background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 51, 6, BRATISLAVA, DECEMBER 2000

371–382

LATE ALBIAN AND CENOMANIAN REDEPOSITED  FORAMINIFERA

FROM LATE CRETACEOUS-PALEOCENE DEPOSITS OF THE RAÈA

SUBUNIT (MAGURA NAPPE, POLISH WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

AND THEIR PALEOGEOGRAPHICAL SIGNIFICANCE

KRZYSZTOF B¥K

1

 and NESTOR OSZCZYPKO

2

1

Institute of Geography, Cracow Pedagogical University, Podchor¹¿ych St. 2, 30-084 Kraków, Poland; sgbak@cyf-kr.edu.pl

2

Institute of Geological Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Oleandry St. 2a, 30-063 Kraków, Poland; nestor@geos.ing.uj.edu.pl

(Manuscript received April 25, 2000; accepted in revised form October 17, 2000)

Abstract: Late Albian abundant and diversified foraminifers and calcified radiolaria representing the Planomalina

buxtorfi-Rotalipora appenninica Zone, and single Cenomanian planktonic foraminifers have been found as redepos-

ited assemblages within lower-middle Campanian and Paleocene flysch deposits of the Raèa Subunit, Magura Nappe,

Polish Western Carpathians. The Late Albian foraminifers derived from the source area located at the NW margin of

the Magura Basin, whereas the Cenomanian foraminifers derived from the SE periphery of the basin. The presence of

such microfauna is interpreted as an occurrence of a submarine plateau with pelagic deposition, under lower neritic-

upper  bathyal  depths  in  the  marginal  parts  of  the  Magura  Basin,  during  the  Late  Albian–Early  Cenomanian.  This

assumption was used for reconstruction of the Late Albian-Early Cenomanian paleogeography of the Magura Basin.

Key words: Western Carpathians, Magura Nappe, Late Albian, Cenomanian, paleogeography, Foraminifera.

Introduction

The  results  of  paleontological  studies  of  Late  Albian  and

Cenomanian  redeposited  foraminifers  from  the  Campanian

and Paleocene deposits of the Magura Nappe (Western Car-

pathians) within the Raèa Subunit are discussed in this paper.

These studies may give a better understanding of the early

sedimentation history in the Polish part of the Magura Basin

(a part of the Outer Carpathian realm), which is poorly docu-

mented.

The Magura Nappe was almost completely uprooted from

its  substratum  during  the  overthrust  movements,  mostly

along  the  ductile  Upper  Cretaceous  rocks.  For  this  reason,

the  Lower  Cretaceous  deposits  are  very  scarce.  Exposures

with Lower Cretaceous deposits in this nappe were described

from Southern Moravia (Bubík et al. 1993; Švabenická et al.

1997)  and  from  Poland  (Birkenmajer  1965,  1973;  Ciesz-

kowski & Sikora 1976; Burtan et al. 1976, 1978; Burtan &

£ydka 1978).

Most stratigraphical data concerning the oldest deposits in

the Polish part of the Magura Nappe were connected with the

Grajcarek  Unit  (Birkenmajer  1965,  1973)  —  the  southern-

most tectonic-facies zone of the Magura Nappe, incorporated

into  the  Pieniny  Klippen  Belt  during  the  Laramian  folding

(Birkenmajer  1986).  The  oldest  deposits  of  the  Grajcarek

Unit, represented by black turbidities, are ?Toarcian-Aalen-

ian in age (e.g. Birkenmajer 1977). They were followed by

deep-water,  condensed  sedimentation  of  Bajocian  through

Lower Cretaceous. The Albian and ?Cenomanian rocks were

attributed to the Wronine and Hulina formations (Birkenma-

jer  1977),  represented  mostly  by  argillaceous,  marly,  sili-

ceous,  bituminous,  black  or  dark-green  shales  with  pyrite,

siderite  and  ferruginous  dolomite  concretions  (Wronine

Fm.), and radiolarian cherts (Hulina Fm.).

The  oldest  deposits  (green  spotty  shales)  of  the  Krynica

Subunit  were  described  in  the  Obidowa  IG-1  borehole

(2453–2510 m; Cieszkowski & Sikora 1976). Their age was

determined as the Cenomanian, however, no paleontological

data was presented there. According to Birkenmajer & Osz-

czypko (1989), these deposits could be included as a part of

the Hulina Formation (Albian–Cenomanian in the Grajcarek

Unit; Birkenmajer 1977), based on lithofacies.

The oldest deposits in the Grybów Subunit and the Koninki

thrust-sheet of the Magura Nappe are known from a few small

exposures at the southern margin of the Mszana Dolna tecton-

ic window (Burtan et al. 1976, 1978; Burtan & £ydka 1978).

They include dark and green, spotty shales with manganesifer-

rous concretions (?Albian-Cenomanian) and dark shales with

siliceous sandstones and benthonites (?Albian-Cenomanian).

According to a recent investigation (Oszczypko et al. 1999),

the Koninki thrust-slice could be assigned to the Raèa Subunit.

