background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 53, 2, BRATISLAVA, APRIL  2002

93 — 98

SORPTION PROPERTIES OF REDUCED-CHARGE

MONTMORILLONITES

JANA HROBÁRIKOVÁ

*

 and PETER KOMADEL

     Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 842 36 Bratislava,

Slovak Republic

(Manuscript received October 4, 2001; accepted in revised form December 13, 2001)

Abstract: Four series of reduced-charge montmorillonites, with ranges in layer charge, were prepared from parent Ca-
montmorillonites  of  various  chemical  compositions.  Fine  fractions  of  bentonites  from  Otay  (USA),  Ivančice  (Czech
Republic), Sarigus (Armenia) and Kriva Palanka (Macedonia) were used. The extent of ion exchange, 62—89 % of CEC
covered by Li

+

, was dependent on the mineral and on the Li

+

 concentration in the liquid phase. Different levels of charge

reduction were achieved via Li-fixation by heating the samples for 24 h at 110—300 °C. Li

+

 ions were fixed in the layers

of all four montmorillonites, but incomplete Li

+

 for Ca

2+

 exchange diminished the extent of charge reduction. Heating

the samples at temperatures up to 140 °C caused Li-fixation and reduction in relative cation-exchange capacity (CEC)
values by 32 to 48 % but only a decrease by 17 to 24 % in the sorption of water and by 4 to 14 % of ethylene glycol
monoethyl ether. The greatest changes in these properties were observed among the samples prepared at 130—200 °C,
while higher temperatures had little effect. The most extensive reduction in CEC, by 81 % after preparation at 300 °C,
was obtained for the Otay montmorillonite, the mineral with the highest octahedral and the lowest tetrahedral charge and
the greatest level of Li

+

 for Ca

2+

 exchange. Higher tetrahedral charge and a lower level of Li

+

 for Ca

2+

 exchange nega-

tively affected the decrease in the cation exchange capacities, the specific surface areas and the water uptake capabilities
of the prepared reduced-charge montmorillonites.

Key words: water sorption, EGME specific surface area, cation-exchange capacity, Li-fixation, montmorillonite.

Introduction

The abundance of montmorillonitic bentonite deposits has led
to  extensive  studies  of  its  properties  and  industrial  applica-
tions. Montmorillonites are common in many soils, sediments
and  hydrothermal  alteration  products.  The  minerals  of  this
group have an expandable lattice, which has a variable c-axis
dimension depending on the number of layers of water mole-
cules hydrating the inorganic exchange cation between silicate
layers.  Montmorillonites  have  interesting  plastic,  colloidal,
and other properties, which are frequently quite different from
one sample to another (Grim & Kulbicki 1961).

The layer charge and its distribution are among the most im-

portant characteristics of montmorillonites and indicate the ca-
pacity of a mineral to retain and to release cations and to ad-
sorb  water  and  various  polar  organic  molecules  (Mermut
1994).  The  negative  charge  of  the  layers  arises  mainly  from
the replacement of Al(III) by Mg(II) in the octahedral sheet.
Charge neutrality is achieved through the presence of hydrated
cations in the interlayer space. These cations can be relatively
easily  replaced  in  the  laboratory  with  other  cations,  such  as
Li

+

, in order to obtain a homoionic form of the mineral. Upon

the thermal treatment of Li-saturated montmorillonite, Li

+

 cat-

ions  move  towards  the  negative  charge  centres  in  the  layers
and become irreversibly fixed. Such cation fixation lowers the
cation  exchange  capacity  of  the  clay  (Hofmann  &  Klemen
1950;  Bujdák  et  al.  1991).  Preparation  of  reduced-charge
montmorillonites  provides  a  possibility  to  investigate  the
properties  of  these  materials  that  relate  to  the  layer  charge

(Brindley & Ertem 1971; Clementz et al. 1974; Bujdák et al.
1992, 2000).

