina  gigantea  Zone  (Maastrichtian?

Fig. 7.  Species  distribution  chart  of  deep-water  agglutinated  Fora-

minifera  in  the  Cisna  Beds  and  £upków  Beds,  around  the  inferred

exotic-bearing layer (black star); the Bieszczady Mountains, Poland.

R.f. — Rzehakina fissistomata Zone.

sensu Geroch & Nowak 1984), as the occurrences of R. epigo-

na, R. minima and hormosinids show (Fig. 8.1). First occur-

rences of R. varians (Glaessner) (Fig. 8.3) and Spiroplectam-

mina  spectabilis  (Grzybowski)  (Fig. 8.4),  which  most

probably fall within the Middle-Upper Maastrichtian, have not

been  noted  in  the  sediments  from  the  presented  sections.

However, they have been found in the lower part of the Cisna

Beds, a few kilometers to the north from the studied area (B¹k

2004).

The suggested position of the exotic-bearing layer is close

to the position of the micropaleontological sample Szcz-7/96,

which was taken from the grey, non-calcareous shales, 10 m

above  the  inferred  position  of  this  layer  (Fig. 2B).  These

shales  include  Rzehakina  fissistomata  (Grzybowski)

(Fig. 8.6,7), a Paleocene species (Morgiel & Olszewska 1981;

Geroch  &  Nowak  1984;  Olszewska  1997;  B¹k,  2004)  for

which this sample is its first occurrence in this section (Fig. 5).

Higher  up  in  the  section  (s.  Wo³-7/96;  Fig. 2B),  other  Pale-

ocene species have been found,  Annectina  grzybowskii (Jur-

kiewicz)  (Fig. 8.5)  and  Conotrochammina  whangaia  Finlay

(Fig. 8.8, 8.9), together with a well-diversified DWAF assem-

blage (Fig. 7).

Discussion

Petrography

The mineralogical composition and structural properties of

the granitic protolith was strongly modified. Relics of primary

magmatic  minerals  in  orthogneissic  pebbles  studied  are  not

observed. The rocks studied display structural diversification

(S-C fabric), different thickness of quartz, quartz-feldspar, mi-

caceous  layers  and  variable  size  of  porphyroblasts.  Micro-

probe analyses have revealed the differences in the chemical

composition of feldspars forming porphyroblasts (alkali- and

K-feldspars)  and  differences  in  matrix  (alkali-,  K-feldspars,

Na-Ca  plagioclases).  The  effects  of  metasomatic  processes

(Na-, K-feldspathization) are observed (replacement perthite)

in feldspars, both in porphyroblasts and matrix. Biotite flakes

are altered in various degrees (chloritization process). Pheng-

ite occurs in micaceous layers and is always overgrown by bi-

otite and chlorite. Phengitic muscovite is stable up to >750 °C

and  >7 GPa  (Catlos  &  Sorensen  2003).  The  presence  of

phengite  in  the  orthogneissic  exotics  may  indicate  even  the

high-pressure  metamorphism  in  terranes  of  subduction  zone

slab (Ferraris et al. 2000). However, the recognition of meta-

morphic facies is here difficult, due to a lack of typical meta-

morphic mineral assemblages. It is possible that the orthog-

neisses  underwent  greenschist  facies  metamorphism.  The

orthogneisses  from  Seward  Peninsula,  Alaska  (Evans  &

Patrick 1987) are an example of such rocks with similar min-

eral composition recording such facies conditions.

Geochemistry

The chemical composition of the first and third type of or-

thogneisses  shows  that  they  could  originate  from  the  same

granitic protolith. The differences in chemical composition of

background image

EXOTIC ORTHOGNEISS PEBBLES FROM PALEOCENE FLYSCH OF THE DUKLA NAPPE                             213

Fig. 8.  Paleocene  deep-water  agglutinated  Foraminifera  in  the  vicinity  of  the  exotic-bearing  layer,  the  Dukla  Nappe,  Polish  Outer  Car-

pathians, Bieszczady Mountains: 1 — Hormosina excelsa (Dyl¹¿anka); Wo³-11/98. 2 — Kalamopsis grzybowskii (Dyl¹¿anka); Wo³-11/98.

3  — Remesella  varians  (Glaessner);  Wo³-7/96.  4  — Spiroplectammina  spectabilis  (Grzybowski);  Wo³-7/96.  5  — Annectina  grzybowskii

(Jurkiewicz);  Szcz-6/96. 6, 7 — Rzehakina fissistomata (Grzybowski); Wo³-11/98. 8, 9 — Conotrochammina whangaia Finlay; Wo³-7/96.

Scale bar = 100 µm.

the  second  type  of  orthogneiss  in  relation  to  the  two  other

types could be most probably due to weathering and transport

of pebbles from one side, and/or to the effects of earlier pro-

cesses, which took place in the granitic protolith (e.g. feldspa-

thization and albitization). First of these factors is here probably

the most important, because the second type of orthogneiss was

recognized  from  the  small  pebble  (8 ×5 ×4 cm),  two  times

smaller than the other studied pebbles. Consequently, it may

represent only a fragment of a larger body of banded orthog-

neisses, which disintegrated during the weathering and trans-

port  processes.  Thus  we  can  observe  only  the  quartz  and

quartz-feldspar bands, the most resistant fragments of the orig-

inal orthogneissic body, and their chemical composition could

not be representative for the original rocks. However, on the

other hand, the earlier metamorphic processes, such as felds-

pathization and albitization could be responsible for changes

of  chemical  composition  of  the  original  granitic  protolith.