Birkenmajer  &  Oszczypko  (1989)  compared  these  deposits

with the Hulina Formation (Albian-Cenomanian). The assem-

blage of small foraminifers, described from the green, spotty

shales at Koninki village, consists of exclusively agglutinated

taxa,  corresponding  to  the  Plectorecurvoides  alternans  Zone

sensu Geroch & Nowak (1984). In the Polish Carpathians, this

zone represents the Middle Albian–Early Cenomanian accord-

ing to Geroch & Nowak (1984) and B¹k (in print), and the

Middle–Late Albian according to Olszewska (1997).

background image

372                                                                                      B¥K

 

and OSZCZYPKO

Study area

The study area is located along the £ososina stream in the

Pó³rzeczki  village,  within  the  SE  part  of  the  Beskid

Wyspowy Range, close to Mogielica Mt. (Figs. 1, 2). This

area  belongs  to  the  Raèa  Subunit  of  the  Magura  Nappe,

building up the eastern periphery of the Mszana Dolna tec-

tonic window (Fig. 1; see also Burtan et al. 1976, 1978; Bur-

tan & £ydka 1978). This part of the Raèa Subunit is com-

posed  of  the  Upper  Cretaceous–Middle  Eocene  deposits

belonging to: Malinowa Formation, Jaworzynka and Ropianka

beds, and £abowa and Beloveža formations (Fig. 2; Oszczyp-

ko et al., submitted paper).

The Malinowa ShaleFormation (see Birkenmajer & Osz-

czypko  1989)  is  represented  by  cherry-red,  non-calcareous

shales, which occur in 30–50 cm layers, intercalated by grey-

greenish shales, a few up to 25 cm thick. In this area, the for-

mation contains a few intercalations of thick-bedded, coarse to

medium-grained  quartz-glauconite  sandstones,  laminated

quartzitic  mudstones  and  hornstones.  The  thick-bedded

quartz-glauconite sandstones revealed the paleotransport from

W and WNW. The frequency of the grey-greenish intercala-

tions increases in the upper part of the formation, displaying

features of the Ha³uszowa lithofacies described from the Zasa-

dne section (Malata & Oszczypko 1990). The thickness of the

Malinowa Formation reaches at least 50 m (Oszczypko et al.,

Fig. 1. Sketch-map of the middle part of the Polish Western Carpathians (after Oszczypko et al. 1999, supplemented). 1 — Podhale Flysch, 2

— Pieniny Klippen Belt; Magura Nappe: 3 — Krynica Subunit, 4 — Bystrica Subunit, 5 — Raèa Subunit, 6 — Siary Subunit; 7 — Grybów

Unit; 8 — Dukla, Silesian and Subsilesian units, 9 — Miocene onto the Carpathians, 10 — Miocene andesites, 11 — fault, 12 — Albian-

Cenomanian deposits in outcrops and borehole Obidowa IG-1, 13 — study area.

background image

LATE  ALBIAN–CENOMANIAN  REDEPOSITED  FORAMINIFERA  FROM  RAÈA  SUBUNIT                       373

Fig.  2.  Geological  map  of  the  Pó³rzeczki  area  in  the  Mogielica

Range (Raèa Subunit, Magura Nappe, Polish Western Carpathians;

after Oszczypko et al., submitted paper). 1 — Late Albian-Cenoma-

nian  spotty  shales,  2  —  Malinowa  Shale  Formation,  3  —  Kanina

beds, 4 — Jaworzynka beds, 5 — Szczawina Sandstones, 6 — Ropi-

anka beds, 7 — £abowa Shale Formation, 8 — Beloveža and Bystri-

ca formations (not divided), 9 — Bystrica thrust, 10 — other thrust,

11 — fault, 12 — study section.

argillaceous  shales  with  sideritic  concretions  and  layers  of

black silicified mudstones (hornstones, see sample Pó³-0/93;

Fig. 4). The thickness of the Kanina beds reaches 100 m.

The Jaworzynka beds are composed of thick-bedded sand-

stones, dirty-green in colour, medium to coarse-grained, rich

in feldspars and admixture of glauconite and biotite (Burtan et

al. 1976, 1978; Burtan & £ydka 1978; Oszczypko et al., sub-

mitted  paper).  These  sandstones  revealed  the  paleotransport

direction from W and NW. The Jaworzynka beds are upper Se-

nonian in age. Their maximum thickness is about 200 m.

The Ropianka beds are represented by thin to medium-bed-

ded,  green-greyish  sandstones,  dark,  muscovite  mudstones,

enriched with coalfield plant flakes and dark-grey, blue, usual-

ly carbonate-free shales. In the upper part of the beds, interca-

lations  of  dark-grey  medium-bedded  and  very  fine-grained,

glauconite and biotite non-calcareous sandstones occur. A few

layers  of  turbiditic  limestones  and  siderites  have  also  been

found.  Flute-cast  measurements  display  paleotransport  from

WNW (280°) in the lowermost portion of the beds, to ESE and

SES (100–160°) in their upper part. The Ropianka beds (150

m thick) are Maastrichtian to Paleocene in age (Oszczypko et

al., submitted paper) in the Pó³rzeczki section.

The £abowa Shale Formation (Oszczypko 1991) is repre-

sented by a few meters thick, repeated packets of soft, carbon-

ate-free, red and green shales, intercalated with very thin-bed-

ded turbidites in its lower part, and thick (2–3 m) packets of

red shales in its middle part. Locally, green and blue shales

with intercalations of thin-bedded sandstones have been ob-

served at the Pó³rzeczki section. The thickness of the forma-

tion attains up to 150 m. According to biostratigraphical stud-

ies (see Oszczypko 1991; Oszczypko et al., submitted paper),

the £abowa Shale Formation represents the Early Eocene.

The uppermost part of the Raèa Subunit sequence belongs to

the Beloveža Formation in the study area. The formation is

represented  mainly  by  thin-  to  medium-bedded  turbidites.

Shales, varying in colour (green, grey, blue, brown and yel-

lowish) prevail distinctly over sandstones. In the basal part of

the formation, a few intercalations of red shales have been ob-

served in the studied section. The thickness of the formation

reaches about 50 m. Its age has not been investigated at the

Pó³rzeczki section, however, by comparison with the Zasadne

section (see Oszczypko 1991), it could correspond to the Mid-

dle Eocene.