The  amount  of  water  present  in  smectite  powders  is  very

variable. It depends strongly on several factors, such as rela-
tive humidity, kind and amount of exchangeable cations, size
and  shape  of  the  particles,  and  structural  or  crystal-chemical
constraints.  For  example,  in  the  structurally  related  musco-
vites, two-thirds of the octahedral positions, and one-fourth of
the tetrahedral positions, are occupied by Al(III). The resultant
2e charge per unit cell is compensated by two K

+

 ions, which

do not hydrate and the physical properties of mica do not de-
pend on the water vapour pressure in the ambient atmosphere.
On  the  other  hand,  the  Li-montmorillonites,  where  the  layer
charge is generally less than 1e per unit cell, are particularly
susceptible to swelling by water and their physical properties
are accordingly affected (Bidadi et al. 1988).

With certain cations at interlayer exchange sites, smectites

readily  adsorb  water  and  polar  molecules,  resulting  in  a
marked expansion of their interlayers (Hendricks et al. 1940).
Because of the layer structure and charge of montmorillonite,
the sorption of vapours on the mineral can occur by different
mechanisms, depending on the molecular properties of the va-
pour. For polar molecules on montmorillonite the overall va-
pour sorption may reflect both surface adsorption and other ef-
fects (Monney et al. 1952). Chiou & Rutherford (1997) studied
the effects of layer charge and of Ca

2+

, Na

+

, K

+

, Cs

+

 and tet-

ramethylammonium  exchangeable  cations  on  the  sorption  of
water and EGME (ethylene glycol monoethyl ether) vapours
on two montmorillonites. With the same exchangeable cation,

*

  uachjaha@savba.sk

MECC ‘01

background image

94                                                                           HROBÁRIKOVÁ  and  KOMADEL

KP

Sa

Iv

Ot

20

40

60

80

100

 

 

CE

C [

%

]

Samples

 

60°C

 

110°C

 

120°C

 

130°C

 

140°C

 

150°C

 

160°C

 

180°C

 

200°C

 

250°C

 

300°C

the high-charge SAz-1 mineral showed a higher water capacity
than the low-charge SWy-1. The hydration of the tetrahedral
sheets  of  the  minerals  was  found  to  be  relatively  weak.  The
water  uptake  was  enhanced  by  the  increased  charge  in  the
SAz-1 clay for all exchanged cations and at all p/p

0

 (RH) due

to generally more gain in the energy of cation hydration than in
the energy of layer attraction when the clay is exposed to water
vapour.

The purpose of this study was to determine how the sorption

characteristics of water, at various relative humidities, and of
EGME,  were  affected  by  layer  charge  in  four  series  of  re-
duced-charge montmorillonites.

Materials and methods

Four series of reduced-charge montmorillonites were used.

The parent < 2 

µ

m fractions were separated from the bentonites

from Kriva Palanka (KP, Republic of Macedonia), Sarigus (Sa,
Republic of Armenia), Ivančice (Iv, Czech Republic) and Otay
(Ot,  USA).  Most  of  the  exchangeable  cations  were  replaced
with Li

+

 using 5—7 times repeated washings with 1 M LiCl dur-

ing ion exchange in dialysis tubing and LiCl solutions. Iv was
ion-exchanged differently, with 0.1—1 M LiCl solutions. This
technique allowed elimination of spinning of big volumes of
dispersions at high rotations; however, full ion exchange was
not achieved. Their layer charge, given as multiples of charge
of  one  electron,  e  =  1.6018.10

—19

  C,  per  structural  unit

O

20

(OH)

4

, distribution and structural formulae are listed in Ta-

ble 1. One specimen of each parent material remained unheat-
ed, while the others were heated for 24 h at 110, 120, 130, 140,
150, 160, 180, 200, 250 and 300 °C to evoke different levels of
Li

ion fixation. The details of separation and samples prepara-

tion are described (Hrobáriková et al. 2001).

