background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 51, 4, BRATISLAVA, AUGUST 2000

217–227

SHALLOW LEVEL LOW-SULPHIDATION TYPE EPITHERMAL

SYSTEMS IN THE REGÉC CALDERA, CENTRAL TOKAJ MTS.,

NE-HUNGARY

BERNADETT BAJNÓCZI

1

,  FERENC MOLNÁR

1

,  KATSUHIKO MAEDA

2

  and  EIJI IZAWA

2

1

Department of Mineralogy, Eötvös University, Múzeum krt. 4/a, 1088 Budapest, Hungary

2

Department of Earth Resources System Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University,

6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan

(Manuscript received September 28, 1999; accepted in revised form June 20, 2000)

Abstract: Detailed investigation of the Regéc caldera in the Central Tokaj Mts. revealed several types of hydrother-

mal centers of low-sulphidation type formed at different paleolevels. At the paleosurface, a hydrothermal eruption

breccia and layered siliceous deposit of opal-C and -CT material with cinnabar and anomalous enrichments of Hg and

Sb  were  formed  from  a  hot  spring.  Silicified  tuff  horizons  with  alunite-kaolinite  alteration  indicate  steam-heated

zones.  This  type  of  alteration  was  formed  in  the  near  surface  zone,  probably  above  the  paleowater  table.  Stable

isotope data for large-sized alunite crystals in brecciated tuff may also indicate a magmatic steam origin. In the deeper

zone, around 90–140 m minimal paleodepth, adularia-sericite alteration with quartz veining in andesite formed with

anomalous Sb, As and Ba concentrations. Two stages of K-feldspar formation can be recognized: 1. metasomatic K-

feldspar, replacing plagioclase phenocrysts, and 2. late adularia in quartz-pyrite-veinlets. Intensive brecciation and

adularia formation suggest a pressure drop and boiling of the mineralizing fluids. Late stage quartz crystals show

frequent homogenization temperatures between 170 and 190 °C and a maximum salinity of 3 wt. % NaCl equiv. Stable

isotope data for quartz crystals suggest that the dominant mineralizing fluid was meteoric water that underwent ex-

change reaction with the host rock and/or mixed with magmatic water.

Key words: Tokaj Mountains, epithermal systems, low-sulphidation type, fluid inclusions, stable isotopes.

Introduction

In the last decade several studies have been carried out on the

epithermal systems of the Tokaj Mts. located in the central

part of the Tertiary-Quaternary Carpathian calc-alkaline vol-

canic belt. The low-sulphidation type features of hydrother-

mal alteration have been discussed in several papers (Molnár

1988, 1992, 1993, 1994a,b,c, 1997; Molnár & Zelenka 1995;

Csongrádi & Zelenka 1995; Csongrádi et al. 1996; Horváth

&  Zelenka  1997;  Molnár  et  al.  1999).  The  earlier  studies

were  mostly  focused  on  areas  with  adularia-sericite  alter-

ation due to the correlation between this type alteration and

precious-metal enrichment. The area of the Regéc caldera lo-

cated in the central part of the Tokaj Mts. offers a unique op-

portunity for studies because not only those relatively deep

adularia-sericite zones, but different and shallower alteration

zones are still preserved. Although there are no proofs for the

contemporaneous formation of various alteration zones in the

Regéc caldera, the results of their comparative mineralogi-

cal, geochemical, fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies

highlight features of shallow levels of low-sulfidation type

epithermal systems and these data may be useful for explora-

tion of other less eroded areas in the Tokaj Mts. and else-

where in the Carpathians.

General geology

The Regéc caldera is located in the central-western part of

the Tokaj Mountains around the villages of Regéc and Mogyo-

róska (Fig. 1). The present shape of the caldera with about 7

km diameter resulted from both volcanic and erosional pro-

cesses. Erosion has reached the deep levels of the pre-caldera

stratovolcano at the bottom of the depression (340 m to 400

m) and the hills forming the margins of the caldera (500 to

700 m) are mostly composed of Late Miocene (Sarmatian-

Pannonian) andesitic lava and tuffaceous rocks. In the center

of the volcanic structure a rhyodacite dome is well preserved.

The total thickness of the volcanic rocks of the caldera is not

known exactly (Ilkey-Perlaki 1968), though geophysical data

indicate at least 2000 m depth to the basement (Zentai 1991).

The lower part of the Baskó-3 drilling (1172 m) south of the

caldera  (Fig.  1)  consists  of  submarine  dacitic  and  andesitic

lava and tuff of Badenian age. The Sarmatian-Pannonian stra-

tovolcanic  sequence  with  about  900  m  thickness  is  mainly

composed of pyroxene andesite and andesitic tuff with a lesser

amount  of  amphibole-pyroxene  andesite.  The  Sarmatian

andesitic  rocks  are  divided  into  three  units  (Ilkey-Perlaki

1968; Gyarmati 1977). The Lower Andesite Unit exposed at

the bottom of the caldera is of subvolcanic origin. The Middle

Andesite Unit of the caldera rim corresponds to the thick lava

and intercalated tuff products of the volcanism found in the

Baskó-3 drilling (Gyarmati 1977). The K/Ar ages of the Mid-

dle  Andesite  Unit  are  12.4–12.1 Ma  (Pécskay  et  al.  1987).

Caldera  formation  was  associated  with  emplacement  of  the

rhyodacite dome (11.6 ± 0.3 Ma; Pécskay et al. 1987) in the

central-eastern  part  of  the  structure.  The  occurrences  of  the

Upper  Andesite  Unit  probably  represent  late  stage  parasitic

cones and fissure volcanoes with local lava flows (Fig. 1). The

age of the Upper Andesite Unit north of the caldera is 10.7

background image

218                                                                     BAJNÓCZI, MOLNÁR, MAEDA and IZAWA

Fig. 1. Geological scheme of the Regéc caldera with locations and numbers of studied outcrops and the section of Baskó-3 drilling (mod-

ified after Ilkey-Perlaki 1967; Gyarmati 1977).

± 0.6 Ma and in the uppermost part of the Baskó-3 drilling

south of the caldera 10.4 ± 0.5 Ma (Pécskay et al. 1987).

West and north of the caldera different types of rock accu-

mulated at the time of the andesitic volcanic activity. Mixed

tuff,  redeposited  rhyolitic  tuff,  lacustrine  silica  and  clastic

sediments were deposited in a basin and pyroxene-amphibole

dacite intruded the formations.

