background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 53, 2, BRATISLAVA, APRIL  2002

127 — 132

DETERMINATION OF INTERNAL SHEAR STRENGTH PARAMETERS

OF GEOCOMPOSITE CLAY LINERS

BILJANA KOVAČEVIĆ ZELIĆ

1

, DAVORIN KOVAČIĆ

2

 and DOBROSLAV ZNIDARČIĆ

3

1

University of Zagreb, Faculty of Mining, Geology and Petroleum Engineering,

Pierottijeva 6, Zagreb, Croatia; bkzelic@rudar.rgn.hr

2

BBR-CONEX, Kalinovica 3, Zagreb, Croatia; bbr-conex@zg.tel.hr

3

University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural

Engineering, Boulder, USA; znidarci@spot.colorado.edu

(Manuscript received October 4, 2001; accepted in revised form December 13, 2001)

Abstract:  Geocomposite  clay  liners  (GCLs)  are  used  in  environmental,  transportation  and  geotechnical  engineering
applications. Determination of the internal and interface shear strength parameters of GCLs has a huge importance for
stability analyses. Therefore, the study of the internal shear strength of one type of nonreinforced GCLs was performed.
Laboratory testing programme consisted of five series of direct shear tests. Special attention was given to the influence
of the specimen hydration procedure and horizontal displacement rate on the shear test results. The analysis of the direct
shear tests, presented in the paper, clearly demonstrate that the measured values of internal shear strength depend on the
way of performing the laboratory tests. The internal shear strength envelopes for nonreinforced GCLs are proposed on
the basis of obtained results.

Key words: landfills, bentonite, geocomposite clay liners (GCLs), internal shear strength, direct shear test, nonreinforced
GCLs.

Introduction

Geocomposite  clay  liners  represent  one  type  of  the  geosyn-
thetics that have been used more frequently since the 70’s. Ac-
cording to ASTM a geosynthetic is “a planar product manu-
factured from polymeric material used with soil, rock, earth,
or other geotechnical engineering related material as an inte-
gral part of a man-made project, structure, or system
”. Koern-
er (2000) gives a broad overview of the various possibilities
for their engineering application.

Geocomposite  clay  liners  (IGS  2000)  or  geosynthetic  clay

liners (ASTM 1997) are manufactured hydraulic barriers con-
taining a layer of high-quality sodium bentonite clay attached
or adhered to geotextiles or a geomembrane. Numerous com-
mercially manufactured products of GCLs are available on the
worldwide market. They are used in environmental, transpor-
tation and geotechnical engineering applications. In environ-
mental  applications  GCLs  act  as  a  hydraulic  barrier  compo-
nent  on  waste  disposal  sites  as  a  part  of  the  liner  and  cover
systems. Because of their low permeability they serve very of-
ten as a replacement for low permeability soil or clay liners. In
comparison  with  classical  clay  liners  they  provide  many  ad-
vantages,  including  a  greater  resistance  to  differential  settle-
ments,  desiccation,  and  freeze-thaw  deterioration.  They  also
have  self-healing  characteristics  due  to  their  swelling  poten-
tial. It is also important that their installation is simple, easy
and less time-consuming.

From the engineering design point of view, stability analy-

ses of the hydraulic barriers at waste disposal sites are one of
the most important issues. Therefore, proper determination of
the  shear  strength  parameters  of  all  the  barrier  components
plays a major role in the design process. Internal shear strength
parameters of GCLs are generally obtained from laboratory di-

rect shear tests, but the amount of the published data is limited.
The principal issues for internal shear strength testing of GCLs
are: test configuration, gripping technology, specimen size, de-
gree  of  hydration  and  hydration  liquid,  normal  stress  range,
and shear strain rate. It was found, by reviewing the published
data, that there is a significant variability of the test procedures
used and the results obtained. Therefore, a study of the internal
shear  strength  of  one  type  of  nonreinforced  GCL  was  per-
formed. Special attention was given to the determination of the
influence  of  two  parameters:  specimen  hydration  procedure
and  shear  strain  rate.  The  laboratory  testing  program  was
planned accordingly and consisted of five series of direct shear
tests. Two procedures of specimen hydration and four different
shear strain rates were investigated in the program.

