background image

                                                 411

LATE MIOCENE COUNTERCLOCKWISE ROTATION OF THE PIENINY ANDESITES

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 55, 5, BRATISLAVA, OCTOBER 2004

411–419

LATE MIOCENE COUNTERCLOCKWISE ROTATION OF THE

PIENINY ANDESITES AT THE CONTACT OF THE INNER AND

OUTER WESTERN CARPATHIANS

EMÕ MÁRTON

1

, ANTEK K. TOKARSKI

and DÓRA HALÁSZ

3

1

Eötvös Loránd Geophysical Institute of Hungary, Palaeomagnetic Laboratory,  Columbus 17–23, H-1145 Budapest, Hungary;

paleo@elgi.hu

2

Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geological Sciences, Research Centre in Cracow, Senacka 1–3, 31-002 Cracow, Poland;

ndtokars@cyf-kr.edu.pl

3

Báthory út 7, H-1054 Budapest, Hungary; dora.halasz@hungary.org

(Manuscript received March 12, 2003; accepted in revised form December 16, 2003)

Abstract: The Pieniny andesite line is a 20 km long zone, which cuts obliquely the contact between the Pieniny Klippen

Belt which separates the Inner and Outer Western Carpathians and the Magura Nappe (the innermost nappe system of the

Outer Western Carpathians). The andesites (dykes and sills) were formed during two intrusion phases. The older dykes

are subparallel to the andesite line, while the younger ones are perpendicular to it. Formerly, the andesites were thought

to be of Sarmatian age, recently obtained K/Ar ages are in the 10.8–13.5 Ma range. For paleomagnetic study, we drilled

macroscopically fresh material from both generations of the andesites. The samples were subjected to detailed alternat-

ing field and thermal demagnetization. Isothermal remanence acquisition experiments, Curie-point measurements and

microscopy analysis of polished sections were carried out in order to identify magnetic minerals.  The results are as

follows. The second phase andesites and some sites in the first phase andesites have complex natural remanent magneti-

zations (NRM) with two stable components: one is isolated below, and the other above the Curie-point of magnetite. It is

remarkable that thermal demagnetization was often needed to reveal all components of the NRM although the rocks we

studied were Neogene igneous rocks which are considered ideal targets for the less time-consuming alternating field

method. The lower temperature component follows a great circle containing the expected stable European direction of

corresponding age. The higher temperature component has counterclockwise rotated declination. The remaining sites of

the first phase andesites have practically a single component remanence, which corresponds to one or the other of the

directions described above. The components with counterclockwise rotated declinations cluster around an overall-mean

direction of D=133°, I=–56° with k=26, α

95

=12° (based on 7 site-mean paleomagnetic directions). Neither the magnetic

minerals, nor their degree and type of alteration are different in the two generations of andesites. Thus, the agents of

remagnetization were probably hot fluids acting after the emplacement of the second generation dykes. The tectonic

implication of our results is that the Pieniny andesite area must have rotated counterclockwise, after emplacement of the

second phase dykes.

Key words: Western Carpathians, Neogene andesites, paleomagnetism, complex magnetic remanence, CCW rotations.

Introduction

The  Carpathian  orogenic  belt  (Fig. 1)  is  subdivided  into  the

Inner Western Carpathians (in some tectonic models they are

called the Internides, e.g. Mahe¾ 1986; Plašienka et al. 1997)

and the Outer Western Carpathians. In the West Carpathian re-

gion, the Outer Carpathians are separated from the Inner Car-

pathians by the Pieniny Klippen Belt. Both the Inner and Out-

er  Carpathians  are  characterized  by  complicated  nappe

structures, but the time of nappe transport is different for the

two areas. In the former, it is of Late Cretaceous age, while for

the latter it is of Paleocene (Tokarski & Œwierczewska 1998)

through Late Miocene age (Wójcik et al. 1999). The Pieniny

Klippen Belt is a narrow zone of Mesozoic and Tertiary strata

that underwent extreme shortening and wrenching (Birkenma-

jer 1986 and references therein).