Pervasive propylitic (chlorite-smectite) alteration is typical

of the Lower Andesite Unit at the bottom of the caldera (Il-

key-Perlaki 1968). Most intense quartz veining together with

background image

SHALLOW  LEVEL  LOW-SULPHIDATION  TYPE  EPITHERMAL  SYSTEMS                                 219

adularia-sericite alteration is situated in the eastern side of

the structure (Fig. 1). Hydrothermal eruption breccia, layered

siliceous  deposit,  as  well  as  intensely  silicified  tuff  levels

can also be found in the various parts of the caldera. Accord-

ing to the K/Ar dating of alunite and adularia-bearing rocks

the most probable period of hydrothermal activity is between

11.8 ± 0.5 and 12.3 ± 0.5 Ma (Molnár et al. 1999), thus pre-

dating  the  emplacement  of  the  rhyodacite  dome.  In  agree-

ment with this, the rhyodacite dome and the Upper Andesite

Unit are unaltered.

Methods of study

The mineralogy of the altered rocks and hydrothermal prod-

ucts was examined by conventional microscopic, X-ray pow-

der  diffraction  (Dept.  of  Mineralogy,  Eötvös  University,

Budapest)  and  IR  spectroscopic  methods  (Dept.  of  Organic

Chemistry,  Eötvös  University,  Budapest).  Opal  phases  were

determined by measuring the d-value of the maximal intensity

reflection  and  the  superstructure  reflections  of  low-cristo-

balite, and by measuring the intensity ratio of the two strongest

peaks (Flörke et al. 1991; Elzea et al. 1994; Graetsch 1994;

Graetsch et al. 1994; Guthrie et al. 1995; Elzea & Rice 1996).

In most samples, quartz reflections were used as references.

The trace element geochemistry of 32 samples was deter-

mined by neutron activation analysis (NAA) at the Training

Reactor, Institute of Nuclear Technology, Technical University

of  Budapest.  A  “comparator”  method  using  an  Au-standard

was employed (Balla et al. 1998). Measurements were carried

out in three steps at 5 minutes, 1 week and 1 month cooling

time using about 0.05 g of homogenized samples. NBS 1633a

Coal Fly Ash was used as a routine standard. Detection limits

are as follows: As — 1 ppm, Sb — 0.1 ppm, Hg — 1 ppm, Au

— 0.005 ppm, Mn — 0.5 ppm, Zn — 10 ppm, Ba — 60 ppm,

Mo — 2 ppm, Se — 0.5 ppm, K — 0.01 %.

During  the  fluid  inclusion  studies  (Dept.  of  Mineralogy,

Eötvös  University,  Budapest)  the  homogenization  tempera-

tures (T

hom

), eutectic temperatures (T

e

) and final ice melting

temperatures  (T

mice

)  were  determined  on  a  Chaixmeca-type

microthermometry apparatus (Poty et al. 1976) using double-

polished,  0.1–1  mm  thick  sections  of  hydrothermal  quartz

crystals. Accuracy of the measurements was ±0.1 °C during

freezing and ±2 °C during heating.

Oxygen, hydrogen and sulphur isotope analyses were car-

ried  out  at  the  Institute  for  Study  of  the  Earth’s  Interior,

Okayama University, Japan. Oxygen from silicate and oxide

samples was extracted by a conventional BrF

5

 technique and

converted to CO

2

 gas by graphite (Clayton & Mayeda 1963;

Matsuhisa et al. 1971). Oxygen isotopic compositions mea-

sured on the extracted CO

2

 gases are reported in the 

δ

 nota-

tion relative to SMOW. H

2

O from whole rocks samples was

released according to the method of Godfrey (1962) and re-

duced to H

2

 gas by uranium. The H

2

O content of fluid inclu-

sions in quartz samples was extracted using the ball-milling

method  of  Kazahaya  &  Matsuo  (1985).  Hydrogen  isotopic

compositions are also expressed in the 

δ

 notation relative to

SMOW. The uncertainty of measurements is ±0.2 ‰ for oxy-

gen and ±2 ‰ for hydrogen. The pulverized whole rock sam-

ples for S isotope measurements were made according to the

description of Ueda & Sakai (1983). The sulphur isotopic ra-

tio is presented in the 

δ

 notation relative to CDT standard,

and the analytical reproducibility is generally ±0.3 ‰. Isoto-

pic analyses of the prepared alunite sample were carried out

according to the techniques described by Wasserman et al.

(1992).  A  Fusion  Prism  mass  spectrometer  was  used  for

measurements.

Results

Petrography and mineralogy of hydrothermal zones

Hydrothermal breccia and layered siliceous deposit (Out-

crop 1, Gombás; Fig. 1, Table 1) with significant petrological-

mineralogical  zonation  occur  on  the  western  margin  of  the

caldera.  In  the  center  of  the  outcrop,  a  red-coloured,  poorly

sorted and grain-supported breccia with hematite-opal matrix

covers  an  area  of  approximately  40  m

2

.  The  well  rounded,

5 mm to 5 cm sized fragments are composed of opal material

and altered (opalized) andesite. The white breccia enclosing

the red breccia is restricted to an area of 80 m

2

 and is a poorly

Table 1: Classification of hydrothermal centers of the Regéc caldera.

Outcrop

Rock type

Hydrothermal minerals

Characteristic

elements

1 (Gombás)

Hydrothermal breccia, layered siliceous deposit,

tuff with argillite and alunite alteration,

smectitic-hematitic andesite

opal-C, opal-CT, chalcedony, cinnabar, hematite

opal-CT, kaolinite, smectite, alunite, hematite

Hg

Sb

(As)

2 and 3

4 (Kun Hill) and 5

Silicified tuff with alunite-kaolinite alteration

quartz, alunite, kaolinite

opal-C, opal-CT, alunite, kaolinite, smectite

Ba

6 (Serfõzõ Ridge)

7 (Csonkás)

Andesite with adularia-sericite alteration and

quartz vein

metasomatic K-feldspar, sericite, quartz,

adularia, pyrite, hematite

metasomatic K-feldspar, sericite, quartz,

chalcedony, pyrite, berthierite, smectite

Sb

Ba

As

8 (road cut near Regéc)

and

9 (Soltész Valley)

Propylitic andesite

chlorite, quartz, smectite, pyrite

-

background image

220                                                                     BAJNÓCZI, MOLNÁR, MAEDA and IZAWA

sorted  and  matrix-supported  rock  with  1  mm  to  1  m  sized,

weakly rounded, and altered andesite fragments. The porous

rock comprises an opal matrix with a concentrically laminated

texture  enclosing  irregular  or  round,  formerly  open  spaces

mostly filled with patches of unlaminated opal. The cavities in

the opal matrix have alternating chalcedony and opal fillings

or crusts. The andesite fragments in the opal matrix have fi-

brous chalcedony or opal filling in the places of phenocrysts,

and their matrix is also replaced by opal. Toward the margins

of the outcrop, the size and number of fragments decreases

and  the  breccia  gradually  develops  into  a  macroscopically

layered appearance. The layered siliceous deposit has cinna-

bar  encrustments  and  disseminations.  According  to  micro-

scopic, XRD and IR spectroscopic examinations, white and

red breccias and layered siliceous deposit are composed of

opal-C, opal-CT and chalcedony.