The peak and residual shear strength envelopes were deter-

mined on the basis of test results. Influence of the hydration
procedure and shear strain rate is clearly shown. The appropri-
ate laboratory testing procedure is proposed for the determina-
tion  of  internal  shear  strength  of  GCLs.  With  this  procedure
the  two  most  relevant  parameters  are  included  in  the  testing
programs.

Internal shear strength testing of GCLs

Samples

There  are  a  wide  variety  of  commercially  manufactured

products of GCLs on the market. From the shear strength point
of view, they are divided into two main groups: reinforced and
nonreinforced GCLs. In our investigation, one of the very few
nonreinforced GCLs known under commercial name Claymax
200R  (CETCO,  USA)  is  used.  It  consists  of  approximately

MECC ‘01

background image

128                                                             KOVAČEVIĆ ZELIĆ,  KOVAČIĆ  and  ZNIDARČIĆ

5.0 kg/m

2

 of adhesive bonded natural sodium bentonite sand-

wiched between two lightweight woven geotextiles. A cross-
section sketch of the nonreinforced GCL is shown in the Fig.
1. In the other type of GCLs called reinforced GCLs, geotex-
tiles are held together, for example, by stitch bonding or nee-
dlepunching. The physical bonding of the geotextiles enhances
the internal resistance of GCLs to shearing.

Several reasons influenced the decision to test one type of

nonreinforced  GCL  in  our  investigation.  It  was  our  opinion
that in order to understand the shearing behaviour of GCLs, it
was necessary to investigate in detail the behaviour of bento-
nite itself. In the case of reinforced GCLs, their behaviour in
direct  shear  test  is  influenced  by  the  presence  of  synthetic
yarns. Moreover, previous investigations (Gilbert et al. 1996)
prove that reinforced GCLs have larger peak strengths, but the
residual strength is the same as for nonreinforced ones. Final-
ly, the specimen size is not a critical parameter in testing the
nonreinforced GCLs, as is the case for reinforced ones. In the
case of reinforced GCLs large specimens are necessary. Large
samples  are  not  practical  for  standard  tests  in  common  geo-
technical  laboratories.  Some  investigators  show  that  there  is
also a problem of partial hydration of specimens that leads to
inaccurate results in shear (Gilbert et al. 1997).

GCLs are geocomposites consisting of geological material

(predominantly  sodium  bentonite)  and  synthetic  materials
(geotextiles,  geomembranes).  Bentonite  is  a  key  component
because its function is to maintain low hydraulic permeability.
Therefore, it will be presented in some details.

Bentonite is a naturally occurring clay that is extremely hy-

drophilic (water attracting). In contact with water or even wa-
ter vapour bentonite attracts the water forming a complex con-
figuration that leaves little free-water space in the voids. This
fact explains the resulting low permeability of most GCLs, the
most important property of barrier layers.

Bentonites, which are used for the production of GCLs, con-

sist  mainly  of  three-layer  mineral  montmorillonite  of  the
smectite  group.  Other  ingredients  like  quartz,  christoballite,
feldspars, muscovite/illite, and other clay and nonclay miner-
als  are  not  important  for  the  functionality  in  waste  contain-
ment applications (Egloffstein 1997). Because of the high con-
tent of montmorillonite (60—90 %), bentonites have desirable
properties like swelling, high ion exchange capacity, adsorp-
tion capacity against heavy metals and very low permeability.

Most of the commercially available GCLs use sodium ben-

tonites.  Calcium  bentonites  are  rarely  used  because  of  lower
swelling potential and higher permeability. The water adsorp-
tion capacity of sodium bentonites is approximately 400—700 %
compared with the capacity of calcium bentonites of roughly
200 % (Egloffstein 1995). The permeability of calcium bento-
nites is 1—5

×

10

—10

 m/s and of sodium bentonites 1—3

×

10

—11

 m/s

(Egloffstein 1997). GCLs manufactured in the USA use natu-
ral sodium bentonites found in Wyoming. In many European
countries  natural  calcium  bentonites  are  found  (Koerner

Fig. 1. Cross-section sketch of nonreinforced GCL.

Na-bentonite

Ca-bentonite

Montmorillonite content [%]

75

66

Specific surface area [m

2

/g]

560

490

Exchange capacity [meq/100g]

76

62

1997). In order to receive better swelling properties such calci-
um bentonites are activated with soda (soda activated bento-
nites). Some properties of natural sodium bentonites are given
in Table 1, compared to the properties of a calcium bentonite,
for example, from Bavaria.