The contacts of the Pieniny Klippen Belt with the Outer and

Inner  Carpathians  are  subvertical  (Birkenmajer  1986).  The

Belt was folded first during the Late Cretaceous through Pale-

ocene, then in the Early Miocene (Birkenmajer 1986 and ref-

erences therein). The Pieniny andesite line (Fig. 2), the object

of the present paleomagnetic study, obliquely cuts the Pieniny

Klippen Belt and the Magura Nappe which is the innermost

nappe in the studied part of the Outer Carpathians. The Pien-

iny  andesite  line  is  clearly  younger  than  the  folding  in  the

Magura  Nappe  (Birkenmajer  1986;  cf.  Œwierczewska  &

Tokarski 1998).

Recent paleomagnetic studies on Paleogene flysch in the In-

ner Carpathians (Podhale and Levoèa Basins) revealed that the

Internides  must  have  rotated  about  60°  counterclockwise

(CCW),  after  the  Oligocene  (Márton  et  al.  1998a,b,  1999a).

Sporadic  paleomagnetic  observations  for  the  Magura  flysch

(Márton  et  al.  2000)  also  suggest  CCW  rotation  of  similar

magnitude for the central segment (south of Cracow). In addi-

tion,  there  are  several  paleomagnetic  observations  from  the

foredeep of the Western Carpathians which indicate moderate

CCW rotations (Márton et al. 1999b, 2001) of post-Karpatian

age in the western segment, post-Badenian age in the central

segment and probably post-Pannonian age in the eastern seg-

ment (Karpatian, Badenian, Pannonian are Central Paratethy-

background image

412

MÁRTON, TOKARSKI and HALÁSZ

an stage names; for correlation with the Mediterranean stages

refer to Rögl 1996, and Fig. 8). The upper age limit of the ro-

tations is not yet constrained, apart from a single Upper Bade-

nian  paleomagnetic  result  (showing  no  rotation)  from  the

Nowy S¹cz Basin (a piggyback basin sitting on the Outer Car-

pathians). We decided, therefore, to start a new paleomagnetic

study on the Pieniny andesites, which, at the time of our first

sampling  (1997),  were  thought  to  be  of  Sarmatian  age

(Birkenmajer et al. 1987).

In the 1960’s, Birkenmajer & Nairn (1968) carried out pale-

omagnetic investigation on the Pieniny andesites. They used

the  standard  paleomagnetic  technique  of  partial  alternating

field  (AF)  demagnetization  to  distinguish  between  unstable

and  stable  natural  remanent  magnetization  (NRM)  compo-

nents. With this method, they obtained statistically acceptable

results only for some sites in the western part of the andesite

line,  which  were  mostly  characterized  by  steep  inclinations

and  reversed  polarity.  However,  one  site  had  a  definitely

CCW rotated direction. Subsequently, Kruczyk (1970) studied

the paleomagnetic and rock magnetic properties of the second

phase andesites, and obtained statistically well-defined paleo-

magnetic directions for 4 sites, also with steep inclinations and

reversed polarity. Though the majority of the statistically sat-

isfying paleomagnetic directions obtained by the above named

authors did not indicate CCW rotation, the one site (belonging

to  the  first  phase)  which  did,  suggested  that  rotation  could

have occurred during the activity of the andesite volcanism.

This explains our interest in the Pieniny andesites.

Geology and sampling

The Pieniny andesite line is a 20 km long zone consisting of

andesite  sills  and  dykes,  which  cut  Jurassic-Cretaceous  and

Paleogene  strata  of  the  Pieniny  Klippen  Belt  and  Paleogene

strata of the Magura Nappe (Fig. 2). The andesite intrusions

were formed during two successive phases of intrusive activi-

ty (Birkenmajer 1986, 1996). The older set of intrusions com-

prises  numerous  dykes  striking  subparallel  to  the  Pieniny

Klippen Belt. The younger set consists only of three NNW–

SSE striking dykes, which cut the Magura Nappe at the west-

ern termination of the andesite line. According to Birkenmajer

(1986, 1996), the older phase intrusions formed contempora-

neously with transverse strike-slip faulting. The faulting con-

tinued  after  the  cessation  of  the  older  intrusive  phase.  The

younger phase intrusions follow transversal strike slip faults.

The intrusions are hypabyssal dykes of small (5–10 m wide)

to moderate (over 100 m wide) size, and are composed of sev-

eral  types  of  andesites,  the  most  common  being  augite-am-

phibole  andesite  (Birkenmajer  1996  and  references  therein);

the igneous activity is related to the southward subduction of

the Outer Carpathian basin lithosphere (Birkenmajer & Péc-

skay 1999 and references therein).