The cation-exchange capacities (CECs) were determined by

repeated saturation of the samples with 1 M solution of ammo-
nium acetate at pH  =  7.  All  extracts  obtained  from  the  same
sample were combined and analysed for Ca and Li by atomic
absorption  and  emission  spectroscopy,  respectively.  Infrared
(IR) spectra in the 4000—400 cm

—1

 spectral range with a resolu-

tion  of  4  cm

—1

  were  obtained  on  KBr  pressed  disks  (0.4  mg

sample  and  200  mg  KBr),  using  a  Nicolet  Magna  750  FTIR
spectrometer equipped with a DTGS detector.

The  relative  total  specific  surface  area  was  determined  by

ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) adsorption, follow-
ing the method of Novák & Číčel (1970). The samples were
dried  under  vacuum  in  a  desiccator  over  P

2

O

5

  for  48  h  and

weighted  afterwards.  A  few  drops  of  EGME  were  added  in
several minor portions to each sample (~250 mg) until a slight
excess of EGME was achieved. The point when the clay be-
came unable to accept more EGME was clearly visible. After-
wards the samples with EGME were stored in a vacuum desic-
cator over ignited CaCl

2

. They were weighed every 90 minutes

until constant mass was achieved and the total specific surface
area was then calculated according to Novák & Číčel (1970).

Sorption and desorption isotherms of water vapour were de-

termined under static conditions. Briefly, ~250 mg of the sam-
ples were dried at 60 °C overnight; then kept at 25 °C for 48
hours in a desiccator above P

2

O

5

, at which time the amount of

adsorbed  water  at  0  %  RH  was  determined  gravimetrically.
The  samples  were  then  stored  under  the  next  higher  RH  for
the following 48 hours. On the basis of the previous skills of
Bujdák et al. (1992) with similar amounts of samples and ex-
periments, this period of time was considered sufficient to ob-
tain the equilibrium. This procedure was repeated in dessica-
tors  above  the  saturated  solutions  of  CaCl

2

,  K

2

CO

3

,

Mg(NO

3

)

2

, NaNO

2

, BaCl

2

 or above H

2

O, for RHs of 20, 43,

52, 66, 88 and 100 %, respectively. The results were collected
and the sorption curves plotted. Then, the samples were stored
under gradually decreasing RHs to obtain the corresponding
desorption curves. All the data were measured in triplicates;
the relative error was generally < 3.2 % of the measured value.

Results and discussion

Montmorillonite with Al-rich octahedral sheets was found

to be the dominant mineral in all four separated samples. No
admixtures were detected in KP, but minor amounts of pyro-
phyllite were found in Ot, amorphous SiO

2

 in Iv and opal-CT

in  Sa  (Hrobáriková  et  al.  2001).  Opal-CT,  the  commonest
form of hydrous silica, is composed of disordered stacking of
cristobalite-like and tridymite-like sequences (Jones & Segnit
1971).

Cation-exchange  capacity  (CEC)  is  a  directly  measurable

property  dependent  on  the  layer  charge.  Higher  temperature
during  preparation  caused  greater  Li

+

  fixation,  greater  layer

charge reduction and thus, a more extensive decrease in rela-
tive CEC in all four series (Fig. 1). Preparation below 140 °C
decreased significantly the CEC in all four series. The same
order, CEC

Ot

< CEC

KP

< CEC

Sa

< CEC

Iv

,  was  retained  in  rela-

tive  CEC  reduction  for  the  samples  prepared 

140  °C.  The

CEC values decreased systematically with increasing temper-
ature of preparation up to 250 °C, but further decreases were
negligible  for  the  materials  prepared  at  300 °C  (Fig. 1).  The
most extensive CEC reduction occurred in the Ot series, with
the parent montmorillonite of the highest octahedral and the

Fig.  1.  Relative  cation  exchange  capacities  for  series  of  reduced-
charge montmorillonites prepared by heating for 24 hours at indi-
cated  temperatures.