Material and methods

Samples of black and dark siliceous shales of the Kanina

beds were taken from the Pó³rzeczki section (Figs. 2, 3) for

micropaleontological  study.  Seven  samples  (Pó³-33/94–Pó³-

39/94) were collected from two limbs of an overturned anti-

cline. The samples weigthing 500–750 g were dried and disin-

tegrated in a solution of sodium carbonate. One sample (Pó³-0/

93), taken from a 10 cm thick, black, silicified mudstone layer

was dissolved in 5 % dilute hydrofluoric acid. The material

was then washed through sieves with mesh diameters of 63

µm and 1500 µm. The microfauna were picked from 63–1500

µm fraction and mounted on cardboard slides for microscopic

examination.

submitted paper). According to Malata & Oszczypko (1990)

and Oszczypko et al. (submitted paper), the Malinowa Shale

Formation represents the Turonian through Santonian stages.

The Malinowa Shale Formation passes upward into the Se-

nonian-Paleocene deposits, which have been traditionally re-

ferred to the Inoceramian beds. In the investigated area these

beds have been divided into four divisions, known as the lower

(Kanina beds), the middle (Jaworzynka and Szczawina beds)

and the upper (Ropianka beds) Inoceramian beds (Burtan et al.

1976, 1978; Burtan & £ydka 1978; Cieszkowski et al. 1989;

Oszczypko 1992).

The Kanina beds are composed of thin- to medium-bedded

sandstones with intercalations of grey-bluish and grey-yellow-

ish mudstones and shales, corresponding to the early-middle

Campanian. The uppermost part of the formation consists of

thin- to medium-bedded siliciclastic turbidites with numerous

5–30  cm  thick  intercalations  of  turbiditic  limestones  (see

Cieszkowski et al. 1989). At the Pó³rzeczki village, this part of

the beds displays thin intercalations of grey-green and black

background image

374                                                                                      B¥K

 

and OSZCZYPKO

The microfaunal slides are housed in the Institute of Geog-

raphy, Cracow Pedagogical University (collection No. 07 Mg).

Microfaunal assemblages

The black and dark silicified shales contain scarce and poor-

ly  diversified  deep-water  agglutinated  foraminifers  with

Caudammina  gigantea  (Geroch),  which  is  important  for

stratigraphy. The assemblage is dominated by tubular, mostly

pyritized forms of the superfamily Astrorhizacea (Fig. 4; Pls.

I,  II).  Specimens  of  the  genera  Paratrochamminoides,  Tro-

chamminoides, Reophax, Trochammina, Recurvoides as well

as  Saccammina  placenta  (Grzybowski),  S.  grzybowskii

(Dyl¹¿anka) and Caudammina ovulum (Grzybowski) also oc-

cur frequently.

The occurrence of Caudammina gigantea in these deposits,

the species used as an index taxon in most zonations of non-

calcareous,  Late  Cretaceous  facies  (e.g.  Geroch  &  Nowak

1984; Kuhnt et al. 1992; Bubík 1995; B¹k in print) and the

stratigraphical data of younger deposits in the studied section

suggest  the  early-middle  Campanian  age  of  the  black,  sili-

ceous facies.

However, one sample (Pó³-0/93), taken from a 10 cm thick

chert layer (silicified mudstone) includes a well-preserved and

rich assemblage of planktonic and benthic (calcareous and ag-

glutinated) foraminifers (Fig. 4; Pl. III). The species Hedber-

gella delrioensis (Carsey), accompanied by other hedbergel-

lids,  such  as  H.  planispira  (Tappan),  H.  simplex  (Morrow)

dominates there (more than 140 specimens). Other common

planktonic  forms  include  species  of  Planomalina  buxtorfi

(Gandolfi) (10 specimens), Rotalipora appenninica (Renz) (8

specimens),  Globigerinelloides  ultramicra  (Subbotina)  (6

specimens),  Praeglobotruncana  delrioensis  (Plummer)  (3

specimens)  and  Heterohelix  moremani  (Cushman)  (2  speci-

mens). Benthic foraminifers are represented by single forms

(1–5 specimens) of Gyroidinoides infracretacea (Morozova),

Lenticulina gaultina (Berthelin), Gavelinella intermedia (Ber-

thelin), Dentalina sp., Marginulina sp., Rhabdammina sp. and

Fig. 3. The sampled section of the lower-middle Campanian black turbidite deposits (Kanina beds) at the Pó³rzeczki village (Raèa Sub-

unit, Magura Nappe, Polish Western Carpathians).

Ammodiscus  cretaceus  (Reuss).  Silicified  (all  recrystallized)

small radiolaria (Pl. IV; undeterminable, pers. inf. by Marta

B¹k) are a significant element (50 specimens) of this assem-

blage.

These foraminifers represent the Planomalina buxtorfi-Ro-

talipora  appenninica  Zone  sensu  Gasiñski  (1988)  and  B¹k

(1998), corresponding to Vraconian. Unusual micropaleonto-

logical results obtained from the sample Pó³-0/93, encouraged

us to study more samples from this chert layer. Unfortunately,

they were devoid of microfauna.

In the author’s opinion the described foraminifers can be in-

terpreted  as  redeposition  of  microfauna  from  the  shallower

part of the basin, which represented another type of environ-

ment.  Hieroglyphs  measured  from  the  base  of  this  silicified

black mudstone layer show paleotransport from the west and

north-west.