In addition to the previously mentioned favourable proper-

ties of bentonites for the waste containment applications, there
are some critical issues that should be kept in mind. The ion-
exchange capability of bentonite under typical use conditions
can  cause  the  transformation  of  original  sodium  to  calcium
bentonites. As a consequence of that, some physical character-
istics  will  be  changed,  like  swelling,  permeability  and  self-
healing properties (Egloffstein 1997). This can be avoided by
the  proper  installation  of  GCLs.  The  design  engineer  should
consider the compatibility of GCL with the adjacent soils or
liquids with which it will come into contact. GCLs should not
be used if they can come into contact with limestone. Extreme
weather conditions (heavy raining, very dry areas) should also
be avoided (Mackey 1997).

The most interesting property of bentonites for our research

is their shear strength. Previous investigations show that they
have  very  low  strength  especially  in  free-swell  conditions.
Mesri & Olson (1970) and Olson (1974) conducted consolidat-
ed-undrained triaxial tests with pore water pressure measure-
ments  on  homoionic  sodium-  and  calcium-montmorillonites.
Gleason  et  al.  (1997)  performed  consolidated-drained  direct
shear  tests  on  thin  layers  of  bentonites  according  to  ASTM
D3080.  The  obtained  values  of  shear  strength  parameters  of
montmorillonites and bentonites are shown in Table 2.

Shear apparatus

Direct shear tests were performed in a modified shear appa-

ratus. Some modifications of a standard shear box as used in
common soil mechanics laboratories were necessary. Standard
shear boxes have the following dimensions: specimen size 70 

×

70 mm or 60 

×

 60 mm, specimens height 20 mm. GCLs have a

height of approximately 5 mm in as-received state, and their
height  is  variable  depending  on  the  degree  of  saturation.
Therefore, porous plates of different thickness were added to
the apparatus. Specimen size was enlarged to 100 

×

 100 mm. In

that way, the maximum horizontal displacement was enlarged,
too, and the measurement of residual strength was achieved.
Finally, gripping of the specimens is solved by using teethed
metal plates, containing 112 teeth on the size of 100 

×

 100 mm.

Details of the modified shear box are presented in Fig. 2.

Laboratory testing program

Published  results  of  the  internal  shear  strength  parameters

for  nonreinforced  GCLs  demonstrate  a  huge  variety  of  data

Table 1: Properties of bentonites (Koerner 1997).

background image

SHEAR  STRENGTH  PARAMETERS  OF GEOCOMPOSITE  CLAY  LINERS                                        129

ing  the  hydration  for    24  hours  (normal  consolidation)  or  9
days  (extended  consolidation),  vertical  displacements  were
measured  and  recorded  continuously.  Shearing  of  the  speci-
mens with different rates of displacements begun at the end of
the  hydration  stage  until  the  relative  displacement  of  15  %
was achieved. Depending on the rate of displacements, shear-
ing lasted from 17 minutes for series I and V to 9.5 days for
series IV (Table 3).

Results

Stress and strain components

During the direct shear testing of nonreinforced GCL, shear

stress,  vertical  and  horizontal  displacements  were  measured
and  recorded  in  an  output  file.  Time  intervals  for  recording
output data were adapted to the different test durations given
in  Table  3.  On  the  basis  of  this  data,  stress-displacement
curves were created for every series of testing program. Three
curves  coresponding  to  three  normal  stress  values  (50,  100
and  200  kPa)  for  a  series  III  are  shown  on  Fig.  3.  It  can  be
seen  that  nonreinforced  GCLs  demonstrate  shearing  behav-
iour similar to that of overconsolidated clay materials exibit-
ing peak and residual strengths. In our case, residual strengths
were determined at the displacement of 15 mm, that is at the
relative deformation of 15 %. Total values of peak and residu-
al shear strengths along with their ratios are given in Table 4.

By  reviewing  the  data  presented  in  Table  4,  we  can  con-

clude the following:
– the obtained values of peak and residual strengths are low-
er for lower displacement rates (comparing series I to IV),
– strength reduction from peak to residual values are higher
for lower displacement rates,
–  extended  consolidation  produces  lower  strengths,  too
(comparing series I and V).