During recrystallization and formation of orthogneissic struc-

ture, under conditions of high-pressure metamorphism, meta-

somatic  processes  could  operate.  Na-metasomatism  is  sug-

gested on the basis of irregular albite inclusions (replacement

perthite type) occurring in the matrix of host K-feldspar crys-

tals  (s.  Szcz-1/99;  Wo³-13c/99).  These  inclusions  and  addi-

tionally,  chess-board  albite  porphyroblasts  are  also  found  in

other  types  of  orthogneisses  (s.  Kañcz-12/98).  K-metasoma-

tism is related to the observed formation of spotty replacement

perthites  of  K-feldspar  in  the  matrix  of  host  oligoclases  (s.

Kañcz-12/98).

Geotectonic position of granitic protolith

Various  concentrations  of  trace  elements,  such  as  Rb,  Y

(and its analogue Yb) and Nb (and its analogue Ta) may help

in  discrimination  of  granites  from  different  tectonic  settings

(Pearce et al. 1984). The discrimination diagrams for the stud-

ied protolith granitoids, based on Nb–Y, Rb–Y–Nb and Rb–

Yb–Ta variations, show that they could represent volcanic-arc

or syn-collisional granites (Fig. 9). Other chemical data used

for discrimination, such as proportions of Al

2

O

3

 versus SiO

2

and proportions of (FeO

T

+MgO) versus CaO (Maniar & Pic-

coli 1989) may confirm this suggestion. The studied rocks are

classified on such discrimination diagrams as island arc, conti-

nental arc or continental collision granitoids (Fig. 10). Taking

into consideration their degree of differentiation, they can be

classified  as  poorly-evolved  granites  sensu  Broska  &  Uher

(2001; see Fig. 5D).

The  partial  melting  of  the  crust  material  during  the  colli-

sional conditions may also be evidenced on the basis of nega-

tive Nb and Ti anomalies, as well as distinct enrichment in Ba,

K, Sr, Hf and Y on the chondrite-normalized diagram (Rollin-

son 1993). However, these data should be discussed carefully,

because the same anomalies may be an effect of hydrothermal

background image

214                                                                                            B¥K and WOLSKA

or metasomatic activity in the protolith of granitic rocks and of

later metamorphic processes (e.g. albitization resulted in Nb

negative anomaly; Rollinson 1993).

So,  in  conclusion,  the  presented  petrographical  and

geochemical data, related to typology of protolith granites and

their geotectonic setting, represent features, typical of the per-

Fig. 9.  A — Nb vs. Y diagram (after Pearce et al. 1984). B — Rb

vs. (Y+Nb) diagram (after Pearce et al. 1984). C — Rb vs. (Yb+Ta)

diagram  (after  Pearce  et  al.  1984).  syn-COLG  —  syn-collisional

granites, WPG — within-plate granites, VAG — volcanic-arc gran-

ites, ORG — ocean-ridge granites. For explanations of gneiss sym-

bols — see Fig. 5.

aluminous,  poorly-evolved,  S-type  granites,  widely  known

from the Western Carpathians (see summary in Cambel et al.

1985; Broska & Uher 1991; Uher & Gregor 1992; Uher et al.

1994;  Petrík  &  Broska  1994;  Petrík  et  al.  1994;  Broska  &

Uher 2001). According to their mineralogical and geochemi-

cal characteristics, Broska & Uher (2001) suggested that this

type of granite group exhibits features of orogen-related crust-

al granites, connected with collisional and extensional regime

during and after collision with various contribution from the

mantle especially in the post-collisional tectonics. They were

formed in the Western Carpathians during the meso-Variscan,

Early  Carboniferous  period  (with  culmination  at  about

350 Ma; Cambel et al. 1990).

Age of orthogneissic exotics

Recently,  isotope  study  of  orthogneissic-exotic  pebble

(Szcz-1c/99) has been carried out on separated mineral phase

using the K/Ar method. The age of white micas from this peb-

Fig. 10. A — Al

2

O

3

 vs. SiO

2

 diagram (after Maniar & Piccoli 1989).

B — (FeO

T

+MgO) vs. CaO diagram (after Maniar & Piccoli 1989).

IAG  —  island-arc  granitoids,  CAG  —  continental-arc  granitoids,

CCG  —  continental  collision  granitoids,  POG  —  post-orogenic

granitoids. For explanations of orthogneiss symbols — see Fig. 5.

background image

EXOTIC ORTHOGNEISS PEBBLES FROM PALEOCENE FLYSCH OF THE DUKLA NAPPE                             215

ble, representing the first type of orthogneiss was calculated as

304.9±11.4  Ma (for details — see Poprawa et al. 2004). The

obtained  Late  Carboniferous  date,  which  represents  a  meta-

morphic  event  in  the  rocks,  may  suggest  that  the  protolith

granites may have intruded earlier, during the main Variscan

magmatism  event  in  the  Carpathians,  around  350–340 Ma

(Burchart et al. 1987; Cambel et al. 1990; Petrík et al. 1994;

Petrík & Kohút 1997; Petrík 2000; Poller et al. 2000; Putiš et

al. 2003).