background image

SORPTION  PROPERTIES  OF  REDUCED-CHARGE  MONTMORILLONITES                                          95

1250

1000

750

500

 A

b

so

rb

an

ce

Iv

Sa

KP

Ot

419

1120

 

 

 Wavenumbers [cm

-1

]

KP

Sa

Iv

Ot

20

40

60

80

100

 

 

EG

ME surf

ace 

area [

%

]

Samples

 60°C
 110°C
 120°C
 130°C
 140°C
 150°C
 160°C
 180°C
 200°C
 250°C
 300°C

lowest tetrahedral charge (Table 1). After heating this sample
at 300 °C, the CEC decreased to 19 % of the value obtained for
the unheated Ot. The second greatest decrease was observed in
the KP series, yielding a CEC of 27 % of its original CEC after
heating at 300 °C. The KP montmorillonite has a lower octahe-
dral  charge  (—0.72  e/O

20

(OH)

4

)  than  Ot  as  well  as  a  slightly

higher  tetrahedral  charge  (—0.15  e/O

20

(OH)

4

).  Relative  CEC

values decreased considerably less (to 38 % of the original) in
the  Sa  series,  and  were  presumably  affected  by  the  negative
contribution of the relatively high tetrahedral charge, partially
compensated  by  possibly  unexchangeable  K

+

  cations.  The

least extensive decrease in relative CECs occurred in the Iv se-
ries  (Fig.  1)  with  the  lowest  Li

+

  for  Ca

2+

  substitution

(Hrobáriková et al. 2001). Relative CEC was reduced only to
45 % of CEC of unheated sample presumably due to lower ex-
cess of Li

+

 in the used solutions.

The relative EGME specific surface areas (SSAs) obtained

for  the  four  series  of  reduced-charge  montmorillonites  are
shown in Fig. 2. The values for the parent, unheated montmo-
rillonites were 745, 796, 706 and 799 m

2

.g

—1

 for samples Ot,

KP, Sa and Iv, respectively. The presence of opal-CT and the
high tetrahedral charge of —0.43 e/O

20

(OH)

4

 together with the

relatively  high  K

+

  content  saturating  18  %  of  the  negative

charge, suggest possible presence of illitic, non-swelling inter-
layers  (Hrobáriková  et  al.  2001)  in  Sa  and  explain  its  lowest
SSA. The SSAs in all series decreased only slightly with in-
creasing  temperature  of  preparation  up  to  130  °C.  This  de-
crease was by 10 % in KP, 8 % in Sa, 3 % in Ot and 1 % in Iv
(Fig. 2). Presumably the interlayer space was fully accessible
to EGME molecules for the montmorillonitic minerals in each
sample.

Higher  temperatures  of  preparation  resulted  in  further  de-

creases  in  SSA  and  presumably  led  to  the  formation  of  low
charged pyrophyllite-like layers. The enhanced Li

+

 fixation at

these temperatures, accompanied by reduction of the negative
layer charge, is known to decrease the swelling ability of re-
duced-charge  montmorillonite  (Komadel  et  al.  1996).  The
bands near 1120 and 420 cm

—1

, assigned to absorption of pyro-

phyllite-like layers (Farmer 1974; Madejová et al. 1999) can be
distinguished in the IR spectra of  Iv, KP, Ot and Sa samples
prepared at 

150 °C (Fig. 3). The original fine fraction of Ot

bentonite contained an admixture of pyrophyllite, thus the IR
spectra  of  all  Ot  samples  in  the  series  displayed  absorption
bands  at  these  wavenumbers.  Increasing  intensity  of  these
bands confirmed increasing content of pyrophyllite-like layers
in  the  Ot  samples  prepared  at 

150  °C  (Hrobáriková  et  al.

montmorillonite

charge

(e/O

20

(OH)

4

)

structural formula

tetrahedral

octahedral

total

Kriva Palanka

– 0.15

– 0.72

– 0.87

[Si

7.85

Al

0.15

][Al

2.96

Fe

0.32

Mg

0.72

]Ca

0.07

K

0.03

Li

0.68

O

20

(OH)