Homoionic Na-montmorillonite

Homoionic Ca-montmorillonite

Na-bentonite

Ca-bentonite

 

 CU triaxial test

CD direct shear test

Liquid limit [%]

    880 – 1160

                  190 – 220

603

124

Plasticity index [%]

    -

                  160 – 190

567

98

Cohesion [kPa]

    7

       14

6

 5.8

Friction angle [°]

   5

       15

12

21

Table 2: Shear strength parameters of montmorillonites and bentonites (Mesri & Olson 1970; Gleason et al. 1997).

Fig. 2. Cross-section of the modified shear box.

Normal force

Shearing

force

Porous stone

Metal plate

with teeth

GCL

(Daniel & Shan 1991; Daniel et al. 1993; Fox et al. 1998; Shan
1993). The range of the measured values of friction angle, 

ϕ

,

and cohesion, c, are the following:

dry specimens

ϕ

 = 22—37°          c = 7—50 kPa,

hydrated specimens

ϕ

 = 0—27°              c = 0.2—30 kPa.

There is obviously a huge scatter of the measured values of

shear  strength  parameters.  However,  by  reviewing  the  pub-
lished data, it can be seen that laboratory procedures differ sig-
nificantly concerning the following issues: test configuration,
specimen size, hydration procedure, normal stress range, strain
rate,  and  maximum  horizontal  displacement.  One  of  the  rea-
sons for the scatter is that the established test methods or stan-
dards for the shear strength determination of GCLs did not ex-
ist  at  that  time.  We  concluded  that  the  two  most  important
parameters  for  which  the  influence  should  be  clearly  deter-
mined are: specimen hydration procedure and shear strain rate.
Our laboratory testing program was therefore planned accord-
ingly. It consisted of five series of direct shear tests (Table 3).
Two procedures for specimen hydration (series I and V) and
four different shear strain rates (series I—IV) were investigated
in the program.

Specimens were placed into the direct shear box during the

hydration  stage.  Immediately  after  the  application  of  normal
stress on the specimen, water was added to the shear box. Dur-

Table 3: Laboratory testing program.

Normal stress

Test duration

Series

Displacement rate

[mm/min]

σ

n

 = 50 kPa

σ

n

 = 100 kPa

σ

n

 = 200 kPa

I

1.219

I-1

I-2, I-2_p

I-3, I-3_p

17 min

II

0.1219

II-1

II-2

II-3

3 hours

III

0.01219

III-1

III-2

III-3

27 hours

IV

0.001463

IV-1

IV-2

IV-3

9.5 days

V

1.219

V-1

V-2

V-3

17 min

I-IV: Consolidation stage 24 hours.
V:    Consolidation stage    9 days.

background image

130                                                             KOVAČEVIĆ ZELIĆ,  KOVAČIĆ  and  ZNIDARČIĆ

Displacement
rate [mm/min]

Normal

stress

σ

n

 [kPa]

Peak

strength

τ

p

 [kPa]

Residual

strength

τ

r

 [kPa]

Strength

ratio

τ

r

/

τ

p

50

24.4

20.4

0.84

100

46.1

37.6

0.82

1.219

200

71.5

59.5

0.83

50

19.7

14.5

0.74

100

36.3

25.7

0.71

0.1219

200

62.5

42.8

0.68

50

14.7

7.9

0.54

100

30.4

19.3

0.63

0.01219

200

57.8

36.3

0.63

50

16.5

11.7

0.71

100

28.3

16.9

0.60

0.001463

200

47.4

25.3

0.53

50

22.5

14.9

0.66

100

37.2

27.3

0.73

1.219*

200

66.7

45.1

0.68

* Series V – extended consolidation

0

10

20

30

40

50

0

5

10

15

20

Horizontal displacement [mm]

Shear stress [kPa]

σ

n

=200 kPa

σ

n

=50 kPa

σ

n

=100 kPa

Internal shear strength envelopes

Peak  and  residual  shear  strength  envelopes  are  shown  in

Figs. 4 and 5. Note that the scale for the x- and y-axes are dif-
ferent for clarity of presentation. Both figures show that differ-
ent internal shear strength envelopes will be obtained depend-
ing  on  the  way  of  performing  the  direct  shear  test.  The
strength envelopes for series I—III and V are almost parallel. It
means that they have similar friction angle but different cohe-
sion. Series IV with a lowest displacement rate shows signifi-
cantly smaller friction angle.