Stratigraphic position of exotic-bearing layer

The  biostratigraphy  of  the  Middle–Upper  Campanian,

Maastrichtian  and  Paleocene  of  deep-water  sediments  in  the

Carpathians renders some problems. Planktonic species, usu-

ally poorly preserved, occur as single redeposited specimens,

or they are absent. On the other hand, abundant deep-water ag-

glutinated Foraminifera (DWAF), which are in many cases the

only  microfossils  in  the  sediments,  include  long-ranging

forms. Practically, all of them may occur in both the upper-

most  Cretaceous  and  Paleocene  sediments.  Only  two  long-

ranging taxa may be used to distinguish the Upper Cretaceous

from  Paleogene  sediments:  Caudammina  gigantea  (Geroch)

— typical of the Campanian–Maastrichtian (Geroch & Nowak

1984)  and  Rzehakina  fissistomata  (Grzybowski),  which  oc-

curs  over  the  whole  Paleocene  section.  Unfortunately,  both

taxa are found as single specimens, being especially rare near

their last appearance data (e.g. C. gigantea is extremely rare in

the Upper Maastrichtian). Several DWAF taxa appeared pro-

gressively during Campanian–Maastrichtian times. It concerns

such species as  Hormosina excelsa (Dyl¹¿anka),  Hormosina

velascoensis  (Cushman),  Rzehakina  minima  Cushman  et

Renz,  which  have  FADs  in  the  Campanian,  and  Rzehakina

epigona (Rzehak), Remesella varians (Glaessner), Glomospi-

ra diffundens (Cushman et Renz) and Spiroplectammina spec-

tabilis (Grzybowski) which appear progressively in the Maas-

trichtian. However, a precise correlation of their FADs is not

established yet (for details — see B¹k 2000, 2004).

Such progressive appearance of these DWAF species took

place within the lower part of the Cisna Beds, below the exot-

ic-bearing layer. This shows at least the Maastrichtian age of

this part of the Cisna Beds.

The paleontological data, obtained from the shales, near to

the inferred position of the exotic-bearing layer, and from the

overlying sediments show that this layer was laid down close

to  the  Cretaceous/Tertiary  (K/T)  boundary,  most  probably

during the earliest Paleocene, as indicated by the first appear-

ance of R. fissistomata, noted in the Carpathians just above the

K/T boundary (Bubík et al. 1999).

Source rocks of the exotic-bearing layer and the

Cisna Beds

In order to identify the provenance of the studied pebbles,

and also to evaluate the possibility that the orthogneissic rocks

were the source rocks for the siliciclastic material of the flysch

series of the Cisna Beds, the analytical data from the pebbles

have been compared with the petrographic composition of the

Cisna-type sandstones. This comparison is based on our stud-

ies in various localities of the Bieszczady Mountains (Fig. 11;

Table 2), and on additional petrographic data, related to occur-

rences of the Cisna Beds in both the Polish (Œl¹czka 1971) and

Slovak parts (Koráb & Ïurkoviè 1978) of the Dukla Nappe.

 

 

 

 

Quartz 

 

Feldspars 

Other minerals 

Rock fragments 

  

Samples 

M

osa

ic

 cry

st

al

 

Cr

ys

tal 

w

ith

 u

nd

ul

ato

ry 

ex

tin

ctio

 

Cr

ys

tal 

w

ith

 n

or

m

al 

ex

tin

ctio

C

orro

de

cryst

al

 

M

yrm

ek

ite 

Pl

agio

clas

w

ith

 rep

eated

 lam

ellar 

tw

in

in

M

icro

clin

Pe

rt

ite

-or

th

oc

la

se

 

St

ro

ng

ly 

alt

ered

 feld

sp

ar

 

Bio

tit

Calcite 

Ch

lo

ri

te

 

Mu

sc

ov

ite

 

Gl

au

co

ni

te

 

Fe

rr

ous

 oxi

de

an

hy

dr

ooxi

de

To

ur

m

alin

Ru

tile 

Zi

rc

on

 

G

arn

et

G

nei

sses a

nd

 g

ra

ni

tic

-g

ne

iss 

Crys

tallin

sc

hi

st

Crys

tallin

garn

et

-b

earin

sc

hi

st

Ph

yllites

 

Si

lic

eo

us

 r

oc

ks

 

Clayey 

sh

ales

 

Si

de

ri

te

s?

 

Vo

lcan

ic 

ro

ck

Sa

nd

st

one

and

 m

ud

st

one

Ce

m

en

Kañcz-11/99 

38.4  12.1  6.3  0.5    2.4  4.8  5.1    3.4   

 

 

  0.5  0.5   

 

 

    2.7    1.7    1.2  0.2   

 

 

  20.2 

Semen-lewy-17/1/99  36.2  13.1  7.9    0.1  3.6  0.7  2.4    7.0  0.1   

  0.3  0.3  1.5  0.1  0.1   

    1.4    1.8    3.1  0.4   

  0.1    19.8 

Szyp-wierzch-4/1/98  34.3    9.3  6.3  1.1  0.2  2.3  0.8  4.9  11.5  0.5  1.1    1.1  0.2  1.1   

 

 

    2.9    2.5    1.0  0.5    0.2    0.3  17.9 

Chresty-1/99 

36.5    6.8  3.5  0.6    2.2    4.0    5.5  0.8   

  0.8    1.2   

 

 

  10.5    8.1    3.3  1.4    0.7  1.3  2.4  10.4 

Wlk. Semen-2/99/a  18.0    2.6  1.6   

  0.2  0.3  6.3    1.0  0.1   

  0.1    2.0   

 

 

  51.3    5.2    0.4  0.7  1.6  1.1    0.7    6.8 

Wo³-13b/98 

28.9  10.0  9.1  1.0    2.3  1.2  8.8    5.5  1.0    0.2  0.7  0.6  2.9   

 

 

    9.2    8.2    0.1  0.5   

 

 

    9.8 

Wo³osate-3/98/c 

26.9    7.7  7.6   

  0.2   

    3.5  1.0    0.1  2.3  0.1  3.7  0.1    0.1  0.4  16.3  16.1  0.1  3.5  0.6   

  0.1      9.6 

 