The younger deposits of the studied section at the Beskid

Wyspowy Mts., belonging to the lower Paleocene Ropianka

beds, contain single redeposited Cenomanian planktonic fora-

minifers (Pl. IV). A few specimens of Rotalipora  cushmani

(Morrow), Praeglobotruncana gibba Klaus and P. delrioensis

(Plummer) have been found in the sample Pó³-2/94 (Pl. IV),

taken from the uppermost part of the Ropianka beds (early Pa-

leocene; Oszczypko et al., submitted to print).

Late Albian-Early Cenomanian

paleogeographical implications

The Late Albian-Early Cenomanian paleogeography of the

Outer Carpathian sedimentary area was reconstructed mainly

for its northern (Silesian/Subsilesian Basin) and eastern (Skole

Basin)  parts  (e.g.  Ksi¹¿kiewicz  1962;  Birkenmajer  1977;

Birkenmajer  1986).  The  tectonic  amputation  of  the  Lower/

Middle Cretaceous deposits of the Magura Nappe makes diffi-

cult such reconstruction for the Magura Basin.

Taking  into  account  all  published  data  from  the  Magura

Nappe (Burtan et al. 1976, 1978; Burtan & £ydka 1978; Ciesz-

kowski & Sikora 1976; Birkenmajer 1977; Bubík et al. 1993;

background image

LATE  ALBIAN–CENOMANIAN  REDEPOSITED  FORAMINIFERA  FROM  RAÈA  SUBUNIT                       375

Švabenická et al. 1997; Oszczypko et al., submitted paper) and

the present results, the authors propose the following recon-

struction of the paleogeography for the Magura Basin, during

the Late Albian/Early Cenomanian (Fig. 6).

Calcareous oozes (Vraconian in age) were deposited on the

submarine plateau or basin slope, to the south of the Silesian

submerged  (or  uplifted)  ridge.  Occurrence  of  this  facies  is

speculated here on the basis of the present results. The studied

Vraconian  foraminiferal  assemblage  is  very  similar  to  that

from pelagic deposits of the Pieniny Klippen Belt (Fig. 5). The

number  of  foraminifers,  species  composition  with  abundant

hedbergellids and scarce agglutinated forms are similar to as-

semblages of the same planktonic foraminiferal Zone from the

Niedzica  Succession  (see  sample  Kos-4/92;  B¹k  1998),  and

from the Czorsztyn Succession (comp. Gasiñski 1988). This

may suggest a similar type of sedimentation, interpreted here

for the Magura Basin, as pelagic deposition on submarine pla-

teau  under  lower  neritic-upper  bathyal  depths.  Presence  of

similar  facies-zone  during  the  Early  Cretaceous  in  the  Raèa

Subunit was documented in the Bile Karpaty Mts., within the

so-called  Kurovice  Klippe  (e.g.  Benešová  et  al.  1968).  Ac-

cording to Bubík (in Švábenická et al. 1997), single foramini-

fers such as Caudammina ovulum and Globigerinelloides ul-

tramicra, described from this area by Benešová et al. (1962),

may be indicators of the Albian in the Kurovice Klippe.

On the lower slope of the Silesian Ridge and adjacent part

of the basin, black-grey, calcareous, thin- to medium-bedded

turbidites were deposited (Fig. 6). These deposits are known

from the Hostynske Vrchy Mts. in the Raèa Subunit, Czech

part of the Magura Nappe (Bubík et al. 1993; Švábenická et al.

1997).  Occurrence  of  deep-water  agglutinated  foraminifers

with Recurvoides imperfectus Hanzliková, and numerous cal-

careous nannoplantkon with Eiffelithus turriseiffelii could in-

dicate Middle-Late Albian age (since CC9a Zone). The depos-

its of the latter locality represents flysch-type sedimentation

(Švábenická et al. 1997), compared to the Gault Flysch known

from the Rhenodanubicum of the Eastern Alps (Salzburg envi-

rons).

The deepest part of the Magura Basin, up to the slope of the

Czorsztyn Ridge was probably occupied by pelagic, strongly

bioturbated green shales and spotty shales (see Burtan et al.

1976, 1978; Burtan & £ydka 1978; Birkenmajer 1977; Švábe-

nická et al. 1997; Oszczypko et al., submitted paper), deposit-

ed below the calcium compensation depth (Fig. 6).

On the lower slope of the Czorsztyn Ridge, non-calcareous,

mostly  siliceous  black  and  dark  shales  with  siliceous  mud-

stones (partly radiolarites) were the dominant deposits (Hulina

Formation;  Grajcarek  Unit).  Their  sedimentation  took  place

under deep-water conditions, near the calcium compensation

depth (CCD) (rare planktonic foraminifers are present there).

To the west (Bile Karpaty Subunit), the Hulina Formation is

replaced by the upper part of the Hluk Formation (Stráník et

al. 1995), represented by carbonate flysch with black and grey-

Fig.  4.  Occurrence  of  microfauna  in  the  investigated  samples;

Pó³rzeczki village, Raèa Subunit, Magura Nappe; L.A. — Late Al-

bian.

AGE

Lower-Middle Camp.

  

L.A.