The obtained values of friction angle and cohesion for five

series of tests are extracted in Table 5. The range of obtained
values for friction angle and cohesion are:

peak parameters

ϕ

 = 11.5—16.4°   c = 1—15.4 kPa,

residual parameters

ϕ

 = 5.1—11.2°     c = 0—15.3 kPa.

According to the ASTM D3080 standard and our oedometer

test results, drained conditions were realized only for series IV.

Fig. 3.  Shear stress vs. horizontal displacement.

Table 4: Results of the direct shear tests.

Fig. 5. Residual shear strength envelopes.

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

0

50

100

150

200

250

Normal stress [kPa]

Peak shear stress 

[kPa]

1,219 mm/min,
R2=0,9251

0,1219 mm/min,
R2=0,9962

0,01219 mm/min,
R2=0,9988

0,001463 mm/min,
R2=0,997

1,219 mm/min;
extended
consolidation,
R2=1

Displacement 
rate:

Fig. 4.  Peak shear strength envelopes.

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

0

50

100

150

200

250

Normal stress [kPa]

Residual shear 

stress  [kPa]

1,219 mm/min,
R2=0,7839

0,1219 mm/min,
R2=0,9951

0,01219 mm/min,
R2=0,9955

0,001463 mm/min,
R2=0,997

1,219 mm/min;
extended

consolidation,

R2=0,9924

Displacement 
rate:

Although the range of obtained values is smaller than the pre-
viously mentioned range from the published data, it is obvious
that the influence of the displacement rate and the hydration
procedure should not be disregarded.

a. Influence of the displacement rate: The influence of a dis-

placement  rate  on  the  measured  peak  and  residual  shear
strength is demonstrated in Figs. 6 and 7. Note that the results
of the series V are represented on both figures by full squares,
but they were not included in the trend lines because of differ-
ent hydration procedure. It can be seen that higher values of
displacement rate cause larger values of measured strength. It
is interesting to compare the results for series IV and V (Table
5). They have almost identical total duration of test including
consolidation and shearing stage and therefore approximately
the same hydration conditions. Their displacement rates repre-
sent the minimal and maximal values of the applied range. It
can  be  seen  that  displacement  rate  influences  the  value  of  a
friction angle much more than the value of a cohesion. Look-
ing at the total values of measured shear strength (Table 4) for
series IV and V, one can see that in spite of the similar hydra-
tion, series IV shows lower strength due to a much lower dis-
placement rate. The only explanation for such results could be
found in the rheological properties of the material.

b. Influence of the hydration procedure: The influence of a

hydration procedure can be seen by comparing the results for
series I and V (Table 5). The samples from series I and V were

background image

SHEAR  STRENGTH  PARAMETERS  OF GEOCOMPOSITE  CLAY  LINERS                                        131

sheared with the same displacement rate, but their hydration
procedure  was  totally  different.  The  standard  hydration  and
consolidation procedure of 24 hours duration was used for se-
ries I. For the series V extended hydration and consolidation
lasted 9 days. The cohesion for series V is lower by a factor of
2 or more when compared to the cohesion for series I, looking
to the peak and residual values. The friction angle in both cas-
es is somewhat larger for series V than for series I. It can be
concluded that hydration procedure affects much more the co-
hesion than the friction angle of GCLs.

By reviewing all data recorded during our investigation, the

influence of hydration procedure is demonstrated through the
influence  of  the  final  water  content  of  samples  on  the  mea-
sured  shear  strength.  The  final  water  content  of  samples  de-
pends on the applied normal stress and the total test duration
(Fig. 8). Lower values of applied normal stress and longer test
duration cause larger final water content of samples. Achieved

values of the final water content affect the measured values of
shear strength. This fact is demonstrated in Fig. 9 through the
influence of the final water content on the peak shear strength.
The influence of the displacement rate, and test duration on the
results is also shown in the same figure.

The interpretation of Figures 8 and 9 took us to the follow-

ing conclusions:
– final water content is inversely proportional to the applied
normal stress, that is larger normal stress causes a lower final
water content,
– final water content is proportionally dependant on the test
duration, that is a longer test cause higher values of final water
content,
– longer test duration results in lower shear strengths and this
is caused by higher values of the final water contents,
–  higher  displacement  rates  on  the  contrary  cause  higher
shear strengths, that is rate effects exist, too.