From the older phase intrusions we drilled samples from 3

abandoned quarries and 2 natural outcrops, from the second

phase, two dykes were sampled, in 2 abandoned quarries. In

all cases, the samples were distributed between different parts

of  the  intrusions  so  that  our  samples  represented  rocks  that

cooled  at  different  rates  and  acquired  their  magnetization  at

Fig. 1.  The  location  of  the  Pieniny  andesite  line  in  the  general

framework of A — the Carpathians and B — in relation to the In-

ner and Outer Western Carpathians.

background image

                                                 413

LATE MIOCENE COUNTERCLOCKWISE ROTATION OF THE PIENINY ANDESITES

Fig. 2.  Paleomagnetic  sampling  localities  in  the  Pieniny  andesite  line.  Identification  numbers  are  used  in  Table 1,  in  the  Figures  and

throughout the text.

different times even within the same intrusion. Such sampling

strategy was especially important in the quarries of the young-

er generation dykes, in order to ensure that the secular varia-

tion of the Earth’s magnetic field be averaged out in the over-

all paleomagnetic mean direction. Luckily, in both quarries of

the  younger  dykes,  the  contact  was  clearly  exposed;  due  to

this situation, it was possible to distribute the sampling sites so

that  some  were  very  close  to  the  contact,  others  inside  the

dykes (the contact rock itself could not be sampled, because it

was too weathered). Samples were oriented in the field with

both, magnetic and sun compasses.

Paleomagnetic measurements and results

From  each  core,  sister  specimens  were  cut,  measured  and

demagnetized in the Paleomagnetic Laboratory of the Eötvös

Loránd Geophysical Institute of Hungary. From most samples

one specimen was AF demagnetized in several steps, till the

NRM (natural remanent magnetization) signal was destroyed

or up to 200 mT; the other specimen was thermally demagne-

tized, in increments. During thermal demagnetization, suscep-

tibility  was  monitored.  Low-field  magnetic  susceptibility

anisotropy was measured for each site. We found that the de-

gree of anisotropy was low, characteristically 1–2 percent, the

magnetic  fabric  was  foliated,  and  the  susceptibility  maxima

had near-vertical orientation. These features are characteristic

of tectonically un-deformed, near-vertical dykes.

AF  demagnetization  efficiently  eliminated  most  of  the

NRM signal. However, the magnetic vector often followed a

great circle trend and the direction had not stabilized even in

high AF fields. On the other hand, thermal demagnetization,

sometimes  up  to  the  Curie-point  of  hematite  (680 °C),  was

successful in revealing the components of the NRM.

According  to  the  behaviour  and  complexity  of  the  NRM,

the studied rocks may be subdivided into 3 groups as follows:

1. AF demagnetization is sufficient to eliminate the NRM

signal, which only has a single component (Fig. 3, specimen

PL 495A);

2. thermal method is needed to demagnetize the NRM, in-

stability  sets  in  above  the  Curie-point  of  magnetite  (Fig. 3,

specimen PL 209B);

3. only thermal demagnetization separates the components of

the complex NRM (Figs. 4, 5). Information about the identified

components for each site or locality (in the latter case the sam-

pled sites from the same locality yielded identical results) and

the method of successful demagnetization is given in Table 1.

It is important to note, that all samples from the second gen-

eration dykes (Fig. 5) belong to group 3. Their NRM is char-

acterized by a dominant reversed polarity component (compo-

nent  b)  and  a  small,  but  well-defined  component  of  high

unblocking temperature (component c). The latter persists till

the Curie-point of hematite.

Not far from the quarries of the second generation dykes, in-

trusions belonging to the first generation were also sampled.

At one site near the Monument (PL 219–222) and at two sites

from Czorsztyn (PL 492–494 and PL 495–497) the NRM had

one component, where the direction was similar to component

c of the second generation dyke throughout AF or thermal de-

magnetization.  The  remaining  samples  behaved  similarly  to

samples  from  the  second  generation  dykes  (compare  Fig. 4

and Fig. 5) or they exhibited a single component NRM with

background image

414

MÁRTON, TOKARSKI and HALÁSZ

Fig. 3. Pieniny andesites, first phase intrusions. Examples of simple NRM with CCW rotated declination (PL 495A) and with strange direc-

tion (PL 209B). In the latter, the magnetic signal became extremely unstable above 590 °C, but the unstable part is not shown in the diagram.

