background image

HYDROTHERMAL Sb-Au MINERALIZATION (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)                                        207

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 54, 4, BRATISLAVA, AUGUST 2003

207–216

HYDROTHERMAL Sb-Au MINERALIZATION

IN THE  STRÁŽOVSKÉ VRCHY MOUNTAINS (MALÁ MAGURA,

WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

TOMÁŠ MIKUŠ

1

 and MARTIN CHOVAN

2

1

Geological Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Severná 5, 974 01 Banská Bystrica, Slovak Republic; mikus@savbb.sk

2

Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina G, 842 15 Bratislava,

Slovak Republic; chovan@fns.uniba.sk

(Manuscript received February 18, 2002; accepted in revised form March 11, 2003)

Abstract: Sb-Au mineralization in the Malá Magura mountain group of the Strážovské vrchy Mts was found in the

vicinity of the Chvojnica village. Mineralization occurs in quartz-carbonate veins and disseminated zones in the Variscan

granitoids and highly-metamorphosed rocks. Paragenetic associations of Sb-Au mineralization are close to other depos-

its of this type in the Tatric Superunit (Malé Karpaty Mts, Nízke Tatry Mts etc.). The mineralization was formed during

three stages. The pyrite-arsenopyrite-gold mineral stage is the oldest one. The arsenopyrite geothermometer gives a

temperature range of 385–465 °C. Younger stages are the sphalerite-galena-tetrahedrite (2nd) and stibnite-sphalerite-

sulphosalts (3rd) mineral stages. A substantial part of the sphalerite of the 2nd mineralization stage shows “chalcopyrite

disease”. Common association of pyrrhotite and native antimony observed in the 3rd mineralization stage indicates low

aS

2

 and fO

values of the ore-forming fluid. Furthermore, the 3rd mineralization stage comprises Fe-bearing minerals

(jamesonite, pyrrhotite and berthierite), which indicate Fe-rich environment. Primary gold occurs in two generations

differring in Ag content.

Key words: Western Carpathians, Variscan basement, Sb (Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe) sulphides and sulphosalts, gold.

Introduction

Sb-Au  mineralization  in  the  Tatric  Superunit  (Western  Car-

pathians) is known mainly from numerous occurrences in the

Ïumbierske  Tatry  Mts  (Chovan  et  al.  1996  a.o.).  Deposits

such as Magurka, Dúbrava, Medzibrod, Lom, Dve Vody and

Boca were important sources of gold and later on antimony.

Localities  in  the  past  in  the  Malé  Karpaty  Mts  —  Kolársky

vrch,  Limbach  (Au),  Pernek  and  Kuchyòa  (Cambel  1959;

Chovan et al. 1992) were of economic importance. Gold was

also extracted from the small Sb-Au mineralization deposit on

Kriváò in the High Tatra Mts (Bakos 2000). Occurrences in

the Malá Fatra Mts (Bystrièka and Trebostovo) were without

economic  importance  and  have  been  insufficiently  studied

(Varèek 1963). The geochemical indices of Sb mineralization

in the crystalline basement in the Považský Inovec and Tribeè

Mts were noted by Polák & Rak (1980).

A rich gold-field was known and mined in the Malá Magura

mountain group of the Strážovské vrchy Mts, in the vicinity

of  Chvojnica  and  Malinová  villages  from  the  14th  century.

The mining continued in the 16th and 17th century, (e.g., in

the year 1614, 700 g Au), (Janczy 1973). However the prima-

ry sources of the gold remain unknown (Böhmer & Hvožïara

1980). Up to now, occurrences of ore mineralization in the vi-

cinity of Chvojnica village were ascribed to base metal hydro-

thermal mineralization in the Tatric Superunit (Zelný & Uher

1988; Mikolᚠet al. 1993 a.o.).

During our research in the past few years, we have identified

primary mineralization in the Chvojnica — Partizánska dolina

Valley. This mineralization shows similarities with Sb-Au min-

eralization in other mountains of the Tatric Superunit.

Geological setting and mineralization

Tatric Superunit

The  Western  Carpathians  belong  to  a  collisional  Alpine

Orogen,  which  arose  from  the  closure  of  the  Tethys  Ocean.

The Western Carpathians can be subdivided into the Outer-,

Central-  and  Inner  Western  Carpathians  (Plašienka  et  al.

1997).  The  Tatric  Superunit  is  an  extensive  thick-skinned

crustal sheet composed of a pre-Alpine (generally Variscan)

crystalline  basement  and  its  sedimentary  cover.  The  Tatric

basement generally shows well-preserved Variscan structures

without a significant Alpine overprint.

The Tatric basement is built up of large Variscan granitoid

plutons  located  within  medium  to  high-grade  metamorphic

rocks such as gneisses, anatectic migmatites and amphibolites.

Low to medium-grade shales and mafic rocks of Devonian to

Early  Carboniferous  age  are  less  abundant  (Malé  Karpaty

Mts).  The  Tatric  cover  comprises  the  following  lithological

units: Upper Carboniferous and Permian molasse sediments,

bimodal  volcanics  and  Lower  Triassic-mid-Cretaceous  sedi-

mentary rocks. A few Mesozoic nappes were thrust from the S

and overlie the Tatric basement and cover series.

The formation of the most important Sb-Au hydrothermal

mineralizations  is  believed  to  be  linked  either  to  Variscan

background image

208                                                                                       MIKUŠ and CHOVAN

granitoids or metamorphism. Particular results about mineralogy

and fluid inclusions study in the Sb-Au mineralization in the Tat-

ric Superunit are reported by many authors (e.g., Chovan et al.

1992, 1995, 1996, 1999; Majzlan et al. 2001; Hurai 1988 a.o.).

The Suchý and Malá Magura mountain groups

The  crystalline  complexes  of  Suchý  and  Malá  Magura

mountain  groups  of  the  southernmost  part  of  Strážovské

vrchy Mts are situated in two areas separated by the Paleo-

gene  Diviaky  fault.  They  are  similar  with  respect  to  their

magmatic,  metamorphic  and  tectonic  evolution.  Both  com-

plexes  are  composed  mainly  of  granitoid  rocks  and  parag-

neisses. Migmatites become dominant towards the periphery

of the core areas. The crystalline basement is rather homoge-

neous without any remnants of Mesozoic and younger Tertia-

ry units.

In  the  Malá  Magura  mountain  group  the  metamorphic

rocks  are  mainly  high-temperature  paragneisses  and  quartz-

rich  paragneisses.  Granitic  rocks  (tonalites,  granodiorites,

granites) belong to common differentiation series. They be-

long to peraluminous S-type granite suite (Hovorka & Fejdi

1983).  The  radiogenic 

207

Pb/

206

Pb  zircon  age  of  356±9  Ma

from a granite and coexisting diorite at the Kamenistá dolina

Valley  (Malá  Magura  mountain  group)  indicates  the  granite

intrusion close to the Devonian/Carboniferous boundary (Krá¾

et al. 1997). The core of the Malá Magura mountain group dis-

plays a reduced amount of cover rocks, due probably to a more

important uplift. The pre-Alpine, Variscan tectonics is domi-

nant in both cores. The Alpine restructuring of the crystalline

basement  is  relatively  poor  and  did  not  substantially  change

the older tectonic pattern (Mahe¾ 1985).