Table 5: Shear strength parameters.

Peak parameters

Residual parameters

Series

Displacement rate

[mm/min]

Cohesion, c [kPa]

Friction angle, 

ϕ [°]

Cohesion, c [kPa]

Friction angle, 

ϕ [°]

I

1.219

15.4

14.5

15.3

10.5

II

0.1219

6.6

15.7

6.0

10.5

III

0.01219

               1

15.9

               0

10.5

IV

0.001463

7.0

11.5

7.5

5.1

V

1.219

7.8

16.4

               6

11.2

Fig. 6. Peak shear strength vs. displacement rate.

Fig. 7. Residual shear strength vs. displacement rate.

y = 2,59Ln(x) + 67

R

2

 = 0,7631

y = 2,49Ln(x) + 43

R

2

 = 0,9331

y = 1,29Ln(x) + 23

R

2

 = 0,7757

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

0,001

0,01

0,1

1

10

Displacement rate [mm/min]

Peak shear stress 

[kPa]

σ

n

=200 kPa

σ

n

=50 kPa

σ

n

=100 kPa

y = 3,7Ln(x) + 51

R

2

 = 0,7733

y = 3,15Ln(x) + 35

R

2

 = 0,9425

y = 1,48Ln(x) + 18

R

2

 = 0,6619

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

0,001

0,01

0,1

1

10

Displacement rate [mm/min]

Residual shear 

stress [kPa]

σ

n

=50 kPa

σ

n

=100 kPa

σ

n

=200 kPa

Fig. 9. Peak shear strength vs. final water content.

w

f

 = 356,5 σ

n

-0,337

R

2

 = 0,6303

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

0

50

100

150

200

250

Normal stress, 

σ

n

 [kPa]

Final water content, 

w

f

 [%]

time

Fig. 8. Final water content of samples.

τ

p

 = 43000 w

f

-1,64

R

2

 = 0,6033

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

110

120

130

Final water content, w

f

  [%]

Peak shear stress, 

τ

p

   [kPa]

σ

n

=200 kPa

test duration

di

spl

acem ent rate

I

II

III

IV

V

IV

I

I

I

V

I

II

II

III

III

V

IV

V

σ

n

=50 kPa

σ

n

=100 kPa

background image

132                                                             KOVAČEVIĆ ZELIĆ,  KOVAČIĆ  and  ZNIDARČIĆ

Proposed internal shear strength criteria

As already mentioned in the introduction to this article, sta-

bility analyses of the hydraulic barriers at waste disposal sites
are  one  of  the  most  important  issues  for  design  engineers.
Therefore, proper values of the shear strength parameters of all
barrier components including GCLs have to be chosen.

The analysis of the direct shear tests, presented in the paper,

clearly  demonstrate  that  the  measured  values  of  the  shear
strength depend on the way of performing the laboratory tests.
The main factors affecting the results are hydration procedure
and  displacement  rate.  Therefore,  we  propose  the  shear
strength envelopes as shown in Fig. 10. The envelopes are cre-
ated on the basis of the results presented in Figs. 6 and 7. Peak
and residual strengths are obtained by the extrapolation of the
functions  to  the  displacement  rate  of  0.001  mm/min  for  all
three  normal  stress  values.  These  values  are  redrawn  in  Fig.
10,  giving  the  proposed  envelopes.  The  real  values  of  mea-
sured  peak  and  residual  strengths  are  presented  by  full  and
blank marks, respectively. The envelopes defined in that way
will give the opportunity for engineers to design waste dispos-
al facilities.

Acknowledgments: The work described in this paper is fund-
ed partly by the U.S.—Croatian Joint Board on Scientific and
Technological  Cooperation  JF  150  “Impervious  barriers  for
landfills in karst” and partly by the Croatian Ministry of Sci-
ence and Technology Project “Geotechnology for solid waste
landfills”. This support is gratefully acknowledged.

References

ASTM D 3080—90: Standard Test Method for Direct Shear Test of

Soils Under Consolidated Drained Conditions.

ASTM D 4439—97a: Standard Terminology for Geosynthetics.
Daniel D.E. & Shan H.-Y. 1991: Results of direct shear tests on hy-

drated  bentonitic  blankets.  Project  Report,  Geotech.  Engrg.
Ctr., 
The University of Texas, Austin, 1—13.