Left hand side: orthogonal projection, where solid/open symbols represent projections of the NRM vector onto the horizontal/vertical plane.

Right hand side: stereographic projections with all upper hemisphere data; insert: normalized NRM intensity (open symbols) and susceptibil-

ity (full symbols) as a function of temperature.

Fig. 4. Pieniny andesites, first phase intrusions. A typical example of complex NRM. Thermal demagnetization. Left hand side: orthogonal

projection of the NRM vector; the last four steps are also shown enlarged. Right hand side: change of direction on stereographic projection

(all upper hemisphere directions), with an insert of normalized intensity and susceptibility versus temperature. Key as in Fig. 3.

background image

                                                 415

LATE MIOCENE COUNTERCLOCKWISE ROTATION OF THE PIENINY ANDESITES

Fig. 5. Pieniny andesites, second phase intrusions. A typical example of demagnetization behaviour, where three components are resolved

(see Table 1). Left hand side: orthogonal projection of the NRM vector; the last 5 steps are also shown enlarged. Right hand side: the change

of direction at high temperatures is clear on the stereographic projection (all upper hemisphere directions). Insert: normalized intensity and

susceptibility versus temperature. Key as in Fig. 3.

strange directions, which was consistent for each of the sites

(Table 1, PL 321–324, 325–328).

In the Szczawnica area, the Bryjarka locality was overprint-

ed in the present geomagnetic field (and is therefore not dis-

cussed further); the Jarmuta locality exhibited a strange direc-

tion.  At  Kroœcienko,  no  stable  end  point  was  reached  on

demagnetization,  but  a  component  for  each  of  the  sampled

sites could be defined (Table 1).

When we plot all the identified NRM components (except

Bryjarka)  on  a  stereonet,  we  can  identify  two  sets  of  data

(Fig. 6). One is characterized by easterly declination and re-

versed polarity or in one case, westerly declination and nor-

mal polarity (Fig. 6A), so that the directions are counterclock-

wise  rotated  with  respect  to  the  stable  European  reference

direction. The other directions appear to define a great circle,

which  contains  the  stable  European  reference  direction  for

20–10 Ma (Fig. 6B).

Magnetic minerals

Detailed thermal demagnetization of the NRM has revealed

that  most  of  the  NRM  unblocks  below  the  Curie-point  of

magnetite.  However,  in  several  samples  another  component

exists, which resides in a mineral with higher unblocking tem-

peratures. In order to obtain more information about the carri-

ers of both NRM components, we carried out IRM (isothermal

remanent  magnetization)  acquisition  experiments,  measured

Curie-points  (susceptibility  versus  temperature  curves)  and

made microscopy observation on polished sections.

Fig. 6.  Pieniny  andesites.  Paleomagnetic  directions  on  a  stereo-

graphic projection. A — Components exhibiting CCW rotation with

reversed (open circles) or normal (full circle) polarity; B — compo-

nents interpreted as later overprints in a stable European framework.

Open circles: vectors pointing upward; full circles: vectors pointing

downward;  star:  stable  European  reference  direction  calculated

from data by Besse & Courtillot (1991). The parameters of the pole

of the remagnetization great circle drawn through the isolated com-

ponents for the Pieniny andesites are: D=119°, I=3° and α

95

=7.3°.

If we include the stable European reference direction, the parame-

ters change only slightly to D=118°, I=4° and α

95

=8.7°.

Although  the  NRM  in  several  samples  did  not  unblock

completely until the Curie-point of hematite, the IRM acquisi-

tion  curves  suggest  that  the  dominant  magnetic  mineral  is

magnetically soft and there is only a weak signal from hard

background image

416

MÁRTON, TOKARSKI and HALÁSZ

Table 1: Summary of the paleomagnetic directions (D° and I°) with (k, α

95

°) statistical parameters (Fisher 1953) from the Pieniny andes-

tites. Key: n/no: used/collected samples. Numbers with PL prefix refer to Fig. 2 and are used throughout the text. a, b, c, are the compo-

nents of the NRM when the NRM is complex. Components were defined using principal component analysis (Kent et al. 1983). In “Re-

mark” column the stability range of the NRM (component) is indicated.