The  P-T-X  parameters  of  metamorphic  processes  within

crystalline cores of the Suchý and Malá Magura indicate differ-

ences in their progressive and retrograde metamorphic evolu-

tion.  The  metamorphic  temperatures  and  pressures  of  these

particular crystalline complexes are as follows: Suchý moun-

tain  group:  540–560°/4–5  kbar,  XH

2

O  =  0.6–0.8  and  Malá

Magura  mountain  group:  620–640°/4.5–5.5  kbar,  XH

2

O  =

0.8–1.0 (Dyda 1994).

The P-T-X uplift trajectories in the Suchý paragneisses indi-

cate  their  isothermal  decompression  and  display  several  uni-

form trajectories influenced by decompression during cooling

of the Malá Magura paragneisses (Dyda 1994).

Fig. 1. Schematic geological map of crystalline of Suchý and Malá Magura mountain groups (according to Mahe¾ 1985) with localization of

various types mineralization. 1 —  Krížna Nappe, 2 — Mesozoic sedimentary cover, 3 — graphitic black-shales, 4 — biotitic micaschists,

5 — amphibolites, 6 — ribbed migmatites and migmatized micaschists, 7 — leucocratic granites and biotite-bearing granites, 8 — medium-

grained  granites  and  granodiorites,  9 —  faults,  10 —  old  mines  (1,2 —  Partizánska  dolina  Valley,  3 —  Trausementz  dolina  Valley,  4 —

Kòažia štôlòa adit, 5 — synsedimentary pyrite-pyrrhotite mineralization).

background image

HYDROTHERMAL Sb-Au MINERALIZATION (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)                                        209

Two  types  of  mineralization  were  described  N  and  NW

from the village of Chvojnica (Fig. 1):

1.  syngenetic  primary  exhalation-sedimentary  pyrite-pyr-

rhotite mineralization (Fig. 1, locality 5) located in an amphib-

olite body (Böhmer & Hvožïara 1980),

2. base metal mineralization (Fig. 1, locality 4) considered

as continuation of veins from Èavoj (Mikolᚠet al. 1993).

The investigated hydrothermal Sb-Au mineralization occur-

rences (Fig. 1, localities 1–3) in the Malá Magura mountain

group are situated 2 km W and NW from the village of Chvoj-

nica in the Partizánska and Trausementz dolina Valleys within

the crystalline complex of the Malá Magura mountain group.

These occurrences of generally SW–NE direction are located

in fine-grained biotitic granodiorites, granites, ribbed migma-

tites and migmatitic paragneisses.

Methods of study

Samples for mineralogical study were collected at old mine

dumps in the Partizánska dolina Valley. Sulphides, sulphos-

alts  and  native  elements  were  analysed  by  wave-dispersion

(WDS) analysis and photographed in back-scattered electrons

(SEM–BEI) at Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius Univer-

sity in Bratislava; a JEOL JXA 840A probe was used with op-

erating conditions: 20kV, 15nA, beam diameter 2–5 

µ

m, stan-

dards  —  pyrite,  galena,  cinnabarite,  sphalerite,  chalcopyrite,

arsenopyrite, Fe, Ag, Cu, Bi, Sb, Au, Cd, MnO, GaAs, Ni, Co.

Carbonates  were  analysed  by  an  energy-dispersion  system

(EDS) KEVEX in the Geological Survey of the Slovak Re-

public, Bratislava.

The results of mineralogical research

Jamesonite, sphalerite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, quartz, carbon-

ates, boulangerite are the most abundant in the Partizánska do-

lina Valley. Berthierite, bournonite, galena, gold and tetrahe-

drite  are  less  abundant.  Pyrrhotite,  native  antimony,  stibnite

and chalcopyrite were found only sporadically. In the Trause-

mentz dolina Valley, only berthierite and gold were identified.

Primary minerals

Arsenopyrite is abundant; associated with quartz I and py-

rite, and in silicified hydrothermal wall-rock alteration zones.

Euhedral  grains,  anhedral  aggregates  and  several  mm  thick

veinlets occur in quartz. Aggregates are often crushed. The re-

lationship between arsenopyrite and Pb-Sb, Fe-Sb sulphosalts

was not observed. Arsenopyrite is not Au-bearing (Mikolᚠet

al.  1993).  The  arsenopyrite  geothermometer  (Kretschmar  &

Scott 1976) was applied to calculate the crystallization tem-

perature  from  equilibrium  arsenopyrite+pyrite  association,

taking into account all limiting conditions (Fig. 2) (Table 2).

The temperature of arsenopyrite precipitation ranges from 385

to 465 °C, and log aS

2

 = –5.9 to –6.9 (Fig. 2).

Fig. 2.  Log  aS  versus  crystallization  temperature  (°C)  of    arse-

nopyrite as determined according to As content (in at. %) in arse-

nopyrite  (Kretschmar  &  Scott  1976).  Symbols:  asp —  arsenopy-

rite, py — pyrite, po — pyrrhotite, lo — löllingite.

Table 1: Selected WDS analyses of sulphides and sulphosalts from the Partizánska dolina Valley.

 

wt. % 

Stb 

Stb 

Brt

2

Brt 

Blg

2

Blg

2

Blg 

Bnt 

Bnt 

Ant 

Jms

4

Jms

4

Jms 

Po 

Sb 

73.08 

73.27 

57.22 

54.98 

24.98 

26.10 

25.31 

20.76 

25.69 

99.98 

35.69 

36.13 

32.60 

0.19 

Pb 

2.15 

0.00 

0.00 

0.03 

55.36 

55.90 

53.41 

43.53 

42.43 

0.77 

40.34 

37.81 

43.16 

0.63 

Fe 

0.26 

0.41 

15.00 

15.10 

0.15 

0.27 

0.27 

0.14 

0.34 

0.10 

3.50 

3.42 

3.21 

65.03 

23.37 

25.56 

27.36 

29.61 

19.68 

17.44 

19.58 

20.03 

19.25 

0.09 

20.94 

22.29 

21.16 

34.69 

Cu 

0.17 

0.00 

0.05 

0.13 

0.00 

0.04 

0.13 

14.22 

12.47 

0.03 

0.08 

0.11 

0.13 

0.14 

Ag 

0.07 

0.03 

0.00 

0.07 

0.03 

0.14 

0.00 

0.02 

0.03 

0.02 

0.04 

Bi 

0.00 

0.11 

0.06 

0.10 

0.16 

0.07 

0.27 

1.90 

0.00 

0.00 

0.15 

0.06 

0.00 

0.12 

å 

99.09 

99.39 

99.70 

99.95 

100.33 

99.89 

98.99 

100.72 

100.18 

101.0

0

 

100.73 

99.82 

100.28 

100.84 

 

atomic % 

 