Daniel  D.E.,  Shan  H.-Y.  &  Anderson  J.D.  1993:  Effects  of  partial

wetting  on  the  performance  of  the  bentonite  component  of  a
geosynthetic  clay  liner.  Proceedings,  Geosynthetics  ‘93,  Van-
couver, B.C., IFAI Publ.,
 1483—1496.

Egloffstein T. 1995: Properties and test methods to assess bentonite

used in geosynthetic clay liners. In: R.M. Koerner, E. Gartung
& H. Zanzinger (Eds.): Proceedings of an International Sympo-
sium:  Geosynthetic  Clay  Liners,  Nurnberg,  Germany  14—15,
April 1994. Balkema, Rotterdam, 51—71.

Egloffstein  T.  1997:  Geosynthetic  clay  liners.  Part  six:  Ion  ex-

change. Geotechnical Fabrics Report, June-July, 38—43.

Fox  P.J,  Rowland  M.G.  &  Scheithe  J.R.  1998:  Internal  shear

strength  of  three  geosynthetic  clay  liners.  Journal  of  Geotech-
nical and Geoenvironmental Engineering
 124, 10, 933—944.

Gilbert  R.B.,  Fernandez  F.  &  Horsfield  D.W.  1996:  Shear  strength

of reinforced geosynthetic clay liners.  Journal of the Geotech-
nical Engineering
 122, 4, 259—266.

Gilbert  R.B.,  Scranton  H.B.  &  Daniel  D.E.  1997:  Shear  strength

testing for geosynthetic clay liners. In: L.W. Well (Ed.): Testing
and acceptance criteria for geosynthetic clay liners. ASTM STP
1308, 121—135.

Gleason M.H., Daniel D.E. & Eykholt G.R. 1997: Calcium and sodi-

um  bentonite  for  hydraulic  containment  applications.  Journal
of  Geotechnical  and  Geoenvironmental  Engineering
  123,  5,
438—445.

IGS  2000:  Recommended  descriptions  of  geosynthetics  functions,

geosynthetics terminology, mathematical and graphical symbols.

Koerner  R.M.  1997:  Perspectives  on  geosynthetic  clay  liners.  In:

L.W.  Well  (Ed.):  Testing  and  acceptance  criteria  for  geosyn-
thetic clay liners. ASTM STP 1308, 3—20.

Koerner R.M. 2000: Emerging and future developments of selected

geosynthetic  applications  (The  Thirty-Second  Terzaghi  Lec-
ture).  Journal  of  Geotechnical  and  Geoenvironmental  Engi-
neering
 126, 4, 293—306.

Mackey R.E. 1997: Geosynthetic clay liners. Part five: Design, per-

mitting  and  installation  concerns.  Geotechnical  Fabrics  Re-
port
, January—February, 34—39.

Mesri  G.  &  Olson  R.E.  1970:  Shear  strength  of  montmorillonite.

Geotechnique 20, 3, 261—270.

Olson R.E. 1974: Shearing strength of kaolinite, illite, and montmo-

rillonite. ASCE Journal of the Geotechnical Engineering Divi-
sion
 100, GT11, 1215—1229.

Shan H-Y. 1993: Stability of final covers placed on slopes contain-

ing  geosynthetic  clay  liners.  Dissertation,  The  University  of
Texas at Austin, 1—296.

Fig. 10. Proposed shear strength envelope.

τ

p

=2,65+σ

n

 tg 13

o

τ

r

=2,18+σ

n

 tg 6,6

o

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

0

50

100

150

200

250

Normal stress [kPa]

Shear stress [kPa]

Conclusions

A series of direct shear tests were performed in the modified

shear box in order to determine the internal shear strength of
one type of GCLs. The results showed that by using the modi-
fied shear box, peak and residual strength could be obtained
for the nonreinforced types of GCLs. The key parameters for
performing the direct shear tests are the hydration procedure
and the applied displacement rate. The influence of these pa-
rameters on the results is demonstrated. On the basis of the ob-
tained results, peak and residual strength criteria are proposed.
As the waste disposal facilities have a huge impact on the en-
vironment, it is important for design engineers to have reliable
shear  strength  parameters.  It  is  believed  that  the  proposed
shear strength criteria enable designing of new facilities in a
safe way.