Locality 

n/no 

D (°)

 

I (°) 

=

95 

(°) 

Remark 

Pieniny andesites, 1

st

 phase intrusions 

1   W¿ar Mts, Monument 

PL 215–218 

4/4 

303 

+33 

    27 

17 

NRM–300 °C 

 

 

4/4 

209 

–53 

  369 

  5 

300–610 °C 

 

 

4/4 

139 

–56 

    30 

17 

610–670 °C 

 

PL 219–222 

 

4/4 

157 

–62 

3120 

  2 

NRM–670 °C, NRM–120 mT 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2   Czorsztyn 

PL 321–324 

 

4/4 

214 

+31 

  297 

  5 

NRM–640 °C 

 

PL 325–328 

 

4/4 

  33 

+40 

  273 

  6 

NRM–640 °C 

 

PL 492–494 

 

3/3 

140 

–38 

  292 

  7 

NRM–140 mT 

 

PL 495–197 

 

3/3 

142 

–45 

1032 

  4 

NRM–140 mT 

 

3   Szcsawnica,  

     Jarmuta Quarry 

PL 209–214 

 

6/6 

  28 

–79 

  165 

  5 

150–590 °C 

 

4   Szcsawnica, 

     Bryjarka Quarry 

PL 469–472 

 

4/4 

352 

+49 

    80 

10 

NRM–390 °C 

 

PL 473–475 

 

3/3 

357 

+88 

  269 

  8 

NRM–25 mT 

PL 476–478 

 

3/3 

  13 

+70 

  465 

  6 

NRM–550 °C, NRM–25 mT 

5   Kroœcienko, Zakijowski 

stream 

PL 479–481 

 

3/3 

312 

+51 

1101 

  4 

NRM–25 mT 

Pieniny andesites, 2

nd

 phase intrusions 

6   W¿ar Mts, S. Quarry 

PL 316–320 

5/5 

356 

+34 

    18 

19 

NRM–350 °C 

 

 

5/5 

176 

–86 

    51 

11 

350–550 (585) °C 

 

 

4/5 

  87 

–61 

    36 

16 

585–640 °C 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7   W¿ar Mts, N. Quarry 

PL 459–468 

    5/10 

331 

+70 

  120 

  7 

18–25 mT 

 

 

  10/10 

181 

–73 

  165 

  4 

25 mT–525 (575) °C 

 

 

    9/10 

125 

–71 

    67 

  7 

630–670 °C 

 

 

magnetic  minerals  in  some  samples  (e.g.  Fig. 7,  PL 214,

PL 216b); the Curie-point characterizes magnetite or a some-

what oxidized magnetite (Fig. 7).

Polished  sections  were  prepared  from  the  specimens  that

had  provided  the  IRM  acquisition  and  susceptibility  versus

temperature curves (11 representative specimens). In all sec-

tions,  magnetite  was  identified,  both  as  phenocrysts  and  as

smaller grains in the matrix; mafic-magnetite alteration was

also observed in all sections.

Hematite  as  martite  (in  magnetite)  characterizes  both  the

second and first generation intrusions from the W¿ar Moun-

tains (sometimes it is without structure, which suggests that

martitization occurred during the formation of magnetite in a

strongly oxidizing environment), but is not typical in the Szcza-

wnica  area.  Hematite  also  occurs  in  the  samples  from  the

W¿ar Mountains (and in Jarmuta Quarry) as spots and along

fissures, but it is lacking in Bryjarka and Kroœcienko.

Small  magnetite  and  hematite  grains  occasionally  occur

together as inclusions in mafic minerals. Sulphides, mostly

chalcopyrite, are observed in all samples, although their fre-

quency is variable: they are rare in the first phase intrusions

of the W¿ar Mountains, and frequent in the second phase in-

trusions.  They  are  also  abundant  in  samples  from  Kroœ-

cienko.