4

Sarigus

– 0.43

– 0.73

– 1.16

[Si

7.57

Al

0.43

][Al

2.36

Fe

0.91

Mg

0.73

]Ca

0.11

K

0.21

Li

0.71

O

20

(OH)

4

Ivančice

– 0.21

– 0.74

– 0.95

[Si

7.79

Al

0.21

][Al

2.84

Fe

0.42

Mg

0.74

]Ca

0.17

K

0.02

Li

0.58

O

20

(OH)

4

Otay

– 0.05

– 0.93

– 0.98

[Si

7.95

Al

0.05

][Al

2.77

Fe

0.15

Mg

1.17

]Ca

0.05

K

0.05

Li

0.81

O

20

(OH)

4

Table 1: Tetrahedral, octahedral and total charges and structural formulae of parent Li-montmorillonites.

Fig.  3.  Infrared  spectra  of  samples  Iv,  Sa,  KP  and  Ot  prepared  by
heating for 24 hours at 150 °C.

Fig. 2. Relative EGME specific surface areas for series of reduced-
charge  montmorillonites  prepared  by  heating  for  24  hours  at  indi-
cated  temperatures.

2001).  EGME  molecules  could  not  penetrate  into  the  non-
swelling  interlayer  spaces.  This  was  reflected  in  decreased
EGME SSAs obtained for the samples prepared at 

150  °C

(Fig. 2).

The  effect  of  heating  at  150—200  °C  on  the  samples  was

clearly  different  (Fig.  2).  The  relative  EGME  SSA  decrease

background image

96                                                                           HROBÁRIKOVÁ  and  KOMADEL

was more pronounced for the KP and Ot series than for the Sa
or Iv series, as was observed for the relative CEC values (Fig.
1). The relative SSAs of the samples prepared at 200 °C de-
creased to 38, 43, 61 and 68 % of the values obtained for the
parent KP, Ot, Sa and Iv samples, respectively. The exact rea-
son for this behaviour remains unclear, however, possible dif-
ferences in the homogeneity of the layer charge distribution in
the parent samples could be one of the explanations. As was
observed  for  CEC,  differences  between  the  samples  in  the
same series prepared at 250 and 300 °C were minor, proving
that heating of Li-montmorillonites beyond 250 °C results in
little further change to their properties (Madejová et al. 1999).
For the samples prepared at 300 °C the values obtained were
27, 34, 45 and 44 % for KP, Ot, Sa and Iv (Fig. 2). The final
extent of reduction in relative SSAs reflected the negative in-
fluence of the highest tetrahedral charge in Sa and the lowest
Li

+

 for Ca

2+

 substitution in Iv.

Comparison of relative CECs and relative EGME SSAs for

four  series  of  reduced-charge  montmorillonites  is  shown  in
Fig.  4.  It  demonstrates  clearly  that  CEC  was  affected  to  a
greater extent than SSAs at low and intermediate preparation
temperatures; indicating that decreases in layer charge had a
greater effect on the exchange capacity than the total surface
area available for the sorption of EGME molecules. This effect
is most significant for the Ot series, i.e. for the mineral of the
highest  octahedral  charge,  in  which  the  relative  charge  de-
crease was the greatest before the substantial decrease in rela-
tive EGME surface area could be observed (Fig. 4).