The layered siliceous rock is surrounded semicircularly by

a poorly sorted and grain-supported, redeposited tuff with 0.1

to 3 mm sized, weakly rounded pumice-, andesite-, quartz-

and glass fragments sometimes mixed with the eroded frag-

ments of the layered siliceous deposit. The matrix of the tuff

has  siliceous  and  kaolinite-smectite  alteration  with  occur-

rences of fine alunite.

In the surroundings of the hydrothermal center the Middle

Andesite is slightly altered and the degree of alteration de-

creases  away  from  the  hydrothermal  center.  The  alteration

products are smectite after plagioclase and hematite-limonite

after mafic minerals.

Tuff  with  alunite-kaolinite  alteration  occurs  in  the  central

and southern part of the caldera (Outcrops 2 to 5; Fig. 1, Table

1). The original rock of this group was acid and mixed (acid-

neutral) tuff. These outcrops are almost the only exposed rep-

resentatives of the tuff in the caldera. The preservation of the

tuff is probably due to the intensive silicification.

In Outcrop 2, the layered, silicified lapilli tuff contains an-

gular quartz, glass and pumice fragments 0.2 to 4 cm in size.

Some rounded tuffpellets or accretionary lapilli 0.2 to 2 cm

in size also appear with kaolinite core and silica rim. Beside

siliceous and kaolinite alteration, small amount of alunite (1–

2  %)  was  detected  by  XRD  from  the  kaolinite  core  of  the

lapilli.  In  Outcrop  4  (Kun  Hill)  and  5,  the  original  rock  is

layered lapilli tuff and agglomerate with 1 mm to 6 cm sized,

angular andesite, pumice and quartz fragments. Alunite, ka-

olinite, illite, smectite and hematite alteration occurred dur-

ing  hydrothermal  processes.  Andesitic  rock  fragments  be-

came  totally  opalized  and  the  matrix  of  the  tuff  was  also

transformed into opal. The hydrothermal alteration was ac-

companied  by  brecciation  and  synsedimentary  faulting.

Along the southern margin of caldera, in Outcrop 3, the tuff

comprises angular silicified rock and quartz fragments 0.5 to

1 mm in size in the silicified matrix. Alunite appears in sev-

eral forms and generations, scattered in the matrix of the tuff

(5 to 30 

µ

m) and as 1 to 6 mm sized, euhedral, comb-like or

bladed crystals in veinlets cutting the host rock. The kaolin-

ite content of the altered tuff is neglectable (1–2 %).

Adularia-sericite alteration with quartz vein in the Lower

Andesite Unit is controlled by north striking faults in the east-

ern and central parts of the caldera (Outcrops 6 and 7; Fig. 1,

Table 1). The altered rock contains no mafic minerals, only hy-

drothermal K-feldspars and microcrystalline quartz. This type

of hydrothermal alteration is characterized by multiple hydro-

thermal processes and several episodes of brecciation. In Out-

crop  6  (Serfõzõ  Ridge),  hydrothermal  processes  resulted  in

two generations of potassium-feldspar in andesite with differ-

ent morphologies and compositions. First the plagioclase phe-

nocrysts of andesite were replaced by metasomatic potassium-

feldspar  pseudomorphs,  which  has  been  then  altered  to

sericite. Under SEM this type of feldspar shows enrichment of

barium in patchy arrangement. Later andesite underwent frac-

turing  and  silicification.  Banded  quartz  veins  and  1–2  mm

wide quartz veinlets with pyrite, hematite and 20–40 

µ

m sized

fresh adularia crystals of pseudorhombohedral shape and pure

K-feldspar composition were formed. In Outcrop 7 (Csonkás)

the early K-feldspar replaced plagioclase phenocrysts of the

andesitic rock and later transformed to sericite. Minor smectite

and illite alteration in the groundmass is also present. The ear-

ly alteration was followed by intensive silicification and brec-

ciation  of  the  host  rock.  Quartz  veins  and  stockworks  and

quartz-chalcedony  veinlets  with  pyrite  and  berthierite  were

also formed.

Propylitic  alteration  is  regionally  characteristic  for  the

Lower Andesitic Unit (Outcrops 8 and 9; Fig. 1, Table 1). It

includes siliceous alteration of matrix, chlorite alteration of

pyroxene phenocrysts and smectite alteration of plagioclase

phenocrysts with some quartz veinlets. Pyrite disseminations

in siliceous veinlets and in the groundmass of rock are also

typical of these zones.

Geochemical data

Different types of hydrothermal products were measured to

determine their trace element compositions. For evaluation

of data we used the anomaly thresholds of trace and main el-

ements earlier determined by Hartikainen et al. (1992) during

the regional geochemical study of the Tokaj Mts. (As — 136

ppm, Sb — 16 ppm, Au — 12 ppb, Ag — 1 ppm, K — 5.8

%). They used not only fresh, but also altered rocks to deter-

mine the threshold value. Therefore these values are higher

than  the  average  trace  element  content  of  fresh  volcanic

rocks. In the case of Hg we considered the Clark Value (0.08

ppm), which is below the detection limit of the NAA analy-

sis. Regarding Ba, the average concentration of andesite in

the Tokaj Mts. is 400–500 ppm (Gyarmati 1977). The results

of analyses are summarized in Table 2.

The  red and white breccia, layered siliceous deposit and

altered tuff in Outcrop 1 (Gombás) generally have anoma-

lous Sb and Hg contents. However, these rocks show relative

enrichment in certain element(s) compared to each other and

to the smectitic-hematitic andesite from the outer zone of the

outcrop.  The  red  breccia  is  relatively  enriched  in  Sb,  the

white breccia and layered siliceous deposit in Hg and Sb and

altered tuff in As. The latter one does not show As-concen-

trations above the threshold values. Considering white brec-

cia  samples,  the  Hg-content  increases  towards  the  edge  of

the outcrop where it appears as cinnabar in the layered de-

posit. In some samples the Au-content of the redeposited tuff

and smectitic-hematitic andesite exceeds the anomaly thresh-

old of 12 ppb.

background image

SHALLOW  LEVEL  LOW-SULPHIDATION  TYPE  EPITHERMAL  SYSTEMS                                 221

Tuff with alunite-kaolinite alteration (Outcrops 2 to 5) has

no Hg anomalies comparing to the Clark Value, whereas As

content is around or 1.5 times higher than the Clark Value.