Samples  (Pó³)

39/94

38/94

37/94

36/94

0/93

35/94

34/94

33/94

Nothia  sp.
Hyperammina  sp.
Hyperammina  cf. dilatata
Kalamopsis  grzybowskii
Rhabdammina  sp.
Saccammina grzybowskii
Saccammina placenta
Saccammina  sp.
Ammodiscus cretaceus
Ammodiscus  sp.
Glomospira charoides
Glomospira gordialis
Glomospira irregularis
Glomospira serpens
Aschemocella grandis
Reophax  sp.
Subreophax  cf. splendidus
Subreophax  cf. scalaris
Pseudonodosinella parvula
Caudammina  cf. crassa
Caudammina ovulum
Caudammina gigantea
Haplophragmoides  sp. 
Recurvoides  spp.
Cribrostommoides  cf. trinitatensis
Trochammina  sp.
Paratrochamminoides variolarius
Paratrochamminoides  spp.
Gerochammina conversa
Karrerulina coniformis
Karrerulina  sp.
Dentalina  sp.
Marginulina  sp.
Lenticulina gaultina
Heterohelix  cf. moremani
Globigerinelloides ultramicra
Hedbergella delrioensis
Hedbergella planispira
Hedbergella simplex
Planomalina buxtorfi
Praeglobotruncana delrioensis
Rotalipora appenninica
Gavelinella intermedia
Gyroidinoides infracretacea
Radiolaria

1-4 specimens
5-9 specimens
10-19 specimens
20-100 specimens
> 100 specimens

background image

376                                                                                      B¥K

 

and OSZCZYPKO

Plate I: SEM photomicrographs of autochthonous Campanian deep-water agglutinated Foraminifera at the Pó³rzeczki section; Raèa Subunit,

Magura  Nappe,  Polish  Western  Carpathians:  Fig.  1.  ?Hyperammina  cf.  dilatata,  sample  Pó³-39/94.  Fig.  2.  Kalamopsis  grzybowskii

(Dyl¹¿anka), sample Pó³-39/94. Fig. 3. Subreophax cf. splendidus (Grzybowski), sample Pó³-36/94. Fig. 4. Subreophax cf. scalaris (Grzy-

bowski), sample Pó³-39/94. Fig. 5. Caudammina gigantea (Geroch), sample Pó³-39/94. Fig. 6. Pseudonodosinella parvula (Huss), sample

Pó³-39/94. Figs. 7, 8. Subreophax splendidus (Grzybowski), sample Pó³-36/94. Figs. 9, 10. Caudammina ovulum (Grzybowski), sample Pó³-

35/94. Fig. 11. Caudammina cf. crassa (Geroch), sample Pó³-39/94. Fig. 12. Aschemocella grandis (Grzybowski), sample Pó³-34/94. Fig.

13. Caudammina ovulum (Grzybowski), sample Pó³-38/94. Figs. 14, 15. Saccammina grzybowskii (Schubert), Pó³-39/94.

background image

LATE  ALBIAN–CENOMANIAN  REDEPOSITED  FORAMINIFERA  FROM  RAÈA  SUBUNIT                       377

Plate II: SEM photomicrographs of autochthonous Campanian deep-water agglutinated Foraminifera at the Pó³rzeczki section; Raèa Sub-

unit, Magura Nappe, Polish Western Carpathians: Fig. 1. Ammodiscus cretaceus (Reuss), sample Pó³-39/94. Figs. 2, 3. Glomospira charoi-

des (Parker & Jones), sample Pó³-38/94. Fig. 4. Glomospira serpens (Grzybowski), sample Pó³-33/94. Fig. 5. Glomospira irregularis (Grzy-

bowski), sample Pó³-36/94. Figs. 6, 7. Paratrochamminoides sp., sample Pó³-39/94. Fig. 8. Trochammina sp., sample Pó³-38/94. Figs. 9, 10.

Cribrostommoides cf. trinitatensis Cushman, sample Pó³-39/94. Fig. 11. Recurvoides sp., sample Pó³-36/94. Fig. 12. Paratrochamminoides

cf. variolarius (Grzybowski), sampe Pó³-39/94. Figs. 13, 14. Gerochammina conversa (Grzybowski), sample Pó³-38/94. Fig. 15. Karreruli-

na coniformis (Grzybowski), sample Pó³-38/94. Fig. 16. Haplophragmoides sp., sample Pó³-39/94.

background image

378                                                                                      B¥K

 

and OSZCZYPKO

Plate  III:  SEM  photomicrographs  of  planktonic  Vraconian  Foraminifera  at  the  Pó³rzeczki  section  (sample  Pó³-0/93);  Raèa  Subunit,

Magura Nappe, Polish Western Carpathians: Figs. 1–3. Planomalina buxtorfi (Gandolfi). Fig. 4. Heterohelix cf. moremani (Cushman).

Figs. 5, 6. Hedbergella delrioensis (Carsey). Figs. 7, 8. Hedbergella simplex (Morrow). Figs. 9–11. Rotalipora appenninica (Renz). Fig.

12. Globigerinelloides ultramicra (Subbotina). Figs. 13, 14. Praeglobotruncana delrioensis (Plummer). Fig. 15. Globigerinelloides ul-

tramicra (Subbotina).

background image

LATE  ALBIAN–CENOMANIAN  REDEPOSITED  FORAMINIFERA  FROM  RAÈA  SUBUNIT                       379

Plate IV: SEM photomicrographs of redeposited planktonic Cenomanian Foraminifera (sample Pó³-2/93; Rzehakina fissistomata Zone,

early Paleocene) and Vraconian Radiolaria (sample Pó³-0/93) at the Pó³rzeczki section; Raèa Subunit, Magura Nappe, Polish Wetern Car-

pathians: Figs. 1, 2. Rotalipora cushmani (Morrow). Figs. 3–7. Praeglobotruncana gibba Klaus. Figs. 8, 9. Praeglobotruncana delrioen-

sis (Plummer). Figs. 10–14. Spherical tests of Radiolaria.

background image

380                                                                                      B¥K

 

and OSZCZYPKO

green claystones, whitish marls and limestones. They are in-

tercalated  with  carbonate-free  clays  of  the  Glomospira-

Rhizammina  and  Rhabdammina-Rzehakina  biofacies,  which

could be evidence of an environment below the CCD (Šváben-

ická et al. 1997).