Table 2:  Petrographic  composition  of  the  fine-grained  conglomerate  of  the  Cisna  Beds,  Bieszczady  Mountains,  Poland.  Total  content

calculated as 100 %.

background image

216                                                                                            B¥K and WOLSKA

Structural features, textural features and mineralogy of the

Cisna-type sandstones

Detrital grains in the sandstones vary in the degree of round-

ing.  According  to  Pettijohn’s  (1975)  classification,  they  are

subrounded,  rounded  and  well  rounded.  Their  contacts  are

straight-line, but convex-concave are also observed. The size

of  grains  is  diversified,  mineral  grains  range  from  0.2  to

2.1 mm,  whereas  rock  fragments  —  from  0.9  to  2.5 mm.  In

some samples, the sandy grain size is accompanied by gravel-

ly grain size, represented by mineral and rock fragments, 3.5–

7.0 mm in size. In the sample Wlk. Semen-2/99/a, the size of

detrital  grains  and  rock  fragments  exceeds  2.0 mm  and  the

volume of gravelly grain size is higher than 50 %.

Quartz is dominant among detrital minerals, forming com-

monly mosaic crystals and crystals exhibiting undulatory ex-

tinction  (Fig. 12.8).  The  present  study  has  confirmed

Œl¹czka’s opinion (1971) that the majority of detrital feldspar

grains  are  strongly  altered.  Their  content  is  significant  and

amounts to 11.6 vol. %, whilst that of unaltered feldspars, rep-

resented  mainly  by  orthoclase  perthite  (Fig. 12.3)  and  less

common  microcline  (Fig. 12.7),  showing  typical-twinning

cross-hatched or “tartan” type and repeated lamellar-twinning

plagioclases (Fig. 12.6) is distinctly lower. The fragments of

Fig. 11.  Petrographic  composition  of  the  Cisna-type  sandstones  from  the  studied  area;  northern  part  of  the  Dukla  Nappe,  Bieszczady

Mountains, Poland.

myrmekite (Fig. 12.5) and phyllosilicates occur in subordinate

amounts, while white mica is more common than biotite. Bi-

otite is more easily altered, showing different stages of chlori-

tization.  Small  chlorite  flakes  and  glauconite  aggregates  are

also observed. Opaque minerals are represented mainly by an-

hydrous and hydrated iron oxides.

The sandstones also contain heavy minerals, including gar-

nets,  zircon,  tourmaline  and  rutile  (Table 2).  The  amount  of

garnets is the highest. Though these minerals are not resistant

to chemical weathering, they are well preserved during trans-

port and mechanical disintegration. This conclusion is consis-

tent  with  the  data  reported  by  other  authors  (Œl¹czka  1971;

Koráb & Ïurkoviè 1978; Winkler & Œl¹czka 1992, 1994) for

heavy minerals of the Cisna Beds. All these authors described

the population dominated by garnet and very stable minerals

(zircon, tourmaline and rutile) (up to 95 % in frequency), with

accessory of brookite, anatase, titanite, apatite and epidote.

Rock-fragment  grains  are  the  other  significant  component

of the Cisna-type sandstones. They are represented by crystal-

line  rocks  (Fig. 11,  Table 2)  showing  medium  degree  of  re-

gional metamorphism — mainly orthogneisses and schists (in

s. Wo³-13b/98 — also garnet-bearing schist). The content of

crystalline  rocks  is  variable.  It  is  the  highest  in  sandstones

containing gravelly grain size (18.6–32.4 vol. %) and in con-

background image

EXOTIC ORTHOGNEISS PEBBLES FROM PALEOCENE FLYSCH OF THE DUKLA NAPPE                             217

glomerates (s. Wlk. Semen-2/99/a: 56.8 vol. %). Fragments of

phyllites and siliceous, ferruginous, clayey and effusive (vol-

canic) rocks are less common. Some thick-bedded layers (not

studied  here)  may  also  contain  sedimentary  clasts  (mainly

non-calcareous shales).

The Cisna-type sandstones contain predominantly contact-

porous  and  basal  cement.  In  some  samples,  matrix-type  ce-

ment also occurs, where the main detrital quartz and less com-

mon feldspars are much smaller in size. The content of cement

is  diversified,  as  documented  by  planimetric  analyses  (Ta-

Fig. 12.  1 — Gravelstone of the Cisna Beds with abundant white pebbles of orthogneiss fragments (gn) and dark grey quartz (q),  Wo³-3/98,

polished slab. 2–8 — Micrographs of grains from sandstones of the Cisna Beds which derive from decomposition of orthogneisses: 2 —

Crystalline rocks fragments; A — orthogneiss grain, B — phyllite grain, Wo³osate-3/98/c, crossed nicols. 3 — Grain of perthitic orthoclase,

Wo³-13b/98,  crossed  nicols.  4  —  Plagioclase  grain,  Kañcz-11/99,  crossed  nicols.  5  —  Fragment  of  myrmekite,  Semen-lewy-17/1/99,

crossed nicols. 6 — Plagioclase grain showing repeated lamellar albite twinning, Semen-lewy-17/1/99, crossed nicols. 7 — Fragment of or-

thogneiss  (microcline  and  mosaic  quartz  crystalloblasts),  Kañcz-11/99,  crossed  nicols.  8  —  Mosaic  quartz  grain,  Semen-lewy-17/1/99,

crossed nicols.

ble 2). In sandstones lacking the gravelly grains (pebbles), it

varies from 10 to 20 vol. % and does not exceed 10 vol. % in

sandstones containing some admixture of gravelly material. In

conglomerates,  the  content  of  cement  is  distinctly  low  (ca.