Sb content increases with the increasing As concentration up

to 4 ppm, but neither As, nor Sb reaches the threshold values

determined by Hartikainen et al. (1992). This group contains

216–996 ppm Ba.

Andesite with adularia-sericite alteration (Outcrops 6 and

7)  is  characterized  by  K-enrichment  of  6.2–7.8  %  in  the

whole rock. Regarding trace elements Ba, As and partly Sb

anomalies  occur  in  the  altered  rock.  Slight  Ba-anomaly  of

672–691 ppm can be connected mineralogically to the meta-

somatic K-feldspars, because these are the only Ba-bearing

minerals in the rock. Quartz veins cutting the host rock have

elevated Sb concentrations (174–432 ppm).

In comparison to the relatively fresh andesite (Outcrop 1)

the propylitic andesite does not show any kind of anomalous

element  content.  The  pyrite-quartz  veinlets  of  Outcrop  8

have  higher  As-  and  Sb-concentrations  than  the  host  rock,

but they do not exceed the threshold values.

Fluid inclusions

Fluid inclusions were studied in hydrothermal quartz crys-

tals from quartz veinlets hosted by the andesitic rocks showing

adularia-sericite alteration (Outcrops 6 and 7). In the case of

Outcrop 6 (Serfõzõ), measurements were made on inclusions

from  late-stage  euhedral  quartz  crystals  formed  after  the

quartz-adularia-pyrite-hematite-bearing veinlets. For Outcrop

7 (Csonkás) the observations were made on inclusions from

comb quartz from veinlets cutting andesite with pronounced

adularia-sericite  alteration  and  from  quartz  cement  from  a

breccia containing altered andesite fragments.

Microthermometric analyses were carried out on primary

and secondary fluid inclusions containing liquid and approx.

10–15 vol. % vapour phase at room temperature. In addition

to this type of inclusion, apparently liquid-absent vapour and

vapour rich (at least 60–80 vol. % vapour phase) liquid + va-

pour inclusions were also detected. This fluid inclusion as-

semblage indicates boiling of parent fluids (Roedder 1984)

and the variable vapour to liquid ratios can be attributed to

Table 2: Trace element range (in ppm) and K-content (in %) of the hydrothermal altered rocks, hydrothermal products and rhyodacite

from the Regéc caldera. Number in parenthesis shows the numbers of measured samples of each rock type.

Locality

Outcrop 6

(Serfõzõ)

Outcrop 7

(Csonkás)

Outcrop 8

(road cut near Regéc)

Outcrop 9

(Soltész Valley)

Castle Hill

Rock

type

andesite with

adularia-sericite

alteration and

alunite-quartz-

pyrite stockworks

[2]

quartz vein

[1]

andesite with

adularia-sericite

alteration and

quartz-chalcedony-

pyrite stockworks

[2]

quartz vein

[1]

propylitic

andesite

[1]

pyrite-quartz

veinlet

[1]

propylitic

andesite

[1]

rhyodacite

[1]

As

157 – 309

    6

176 – 192

    9

    3

  33

    3

    5

Sb

10 – 15

174

56 – 65

432

       0.6

    8

       0.4

       0.6

Hg

-

-

<1 – 4

-

-

       1.3

-

-

Au

<0.005 – 0.010

-

<0.005 – 0.100

-

-

-

-

-

Mn

320 – 469

201

67 – 69

  78

702

234

798

122

Zn

64 – 82

-

-

-

  89

-

106

  33

Ba

672 – 691

-

<60 – 312

-

365

-

604

496

Mo

<2 – 3

-

-

-

-

-

-

    5

Se

-

  20

<0.5 – 8.6

  12

-

    3

-

    4

K (%)

6.9 – 7.8

-

6.2

       2.1

-

-

       1.1

       3.4

Locality

Outcrop 1

(Gombás)

Outcrop 2

Outcrop 3

(south margin

 of the caldera)

Outcrop 4

(Kun Hill)

Rock type

red breccia

[2]

white breccia

and layered

siliceous deposit

[7]

tuff with argillite

and alunite

alteration

[3]

smectitic-hematitic

andesite

[2]

lapilli tuff with

siliceous,

kaolinite (and

alunite) alteration

[2]

tuff with siliceous,

alunite

(and kaolinite)

alteration

[2]

lapilli tuff and agglome-

rate with opaline,

alunite, hematite, illite

and smectite alteration

[4]

As

16 – 22

3 – 52

10 – 83

4

<1 – 3

<1 – 2

<1 – 25

Sb

165 – 591

29 – 219

10 – 138

11 – 16

<0.1 – 0.5

<0.1 – 0.4

0.3 – 3.7

Hg

7 – 23

8 – 2129

8 – 46

<1 – 4

<1 – 3

-

<1 – 2

Au

-

<0.005 – 0.010 <0.005 – 0.020

<0.005 – 0.017

-

-

-

Mn

33 – 54

9 – 89

38 – 148

471 – 522

<0.5 –3.3

10 – 14

7 – 50

Zn

-

-

-

117 – 142

-

-

-

Ba

-

-

<60 – 295

283 – 372

300 – 637

352 – 835

<60 – 997

Mo

-

-

-

-

<2 – 4

-

<2 – 6

Se

-

7 – 13

-

-

3 – 4

-

<0.5 – 3.8

K (%)

-

-

<0.01 – 0.6

1.3 – 1.8

-

1.2 – 4.6

-

background image

222                                                                     BAJNÓCZI, MOLNÁR, MAEDA and IZAWA

inhomogeneous trapping (Bodnar et al. 1985). In addition to

fluid inclusions rare occurrences of rhombohedral calcite in-

clusions were also detected.

Microthermometric  data  for  fluid  inclusions  are  summa-

rized in Table 3. Total homogenization temperatures (T

hom

)

of  liquid-rich  inclusions  for  the  late  stage  euhedral  quartz

crystals from veinlets in Outcrop 6 (Serfõzõ) are 140–220 °C

with most values in the range 170–185 °C (Fig. 2a). In the

case of Outcrop 7 (Csonkás) the distribution of homogeniza-

Fig. 2. Distributions of microthermometric data for fluid inclusions

of late-stage quartz crystals from andesite with adularia-sericite al-

teration. a — Distribution diagram of homogenization temperatures

(T

hom

) measured in fluid inclusions of euhedral quartz from Serfõzõ

(Outcrop 6). b — Distribution diagram of homogenization tempera-

tures  (T

hom

)  measured  in  fluid  inclusions  of  quartz  crystals  from

Csonkás (Outcrop 7), n — number of measurements.