Towards  the  Czorsztyn  submerged  ridge,  these  deposits

were replaced by the calcareous oozes, partly silicified (plank-

tonic foraminiferal-radiolarian microfacies) of the Pomiedznik

Formation and the Brynczkowa Marl Member (Jaworki For-

mation) (see Birkenmajer 1977; Birkenmajer & Jednorowska

1987) (Fig. 6). The foraminiferal associations suggest the shelf

and upper slope depth of the Czorsztyn Ridge (Birkenmajer &

Gasiñski 1992).

Similar, upper Albian-lower Cenomanian facies occur in the

Ukrainian part of the Klippen Belt, described as the Tissalo

Formation (Vialov et al. 1988). These deposits are represented

by  145  m  thick,  light  and  dark-grey  marls  (partly  fucoide),

with thin intercalations of black shales and grey-green lime-

stones. The Tissalo Formation is underlain by the Neocomian

cherty  limestones  and  covered  by  the  Late  Cenomanian-Se-

nonian variegated marls of the Puchov Formation.

The Albian and Cenomanian deposits are also known in the

Ukrainian  and  Romanian  Outer  Carpathians,  in  their  parts,

which are correlated with the Magura Unit (Fig. 6). According

to Sãndulescu (1988; see also Oszczypko 1992), the Silesian

Cordillera  was  a  prolongation  of  the  Middle  and  Outer

Dacides, which were tectonized during the Middle Cretaceous.

Fig.  5.  Comparison  of  foraminiferal  assemblages  within  the  Pla-

nomalina  buxtorfii-Rotalipora  apeninnica  Zone  (Vraconian)  from

the Pó³rzeczki section (Raèa Subunit, Magura Nappe, Polish West-

ern Carpathians) and from the Pieniny Klippen Belt (B¹k 1998). 1

— tubular agglutinated foraminifers;  — Ammodiscus, Glomospi-

ra;  3  —  Saccammina,  Trochammina,  Haplophragmoides,  Recur-

voides; 4— Reophax, Dorothia, Gaudryina, Tritaxia; 5— Globu-

lina,  Dentalina,  Lenticulina,  Planularia,  Marginulina;  6 —

Epistommina, Gavelinella, Gyroidinoides; 7— Planomalina bux-

torfii; 8— Rotalipora, Praeglobotruncana, 9 — Hedbergella, Glo-

bigerinelloides,  Heterohelix.

Thus,  since  that  time,  the  Marmarosh  (Maramuresh)  Massif

could supply the material to the NE part of the Magura Basin

(Raèa sedimentary area; see ¯ytko 1999). The NW prolonga-

tion  of  the  Marmarosh  Massif  is  known  as  the  Marmarosh

Klippen (Vezhany Nappe; ¯ytko 1999).

The Marmarosh Massif was transgressively overlapped by

the Late Albian-Cenomanian postectonic Sojmul Formation in

the SE part of the Ukrainian Carpathians (Vialov et al. 1988).

This  formation,  up  to  120  m  thick,  overlaying  the  Triassic

folded deposits, includes the shallow-water, marine clastic de-

posits, coarse-grained in their lower part and fine-grained in

the upper ones. The formation includes also deep-water, basi-

nal  turbidites,  passing  upward  to  the  pelagic  Puchov  Marls

(Late Cenomanian-Maastrichtian; see Panomareva in: Vialov

et al. 1988) in the area of the Marmarosh Klippen (Dragovo

section).

It should be stressed that there is a lack of the Aptian-Lower

Cenomanian deposits in the Poiana Botizei section (East Car-

pathians, Romania), the SE termination of the Pieniny Klippen

Belt  and  the  Magura  Nappe  (Bombita  et  al.  1992).  This  is

probably an effect of a latter (or synsedimentary) erosion in

that area.

Source of the Cenomanian redeposited foraminifers

The source area for the Cenomanian redeposited foramini-

fers is reconstructed here on the basis of paleotransport mea-

surements in the upper part of the Ropianka beds. Flute casts

on  soles  of  thin-  to  medium-bedded  sandstones  suggest  the

ESE  and  SES  (100–160°)  transport  directions.  These  direc-

tions were similar to those during deposition of the Campa-

nian, thick-bedded, turbidite sandstones, belonging to the Sz-

czawina  beds  (transport  also  from  SE).  Thus,  the  clastic

material of the Ropianka and Szczawina beds derived, most

probably,  from  the  peri-Pieninian  source  area  (see  Sikora

1970).

Conclusions

The presented micropaleontological data confirm that deep-

water sedimentation in the northernmost part of the Magura

Basin, in its Polish segment, started during the Late Albian.

The paleotransport directions of the mudstone layer (from W

and NW), in which the foraminifers have been found, and for

other turbidity layers of the Kanina beds, show that the Sile-

sian Ridge (or its southern slope) was the source area for the

redeposited material. The studied Vraconian foraminiferal as-

semblage resembles microfauna from the pelagic deposits of

the Pieniny Klippen Belt. Taking into account these similari-

ties, the lower neritic-upper bathyal depths and pelagic-type of

sedimentation are interpreted for this part of the Silesian Ridge

during the Late Albian.

Redeposited Cenomanian planktonic foraminifers, found in

the early Paleocene flysch of the Ropianka beds could also be

indicators of pelagic sedimentation, but on the southern periph-

ery of the Magura Basin, connected with the peripieninian area.