Representative water sorption-desorption curves (SDCs) of

the Sa series are illustrated in Fig. 5. The shapes of the SDCs
for the other three reduced-charge montmorillonite series (not
shown) were similar. The inclination of isotherms was influ-
enced  by  the  layer  charge  reduction.  The  irregular  shapes of
both the adsorption and desorption branches of the isotherms
suggested complex water adsorption mechanisms. More water
remained on all the samples during desorption, i.e. when the
drying parts of the sorption/desorption curves were measured.
Such hysteresis was reported to occur due to more extensive
water adsorption mainly on the external surfaces of the mont-
morillonite particles throughout the drying rather than wetting
experiments (Ormerod & Newman 1983; Bujdák et al. 1992).
The amount of water sorption was dependent on RH, as is of-
ten the case for swelling clay minerals (Cases et al. 1992). As
was expected from the high hydration energy of the Li

+

 cation,

hydration of the interlamellar space of reduced-charge samples
started at very low relative pressures. The samples prepared at
the lowest temperatures of 110 and 120 °C had a higher affini-
ty for water (Fig. 5, data for 120 °C are not shown, they over-
lap with those for 110 °C) than the untreated samples. Higher
water uptake by these samples, in comparison to the parent Li-
montmorillonites, could be caused by lower hydration of their
interlayer cations brought about via more extensive dehydra-
tion upon preparation at increased temperatures of 110 or 120
vs. 60 °C.

The samples prepared at 130—300 °C were less hydrated at

all investigated RHs. Water content in these samples gradually
decreased  with  decreasing  layer  charge  and  with  decreasing
surface area. The effect of charge reduction on hydration was
better observed at high relative humidity: at a high RH, more

water  was  adsorbed,  but  differences  between  samples  were
greater; as the RH decreased, both the total amount of water
adsorbed and differences between the materials decreased. At
high RH, above ~80 %, the water vapour hydrated interlayer
cations and condensed more effectively in the micropores and
interlayer  voids  by  wicking,  resulting  in  saturation  of  water
sorption  capacities  of  the  samples  (Güven  1992).  The  water
molecules filled the interlayers as well as the spaces between
the mineral particles.

Relative water sorption data obtained at 100 % RH for four

series of reduced-charge montmorillonites are shown in Fig. 6.
All  samples  prepared  at  110  and  120  °C  adsorbed  a  similar
amount  of  water  to  their  parent  counterparts.  Preparation  at
higher temperatures, resulting in Li

+

 fixation and layer charge

reduction as well as more extensive dehydration of the remain-
ing Li

+

 cations in the interlayers, led to materials of gradually

decreased water uptake ability. The data for the samples pre-
pared at 250 and 300 °C overlapped, again confirming the sim-

0

20

40

60

80

100

0

20

40

60

80

100

in

cre

asi

ng

 p

rep

ara

tio

n

te

m

per

atu

re

 

 

EG

ME

 s

u

rf

ace 

area 

[%

]

CEC [%]

 KP
 Sa
 Iv
 Ot

0

20

40

60

80

100

0

10

20

30

40

 

 

so

rpti

on

desorpti

on

Wat

er

 s

o

rp

ti

o

n

/d

eso

rp

ti

on

 [

m

as

%

]

Relative humidity [%]

 

Sa60

 

Sa110

 

Sa130

 

Sa140

 

Sa150

 

Sa160

 

Sa300

Fig. 5. Effect of preparation temperature on water sorption and de-
sorption of the Sa series at various relative humidities.

Fig. 4. Comparison of relative cation exchange capacities and rel-
ative  EGME  specific  surface  areas  for  four  series  of  reduced-
charge  montmorillonites.

background image

SORPTION  PROPERTIES  OF  REDUCED-CHARGE  MONTMORILLONITES                                          97

ilarity  in  hydration  properties  of  these  pairs  of  samples.  The
changes in water sorption within the series (Fig. 6) and among
the  series  were  similar  to  those  observed  for  the  relative
EGME  specific  surface  areas  (Fig. 2),  showing  the  negative
effect of the increasing number of pyrophyllite-like layers on
sorption properties of all four series investigated. This infor-
mation along with IR and RTG results shows the negative ef-
fect of the increasing number of non-expandable layers on the
water uptake. Comparison of the relative cation exchange ca-
pacities and the relative levels of water sorption at 100 % RH
is made in Fig. 7 for all four series of reduced-charge montmo-
rillonites. As was observed for EGME uptake, the relative wa-
ter uptake decreased at a lower rate that the decrease of rela-
tive  CECs  for  sample  preparation  below  200  °C.  Heating  of
the  samples  for  24  hours  at  temperatures  < 200  °C  evoked
more  pronounced  decreases  in  the  relative  CECs  than  in  the
relative amount of water sorbed. Similarly to EGME sorption
(Fig. 4), the effect is most pronounced for the Ot series, where
the most extensive reduction of the relative CEC was observed
before  the  relative  water  sorption  effectively  decreased  from
its initial value (Fig. 7).