Sample

Fluid inclusion

type

T

hom

(°C)

T

e

(°C)

T

mice

(°C)

Salinity

(NaCl equiv. wt%)

Density

(g/cm

3

)

Euhedral quartz

Outcrop 6 (Serfõzõ)

P, S

144 – 219

(170 – 185)

[42]

–26 – –19.8

(?)

[5]

–0.1 – –1.8

(–0.6 – –1.0)

[11]

0.17 – 3.05

(1.40 – 1.74)

[11]

0.874 – 0.919

(0.88 – 0.92

[11]

Comb quartz

Outcrop 7 (Csonkás)

P, S

137 – 258

(180 – 210)

[41]

–19.8 – –30.1

(–19.8)

[5]

–0.5 – –1.7

(–0.9 – –1.0)

[13]

0.88 – 2.90

(1.57 – 1.74)

[13]

0.872 – 0.915

(0.88)

[13]

Quartz from breccia

Outcrop 7 (Csonkás)

P, S

152 – 183

(?)

[14]

–22.9

(–22.9)

[1]

–1.3 – –1.5

(–1.4)

[3]

2.24 – 2.57

(2.41)

[3]

0.896 – 0.916

(0.90)

[3]

All sample from Outcrop 7

P, S

(175 – 190)

19.8

(–0.9 – –1.0)

(1.57 – 1.74)

(0.88 – 0.90)

Table 3: Summary of fluid inclusion microthermometric data and calculated fluid properties of quartz crystals of Outcrop 6 (Serfõzõ) and

Outcrop 7 (Csonkás). Data from Molnár (1992) are also included. P: primary inclusion; S: secondary inclusion; T

hom

: homogenization tem-

perature of vapour phase (°C); T

e

: eutectic temperature of ice phase (°C); T

mice

: final melting temperature of ice phase (°C); salinity of fluid:

calculated from the melting temperature of ice (T

mice

); density of fluid: calculation based on measured homogenization temperature (T

hom

) of

fluid inclusion. Numbers in parenthesis () show the most frequent ranges of data. Numbers in paranthesis [] show the numbers of measure-

ments.

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

130

150

170

190

210

230

250

270

T

hom

(L-V)L (

o

C)

Frequency

Serfõzõ, euhedral quartz

n = 55

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

130

150

170

190

210

230

250

270

T

hom

(L-V)L (

o

C)

Frequency

Csonkás, quartz from breccia
Csonkás, comb quartz

n = 42

a

b

tion temperatures for the comb quartz is very wide and rang-

es from 130 °C to 260 °C (Fig. 2b) with the most frequent

values between 180 and 210 °C. The distribution of homoge-

nization  temperatures  is  quite  narrow  and  ranges  from

150 °C to 190 °C (mode 170–190 °C for primary inclusions

and 150–170 °C for secondary inclusions) in the quartz ce-

ment from a breccia. The most frequent range for homogeni-

zation  temperatures  of  all  quartz  samples  from  Csonkás  is

between 175 and 190 °C.

Eutectic temperatures (T

e

) around –20 °C indicate that the

composition of fluid inclusions can be modelled by the NaCl–

H

2

O  binary  system  (Crawford  1985).  The  final  ice  melting

temperatures (T

mice

) are between –0.1 and –1.8 °C, clustering

around –1.0 °C. From the final ice melting data, the calculated

apparent  salinities  of  inclusions  (Bodnar  1993)  are  between

0.2 and 3.1 NaCl equiv. wt. % clustering at 1.4–1.7 wt. %. The

corresponding fluid densities exhibit a very narrow range be-

tween 0.87 and 0.92 g/cm

3

 (calculated after Haas 1976).

Light stable isotope studies

Stable isotope analyses for H, O and S were carried out on

fresh  and  strongly  altered  volcanic  rocks,  and  hydrothermal

minerals (Table 4). A total of 12 and 11 samples were analysed

for 

δ

18

O and for 

δ

D, respectively, and 5 samples for 

δ

34

S.

With the exception of rhyodacite and propylitic andesite, the

δ

18

O values of the whole rock samples cluster around +10 ‰.

By comparison, the 

δ

D values show a wide range. Altered tuff

from Outcrop 1 has the highest 

δ

D value (–55 ‰), whereas val-

ues of altered andesite are between –64 ‰ and –75 ‰. Fresh

rhyodacite has rather low 

δ

D value (–83 ‰). Two andesite sam-

ples with adularia-sericite alteration show a strong depletion in

deuterium (

δ

D = –96 ‰ and –102 ‰, Fig. 3) compared to other

whole rock samples.

The 

δ

34

S values for propylitic andesites and rhyodacite are

3–4 ‰. The andesite sample with adularia-sericite alteration

from outcrop 7 (Csonkás) has a higher value; probably due to

the presence of secondary jarosite. Alunite shows the highest

enrichment  in 

34

S  among  samples  from  the  caldera

(

δ

34

S = 8.9 ‰).

background image

SHALLOW  LEVEL  LOW-SULPHIDATION  TYPE  EPITHERMAL  SYSTEMS                                 223

Regarding the euhedral alunite from Outcrop 3 the differ-

ence  between  the  directly  measured 

δ

18

O

SO

4

  value  and  the

calculated 

δ

18

O

OH

 value does not exceed 4 ‰. The 

δ

D value

(–34 ‰) of alunite strongly differs from that of the rocks and

is between the values for isotopically heavy volcanic vapour

and  for  late-stage  magmatic  water  (Hedenquist  &  Lowen-

stern 1994).

δ

18

O  values  for  hydrothermal  quartz  crystals  range  from

10.2 ‰ to 13.6 ‰, while 

δ

D data for their fluid inclusions

have a relatively large spread between –79 ‰ and –107 ‰.

Discussion

The textural-structural characteristics of the red and white

breccias in the central part of Outcrop 1 (Gombás) are con-

sistent with those of hydrothermal eruption breccias of recent

geothermal fields (e.g. New Zealand, Hedenquist & Henley

1985a). The formation of the eruption breccia can be attribut-

ed to overpressure in the fluid flow zone, which in the case

of Gombás was probably the result of silica sealing. The dep-

osition of a hydrothermal eruption breccia takes place on the

surface, thus the hydrothermal enviroment of rocks of Out-

crop 1 represent a paleosurface in the caldera.