Sb 

44.55 

42.76 

29.54 

27.40 

18.82 

20.71 

19.17 

13.73 

17.31 

98.92 

24.32 

23.97 

22.40 

0.07 

Pb 

0.77 

0.00 

0.00 

0.01 

24.52 

26.09 

23.76 

16.92 

16.81 

0.45 

16.21 

14.74 

17.43 

0.13 

Fe 

0.34 

0.52 

16.92 

16.41 

0.24 

0.48 

0.44 

0.20 

0.50 

0.21 

5.19 

4.94 

4.80 

51.66 

54.10 

56.65 

53.46 

56.03 

56.32 

52.57 

56.30 

50.29 

49.27 

0.33 

54.09 

56.14 

55.19 

48.00 

Cu 

0.19 

0.00 

0.05 

0.12 

0.00 

0.06 

0.19 

18.03 

16.10 

0.06 

0.10 

0.14 

0.17 

0.10 

Ag 

0.05 

0.02 

0.00 

0.06 

0.02 

0.11 

0.00 

0.03 

0.02 

0.02 

0.02 

Bi 

0.00 

0.04 

0.02 

0.03 

0.07 

0.03 

0.12 

0.73 

0.00 

0.00 

0.06 

0.02 

0.00 

0.02 

Stb - stibnite, Brt — berthierite, Blg — boulangerite, Bnt — bournonite, Ant — antimony, Jms — jamesonite, Po — pyrrhotite; 

2

* — average of 2 analyses, 

4

* - average of 4 analyses 

 

background image

210                                                                                       MIKUŠ and CHOVAN

Berthierite  forms  needle-shaped  and  stalk-like  crystals  up

to 0.2 cm in size or anhedral aggregates in quartz and carbon-

ates.  Berthierite  is  one  of  the  youngest  minerals  associated

with stibnite, jamesonite (Fig. 3) and boulangerite. It replaces

quartz  of  the  arsenopyrite  stage.  Identification  of  berthierite

was confirmed by WDS analysis (Table 1).

Boulangerite is commonly associated with galena, bourno-

nite and jamesonite in quartz and carbonate, forming needle-

shaped crystals and anhedral grains up to 0.1 cm in size. Two

different forms of boulangerite can be distinguished: 1) nee-

dle-shaped crystals and grains (max. 100 µm) enclosed in ga-

lena and 2) anhedral and needle-shaped grains associated with

jamesonite (Fig. 4) and bournonite (Fig. 5) in cleavage planes

and  cavities  of  ankerite.  Boulangerite  replaces  carbonates,

bournonite and galena. WDS analyses of boulangerite are giv-

en in Table 1, (Fig. 6).

Bournonite  occurs  with  tetrahedrite,  chalcopyrite,  galena

and boulangerite (Fig. 5). It is one of the oldest sulphosalts,

forming anhedral grains up to 5 mm in size. It is replaced by

galena and boulangerite, and replaces tetrahedrite, chalcopy-

Fig. 5.  Boulangerite  (white)  associated  with  bournonite  (grey);

(SEM-BEI).

Fig. 4.  Boulangerite  (white)  associated  with  jamesonite  (grey);

(SEM-BEI).

Fig. 3.  Berthierite  (dark-grey)  associated  with  jamesonite  (white)

and  stibnite  (light-grey)  inclusion  within  the  jamesonite  grain.

Back-scattered electrons (SEM-BEI).

Table 2: Selected WDS analyses of arsenopyrite from the Partizánska dolina Valley.

 

weight %                                                                                atomic % 

 

Fe 

As 

Sb 

Ni 

Co 

Au 

Total 

Fe 

As 

Sb 

Ni 

Co 

Au 

34.24 

43.34 

21.61 

0.63 

0.03 

0.00 

0.00 

99.87 

32.76 

30.93 

36.01 

0.28 

0.03 

0.00 

0.00 

33.96 

42.56 

22.02 

0.61 

0.03 

0.00 

0.00 

99.17 

32.54 

30.40 

36.76 

0.27 

0.03 

0.00 

0.00 

34.33 

43.21 

22.30 

0.66 

0.02 

0.03 

0.07 

100.61 

32.47 

30.46 

36.73 

0.28 

0.02 

0.03 

0.02 

34.62 

44.02 

21.87 

0.68 

0.02 

0.03 

0.07 

101.32 

32.68 

30.98 

35.97 

0.29 

0.02 

0.03 

0.02 

33.10 

45.63 

21.57 

0.73 

0.01 

0.02 

0.01 

101.07 

31.51 

32.38 

35.76 

0.32 

0.00 

0.02 

0.00 

32.83 

44.80 

22.01 

0.71 

0.01 

0.02 

0.01 

100.38 

31.29 

31.83 

36.54 

0.31 

0.00 

0.02 

0.00 

34.21 

44.10 

22.07 

0.82 

0.00 

0.02 

0.00 

101.22 

32.30 

31.03 

36.29 

0.36 

0.00 

0.02 

0.00 

33.93 

43.27 

22.49 

0.80 

0.00 

0.02 

0.00 

100.50 

32.09 

30.51 

37.04 

0.35 

0.00 

0.02 

0.00 

33.31 

45.45 

21.52 

0.22 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

100.51 

31.79 

32.33 

35.77 

0.10 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

10 

33.04 

44.61 

21.95 

0.21 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

99.83 

31.58 

31.78 

36.54 

0.09 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

11 

33.74 

44.18 

22.92 

0.23 

0.00 

0.01 

0.01 

101.09 

31.62 

30.86 

37.41 

0.10 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

12 

34.02 

45.03 

22.49 

0.24 

0.00 

0.01 

0.00 

101.80 

31.83 

31.40 

36.66 

0.10 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

13 

33.77 

43.31 

22.28 

0.30 

0.00 

0.08 

0.00 

99.74 

32.13 

30.72 

36.94 

0.13 

0.00 

0.08 

0.00 

14 

33.49 

45.64 

21.24 

0.05 

0.00 

0.04 

0.00 

100.46 

32.03 

32.53 

35.37 

0.02 

0.00 

0.04 

0.00 

15 

33.22 

44.80 

21.67 

0.05 

0.00 

0.04 

0.00 

99.79 

31.82 

31.98 

36.14 

0.02 

0.00 

0.04 

0.00 

 

background image

HYDROTHERMAL Sb-Au MINERALIZATION (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)                                        211

rite and sphalerite I. WDS analyses of bournonite are given in

Table 1 and depicted in Fig. 6.

Galena  forms  irregular  aggregates  and  grains  as  big  as

5 mm in quartz and in younger Fe-bearing carbonate. It usual-

ly fills cavities and fissures in quartz belonging to the older ar-

senopyrite  stage.  It  is  most  commonly  associated  with

sphalerite I, tetrahedrite, bournonite and chalcopyrite.

Gold  was  observed  in  two  generations  at  the  Partizánska

dolina Valley locality: 1) anhedral grains in the arsenopyrite

stage quartz, up to 10 µm in size. Gold is younger than rutile.

Its relationship with other ore minerals was not observed. This

type of gold is characterized by higher purity (14.27 wt. % Ag

in  average).  We  presume  this  is  the  1st  generation  gold

(Fig. 7). 2) anhedral grains (inclusions) up to 10 µm enclosed

in sphalerite belonging to the 2nd mineral stage. The relation-

ship of gold with sphalerite is unclear. The average silver con-

tent is 23.12 wt. %. We propose that it is the younger gold

(2nd generation) (Fig. 7).