Discussion and conclusions

Analysis  of  the  NRM,  magnetic  mineralogy  experiments

and inspection of polished sections did not reveal any charac-

teristic differences between the first and second phase intru-

sions. The most important common features of the two phases

are:

1. NRM components indicating counterclockwise rotation;

2. other components defining a great circle, which contains

the expected stable European paleomagnetic direction;

3. (oxidized) magnetite as the principal magnetic mineral;

4.  high-temperature  and  hydrothermal  alteration  of  the

magnetite  (as  well  as  other  minerals,  like  opacitization  of

amphiboles).

The component indicating counterclockwise rotation of the

second phase dykes resides in a mineral with higher unblock-

ing  temperature  (higher  oxidation  state)  than  magnetite;  the

same is true for the first phase intrusions, except three sites

(Table 1,  PL 219–22,  PL 492–94,  PL 495–97),  where  this

component is observed in the magnetite unblocking tempera-

ture range. The enumerated common features have the follow-

ing implications:

First, the area intruded by the Pieniny andesites must have

rotated  counterclockwise  after  formation  of  the  2

nd

  phase

background image

                                                 417

LATE MIOCENE COUNTERCLOCKWISE ROTATION OF THE PIENINY ANDESITES

Fig. 7. Magnetic experiments aiming at identification of the magnetic minerals in the Pieniny andesites. Second phase intrusion (PL 463)

and first phase intrusions (PL 214 with non-rotated declination only, PL 216B with complex NRM). Left hand side: isothermal remanent

magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves. Right hand side: susceptibility versus temperature curves. IRM acquisition curves show exclusively

(PL 463) or dominantly (PL 214, PL 216B) low coercivity magnetic minerals, which may be oxidized magnetite, according to the suscepti-

bility versus temperature curves, in PL 463 and PL 216B and typical magnetite in PL 214.

dykes.  Second,  although  the  samples  are  fresh  to  the  naked

eye, the effects of high temperature oxidation and hydrother-

mal alteration are observed under the microscope, in samples

with a single component NRM of rotated declination as well

as in samples with complex NRM. This means that the pro-

cess  responsible  for  overprinting  postdates  even  the  hydro-

thermal activity and may be attributed to hot fluids imprinting

partial  thermoremanent  magnetization  on  the  pre-existing

thermoremanent or chemical remanent magnetization.

Normally,  it  is  taken  for  granted  that  fresh  magnetite  in

andesites carries a primary magnetization, while the oxidized

varieties carry a secondary remanence. In the Pieniny andesite

line, there seems to be no correlation between NRM compo-

nents and magnetic minerals in this sense.

The “non-westerly” components appear to be younger than

the CCW rotated ones, since they lie along a great circle that

contains  the  stable  European  reference  direction  (Fig. 6B).

The andesites were, therefore, emplaced and oxidized before

background image

418

MÁRTON, TOKARSKI and HALÁSZ

the final rotation of the area. The inferred hot fluids, on the

other hand, overprinted the NRM after the counterclockwise

rotation event.

From the tectonic point of view, the most important ques-

tion is the age of the andesites. An older than Late Badenian

age would permit us to connect the counterclockwise rotation

of the Pieniny andesites to the rotation of the Inner Western

Carpathians (and perhaps to movements in the Outer Western

Carpathians and in the Foredeep). In this case, the Upper Bad-

enian strata filling the Nowy S¹cz Basin (Fig. 1b, Oszczypko

et al. 1991) exhibiting a paleomagnetic declination (D=188°,

I=–42°, k=36, α

95

=9°, based on 8 samples) which is aligned

with the stable European reference declination (8°) would sig-

nify the termination of the large scale movements of the Car-

pathians.  However,  recently  obtained  K/Ar  ages  for  several

sites  of  the  Pieniny  andesite  line  (Birkenmajer  &  Pécskay

1999, 2000) confirm the Sarmatian age of both intrusive phas-

es (Fig. 8). These young age estimates imply that the rotation

of  the  Pieniny  andesite  line  took  place  in  post-Sarmatian

times, due to local tectonic causes. It would be tempting to

connect  the  rotation  to  the  sinistral  strike-slip  movement

along the Pieniny Klippen Belt, which was postulated in some

tectonic models (e.g. Birkenmajer 1986 and references there-

in). Unfortunately, the strike-slip movement pre-dates a post-

Sarmatian rotation.