The published data, concerning the Late Albian-Early Cen-

omanian sedimentation in the Magura Basin, have been used

background image

LATE  ALBIAN–CENOMANIAN  REDEPOSITED  FORAMINIFERA  FROM  RAÈA  SUBUNIT                       381

here to reconstruct the main facial zones during this time. The

type  of  deposits  and  microfossil  content  show  deep-water,

mostly pelagic and hemipelagic sedimentation below the cal-

cium compensation depth in the central part, and pelagic sedi-

mentation  under  lower  neritic-upper  bathyal  depths  in  the

northern (Silesian Ridge) and southern (Czorsztyn Ridge) pe-

ripheries of the Magura Basin.

Acknowledgements: The authors would like to thank Marta

B¹k (Jagiellonian University) for help in preparation of chert

sample to micropaleontological analysis, and for information

about radiolarian fauna. Our thanks go also to Ewa Malata

(Jagiellonian  University)  for  improving  the  English  text.

Thanks are extended to Jadwiga Faber (Jagiellonian Univer-

sity) who made the SEM photographs and to anonymous re-

viewers for helpful suggestions.

This study was prepared using financial support of Project

No. DS/IG/3/99 funded by the Cracow Pedagogical Univer-

sity (K.B.) and Project No. DS/V/ING/99 funded by Jagiel-

lonian University (N.O.).

Fig. 6. Late Albian-Early Cenomanian paleogeography of the Outer Carpathians (Magura Basin — this paper; Silesian/Subsilesian and

Skole basins after Ksi¹¿kiewicz 1962).

background image

382                                                                                      B¥K

 

and OSZCZYPKO

References

B¹k K. 1998: Planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy, Upper Cre-

taceous  red  pelagic  deposits,  Pieniny  Klippen  Belt,  Car-

pathians. Stud. Geol. Pol. 111, 7–92.

B¹k K. (in print): Biostratigraphy of deep-water agglutinated Fora-

minifera  in  Scaglia  Rossa-type  deposits,  the  Pieniny  Klippen

Belt,  Carpathians,  Poland.  In:  Hart  M.,  Kaminski  M.A.  &

Smart C. (Eds.): Proceedings of the Fiftth International Work-

shop  on  Agglutinated  Foraminifera.  Grzybowski  Foundation

Spec. Publ. 9, 1–24.

Benešová E., Hanzlíková E. & Matejka A. 1962: Contribution to the

geology  of  Kurovice  Klippe.  Zpr.  Geol.  Výzk.  v  Roce  1961,

185–186 (in Czech).

Benešová E., EliᚠM. & Matejka A. 1968: Geology of the Kurovice

klippe. Sbor. Geol. Vìd, Geol. 13, 7–36.

Birkenmajer K. 1965: Outlines of the geology of the Pieniny Klip-

pen Belt of Poland. Ann. Soc. Geol. Pol. 35, 3, 327–356.

Birkenmajer K. 1973: Cretaceous. Stratigraphy and area of occur-

rence:  Pieniny  Klippen  Belt.  In:  Geology  of  Poland,  I

(Stratigraphy), 2 (Mesozoic). 669–690 (in Polish).

Birkenmajer  K.  1977:  Jurassic  and  Cretaceous  lithostratigraphic

units  of  the  Pieniny  Klippen  Belt,  Carpathians,  Poland.  Stud.

Geol. Pol. 45, 1–159.

Birkenmajer K. 1986: Stages of structural evolution of the Pieniny

Klippen Belt, Carpathians. Stud. Geol. Pol. 88, 7–32.

Birkenmajer  K.  &  Gasiñski  M.A.  1992:  Albian  and  Cenomanian

paleobathymetry in the Pieniny Klippen Belt Basin, Polish Car-

pathians. Cretaceous Research 13, 479–485.

Birkenmajer K. & Jednorowska A. 1987: Late Cretaceous foramin-

iferal biostratigraphy, Pieniny Klippen Belt, Carpathians. Stud.

Geol. Pol. 92, 4–28.

Birkenmajer  K.  &  Oszczypko  N.  1989:  Cretaceous  and  Paleogene

lithostratigraphic units of the Magura Nappe, Krynica Subunit,

Carpathians. Ann. Soc. Geol. Pol. 59, 145–181.

Bombita G., Antonescu E., Malata E. & Jon J. 1992: Pieniny-type

formations  from  Maramures,  Romanian  (second  part).  Acta

Geol. Hung. 35, 2, 117–144.

Bubík M. 1995: Cretaceous to Paleogene agglutinated foraminifera

of the Bile Karpaty Unit (West Carpathians, Czech Republic).

In:  Kaminski  M.A.,  Geroch  S.  &  Gasiñski  M.A.  (Eds.):  Pro-

ceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on Agglutinated

Foraminifera. Grzybowski Foundation Spec. Publ. 3, 71–116.

Bubík M., Stráník Z., Švabenická L. & Vujta M. 1993: Find of the

Upper  Albian  in  the  Magura  nappe  of  the  Hostynske  vrchy

Hills. Zpr. Geol. Výzk. v Roce 1991, 20–21 (in Czech).

Burtan  J.  &  £ydka  K.  1978:  On  metamorphic  tectonites  of  the

Magura  Nappe  in  the  Polish  Flysch  Carpathians.  Bull.  Acad.

Pol. Sci., Terre 26, 2, 95–101.

Burtan J., Paul Z. & Watycha L. 1976: Detailed Geological Map of

Poland,  scale  1:50,000;  Mszana  Górna  sheet.  Pañstwowy In-

stytut Geologiczny, Warszawa (in Polish).