6.8 vol. %). The majority of clastic rocks contain clayey-fer-

ruginous cement, but locally it is calcareous, corroding detrital

feldspar grains. This phenomenon may be related to the pres-

ence of secretional forms — calcite veinlets and nests.

In  the  classification  F–Q–R  and  M–Q–F+R  diagrams  (for

details, see Fig. 13A,B) showing the petrographical and struc-

background image

218                                                                                            B¥K and WOLSKA

tural features, the Cisna-type sandstones containing pebbles of

orthogneissic  rocks  are  plotting  in  similar  fields  to  those  of

sandstones examined by Œl¹czka (1971) from the western part

of the Dukla Nappe.

In  the  F–Q–L  and  F–Q

m

–L

diagrams  showing  the  prove-

nances  of  material  (Dickinson  &  Suczek  1979),  the  studied

Cisna-type  sandstones  are  plotted  in  the  field  of  continental

block provenances (Fig. 13C,D).

Cisna-type sandstones versus orthogneissic exotics

Detailed petrographic studies of sandstones and conglomer-

ates  from  the  series  containing  orthogneissic  pebbles  have

confirmed  that  the  continental  crust  rocks  consisting  of  or-

thogneisses and granitic-gneisses were the source material for

the Cisna-type sandstones.

The  following  data  indicate  that  orthogneisses  were  the

dominant  rocks  of  the  source  area  for  the  Cisna-type  sand-

Fig. 13.  A, B — Mineral-petrographic composition of sandstones in the Dukla Beds including data from literature (Œl¹czka 1971; Koráb &

Ïurkoviè 1978): A — Content of quartz, feldspars and rock fragments calculated as 100 %. B — Content of quartz, feldspars together with

rock  fragments  and  matrix  calculated  as  100 %.  C, D  —  Ternary  discrimination  diagrams  of  the  coarse-grained  sandstones  of  the  Cisna

Beds,  related  to  different  tectonic  provenances  (after  Dickinson  &  Suczek  1979).  1  —  Kañcz-11/99,  2  —  Semen-lewy-17/1/99,  3  —

Szyp-wierz-4/1/98.

stones:  1  —  prevalence  of  clasts  of  mosaic  quartz  (up  to

39 vol. %), 2 — considerable content of crystals of quartz ex-

hibiting undulatory extinction, 3 — myrmekite fragments, 4 —

microcline  clasts  showing  typical  twinning  cross-hatched  or

“tartan”  type,  5  —  alkali  feldspar  clasts  displaying  perthite

structures, 6 — plagioclase clasts containing light mica inclu-

sions in central parts, 7 — occurrence of flakes of white mica

and  sporadically  strongly  altered  flakes  of  biotite  (hydrobi-

otite), 8 — occurrence of small fragments of gneisses (quartz

+feldspars,  quartz+plagioclase,  quartz+K-feldspar+  plagio-

clase,  K-feldspar+plagioclase)  and  larger  fragments  of  or-

thogneisses in gravelly grain size in sandstone and conglomer-

ate samples.

The occurrence of granitic rocks as the source rocks of the Ci-

sna-type sandstones is here documented by various mineral as-

semblages, found in the studied samples. They include quartz+

feldspars  (alkali  feldspar+K-feldspar+plagioclases)+white

mica (phengite)+biotite (chlorite).

background image

EXOTIC ORTHOGNEISS PEBBLES FROM PALEOCENE FLYSCH OF THE DUKLA NAPPE                             219

Fig. 14.  A — Directions of paleotransport in the Cisna Beds near the inferred exotic-bearing layer; Wo³osatka drainge basin, Bieszczady

Mountains, Poland. B — Directions of material transport in the £upków and Cisna Beds (Campanian–Paleocene) and position of the source

area (after Ksi¹¿kiewicz 1962; Œl¹czka 1971; supplemented).

Provenance of orthogneissic exotics

The exposures with exotics in the Dukla Nappe do not pro-

vide direct information about the location of the source area

for the orthogneissic exotics. Petrographic affinities between

orthogneissic  pebbles  and  mineral/rock  fragments  grains  of

the  Cisna-type  sandstones  unequivocally  show  on  the  same

provenance of them. Thus we suggest that these deposits were

transported from south-east, like the material of the Cisna-type

sandstones.  The  directions  of  material  transport,  measured

from  hieroglyphs  in  the  studied  area  are  fairly  stable,  from

100º to 160º

 

(Fig. 14A). Comparison of the petrographic com-

position of the Dukla-type sandstones, textural features of the

sandstones (e.g. ratio of grains versus matrix) and contents of

coarse-grain material between the western and eastern parts of

the Dukla Nappe (Œl¹czka 1971; Koráb & Ïurkoviè 1978) are

additional  factors  which  point  to  the  location  of  the  source

area south-east of the studied area.

The paleogeography of the Dukla Basin during the Senon-

ian  and  Paleocene  was  presented  by  Ksi¹¿kiewicz  (1962),

Œl¹czka  (1971),  Danysh  (1973)  and  Koráb  &  Ïurkoviè

(1978). According to these authors, the turbidites of the Cisna

Beds  were  derived  from  a  cordillera,  located  to  the  SE

(Fig. 14B). Sedimentological and petrographical data, present-

ed  by  Œl¹czka  (1959)  from  the  Bystre  Scale  (Upper  Creta-

ceous-Paleocene Istebna Beds of the Silesian Basin) show that

the Dukla Basin was restricted to the north by the south-east-

ern  extension  of  the  Silesian  cordillera.  On  the  other  hand,

Danysh (1973) suggested an occurrence of the so-called “Cen-

tral Cordillera” within the south-eastern part of the Dukla Ba-

sin.  It  was  the  source  area  for  thick-bedded,  coarse-grained

turbidites of the Upper Berezny Beds (equivalent of the Cisna

Beds in Ukrainian territory). Most probably, an extension of

this cordillera, which is recently regarded as the NE part of the

Marmarosh massif (Hamor et al. 1989; Poprawa et al. 2002)