Conclusions

Four series of reduced-charge montmorillonites with gradu-

ally decreasing cation exchange capacity were prepared from
different parent Li-montmorillonites by heating at 110—300 °C.
Preparation  at  110—130  °C  produced  materials  with  signifi-
cantly decreased CEC, but with rather minor modification in
both the total specific surface area as well as water and EGME
sorption  capabilities.  All  investigated  properties  of  the  prod-
ucts prepared at higher temperatures were more significantly
modified, presumably due to the development of collapsed and
non-swelling  pyrophyllite-like  interlayers.  Negligible  differ-
ences in properties of materials prepared at 250 and at 300 °C
proves  that  heating  at  250  °C  for  24  hours  is  sufficient  to
achieve a maximal extent of Li

+

 fixation and layer charge re-

duction.

Fig. 7. Comparison of relative cation exchange capacities and rel-
ative water sorption at 100 % RH for four series of reduced-charge
montmorillonites.

0

20

40

60

80

100

0

20

40

60

80

100

in

crea

si

ng

 p

re

pa

rat

io

n

tem

peratu

re

 

 

W

at

er 

so

rp

ti

on

 a

10

%

 R

H

  [

%

]

CEC [%]

 KP
 Sa
 Iv
 Ot

KP

Sa

Iv

Ot

20

40

60

80

100

 

 

Wat

er

 sor

p

ti

o

n

 at

 10

0 %

 RH   

[%

]

Samples

 

60°C

 

110°C

 

120°C

 

130°C

 

140°C

 

150°C

 

160°C

 

180°C

 

200°C

 

250°C

 

300°C

Fig. 6. Relative water sorption data at 100 % relative humidity for
series of reduced-charge montmorillonites prepared by heating for
24 hours at indicated temperatures.

Acknowledgment: The authors appreciate helpful comments
of Drs. Bujdák, Gates and Serwicka on an earlier version of
this paper and financial support of the Slovak Grant Agency
VEGA (Grant No. 2/7202).

References

Bidadi H., Schroeder P.A. & Pinnavaia T.J. 1988: Dielectric proper-

ties  of  montmorillonite  clay  films:  Effects  of  water  and  layer
charge reduction. J. Phys. Chem. Solids 49, 1435—1440.

Brindley G.W. & Ertem G. 1971: Preparation and solvation proper-

ties of some variable charge montmorillonites. Clays and Clay
Miner.
 19, 399—404.

Bujdák J., Slosiariková H., Nováková  . & Číčel B. 1991: Fixation

of lithium cations in montmorillonite. Chem. Papers 45, 499-
507.

Bujdák J., Petrovičová I. & Slosiariková H. 1992: Study of water-re-

duced  charge  montmorillonite  system.  Geol.  Carpathica,  Ser.
Clays
 43, 109—111.

Bujdák J., Hackett E. & Giannelis E.P. 2000: Effect of layer charge

on the intercalation of poly(ethylene oxide) in layered silicates:
Implication  on  nanocomposite  polymer  electrolytes.  Chem.
Mater.
 12, 2168—2174.

Cases J.M., Berend G., Besson M., François M., Uriot J.P., Thomas

F. & Poirier J.E. 1992: Mechanism of adsorption-desorption of
water vapor by homoionic montmorillonite. 1. The sodium ex-
changed form. Langmuir 8, 2730—2739.