Rocks consisting of opaline silica (e.g. silica sinters, sili-

ceous hot-spring precipitates) are typical of the surface zones

of recent geothermal areas (Fournier 1985). With time, the

amorphous material transforms to opal-C and opal-CT, then

finally to chalcedony. The transformation is time dependent

but is strongly influenced by burial diagenesis in higher tem-

perature and pressure environments (Fournier 1985). The sil-

ica material of Outcop 1 is opal-C and opal-CT, thus mineral-

ogically  it  is  analogous  to  the  recrystallized  hot-spring

precipitates,  but  there  is  no  evidence  for  deep  burial.  The

most  intense  XRD  reflection  of  the  microcrystalline  opal

phases of Gombás shifts to higher values towards the margin

of the outcrop (from 0.405 nm to 0.412 nm). This tendency

refers  to  the  more  disordered  structure  of  opal  phases  and

may be attributed to temperature decrease. Towards the mar-

gin of the outcrop, precipitation of opal was probably quicker

because of the lower temperature, and hence a less ordered

structure developed.

The siliceous deposit adjacent to the red and white brec-

cias comprises layers of silica. However, it shows no pres-

ence  of  columnar  structure  perpendicular  to  and  between

laminations, which is unequivocal evidence for a sinter ori-

gin (White et al. 1989), thus it is not reasonable to name it as

silica sinter. The layered appearance suggests underwater ac-

Table 4: 

δ

18

O, 

δ

D and 

δ

34

S isotopic compositions (in ‰) of fresh and altered rocks and hydrothermal minerals of the Regéc caldera, pre-

cipitation temperatures and calculated isotopic compositions (in ‰) of the parent hydrothermal fluids.

Sample

@

18

O

@D

@

34

S

T(°C)

calculated

@

18

O

fluid

calculated

@D

fluid

                   Whole rock samples

Tuff with argillite and alunite alteration

Outcrop 1 (Gombás)

10.3

–55

-

-

-

-

Smectitic-hematitic andesite

Outcrop 1 (Csonkás)

10.3

–75

-

-

-

-

Tuff with siliceous, alunite

(and kaolinite) alteration

Outcrop 3 (south margin of the caldera)

10.6

-

-

-

-

-

Andesite with adularia-sericite alteration

Outcrop 6 (Serfõzõ)

10.1

–102

-

-

-

-

Andesite with adularia-sericite alteration

Outcrop 7 (Csonkás)

10.5

–96

5.6

-

-

-

Propylitic andesite

 Outcrop 8 (road cut, Regéc)

9.1

–71

3.0

-

-

-

Propylitic andesite

Outcrop 9 (Soltész Valley)

7.3

–64

3.8

-

-

-

Rhyodacite (Castle Hill)

12.4

–83

3.4

-

-

-

                    Hydrothermal minerals

Alunite

Outcrop 3 (south margin of the caldera)

5.2 (@

18

O

BrF5

)

11.6 (@

18

O

SO4

)

7.9 (@

18

O

OH

)

–34

8.9

274

100

4.2

–7.7 (@

18

O

SO4

)

–4.6 (@

18

O

OH

)

–27

–32

Vein-quartz

Outcrop 6 (Serfõzõ)

13.6

–79

-

170 – 185

–0.2 – 0.8

-

Euhedral quartz

Outcrop 6 (Serfõzõ)

10.2

–86

170 – 185

–3.6  –  –2.4

-

Comb quartz

Outcrop 7 (Csonkás)

12.4

–98

-

175 – 190

–1.0 – 0.1

-

Quartz from stockworks

Outcrop 7 (Csonkás)

11.7

     –107

-

175 – 190

–2.3  –  –1.2

-

background image

224                                                                     BAJNÓCZI, MOLNÁR, MAEDA and IZAWA

andesite with adularia-sericite alteration (Outcrops 6 & 7)

tuff with argillite and alunite alteration (Outcrop 1)

smectitic-hematitic andesite (Outcrop 1)

propylitic andesite (Outcrops 8 & 9)

rhyodacite (Castle Hill)
range of 

δ

18

O

SO4

 for parent fluid of alunite (Outcrop 3) between 100°C 

(open diamond) and 274°C (filled diamond)
range of 

δ

18

O

OH

 for parent fluid of alunite (Outcrop 3) between 100°C 

(open diamond) and 274°C (filled diamond)

parent fluid of quartz crystals of Serfõzõ (Outcrop 6) with the error of 

the estimated range of precipitation temperatures

parent fluid of quartz crystals of Csonkás (Outcrop 7) with the error of 

the estimated range of precipitation temperatures

MWL

SMOW

magmatic 
vapour

late-stage 

magmatic water

assumed 

composition of 

paleometeoric 

water

composition of present-

day meteoric water

mixing and/or

fluid-rock interaction

OH

SO

274°C

100°C

-150

-130

-110

-90

-70

-50

-30

-10

10

-20

-10

0

10

20

δ

18

O (%

o

)

δ

(%

o

)

cumulation probably as a fine silica mud in a shallow pool

fed by a hot spring.

The observed geochemical anomalies and the occurrence

of cinnabar also support the assumption that the hydrother-

mal  rocks  of  Outcrop  1  represent  a  shallow  hydrothermal

zone. Sb, As and Hg are typical of hot-spring type systems

(Weissberg  1969;  Berger  &  Silberman  1985;  Krupp  &

Seward 1987). Besides the anomalous concentration of Sb in

the  central  red  breccia,  the  white  breccia  and  layered  sili-

ceous  deposit  also  has  an  Hg-anomaly,  increasing  towards

the  margins.  In  hot-spring  hydrothermal  systems,  mercury

transports such as (bi)sulfide-complexes and precipitation of

cinnabar may be triggered by cooling and/or pH decrease of

the mineralizing fluid (Hedenquist & Henley 1985a). Thus

the presence of cinnabar in the outer zones of the hydrother-

mal  center  correlates  with  the  structural  characteristics  of

opal  varieties,  which  may  suggest  decrease  of  temperature

from the red breccia zone towards the marginal zones with

layered siliceous deposit.

The alunite-kaolinite bearing tuff of the Regéc caldera (Out-

crops 2 to 5) corresponds to an acid and oxidative (sulphate)

type  alteration  zone  (Hemley  et  al.  1969).  Acid-sulphate,

steam-heated fluids may have originated from the condensa-

tion and oxidation of H

2

S gas derived from an underlying boil-

ing horizon and are typical above the groundwater table (Silli-

toe 1993). In contrast to the hot spring environment of Outcrop

1 that may have formed at the paleogroundwater table, these

acidic alteration zones were formed most probably above that

level. In accordance with this, the acid alteration zones occur

at a relatively high level within the Regéc caldera (Fig. 1), al-

though there are no proofs that this corresponds to their origi-

nal  position.  Above  the  paleogroundwater  table  descending

acid  fluids  dominate  therefore  this  is  not  an  accumulation

zone,  but  rather  an  acid-leaching  zone  of  elements  (Heden-

quist & Arribas 1999). This explains the lack of pronounced

geochemical anomalies in these horizons around Regéc.