could be the source area of the Cisna Beds in the Polish part of

the Dukla Basin. The foraminiferal assemblages (Saccammi-

na-Bathysiphon  biofacies;  B¹k  2004)  show  on  deep-water

sedimentation, below the calcium compensation depth during

the Maastrichtian–Paleocene in the Dukla Basin. According to

Œl¹czka (1971) and Leško et al. (1960), the thickness distribu-

tion of the Cisna Beds, which gradually disappear in the more

inner folds of the Dukla Nappe, show that the axis of maxi-

mum  deposition  was  near  the  northern  margin  of  the  Dukla

Basin.

Conclusions

1 — The layer with exotics may be a useful correlation hori-

zon on a regional scale in the Campanian–Paleocene monoto-

nous flysch series of the Dukla Nappe. The exotics from the

Dukla Nappe probably occur in a layer, which extends over a

distance  of  at  least  3 km.  This  layer  occurs  in  the  southern

limb of the northernmost anticline of the Dukla Nappe, within

the thick series of thick-bedded and coarse-grained sandstones

of the Cisna Beds, 550 m above their lower boundary.

2 — The exotic pebbles include three types of granite de-

rived orthogneisses: 1 — medium-banded orthogneiss with al-

kali feldspar porphyroblasts showing structural features of fo-

liated  granitic-gneiss,  2  —  medium-banded  orthogneiss

containing  small  microcline  porphyroblasts  and  showing

structural features of foliated granitic-gneiss, and 3 — strong-

ly cataclastic granitic-gneiss with chess-board albite porphy-

roblasts showing properties of partly mylonitized granite. The

petrographic composition of the orthogneisses shows that the

protolith  of  the  orthogneisses  points  to  granites  metamor-

phosed under conditions of greenschist facies.

background image

220                                                                                            B¥K and WOLSKA

3 — The chemical composition of the exotic pebbles con-

firms that they represent orthogneisses, which point to peralu-

minous, poorly-evolved, S-type granites, widely known from

the Variscan crystalline basement of the Western Carpathians.

According to their mineralogical and geochemical characteris-

tics,  they  exhibit  features  of  orogen-related  crustal  granites.

The discrimination diagrams, based upon major elements and

trace  elements  show  that  the  protolith  rocks  could  represent

active  continental  margin  or  continental  collision  (syn-colli-

sional) granites.

4 — The Late Carboniferous age date of white micas from

the orthogneissic pebble (first type of orthogneiss; K/Ar meth-

od:  304.9±11.4  Ma;  Poprawa  et  al.  2004)  is  related  to  the

metamorphism event of the rocks. It may suggest that the pro-

tolith  granites  may  have  intruded  during  the  main  Variscan

magmatism event in the Carpathians, coinciding with interval

350–340 Ma.

5 — The biostratigraphical data on deep-water agglutinated

Foraminifera suggest the position of the exotic-bearing layer

in the lowermost Paleocene, close to the K/T boundary.

6 — Petrographic affinities between orthogneissic pebbles

and  mineral/rock  fragments  grains  of  the  Cisna-type  sand-

stones  show  the  same  provenance  for  them.  These  deposits

were transported from the northeast extension of the Marma-

rosh massif. During the Maastrichtian and Paleocene, the mas-

sif had the character of continental source bearing cordillera,

formed mainly of orthogneissic and granitic rocks.

Acknowledgments:  Thanks  are  due  to  Prof.  G.  Haczewski

(Cracow Pedagogical University) for his discussion during the

mapping of the study area and for improving the English text

of  the  manuscript,  and  Prof.  W.  Narêbski  (Museum  of  the

Earth, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw) for critical read-

ing of the geochemical part of this paper. Thanks are extended

to the Directors of the Bieszczady National Park for the per-

mission to carry out the fieldwork. The authors are indebted to

Jadwiga Faber M.Sc. (Scanning Microscope Laboratory of the

Institute  of  Zoology,  Jagiellonian  University)  for  scanning

electron  micrographs  and  chemical  microprobe  analyses.

Many thanks are also due reviewers of the manuscript: Prof.

N. Oszczypko, Dr. L. Švábenická, Dr. O. Krejèí, Dr. I. Petrík

and two anonymous persons for constructive comments.

References

B¹k  K.  2000:  Biostratigraphy  of  deep-water  agglutinated  Foramin-

ifera  in  Scaglia  Rossa-type  deposits  of  the  Pieniny  Klippen

Belt,  Carpathians,  Poland.  In:  Hart  M.B.,  Kaminski  M.A.  &

Smart  C.  (Eds.):  Proceedings  of  the  Fifth  International  Work-

shop  on  Agglutinated  Foraminifera,  Plymouth,  England,  Sep-

tember 12–19. 1997. Grzybowski Found. Spec. Publ. 7, 15–40.

B¹k K. 2004: Upper Cretaceous-Palaeogene foraminiferal biofacies

in  the  deep-water  flysch  environment;  a  case  study  from  the

Eastern  Carpathians.  In:  Kaminski  M.A.  &  Bubík  M.  (Eds.):

Proceedings  of  the  Sixth  International  Workshop  on  Aggluti-

nated Foraminifera. Grzybowski Found. Spec. Publ. 8, 1–56.