Colluvial gold from exploratory pits in the Trausementz do-

lina  Valley  occurs  in  the  form  of  grains  overgrown  with

quartz. The size of gold particles is up to 1.5 mm.

Some gold grains exhibit a gold-rich rim (Fig. 8) with char-

acteristic spongy structure. The thickness of rims ranges from

10 to 20 µm; silver contents does not exceed 2 wt. %. High

purity gold veinlets penetrate the core of gold grains, whose

composition ranges from 10.31 to 28.37 wt. % Ag (Table 3).

Fig. 7. Au/Ag plot in different types of gold from the vicinity of

the Chvojnica village.

Fig. 6.  Ternary  plot  of  electron  probe  microanalyses  of  Pb-Sb-

(Cu) sulphosalts from Chvojnica.

Fig. 8. Gold-rich ream (white) on a gold grain (grey). The phase with

high Ag content (dark-grey) is in the down-left corner; (SEM-BEI).

Table 3: Selected WDS analyses of gold from the Partizánska and Trausementz dolina Valley.

 

 

 

1

 

1

1

1

 

1

 

Au 

98.69 

96.90 

69.13 

83.41 

88.45 

95.33 

58.92 

57.39 

85.02 

84.25 

76.96 

75.68 

 

Ag 

1.69 

1.99 

28.32 

15.97 

10.31 

2.06 

39.29 

41.99 

14.04 

13.40 

21.50 

23.82 

wt. % 

Hg 

0.58 

1.09 

0.73 

0.78 

0.83 

1.21 

0.76 

0.77 

0.64 

0.94 

0.63 

0.65 

 

Bi 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

 

Sb 

0.06 

0.08 

0.01 

0.36 

0.04 

0.16 

0.76 

0.67 

0.37 

0.17 

0.01 

0.01 

 

Cu 

0.00 

0.05 

0.17 

0.00 

0.00 

0.03 

0.10 

0.13 

0.11 

0.28 

0.00 

0.00 

 

å 

101.02 

100.11 

98.36 

100.52 

99.63 

98.79 

99.83 

100.95 

100.18 

99.04 

99.10 

100.16 

 

Au 

96.33 

95.10 

56.62 

73.22 

81.78 

94.72 

44.40 

42.10 

75.76 

76.06 

65.86 

63.16 

 

Ag 

3.01 

3.57 

42.34 

25.60 

17.41 

3.74 

54.06 

56.25 

22.85 

22.08 

33.59 

39.29 

at. % 

Hg 

0.56 

1.05 

0.59 

0.67 

0.75 

1.18 

0.56 

0.56 

0.56 

0.83 

0.53 

0.54 

 

Bi 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

 

Sb 

0.10 

0.13 

0.01 

0.51 

0.06 

0.26 

0.75 

0.80 

0.53 

0.24 

0.02 

0.02 

 

Cu 

0.00 

0.14 

0.44 

0.00 

0.00 

0.09 

0.23 

0.30 

0.29 

0.78 

0.00 

0.00 

Colluvial  primary gold  from  the  Trausementz  dolina  Valley,  analyses number: 1,2 — gold-rich rim, 3,4,5,6 — core,

 

7,8 — admixtures and inclusions; Primary gold                     

from Partizánska Valley, analyses number: 9,10 — generation I (gold with quartz), 11,12 — generation II (gold with sphalerite) 

 

An  inclusion  rich  in  Ag  was  observed  (up  to  42 wt. %  Ag)

(Fig. 8). This gold could be a result of a late mobilization pro-

cess. In the quartz-gold overgrowth thin gold veinlets (up to

1 µm) were observed in quartz interstices. Sporadically, gold

is enclosed in grains of arsenopyrite. In total, 27 WDS analy-

ses of gold were carried out (Table 3).

Chalcopyrite forms anhedral grains in two different associ-

ations and generations:

background image

212                                                                                       MIKUŠ and CHOVAN

1) as inclusions in sphalerite (up to 100 µm) forming blebs,

dots,  minute  particles  and  vermicular  structures  in  intimate

chalcopyrite-sphalerite intergrowth (Fig. 9).

2) in  association  with  tetrahedrite  and  bournonite.  Chal-

copyrite replaces tetrahedrite and bournonite.

Jamesonite  is  usually  medium  to  fine-grained,  sometimes

forming needle-shaped crystals in quartz and carbonates up to

several cm in size. Needle-shaped crystals of jamesonite ce-

ment  carbonates  and  quartz  of  the  3rd  mineralization  stage.

Furthermore, jamesonite fills fissures in carbonates. Its anhe-

dral grains are often overgrown with other Pb-Sb sulphosalts

and  berthierite.  Quartz  relicts  belonging  to  the  arsenopyrite

mineralization  stage  are  common.  Jamesonite  is  replacing

bournonite and boulangerite (Fig. 4) and is replaced by ber-

thierite (Fig. 3). Moreover, jamesonite is associated with pyr-

rhotite, native antimony and sphalerite II, replacing these min-

erals. WDS analyses of jamesonite are in Table 1 and Fig. 6.

Native antimony occurs together with jamesonite, pyrrhotite

and sphalerite II. Fine isometric grains of antimony are up to

0.01 mm in size, forming anhedral aggregates up to 1

×

1.5 cm

in size. It is replaced by pyrrhotite and jamesonite. It is chemi-

cally pure without any distinct impurities (Table 1).

Pyrite is very abundant in silicified hydrothermal alteration

wall-rock zones and also in hydrothermal veins. It occurs in

several  generations.  Pyrite  I  forms  massive  irregular  aggre-

gates and crystals of euhedral shape, forming up to 2 cm thick

veins in quartz of the arsenopyrite stage. Pyrite I is mostly as-

sociated  with  arsenopyrite  and  is  often  cataclastically  de-

formed. Rarely, it is replaced by sphalerite and Fe-oxyhydrox-

ides. Pyrite II forms crystals up to 0.05 mm in size enclosed in

galena and bournonite. It impregnates the oldest quartz. Pyrite

III occurs with ankerite and it is enclosed in Pb-Sb sulphosalts.

Pyrrhotite is found in paragenetic association with jameso-

nite and native antimony. It forms irregular aggregates evolv-

ing  into  veinlets  several  mm  thick.  Lamellar  crystals  up  to

0.05 mm in size are commonly present. They cement aggre-

gates  of  native  antimony  and  are  replaced  by  jamesonite.

Identification of pyrrhotite was confirmed by WDS analysis

(Table 1).

Sphalerite  forms  aggregates  composed  of  anhedral  grains

mainly located in quartz (up to 2 cm), more rarely in carbon-

ates. It has a black or brown-black colour and occurs in two

generations: Sphalerite I (the most frequent) contains numer-

ous chalcopyrite inclusions (“chalcopyrite disease”) (Fig. 9).

It is enriched in Fe (3.41 wt. %), whereas sphalerite without

“chalcopyrite disease” contains only up to 1.95 wt. % Fe (Ta-

ble 4) and (Fig. 10). Sphalerite I also occurs associated with

galena and tetrahedrite and is intensively replaced from rims

by the latter. Sphalerite I encloses gold grains up to 10 µm in

size. The gold grains are probably younger than sphalerite I.

Fig. 10. The relationship between Fe and Zn content in sphalerite

with and without “chalcopyrite disease”.