The marked difference (5–6 ‰) between the 

δ

34

S values of

euhedral, coarse-grained alunite from Outcrop 3 and propylitic

andesite from Outcrops 8 and 9 also supports the assumption

that alunite has not been derived from the supergene oxidation.

From the measured 

δ

18

O

SO

4

 and 

δ

18

O

OH 

values of alunite crys-

tals, the calculated temperature 274 °C (Stoffregen et al. 1994)

of precipitation is higher than the most typical 90–160 °C tem-

perature  range  of  steam-heated  alteration  (Rye  et  al.  1992).

Usually the O-isotope in crystallographic SO

4

 sites is in equi-

librium with the fluid in a steam-heated acid-sulphate environ-

ment, but sometimes unreasonably high temperatures are cal-

culated,  mostly  because  of  post-depositional  retrograde

isotope exchange in the OH site (Rye et al. 1992). For 100 °C

the calculated 

δ

18

O composition of parent fluid is very close to

the meteoric water line (Fig. 3).

The 

δ

D value (–27 ‰) of alunite is the highest among the 

δ

D

data from the caldera (Fig. 3). As the D-fractionation between

alunite and water is small (

 = –6 –+4 ‰) at temperatures be-

low 274 °C (Rye et al. 1992; Stoffregen et al. 1994), the original

alunite mineralizing fluid is not the same as the present meteoric

water (

δ

D = –66 ‰ to –68 ‰; Deák 1995) or the inclusion flu-

ids in hydrothermal quartz (

δ

D = –79 to –107 ‰). Evaporation

or boiling of the parent fluids of quartz crystals cannot result in

such a huge shift in 

δ

D values (Fig. 3). Thus the isotopic com-

position of euhedral, coarse-grained alunite crystals of Outcrop

3 suggests a presence of magmatic component. The data can be

indicative of a “magmatic steam” (Rye et al. 1992) rather than a

steam-heated origin.

Studies  on  recent  geothermal  deposits  demonstrate  the

close relation between precipitation of adularia and boiling

of  fluids  (e.g.  Broadlands,  New  Zealand,  Simmons  et  al.

1992). Thus, andesite with adularia-sericite alteration (Out-

crops 6 and 7) represents the boiling zone of hydrothermal

fluids in the caldera. This is in agreement with the fluid in-

clusion  assemblage  found  in  quartz  crystals  of  these  alter-

ation  zones.  Most  common  homogenization  temperatures

and  salinities  correspond  to  7–10.5  (Outcrop  6)  and  8–12

bars (Outcrop 7) boiling pressures, respectively, which yield

90 to 120 m (Outcrop 6) and 90 to 140 m (Outcrop 7) depth

below  the  paleogroundwater  table  using  the  density  values

for hydrostatic conditions (Haas 1971). Presence of fresh ad-

ularia formed after the sericitic alteration of metasomatic K-

feldspar reflects a pH increase of fluids during boiling. This

can be attributed to loss of volatiles during the initial stages

of boiling (Henley et al. 1984) and the gas content of fluids

should also be considered in the determination of paleodepth.

The existence of minor amount of CO

2

 in the low pressure,

near-surface fluids is general and it is usually undetectable

by  microthermometric  methods  in  inclusions  that  trapped

these fluids (Hedenquist & Henley 1985b). As the CO

2

-con-

tent  increases  the  vapour  pressure,  the  paleodepth  of  Out-

crops 6 and 7 could be more than 90–140 m.

Quartz  veins  crosscutting  andesite  with  adularia-sericite

alteration exhibit anomalous enrichment in Sb. This feature

Fig.  3. 

δ

D  and 

δ

18

O  isotopic  compositions  of  fresh  and  altered

rocks and the calculated parent fluids of the hydrothermal miner-

als from the Regéc caldera.

×

+

4

background image

SHALLOW  LEVEL  LOW-SULPHIDATION  TYPE  EPITHERMAL  SYSTEMS                                 225

Fig. 4. Recent elevation of the studied outcrops in the Regéc caldera along a horizontally exaggerated W-E section with indication of the

paleowatertable.

seems to be characteristic for the upflowing zones of hydro-

thermal fluids in the Regéc caldera since the central red brec-

cia in Outcrop 1 also has an anomalous Sb content.

The calculated 

δ

18

O values of the parent fluids for various

types  of  quartz  from  the  adularia-sericite  alteration  zones

(Outcrops 6 and 7) are from 0.8 ‰ to –3.6 ‰ for average

precipitation temperatures of 170–190 °C (Matsuhisa et al.

1979; Table 4). The calculated 

δ

18

O values and 

δ

D data mea-

sured in fluid inclusions show that the composition of hydro-

thermal fluids is between the meteoric water line and the val-

ues  of  the  late-stage  magmatic  water  (Hedenquist  &

Lowenstern 1994; Fig. 3). The hydrothermal fluids are prob-

ably of meteoric origin and were shifted from their original

isotopic  composition  (from  the  meteoric  water  line)  by  an

isotope-exchange reaction with 

18

O-rich magmatic rock and/

or  a  mixing  with  magmatic  fluids  (Field  &  Fifarek  1985).

This  intensive  water/rock  interaction  may  also  explain  the

very depleted 

δ

D values found in the rock samples of adular-

ia-sericite alteration.

From the measured data we can assume that the lowest 

δ

D

value of former meteoric water was –107 ‰ because the evo-

lution  of  meteoric  water  through  boiling,  evaporation,  ex-

change reaction with rocks or mixing with magmatic fluid re-

sults  in  only  D-enrichment  and  not  D-depletion  (Field  &

Fifarek 1985). Isotopic data from inclusion fluids from Ban-

sk᠊tiavnica, Slovakia (values up to –113 ‰, Kantor et al.

1983),  also  refer  to  similar  negative 

δ

D  value  of  meteoric

water during the Sarmatian. However, recent groundwater is

characterized by 

δ

D = –66 ‰ to –68 ‰ and 

δ

18

O = –9.3 ‰

to –9.5 ‰ values (Deák 1995) and this indicates that impor-

tant  changes  have  occurred  in  the  isotopic  composition  of

meteoric water during the past 10 million years. The possible

cause of the difference in isotopic composition could be cli-

matic change and with less importance change in elevation.