Burtan J., Paul Z. & Watycha L. 1978: Detailed Geological Map of

Poland, scale 1:50,000; Mszana Dolna sheet.  Pañstwowy In-

stytut Geologiczny, Warszawa (in Polish).

Cieszkowski M. & Sikora W. 1976: Geological results of Obidowa

IG-1  borehole  (Polish  Western  Carpathians).  Kwart.  Geol.  2,

441–442 (in Polish).

Cieszkowski M., Oszczypko N. & Zuchiewicz W. 1989: Upper Cre-

taceous  siliciclastic-carbonate  turbidites  at  Szczawa,  Magura

Nappe, West Carpathians, Poland. Bull. Pol. Acad., Earth Sci.

37, 231–245.

Gasiñski  M.A.  1988:  Foraminiferal  biostratigraphy  of  the  Albian

and  Cenomanian  sediments  in  the  Polish  part  of  the  Pieniny

Klippen Belt, Carpathians Mountains. Cretaceous Research 9,

217–247.

Geroch S. & Nowak W. 1984: Proposal of zonation for the Late Ti-

thonian-Late  Eocene,  based  upon  arenaceous  Foraminifera

from  the  Outer  Carpathians,  Poland.  In:  Oertli  H.J.  (Ed.):

Benthos ’83; 2nd Intern. Symp. on Benthic Foraminifera (Pau,

France),  April  11–15,  1983.  Elf  Aquitane,  ESSO  REP  and

TOTAL CFP, Pau & Bordeaux, 225–239.

Ksi¹¿kiewicz  M.  (Ed.)  1962:  Geological  Atlas  of  Poland.  Strati-

graphic-facial issues. Cretaceous and Paleogene in the Polish

Outer  Carpathians.  Instytut  Geologiczny,  Warszawa  (English

summary).

Kuhnt  W.,  Geroch  S.,  Kaminski  M.A.,  Moullade  M.  &  Neagu  T.

1992: Upper Cretaceous abussal claystones in the North Atlan-

tic and Western Tethys: current status of biostratigraphical cor-

relation using agglutinated foraminifers and paleoceanographic

events. Cretaceous Research 13, 467–478.

Malata E. & Oszczypko N. 1990: Deep-water foraminiferal assem-

blages from Late Cretaceous red shales of the Magura Nappe,

Polish West Carpathians. In: Hemleben C. et al. (Eds.): Paleo-

ecology,  Biostratigraphy,  Paleceanography  and  Taxonomy  of

Agglutinated  Foraminifera.  Kluwer  Academic  Publishers,

NATO ASI Series 327, 507–524.

Olszewska  B.  1997:  Foraminiferal  biostratigraphy  of  the  Polish

Outer  Carpathians:  a  record  of  basin  geohistory.  Ann.  Soc.

Geol. Pol. 67, 2–3, 245–256.

Oszczypko  N.  1991:  Stratigraphy  of  the  Paleogene  deposits  of  the

Bystrica  subunit  (Magura  Nappe,  Polish  Outer  Carpathians).

Bull. Pol. Acad. Sci., Earth Sci. 39, 4, 415–431.

Oszczypko  N.  1992:  Late  Cretaceous  through  Paleogene  evolution

of Magura Basin. Geol. Carpathica 43, 6, 333–338.

Oszczypko  N.,  Malata  E.  &  Oszczypko-Clowes  M.  1999:  Revised

position and age of the Eocene deposits on the northern slope

of  the  Gorce  Range  (Bystrica  Subunit,  Polish  Western  Car-

pathians). Slovak Geol. Mag. 5, 4, 235–254.

Oszczypko  N.,  Malata  E.,  B¹k  K.  &  Kêdzierski  M.  (sumbitted  to

print):  Lithostratigraphy,  biostratigraphy  and  paleoenviron-

ment  of  the  Upper  Cretaceous-Paleogene  deposits  in  the  Mo-

gielica  Range;  Bystrica  and  Raèa  subunits  of  the  Magura

Nappe, Polish Outer Carpathians. Submitted to Acta Geol. Pol.

Sãndulescu M. 1988: Cenozoik tectonics history of the Carpathians.

In: Royden L.H. & Horvath F. (Eds.): The Pannonian Basin a

study in basin evolution. AAPG Memoir 45, 7–48.

Sikora W. 1970: Geology of the Magura Nappe between Szymbark

Ruski and Nawojowa. Biul. Inst. Geol. 235, 5–121 (in Polish,

English summary).

Stráník  Z.,  Bubík  M.,  Krejèí  O.,  Marschalko  R.,  Švábenická  L.  &

Vujta M. 1995: New lithostratigraphy of the Hluk development

of the Bilé Karpaty unit. Geol. Práce, Spr. 100, 57–69.

Švábenická L., Bubík M., Krejèí O. & Stráník Z. 1997: Stratigraphy

of  Cretaceous  sediments  of  the  Magura  Group  of  nappes  in

Moravia. Geol. Carpathica 48, 3, 179–191.

Vialov O.S., Gavura S.P., Danysh V.V., Lemishko O.D., Leschuch

R.I., Panomareva V.A., Romanov A.M., Smirnov S.E., Smolin-

skaya N.I. & Carnienko P.N. 1988: Strathotypes of the Creta-

ceous  and  Paleogene  deposits  of  the  Ukrainian  Carpathians.

Naukova Dumka, 1–202 (in Russian).

¯ytko K. 1999: Correlation of the main structural units of the West-

ern Carpathians. Prace Pañstw. Inst. Geol. 168, 135–164 (En-

glish summary).