Fig. 9.  Chalcopyrite  inclusions  in  sphalerite  (texture  “chalcopyrite

disease”). Reflected light.

Table 4: Selected WDS analyses of sphalerite from the Partizáns-

ka dolina Valley.

 

 

 

4* 

5* 

 

Zn 

66.47 

65.33 

67.17 

65.28 

64.18 

 

Cu 

0.03 

0.03 

0.10 

0.52 

0.52 

 

Fe 

1.99 

1.98 

1.97 

3.41 

3.38 

wt. % 

Mn 

0.09 

0.09 

0.00 

0.05 

0.05 

 

Hg 

0.10 

0.10 

0.06 

0.00 

0.00 

 

30.37 

30.13 

31.68 

30.03 

29.80 

 

Cd 

0.43 

0.41 

0.34 

0.69 

0.67 

 

å 

99.48 

98.07 

101.32 

99.98 

98.60 

 

Zn 

50.69 

50.46 

49.98 

49.64 

49.42 

 

Cu 

0.02 

0.02 

0.08 

0.41 

0.41 

 

Fe 

1.78 

1.79 

1.72 

3.03 

3.05 

at. % 

Mn 

0.08 

0.09 

0.00 

0.04 

0.04 

 

Hg 

0.03 

0.02 

0.01 

0.00 

0.00 

 

47.21 

47.44 

48.06 

46.56 

46.78 

 

Cd 

0.19 

0.18 

0.15 

0.31 

0.30 

*The analyses 4 and 5 are from sphalerite with “chalcopyrite disease” 

 

Sphalerite II occurs together with stibnite, jamesonite, native

antimony and pyrrhotite.

Stibnite occurs as anhedral grains in quartz or in jamesonite

(up to 0.04 mm), associated with berthierite (Fig. 3). Stibnite

is replaced by berthierite. Identification of stibnite was con-

firmed by WDS analyses (Table 1).

Tetrahedrite occurs with sphalerite I, bournonite, chalcopy-

rite and galena. It is older than sulphosalts, replacing sphaler-

ite and quartz belonging to the arsenopyrite stage. It rarely en-

closes and replaces pyrite I.

Gangue minerals

Carbonates are abundant in Sb-Au veins. The oldest is sid-

erite occurring with quartz, arsenopyrite, pyrite. Its grains are

inhomogeneous  in  chemical  composition  and  its  position

background image

HYDROTHERMAL Sb-Au MINERALIZATION (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)                                        213

within the succession scheme is uncertain. Calcite (Fig. 12) is

enclosed by dolomite and ankerite. The chemical composition

of calcite is homogeneous but its position in the succession of

crystallization remains unclear. Dolomite is often brecciated.

Fissures in dolomite are filled by ankerite (Fig. 12), showing a

compositional zoning with some zones corresponding to Fe-

dolomite. Dolomite and ankerite occur together with quartz II

and III. Furthermore, dolomite is associated with sphalerite,

chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite, bournonite and galena. Ankerite oc-

curs  with  pyrite  III,  stibnite,  native  antimony,  pyrrhotite,

jamesonite and berthierite. Sulphosalts often fill cavities and

fissures in ankerite. Both ankerite and dolomite are affected

by “overprinting” tectonic processes. The chemical composit-

ion of carbonates is given in Table 5 and in Fig. 11.

Quartz appears in 3 generations:

Quartz  I  occurs  in  association  with  arsenopyrite,  pyrite  I

and gold. Quartz I is replaced by carbonates, quartz II with

younger mineralization (quartz III, ankerite etc.) and is fine-

grained. It sporadically occurs in quartz I gold grains. Quartz

II is coarse-grained to massive. It occurs associated with dolo-

mite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite, bournonite, galena

and  intensively  replaces  quartz  I.  Quartz  III  occurs  with

ankerite, stibnite, native antimony, pyrrhotite, jamesonite and

berthierite. Quartz II (the sphalerite-galena-tetrahedrite stage

of Sb-Au mineralization) and quartz III (the stibnite-sphaler-

ite-sulphosalts stage of Sb-Au mineralization) are devoid of

fluid inclusions.

Fig. 12. Grain of calcite (Cal) enclosed in ankerite (Ank) display-

ing  compositional  zoning.  Younger  ankerite  veins  replace  older

dolomite (Dol) veins.

Fig. 11.  Ternary  diagram  of  carbonates  from  the  vicinity  of  the

Chvojnica village.

Table 5: Selected EDS analyses of carbonates from the Partizánska dolina Valley.

 

 

 

1

 

1

1

1

 

 

MgO 

4.78 

5.22 

8.30 

4.87 

7.59 

13.06 

13.13 

17.40 

15.55 

0.00 

8.40 

 

CaO 

30.60 

30.86 

27.62 

28.98 

31.71 

32.40 

28.54 

29.86 

29.37 

53.85 

0.16 

 

MnO 

2.86 

2.92 

2.15 

4.74 

3.34 

2.21 

0.98 

0.50 

0.70 

1.04 

3.10 

 

FeO 

19.05 

18.32 

18.48 

18.77 

14.36 

7.66 

12.35 

5.81 

8.64 

1.44 

48.18 

 

Total 

57.29 

57.32 

56.55 

57.36 

57.00 

55.33 

55.00 

53.57 

54.26 

56.33 

59.84 

  MgCO

10.00 

10.92 

17.36 

10.19 

15.88 

27.32 

27.47 

36.40 

32.53 

0.00 

17.57 

  CaCO

3

 

54.61 

55.08 

49.30 

51.72 

56.60 

57.83 

50.74 

53.29 

52.42 

96.11 

0.29 

  MnCO

4.63 

4.73 

3.48 

7.68 

5.41 

3.58 

1.59 

0.81 

1.13 

1.69 

5.02 

  FeCO

30.72 

29.54 

29.80 

30.27 

23.16 

12.35 

19.92 

9.37 

13.93 

2.32 

77.69 

 

Total 

99.97 

100.28 

99.94 

99.86 

101.04 

101.08 

99.91 

99.87 

100.02 

100.12 

100.57 

Analyses number: 1,2,3,4,5,6 — ankerite, 7,8,9 — dolomite, 10 — calcite, 11 — siderite  

 

Development of mineralization

Paragenetic associations were distinguished by mineralogi-

cal study and are also supported by analogy with previously

investigated  Variscan  Sb-Au  deposits  in  the  Western  Car-

pathians  (Chovan  1990;  Chovan  et  al.  (Eds.)  1994).  In  the

Malá Magura mountain group, at localities with Sb-Au min-

eralization in the vicinity of the Chvojnica village the follow-

ing mineralization stages were distinguished:

I.    quartz I–pyrite, arsenopyrite–gold I

II.  quartz II–dolomite–sphalerite I, (chalcopyrite I), gold II–

tetrahedrite–bournonite–chalcopyrite II,  galena,  bou-

langerite, pyrite II

III. quartz III–ankerite–pyrite III–stibnite–sphalerite II, pyr-

rhotite, antimony, jamesonite, berthierite

Discussion

The Sb-Au type of mineralization, reported in the Tatric

by  Chovan  et  al.  (1996)  was  found  in  the  vicinity  of  the

background image

214                                                                                       MIKUŠ and CHOVAN

Chvojnica village, in the Partizánska and Trausementz dolina

Valleys.