Broska I. & Uher P. 1991: Regional typology of zircon and their re-

lationships  to  allanite-monazite  antagonism  (on  example  of

Hercynian  granitoids  of  the  Western  Carpathians).  Geol.  Car-

pathica 42, 271–277.

Broska I. & Uher P. 2001: Whole-rock chemistry and genetic typol-

ogy of the West-Carpathian Variscan granites. Geol. Carpathi-

ca 52, 79–90.

Bubík  M.,  B¹k  M.  &  Švábenická  L.  1999:  Biostratigraphy  of  the

Maastrichtian to Paleocene distal flysch sediments of the Raèa

Unit  in  the  Uzgruò  section  (Magura  group  of  nappes,  Czech

Republic). Geol. Carpathica 50, 33–48.

Burchart J., Cambel B. & Král’ J. 1987: Isochron reassessment of

K-Ar  dating  from  the  West  Carpathian  crystalline  complex.

Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath. 41, 131–170.

Cambel C., Petrík I. & Vilinoviè V. 1985: Variscan granitoids of the

Western Carpathians in the light of geochemical-petrochemical

study. Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath. 36, 204–218.

Cambel C., Král’ J. & Burchart J. 1990: Isotopic geochronology of the

West  Carpathian  crystalline  complex  with  catalogue  of  data.

Veda, Bratislava, 1–183 (in Slovak with English summary).

Catlos E.J. & Sorensen S.S. 2003: Phengite-based chronology of K-

and  Ba-rich  fluid  flow  in  two  paleosubduction  zone.  Science

299, 92–95.

Danysh W.W. 1973: Geology of the western part of the Ukrainian

Carpathians. Naukova dumka, Kijev, 1–116 (in Russian).

Deer W.A., Howie R.A. & Zussman J. 1962: Rock-forming miner-

als; part 5. Longmans, Green and Co Ltd., London, 1–435.

de La Roche H., Leterrier J., Grande Claude P. & Marchal M. 1980:

A classification of volcanic and plutonic rocks using R1-R2 di-

agrams  and  major  element  analyses  —  its  relationships  and

current nomenclature. Chem. Geol. 29, 183–210.

Dickinson W.R. & Suczek C.A. 1979: Plate tectonics and sandstone

compositions. Bull. Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. 63, 2164–2182.

Evans  B.W.  &  Patrick  B.E.  1987:  Phengite  (3T)  in  high-pressure

metamorphosed  granitic  orthogneisses,  Seward  Peninsula,

Alaska. Canad. Mineralogist 25, 141–158.

Ferraris C., Chopin C. & Wessicken R. 2000: Nano- to micro-scale

decompression  products  in  ultra  high-pressure  phengite:  HR-

TEM  and  AEM  study,  and  some  petrological  implications.

Amer. Mineralogist 85, 1195–1201.

Geroch S. & Nowak W. 1984: Proposal of zonation for the Late Ti-

thonian–Late  Eocene,  based  upon  arenaceous  Foraminifera

from  the  Outer  Carpathians,  Poland.  In:  Oertli  H.J.  (Ed.):

Benthos’  83:  2nd  International  Symposium  on  Benthic  Fora-

minifera (Pau, April 11–15, 1983). Elf-Aquitane, ESO REP and

TOTAL CFP, Pau & Bordeoux, 225–239.

Haczewski G., B¹k K., Kukulak J., Mastella L. & Rubinkiewicz J.

(submitted  to  print):  Ustrzyki  Górne  Sheet  (1068)  of  Detailed

Geological Map of Poland, scale 1:50,000. Pañstw. Inst. Geol.,

Warszawa.

Hamor G., Steininger F.F., Kojundgieva E., Cicha I., Vass D., Bar-

thelt D., Halmai J., Boccaletti M., Gelati R., Moratti G., Slacz-

ka A., Marinescu F., Berger J.P., Babak E.V., Goncharova I.A.,

Ilvina  L.B.,  Nevesskaja  L.A.,  Paramanova  N.P.,  Popov  S.V.,

Eremija M. & Marinovich D. 1989: Neogene Palaeogeographic

Atlas of Central and Eastern Europe, scale 1:3,000,000. Maps

1–7. Geol. Inst. Hung. (MÁFI), Budapest.

Hatch F.H., Wells A.K. & Wells M.K. 1961: Petrology of the igne-

ous rocks. 12

th

 edition. Thomas Murby & Co, London, 1–515.

Hovorka D. & Petrík I. 1992: Variscan granitic bodies of the West-

ern  Carpathians  —  the  backbone  of  the  mountain  chain.  In:

Vozár  J.  (Ed.):  The  Palaeozoic  geodynamic  domains  of  the

Western  Carpathians,  Eastern  Alps  and  Dinarides.  Spec.  Vol.

IGCP 276, Bratislava, 57–66.

Koráb T. & Ïurkoviè T. 1978: Geology of Dukla Unit (East-Slova-

kian Flysch). Geol. Ústav D. Štúra, Bratislava, 1–144.

Koszarski L., Œl¹czka A. & ¯ytko K. 1961: Stratigraphy and palaeo-

geography of the Dukla Nappe in the Bieszczady Mts. Kwart.

Geol. 5, 551–578 (in Polish).

Ksi¹¿kiewicz M. 1962: Geological Atlas of Poland. Cretaceous and

background image

EXOTIC ORTHOGNEISS PEBBLES FROM PALEOCENE FLYSCH OF THE DUKLA NAPPE                             221

Paleogene  stratigraphy  and  facies  in  the  Polish  Central  Car-

pathians. Inst. Geol., Warszawa (in Polish, English summary).

Leško B., Nemèok J. & Koráb T. 1960: Flysch of the Užská hornati-

na Mts. Geol. Práce, Spr. 19, 65–85 (in Slovak).