Chiou C.T. & Rutherford D.W. 1997: Effects of exchanged cation

and layer charge on the sorption of water and EGME vapours
on  montmorillonite  clays.  Clays  and  Clay  Miner.  45,  867—
880.

Clementz  D.M.,  Mortland  M.M.  &  Pinnavaia  T.J.  1974:  Properties

of  reduced  charge  montmorillonites:  Hydrated  Cu(II)  ions  as
a spectroscopic probe. Clays and Clay Miner. 22, 49—57.

Farmer V.C. 1974: Layer silicates. In: Farmer V.C. (Ed.): Infrared spec-

tra of minerals. Mineralogical Society, London, UK, 1—331.

Grim  R.E.  &  Kulbicki  G.  1961:  Montmorillonite:  High  tempera-

ture  reactions  and  classification.  Amer.  Mineralogist  46,
1329—1369.

Güven  N.  1992:  Molecular  aspects  of  clay—water  interactions.  In:

Güven  N.  &  Pollastro  R.M.  (Eds.):  CMS  Workshop  Lectures.
Vol.  4:  Clay-water  interface  and  its  rheological  implications.

background image

98                                                                           HROBÁRIKOVÁ  and  KOMADEL

The Clay Minerals Society, Boulder, USA, 2—79.

Hendricks  S.B.,  Nelson  R.A.  &  Alexander  L.T.  1940:  Hydration

mechanism of the clay montmorillonite with various cations. J.
Am. Chem. Soc
. 62, 1457—1464.

Hofmann U. & Klemen R. 1950: Verlust der Austauschfähigkeit von

Lithiuminonen  an  Bentonit  durch  Erhitzung.  Z.  Anorg.  Allg.
Chem.
 262, 95—99.

Hrobáriková J., Madejová J. & Komadel P. 2001: Effect of heating

temperature on Li fixation, layer charge and properties of fine
fractions of bentonites. J. Mater. Chem. 11, 1452—1457.

Jones J.B. & Segnit E.R. 1971: The nature of opal. I. Nomenclature

and constituent phases. J. Geol. Soc. Australia 18, 57—68.

Komadel P., Bujdák J., Madejová J., Šucha V. & Elsass F. 1996: Ef-

fect  of  non-swelling  layers  on  the  dissolution  of  reduced-
charge  montmorillonite  in  hydrochloric  acid.  Clay  Miner.  31,
333—345.

Madejová J., Arvaiová B. & Komadel P. 1999: FTIR spectroscopic

characterization of thermally treated Cu

2+

, Cd

2+

, and Li

+

 mont-

morillonites. Spectrochimica Acta A 55, 2467—2476.

Mermut  A.R.  1994:  Problems  associated  with  layer  charge  charac-

terization  of  2:1  phyllosilicates.  In:  Mermut  A.R.  (Ed.):  CMS
Workshop Lectures. Vol. 6: Layer charge characteristics of 2:1
silicate  clay  minerals.  The  Clay  Minerals  Society,  Boulder,
USA, 106—122.

Monney R.W., Keenan A.G. & Wood L.A. 1952: Adsorpton of wa-

ter vapour by montorillonite. I. Heat of desorption and applica-
tion of BET theory. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 74, 1367—1371.

Novák I. & Číčel B. 1972: Refinement of surface area determining

of  clays  by  ethylene  glycol  monoethyl  ether  (EGME)  reten-
tion. In: Konta J. (Ed.): Proc. Fifth Conference on Clay Min-
eralogy  and  Petrology,  Praha  1970.  Charles  University,
Praha, 123—129.

Ormerod E.C. & Newman A.C.D. 1983: Water sorption on Ca-satu-

rated  clays:  II.  Internal  and  external  surfaces  of  montmorillo-
nite. Clay Miner. 18, 289—299.

Skipper N.T., Refson K. & McConnell J.D.C. 1989: Computer cal-

culation of water-clay interactions using atomic pair potentials.
Clay Miner. 24, 411—425.