The mineralization in the vicinity of Chvojnica, including

occurrences in the Partizánska dolina Valley was identified by

Zelný & Uher (1988) as a low- to moderate-temperature poly-

metallic association (Cu, As, Pb, Zn, Sb) with crystallization

of sulphosalts at the end of the hydrothermal process.

The oldest paragenesis of Sb-Au mineralization is quartz–

pyrite–arsenopyrite with frequent occurrence of native gold.

The temperature of arsenopyrite–pyrite association (Chvojni-

ca) ranges from 385 to 465 °C according to the arsenopyrite

geothermometer of Kretschmar & Scott (1976). This tempera-

ture corresponds to that calculated for other localities in the

Tatric Superunit of the Western Carpathians for equilibrium

assemblage arsenopyrite+pyrite (Fig. 2): the Dúbrava depos-

it —  395–430 °C  (Sachan  &  Chovan  1991);  Mlynná  dolina

Valley — 393 °C (Majzlan & Chovan 1997); the Nižná Boca

deposit — 445 °C (Smirnov 2000) and the Pezinok-Kolársky

vrch deposit in the Malé Karpaty Mts — 320–410 °C (Andráš

et al. 1999).

The presence of primary gold is described for the first time

in  the  Partizánska  dolina  and  Trausementz  dolina  Valleys.

The gold occurs in two generations: I) 1st generation gold —

has higher Ag content in comparison with the 1st generation

gold from Magurka (Bakos & Chovan 1999) and II) 2nd gen-

eration gold with high Ag content, which occurs together with

Sb, Pb, Cu sulphides; this association is also known from oth-

er  Sb-Au  mineralization  localities  in  the  Ïumbierske  Tatry

Mts, such as Magurka and Nižná Boca (Chovan et al. 1995;

Bakos & Chovan 1999; Smirnov 2000).

Colluvial gold from the Trausementz dolina Valley exhibits

three different chemical compositions: the core of gold grains

is formed by gold of the 1st and the 2nd generation. Gold with

high  Ag  content  (Fig. 8)  forms  admixtures  and  inclusions

within the core. The 3rd composition corresponds to the gold-

rich  rim,  which  can  be  produced  by  a  combination  of  self-

electrorefining  and  cementation  processes  in  streams,  or

stream sediments where the Ag-dissolution process and sub-

sequent Ag-complexation can take place (Groen et al. 1990).

The  presence  of  Au  in  the  Partizánska  dolina  Valley  and

Chvojnica  occurrences,  was  suggested  by  Mikolᚠ et  al.

(1993).  It  was  detected  by  quantitative  spectral  analyses  of

quartz  veins  with  pyrite  and  arsenopyrite.  The  Au  content

ranges from 0.1 g/t to 13.10 g/t. Mikolᚠet al. (1993) suggest

that gold occurs in pyrite, mainly because analyses of arse-

nopyrite  were  not  shown  to  be  Au-bearing  and  free  native

gold grains were not observed.

The  occurrence  of  primary  gold  at  the  Partizánska  dolina

and Trausementz dolina Valleys was expected because a) the

primary Sb-Au mineralization is located in the drainage area

of rivers flowing through these valleys, and b) the existence of

an important alluvial gold deposit located between the villag-

es of Chvojnica and Malinová.

Several opinions exist regarding the formation of chalcopy-

rite inclusions in sphalerite, known as the “chalcopyrite dis-

ease” (Barton 1978 in Barton & Bethke 1987). Until the last

two decades, all these textures were thought to be formed by

exsolution from solid solution. Barton & Bethke (1987) inter-

preted the formation of chalcopyrite blebs by a replacement

processes. These authors supported their argument by the fact,

that chalcopyrite inclusions mostly result from replacement of

a Fe-rich sphalerite. Chalcopyrite inclusions were formed by a

reaction of iron from the sphalerite with copper ions transport-

ed in hydrothermal solutions. The studies of Bortnikov et al.

(1991)  showed  that  chalcopyrite  inclusions  were  found  in

sphalerite with different iron content: both Fe-poor varieties

(0.5 to 2 wt. %) and Fe-rich (8 to 14 wt. %). They suggested

that  chalcopyrite  inclusions  are  produced  by  a  replacement

process resulting from the interaction of sphalerite with fluids,

which transport both Cu and Fe. A co-precipitation of sphaler-

ite and chalcopyrite was suggested as an alternative mecha-

nism.

Sphalerite from the Partizánska dolina Valley (Chvojnica)

contains 3.41 wt. % Fe. It is questionable in this case, if chal-

copyrite inclusions in sphalerite (Fig. 9) resulted from co-pre-

cipitation  or  replacement  processes.  Chalcopyrite  inclusions

in  sphalerite  occur  at  moderate  temperatures  (between  200

and 400 °C). The metamorphism homogenizes the sphalerite

banding, re-crystallizes both chalcopyrite and its host sphaler-

ite and coarsens the textures — thereby masking its heritage

(Barton & Bethke 1987). This investigation supports Variscan

age  for  the  Sb  mineralization,  knowing  that  the  Variscan

metamorphosis  reached  the  amphibolite  grade.  The  Alpine

metamorphosis  of  the  crystalline  basement  was  not  recog-

nized in these areas (Dyda 1994).

The  prevailing  sulphosalts  in  the  investigated  mineraliza-

tion are jamesonite and boulangerite. Jamesonite occurs in the

Sb-assemblage, representing sulphosalts with low Pb/Sb ratio

and Fe content. In many occurrences, zinckenite is abundant

and the presence of jamesonite is restricted to local environ-

ments  with  increased  Fe  content  (e.g.,  Dúbrava)  (Chovan

1990). A high Pb/Sb ratio and occurrence of boulangerite is

typical for the association with galena. It is characteristic for

the K¾aèianka and Magurka (Chovan et al. 1995) or the Jase-

nie-Soviansko deposit (Luptáková 1999). Bournonite is typi-

cal for the tetrahedrite-bearing mineral assemblage of Sb-Au

mineralization in the Nízke Tatry Mts and occurs at most lo-

calities:  Mlynná  dolina  Valley  (Majzlan  &  Chovan  1997),

Ve¾ké Oružné, K¾aèianka, Krámec (Bakos et al. 2000), Dúbra-

va (Chovan et al. 1998), Magurka (Chovan et al. 1995), Ri-

šianka, Mal頎elezné (Majzlan et al. 1998) a.o. Berthierite is a

major representative of Fe-Sb sulphosalts. It occurs in associ-

ation with stibnite and gudmundite at Hviezda in the Mlynná

dolina  Valley  in  the  Nízke  Tatry  Mts  (Majzlan  &  Chovan

1997), and is abundant associated with stibnite, gudmundite,

native  antimony  and  kermesite  in  Sb  mineralizations  of  the

Malé Karpaty Mts (Chovan et al. 1992).

Studied  assemblage  of  native  antimony,  pyrrhotite,  ber-

thierite  and  stibnite  can  be  compared  with  the  experimental

data of Williams-Jones & Normand (1997). The crystalliza-

tion of native antimony is limited by aS

2

 and fO

2

. The stabili-

ty  field  of  native  antimony  is  defined  by  low  fO

and  aS

2

.