Maniar P.D. & Piccoli P.M. 1989: Tectonic discrimination of grani-

toids. Geol. Soc. Amer. Bull. 101, 635–643.

Moine B. & de La Roche H. 1968: Nouvelle approche du problème

de  l’origine  des  amphibolites,  à  partir  de  leur  composition

chimique. C. R. Acad. Sci. 267, 20–84.

Morgiel J. & Olszewska B. 1981: Biostratigraphy of the Polish Ex-

ternal  Carpathians  based  on  agglutinated  foraminifera.  Micro-

paleontology 27, 1–30.

Olszewska B. 1980: Foraminiferal stratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous

and Palaeogene sediments of the central part of the Dukla Unit.

Biul.  Inst.  Geol.  (Warszawa)  326,  59–107  (in  Polish,  English

summary).

Olszewska B. 1997: Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the Polish Out-

er  Carpathians:  a  record  of  basin  geohistory.  Ann.  Soc.  Geol.

Poloniae 67, 325–336.

Pearce J.A., Harris N.B.W. & Tindle A.G. 1984: Trace element dis-

crimination diagrams for the tectonic interpretation of granitic

rocks. J. Petrology 25, 956–983.

Petrík I. 2000: Multiple sources of the West-Carpathian granitoids: A

review of Rb/Sr and Sm/Nd data. Geol. Carpathica 51, 145–158.

Petrík I. & Broska I. 1994: Petrology of two granite types from the

Tribec Mountains, Western Carpathians: an example of allanite

(+magnetite) versus monazite dichotomy. Geol. J. 29, 59–78.

Petrík I. & Kohút M. 1997: The evolution of granitoid magmatism

during  the  Hercynian  orogen  in  the  Western  Carpathians.  In:

Grecula P., Hovorka D. & Putiš M. (Eds.): Geological evolu-

tion of the Western Carpathians. Miner. Slovaca — Monograph

235–252.

Petrík  I.,  Broska  I.  &  Uher  P.  1994:  Evolution  of  the  West  Car-

pathian  granite  magmatism:  source  rock,  geotectonic  setting

and  relation  to  the  Variscan  structure.  Geol  Carpathica  45,

283–291.

Pitcher W.S. 1982: Granite type and tectonic environment. In: Hsu

K.J. (Ed.): Mountain Building Processes. Acad. Press, London,

19–40.

Pettijohn F.J. 1975: Sedimentary rocks. Harper & Row Publishers,

New York, 1–628.

Poller  U.,  Broska  I.,  Finger  F.,  Uher  P.  &  Janák  M.  2000:  Early

Variscan  in  the  Western  Carpathians:  U/Pb  zircon  data  from

granitoids and orthogneisses of the Tatra Mountains (Slovakia).

Int. J. Earth Sci. 89, 336–349.

Poprawa P., Malata T. & Oszczypko N. 2002: Tectonic evolution of

the Polish part of Outer Carpathian’s sedimentary basins — con-

strains from subsidence analysis. Przegl. Geol. 50, 1092–1108.

Poprawa T., Malata T., Pécskay Z., Banaœ M., Skulich J., Paszkowski

M. & Kusiak M. 2004: Geochronology of crystalline basement

of the Western Outer Carpathian’s sediment source areas — pre-

liminary data. Mineral. Soc. Pol. Spec. Pap. 22, 329–332.

Putiš M., Kotov A.B., Petrík I., Korikovsky S.P., Madarás J., Salnik-

ova S.P., Yakovleva S.Z., Berezhnaya N.G., Plotkina Y.V., Ko-

vach  V.P.,  Lupták  B.  &  Majdán  M.  2003:  Early-  vs.  late

orogenic granitoids relatioships in the Variscan basement of the

Western Carpathians. Geol. Carpathica 54, 163–174.

Rollinson  H.  1993:  Using  geochemical  data:  evaluation,  presenta-

tion, interpretation. Longman Group UK Ltd., London, 1–352.

Simpson C.A. 1985: Deformation of granitic rocks across the brittle-

ductile transition. J. Struct. Geol. 7, 503–511.

Œl¹czka  A.  1959:  Stratigraphy  of  the  Bystre  Scale  —  Middle  Car-

pathians.  Biul.  Inst.  Geol.  131,  203–286  (in  Polish,  English

summary).

Œl¹czka  A.  1971:  The  geology  of  the  Dukla  unit  —  Polish  Flysch

Carpathians.  Prace  Inst.  Geol.  63,  1–167  (in  Polish,  English

summary).

Tompson  R.N.  1982:  British  Tertiary  volcanic  province.  Scott.  J.

Geol. 18, 49–107.

Uher P. & Gregor T. 1992: The Turèok granite — a product of pos-

torogenic  magmatism  of  A-type.  Miner.  Slovaca  24,  301–304

(in Slovak, English summary).

Uher P., Marschalko R., Martiny E., Puškelová ¼., Streško V., To-

man  B.  &  Walzel  E.  1994:  Geochemical  characterization  of

granitic  rock  pebbles  from  Cretaceous  to  Paleogene  flysch  of

the Pieniny Klippen Belt. Geol. Carpathica 45, 171–183.

Winkler W. & Œl¹czka A. 1992: Sediment dispersal and provenance

in  the  Silesian,  Dukla  and  Magura  flysch  nappes  (Outer  Car-

pathians, Poland). Geol. Rdsch. 81, 371–382.

Winkler  W.  &  Œl¹czka  A.  1994:  A  Late  Cretaceous  to  Paleogene

geodynamic  model  for  the  Western  Carpathians  in  Poland.

Geol. Carpathica 45, 71–82.