The  present  study  on  the  Pieniny  andesites  reinforces  the

conclusion that paleomagnetic results, even from Miocene or

younger magmatic rocks, must be treated with caution, when

based on partial demagnetization. Full demagnetization may

reveal components which are small, but well defined (like the

component  with  high  unblocking  temperature  in  the  second

phase andesites from the Pieniny andesite line), not only in a

Fig. 8. Ages of Pieniny Mts andesites (after Birkenmajer & Pécskay 2000) and of the Neogene fill (fresh water sediment) of the Nowy S¹cz

Basin (after Oszczypko et al. 1992). The latter is dated biostratigraphically by the overlying marine strata.

specimen (Fig. 4), but also on a site level (e.g. good statistical

parameters  in  Table 1,  components  6c  and  7c).  Our  results

from the Pieniny andesites make clear that thermal demagneti-

zation greatly enhances the reliability of data (since AF de-

magnetization,  which  is  routinely  applied  to  young  igneous

rocks, may not lead to the identification of all NRM compo-

nents)  and  demonstrates  that  with  careful  demagnetization

and component analysis it is possible to separate tectonically

significant  paleomagnetic  signals,  even  in  the  presence  of

large overprint NRM components.

Acknowledgment: We are obliged to Krzysztof Birkenmajer

and Zoltán Pécskay for precise information on the location of

exposures. Nestor Oszczypko guided us to the Jarmuta Quarry

and was helpful with digging out our car when we were hope-

lessly  lost  in  the  Carpathian  mud.  Ania  Œwierczewska  and

Krzysztof  Nejbert  supervised  the  petrographic  analysis,  car-

ried out by Dóra Halász. This work was financially supported

by the exchange program between the Polish and Hungarian

Academies  and  by  the  Hungarian  Scientific  Research  Fund

(OTKA) Project No. T034364.

References

Besse J. & Courtillot V. 1991: Revised and synthetic apparent polar

wander paths of the African, Eurasian, North American and In-

dian Plates, and true polar wander since 200 Ma. J. Geophys.

Res. 96, B3, 4029–4050.

Birkenmajer K. 1986: Stages of structural evolution of the Pieniny

Klippen Belt, Carpathians. Studia Geol. Pol. 88, 7–32.

Birkenmajer  K.  1996:  Miocene  andesite  intrusions  in  the  Pieniny

area,  their  geological  forms  and  their  distribution  basing  on

background image

                                                 419

LATE MIOCENE COUNTERCLOCKWISE ROTATION OF THE PIENINY ANDESITES

geological and magnetic studies. Geol. 22, 15–25 (in Polish).

Birkenmajer  K.  &  Nairn  A.E.M.  1968:  Paleomagnetic  studies  of

Polish rocks. III. Neogene igneous rocks of the Pieniny Moun-

tains, Carpathians. Ann. Soc. Géol. Pologne 38, 475–489.

Birkenmajer  K.  &  Pécskay  Z.  1999:  K-Ar  dating  of  the  Miocene

andesite  intrusions,  Pieniny  Mts,  West  Carpathians,  Poland.

Bull. Pol. Acad. Sci., Earth Sci. 47, 155–169.

Birkenmajer  K.  &  Pécskay  Z.  2000:  K-Ar  dating  of  the  Miocene

andesite intrusions, Pieniny Mts, West Carpathians, Poland: a

supplement. Studia Geol. Pol. 117, 7–25.

Birkenmajer K., Delitala M.C., Nicoletti M. & Petrucciani C. 1987:

K-Ar dating of andesite intrusions (Miocene), Pieniny Klippen

Belt, Carpathians. Bull. Pol. Acad. Sci., Earth Sci. 35, 11–19.

Fisher R. 1953: Dispersion on a sphere. Proc. Roy. Soc. London Ser.

A. 217, 295–305.

Kent J.T., Briden J.C. & Mardia K.V. 1983: Linear and planar struc-

ture in ordered multivariate data as applied to progressive de-

magnetization of palaeomagnetic remanence. Geophys. J. Roy.

Astron. Soc. 75, 593–621.

Kruczyk  J.  1970:  Paleomagnetic  investigations  of  the  Mt.  W¿ar

andesites. Publ. Inst. Geophys. Pol. Acad. Sci. 35 (in Russian).