Therefore, in nature, stibnite occurs more frequently as a re-

sult of a wider stability field.

The common association of pyrrhotite and native antimony

observed in studied deposits indicates low aS

2

 and fO

values.

Resulting from increase in aS

during crystallization, berthier-

ite is also present, compared to gudmundite-pyrrhotite associ-

background image

HYDROTHERMAL Sb-Au MINERALIZATION (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)                                        215

olite metamorphic grade (620–640 °C/4.5–5.5 kbar, XH

2

O =

0.8–1.0 (Dyda 1994).

Summary

Sb-Au mineralization was discovered in the Malá Magura

mountain group, at the Chvojnica — Partizánska and Trause-

mentz  dolina  Valley  localities  (Fig. 1B).  This  discovery  in-

creased  the  number  of  known  Sb-Au  mineralization  occur-

rences  in  the  Tatric  Superunit  (Western  Carpathians).

Furthermore, the origin of geochemical anomalies and the ex-

istence of Au placer deposits between the Chvojnica and Ma-

linová  villages,  were  explained.  The  occurrence  of  primary

gold is reported for the first time in the Chvojnica — Partizán-

ska dolina Valley.

The  oldest  high-temperature  mineral  paragenesis  is  repre-

sented  by  quartz–pyrite–arsenopyrite  with  frequent  occur-

rence  of  gold.  The  younger  sulphide  mineralization  was

formed  at  considerably  lower  temperatures.  Two  stages  of

mineralization  were  distinguished:  sphalerite-galena-tetrahe-

drite and stibnite-sphalerite-sulphosalts, consistent with other

Sb-Au  occurrences  in  the  Tatric  Superunit  (Western  Car-

pathians).

Acknowledgments: The authors would like to thank T. Šlep-

ecky from Progeo Ltd. for providing rock samples. We also

thank  D.  Ozdín  from  Dionýz  Štúr  Geological  Institute  and

J. Krištín & J. Stankoviè from the Faculty of Natural Sciences

for EDS and WDS analyses. This research was supported by a

VEGA No. 1/8318/01 Grant.

References

Bakos  F.  &  Chovan  M.  1999:  Genetic  types  of  gold  from  the

Magurka  deposit  (Nizke  Tatry  Mts).  Miner.  Slovaca  3–4,  31,

217–225 (in Slovak).

Bakos F., Chovan M. & Michálek J. 2000: Mineralogy of hydrother-

mal Sb, Cu, Pb, Zn, As mineralization in NE of the Magurka

deposit,  Nízke  Tatry  Mts.  Miner.  Slovaca  5,  32,  497–507  (in

Slovak).

Bakos F. 2000: Mineralogy, paragenesis and fluid inclusion study at

Kriváò  Au-Sb  deposit  (Tatra  Mts.).  Abstract,  ŠVK,  PriF  UK,

Bratislava, 1–156 (in Slovak).

Barton  P.B.,  Jr.  &  Bethke  P.M.  1987:  Chalcopyrite  disease  in

sphalerite:  Pathology  and  epidemiology.  Amer.  Mineralogist

72, 451–467.

Bortnikov  N.S.,  Genkin  A.D.,  Dobrovo¾skaya  M.G.,  Muravitskaya

G.N. & Pilimonova A.A. 1991: The nature of chalcopyrite in-

clusions  in  sphalerite:  Exsolution,  coprecipitation,  or  “dis-

ease”? Econ. Geol. 96, 1070–1082.

Böhmer M. & Hvožïara P. 1980: The results of heavy-mineral con-

centrates research from eastern part of Malá Magura Mts. Acta

Geol. Geogr. Univ. Comen. 34, 31–45 (in Slovak).

Cambel B. 1959: Hydrothermal deposits in the Malé Karpaty Mts.,

mineralogy and geochemistry of their ores. Acta Geol. Geogr.

Univ. Comen. 3, 538 (in Slovak).

Dyda M. 1994: Geothermobarometric characteristics of some Tatric

crystalline basement units (Western Carpathians). Mitt. Österr.

Geol. Gesell. 86, 45–59.

ation in the Malé Karpaty Mts. With increasing fO

senarmon-

tite appears and with increasing aS

2

, kermesite and stibnite as-

sociated with pyrite are stable.

At higher aS

2

 and fO

2

,

 

the characteristic paragenesis is stib-

nite–senarmontite  and  (pyrite)  observed  at  the  Dúbrava  de-

posit. By increasing aS

2

 and fO

2

,

 

an association with native

antimony and pyrrhotite appears, occasionally with gudmun-

dite (Malé Karpaty Mts a.o.). Seinäjokite and magnetite which

could have formed, were not discovered in the Western Car-

pathians.

Dolomite is a characteristic gangue mineral of the sphaler-

ite–galena–(Cu)-Pb-Sb sulphosalts assemblage with ankerite

being a common carbonate of stibnite-bearing assemblage, in

which also Fe-bearing sulphides are present.

As in other localities with Sb-Au mineralization in the Tat-

ric  Superunit  of  the  Western  Carpathians,  an  older,  higher

temperature  mineral  assemblage  was  found  at  Chvojnica.  It

consists of quartz, arsenopyrite, pyrite and gold. The tempera-

ture of arsenopyrite crystallization (385–465 °C) corresponds

to the temperatures determined for this mineral assemblage in

other localities within the Tatric Superunit.

Younger sulphide mineralization developed at lower tem-

peratures (about 200 °C). Two stages can be distinguished:

(1) sphalerite-galena-tetrahedrite,

(2) stibnite-sphalerite-sulphosalts.

The common mineralization stages in the Sb-Au mineral-

ization of the Tatric Superunit are: stibnite Sb-Pb(Zn, Fe) and

tetrahedrite-bournonite Cu-Sb(Pb, Zn, Fe). Independent of lo-

cal conditions, the stibnite mineralization stage can comprise

abundant  Fe-bearing  minerals:  berthierite,  gudmundite,  pyr-

rhotite  (Malé  Karpaty  Mts)  or  with  Pb  content  zinckenite

(Dúbrava). Galena and sphalerite are abundant in the tetrahe-

drite–bournonite  assemblage  (Chvojnica,  Jasenie-Sovians-

ko?)  or  sulphosalts  Pb-Sb-Bi  (tintinaite)  at  the  Dúbrava  de-

posit.

The succession relations of sulphide assemblages in various

localities are different. At the Dúbrava deposit (Chovan 1990)

the stibnite mineralization stage is considered older than the

tetrahedrite, and the stibnite assemblage is younger than the

sphalerite–zinckenite.  However,  at:  K¾aèianka,  Krámec,

Ve¾ké Oružné (Bakos et al. 2000) and Nižná Boca (Smirnov

2000)  the  stibnite-bearing  assemblage  is  older  than  the  sul-

phosalts–zinckenite assemblage. At the Pezinok deposit, the

stibnite assemblage with native antimony is younger than the

sphalerite–sulphosalts assemblage (Andrᚠ1983 in Chovan et

al. 1992).