Mahe¾  M.  1986:  Geological  structure  of  the  Czechoslovak  Car-

pathians. Part I: Paleoalpine units. VEDA, Bratislava, 1–510 (in

Slovak).

Márton E., Tokarski A. & Soták J. 1998a: Magnetic anisotropy, sed-

imentary  transport  and  paleomagnetic  directions  in  the  Inner

Carpathian flysch. 6

th

 New Trends in Geomagnetism.

Márton  E.,  Tokarski  A.  &  Soták  J.  1998b:  Inner  West  Carpathian

flysch:  relation  between  paleomagnetic  directions,  principal

susceptibility  axes  and  sedimentary  transport  direction.  Car-

pathian-Balkan  Geological  Association,  XVI  Congress.  Ab-

stracts, 370.

Márton E., Mastella L. & Tokarski A.K. 1999a: Large counterclock-

wise  rotation  of  the  Inner  West  Carpathian  Paleogene  Flysch

—  evidence  from  paleomagnetic  investigation  of  the  Podhale

Flysch (Poland). Phys. Chem. Earth (A) 24–8, 645–649.

Márton E., Tokarski A.K. & Galicia Tectonic Group 1999b: North-

ward migration of North ALCAPA boundary during Tertiary ac-

cretion  of  the  Outer  Carpathians  —  Paleomagnetic  Approach.

Joint  Meeting  of  EUROPROBE  TESZ,  PANCARDI  and

GeoRift Projects. Rom. J. Tect. Region. Geol. 77, suppl. 1, 22.

Márton E., Tokarski A.K. & Nemèok M. 2000: Paleomagnetic con-

straints for the accretion of the tectonic units at the stable Euro-

pean  margin,  north  of  the  western  Carpathians.  EGS  XXV

General Assembly. Geophys. Res. Abstr. 2, 56.

Márton E., Tokarski A.K., Scholger R., Krejèí O., Stingl K. & Mau-

ritsch  H.J.  2001:  Molasse  in  front  of  the  Outer  West  Car-

pathians:  growing  evidence  for  counterclockwise  rotation.

Pannonian Basin, Carpathian and Dinaride system. Geological

Meeting  on  Dynamics  of  Ongoing  Orogeny,  PANCARDI  Ab-

stracts. CP-19.

Oszczypko N., Stuchlik L. & Wójcik A. 1991: Stratigraphy of fresh-

water Miocene deposits of the Nowy S¹cz basin, Polish West-

ern Carpathians. Biul. Pol. Acad. Sci., Earth Sci. 39, 433–445.

Oszczypko  N.,  Olszewska  B.,  Œlêzak  J.  &  Strzêpka  J.  1992:  Mi-

ocene  marine  and  brackish  deposits  of  the  Nowy  S¹cz  basin

(Polish  Western  Carpathians)  —  New  lithostratigraphic  and

biostratigraphic standards. Biul. Pol. Acad. Sci., Earth Sci. 40,

83–96.

Plašienka D., Grecula P., Putiš M., Kováè M. & Hovorka D. 1997:

Evolution  and  structure  of  the  Western  Carpathians:  an  over-

view. In: Grecula P., Hovorka D. & Putiš M. (Eds.): Geological

evolution of the Western Carpathians. Miner. Slovaca – Mono-

graph, Bratislava, 1–24.

Rögl  F.  1996:  Stratigraphic  correlation  of  the  Parathethys  Oligocene

and Miocene. Mitt. Gesell. Geol. Bergbaustud. (Wien) 41, 65–73.

Œwierczewska  A.  &  Tokarski  A.K.  1998:  Deformation  bands  and

the history of folding in the Magura nappe, Western Outer Car-

pathians (Poland). Tectonophysics 297, 73–90.

Tokarski A.K. & Œwierczewska A. 1998: History of folding in the

Magura  nappe,  Outer  Carpathians,  Poland.  In:  H.-P.  Ross-

manith (Ed.): Mechanics of faulted and jointed rock. Balkema

125–130.

Wójcik A., Szyd³o A., Marciniec P. & Nescieruk P. 1999: The fold-

ed  Miocene  of  the  Andrychów  region.  Biul.  Pol.  Geol.  Inst.

387, 191–195.