The Sb-Au mineralization hosted in crystalline basement of

the Malá Magura mountain group was generated during the

Variscan  tectonometamorphic  events,  characterized  by  am-

phibolite metamorphic grade. The Alpine remodelling of the

crystalline  basement  is  relatively  poor  (Mahe¾  1985).  Ore

veins did not interact with Mesozoic sedimentary cover and

the Krížna Nappe. The presence of chalcopyrite inclusions in

sphalerite indicates that the temperature of Alpine overprint

did  not  exceed  ~200 °C;  otherwise  these  two  usual  phases

would  form  a  homogeneous  solid  solution.  The  last  known

tectonometamorphic event recognized in the crystalline base-

ment  of  the  Malá  Magura  mountain  group  reached  about

200 °C, being of the Variscan age, which attained the amphib-

background image

216                                                                                       MIKUŠ and CHOVAN

Groen J.C., Craig J.R. & Rimstidt D. 1990: Gold-rich rim forma-

tion  on  electrum  grains  in  placers.  Canad.  Mineralogist  28,

207–228.

Hovorka D. & Fejdi P. 1983: Garnets of peraluminous granites of

the Suchý and Malá Magura Mts. (the Western Carpathians) —

their  origin  and  petrological  significance.  Geol.  Zbor.  Geol.

Carpath. 34, 1, 103–115.

Hurai  V.  1988:  P-V-T-X  tables  of  water  and  x-25  weight  percent

NaCl-H

2

O  solutions  to  500 

°

C  and  5000

×

105  Pa.  Acta  Geol.

Geogr. Univ. Comen. 44.

Chovan  M.  (Ed.)  1990:  Mineralogy,  geochemistry,  petrology  of  the

stockwork  —  impregnation  and  vein  mineralization  type  in

Dúbrava-¼ube¾ská. MS, PriFUK, Bratislava, 1–350 (in Slovak).

Chovan M., Rojkoviè I., AndrᚠP. & Hanas P. 1992: Ore mineral-

ization of the Malé Karpaty Mts. (Western Carpathians). Geol.

Carpathica 43, 5, 275–286.

Chovan M., Háber M., Jeleò S. & Rojkoviè I. (Eds.) 1994: Ore tex-

tures in the Western Carpathians. Slovak Academic Press, Brat-

islava, 1–219.

Chovan M., Póè I., Jancsy P., Majzlan J. & Krištín J. 1995: Sb-Au

(As-Pb) ore mineralization at the Magurka deposit, Nízke Ta-

try Mts. Miner. Slovaca 27, 6, 397–406. (in Slovak).

Chovan M., Slavkay M. & Michálek J. 1996: Ore mineralizations of

the  Ïumbierske  Tatry  Mts.  (Western  Carpathians,  Slovakia).

Geol. Carpathica 47, 6, 317–382.

Chovan M., Majzlan J., Ragan M., Siman P. & Krištin J. 1998: Pb-

Sb  and  Pb-Sb-Bi  sulphosalts  and  associated  sulphides  from

Dúbrava  deposit,  Nízke  Tatry  Mts.  Acta  Geol.  Univ.  Comen.

53, 37–49.

Chovan M., Luders V. & Hurai V. 1999: Fluid inclusion and C, O

isotope constraints on the origin of granodiorite-hosted Sb-As-

Au-W  deposit  at  Dúbrava.  Terra  Nostra  99/6,  ECROFI  XV,

71–72.

Janczy J. 1973: Gold in Malá Magura Mts. MS, Geofond, Bratislava,

1–156 (in Slovak).

Krá¾ J., Hess J.C., Kober B. & Lippolt H.J.: 

207

Pb/

206

Pb and 

40

Ar/

39

Ar age data from plutonic rocks of the Strážovské vrchy Mts.

basement, Western Carpathians. In: Grecula P., Hovorka D. &

Putiš M. (Eds.) 1997: Geological evolution of the Western Car-

pathians. Miner. Slovaca — Monograph 253–260.

Kretschmar  U.  &  Scott  S.D.  1976:  Phase  relations  involving  arse-

nopyrite  in  the  system  Fe-As-S  and  their  application.  Canad.

Mineralogist 14, 364–386.

Luptáková J. 1999: Pb, Zn, Cu, Sb hydrothermal mineralization at

the  locality  Jasenie-Soviansko  (Nízke  Tatry  Mts.).  Unpub-

lished diploma thesis, PriF UK, Bratislava, 1–74 (in Slovak).

Majzlan J. & Chovan M. 1997: Hydrothermal mineralization in the

Mlynná dolina valley, Nízke Tatry Mts. Miner. Slovaca 2, 29,

149–159 (in Slovak).

Majzlan J., Chovan M. & Michálek J. 1998: Ore occurrences at Ri-

šianka and Mal頎elezn頗 mineralogy and assemblages. Min-

er. Slovaca 1, 30, 52–60 (in Slovak).

Majzlan J., Hurai V. & Chovan M. 2001: Fluid inclusion study on

hydrothermal As-Au-Sb-Cu-Pb-Zn veins in the Mlynná dolina

valley  (Western  Carpathians,  Slovakia).  Geol.  Carpathica  5,

52, 277–286.

Mahe¾ M. 1985: Geology of the Strážovské vrchy Mts. GÚDŠ, Brat-

islava, 1–221 (in Slovak).

MikolᚠS. (Ed.) 1993: Malá Magura and Suchý Mts, Au-W prog-

noses source of mineral raw materials. MS, Geofond, Bratisla-

va, 1–365 (in Slovak).

Plašienka D., Grecula P., Putiš M., Hovorka D. & Kováè M. 1997:

Evolution  and  structure  of  the  Western  Carpathians:  an  over-

view. In: Grecula P., Hovorka D. & Putiš M. (Eds.): Geological

evolution  of  the  Western  Carpathians.  Miner.  Slovaca  —

Monograph 1–24.

Polák S. & Rak D. 1980: Prognostication problem of antimony min-

eralization in the Malé Karpaty Mts. In: Ilavský J. (Ed.): Anti-

mony ore mineralizations of Czechoslovakia. GÚDŠ, Bratislava,

69–87 (in Slovak).

Sachan K.H. & Chovan M. 1991: Thermometry of arsenopyrite-py-

rite  mineralization  in  the  Dúbrava  antimony  deposit  (Western

Carpathians). Geol. Carpathica 42, 5, 265–269.

Smirnov  A.  2000:  Sb-Au  mineralization  in  the  vicinity  of  Nižná

Boca  (Nízke  Tatry  Mts).  Unpublished  diploma  thesis,  PriF

UK, Bratislava, 1–131 (in Slovak).

Varèek C. 1963: The relationships of geology and ore-forming pro-

cesses  in  the  Western  Carpathians.  Acta  Geol.  Univ.  Comen.

Geol.  8, 7–37 (in Slovak).

Williams-Jones  A.E.  &  Normand  Ch.  1997:  Controls  of  mineral

parageneses in the system Fe-Sb-S-O. Econ. Geol. 97, 308–324.

Zelný ¼. & Uher P. 1988: Hydrothermal polymetalic mineralization

in  the  Chvojnica  (Malá  Magura  Mts).  Miner.  Slovaca  20,  6,

561–567 (in Slovak).