Propylitic (chloritic, smectitic, silicic) andesite with pyrite

always appear in the outermost and/or deepest alteration zone

of an epithermal hydrothermal system (White & Hedenquist

1995). The regional extent of propylitic alteration in the Lower

Andesite Unit of the Regéc caldera also supports this fact.

Conclusion

Detailed  mineralogical,  geochemical,  fluid  inclusion  and

stable isotope studies reveal different styles of mineralization

of low sulphidation type formed at various paleolevels in the

Regéc caldera (Fig. 4).

Hydrothermal  eruption  breccia  incorporating  altered

andesitic rock fragments and surrounding a layered siliceous

deposit  made  of  opal-C  and  -CT  precipitated  from  a  hot

spring and thus represents a paleosurface environment along

the paleogroundwater table. Hg and Sb anomalies of the hy-

drothemal breccia and the layered siliceous deposit with oc-

currence of cinnabar confirm a hot-spring origin.

Acidic and mixed tuff with alunite-kaolinite alteration and

slightly anomalous Ba-concentrations indicates the existence

background image

226                                                                     BAJNÓCZI, MOLNÁR, MAEDA and IZAWA

of  acidic,  sulphate-bearing  fluids.  The  presence  of  fine-

grained alunite and kaolinite in the silicified tuff levels may

suggest  extensive  steam-heating  origin.  However,  the  high

δ

D value of unusually coarse-grained alunite crystals from

an  altered  tuff  horizon  may  also  suggest  incorporation  of

magmatic  steam  into  the  hydrothermal  fluids.  Presence  of

magmatic fluid may indicate a magmatic reservoir at shallow

depth in the area of the Regéc caldera.

At around 90–140 m minimal paleodepth, andesite with ad-

ularia-sericite alteration formed with quartz veins and veinlets

and show multiple alterations and brecciation reflecting the al-

ternating chemical character of the mineralizing fluids. Meta-

somatic K-feldspar and a second generation of adularia are the

typical hydrothermal minerals. Enrichments in Sb, As and Ba

are  characterictic  for  this  type  of  alteration.  Fluid  inclusion

studies of quartz crystals generated after the precipitation of

hydrothermal  feldspars  show  dilute  NaCl–H

2

O-type  fluids

with less than 3 wt. % NaCl equiv. and most frequent homoge-

nization temperatures between 170–190 °C. This result is con-

sistent with the stable isotope data for the same quartz crystals

indicating that the dominant mineralizing fluid was evolved

meteoric water with shifted isotopic composition due to fluid-

rock interaction and/or mixing with magmatic fluids. Data also

suggest  that  the  Sarmatian  meteoric  water  had  depleted 

δ

D

values compared to the recent ones.

The regional alteration type in the caldera is propylitiza-

tion of andesite with quartz, smectite, chlorite and pyrite.

Acknowledgements: This work was carried out in the frame-

work of the Hungarian-Japanese Intergovernmental Science &

Technology Co-operation Programme for 1997–1998 support-

ed by OMFB (Budapest, Hungary) and its foreign partner, Sci-

ence & Technology Agency (Tokyo, Japan). Assistance with

IR  spectroscopy  measurements  is  acknowledged  to  E.  Vass

(Dept. of Organic Chemistry, Eötvös Univ., Budapest, Hunga-

ry). M. Balla and Zs. Molnár (Training Reactor, Institute of

Nuclear  Technilogy,  Technical  University  of  Budapest)  are

thanked for their help in NAA analyses.

References

Balla M., Keömley G. & Molnár Zs. 1998: Neutron activation anal-

ysis. In: Vértes A., Nagy S. & Süvegh K. (Eds.): Nuclear meth-

ods  in  mineralogy  and  geology.  Techniques  and  applications.

Plenum Press, New York and London, 115–144.

Berger B.R. & Silberman M.L. 1985: Relationships of trace element

pattern  to  geology  in  hot-spring-type  precious  metal  deposits.

In: Berger B.R. & Bethke P.M. (Eds.): Geology and geochem-

istry  of  epithermal  systems.  Society  of  Economic  Geologists,

Rev. Econ. Geol. 2, 233–247.

Bodnar  R.J.,  Reynolds  T.J.  &  Kuehn  C.A.  1985:  Fluid-inclusion

systematics in epithermal systems. In: Berger B.R. & Bethke

P.M. (Eds.): Geology and geochemistry of epitermal systems.

Society of Economic Geologists, Rev. Econ. Geol. 2, 73–97.

Bodnar  R.J.  1993:  Revised  equation  and  table  for  determining  the

freezing  point  depression  of  H

2

O-NaCl  solutions.  Geochim.

Cosmochim. Acta 57, 683–684.

Clayton R.N. & Mayeda T.K. 1963: The use of bromine pentaflou-

ride  in  the  extraction  of  oxygen  from  oxides  and  silicates  for

isotopic analysis. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 27, 43–52.

Crawford  M.L.  1985:  Phase  equilibria  in  aqueous  fluid  inclusions.

In: Shepherd T., Rankin A.H. & Alderton D.H. (Eds.): A practi-

cal guide to fluid inclusion studies. Blackie & Son Ltd., Glas-

gow–London, 75–100.

Csongrádi J. & Zelenka T. 1995: Hot-spring type gold-silver miner-

alisations  in  the  Tokaj  Mts.,  (Northeastern  Hungary).  Spec.

Publ. Geol. Soc. Greece 4, 2, 689–693.

Csongrádi J., Tungli Gy. & Zelenka T. 1996: Relation between the

postvolcanic  activities  and  mineralisation  in  the  Koromhegy-

Koromtetõ (Füzérradvány) area. Bull. Hung. Geol. Soc. 126, 2,

67–75 (in Hungarian with English abstract).

Deák J. 1995: Determination of groundwater recharge in the Great

Plain of Hungary using isotope methods. Manuscript, VITUKI,

Budapest (in Hungarian).

Elzea J.M, Odom I.E. & Miles W.J. 1994: Distinguishing well or-

dered  opal-CT  and  opal-C  from  high  temperature  cristobalite

by X-ray diffraction. Analyt. Chim. Acta 286, 107–116.

Elzea J.M. & Rice S.B. 1996: TEM and X-ray diffraction evidence

for cristobalite and tridymite stacking sequences in opal. Clays

and Clay Miner. 44, 4, 492–500.

Field C.W. & Fifarek R.H. 1985: Light stable-isotope systematics in

the  epithermal  environment.  In:  Berger  B.R.  &  Bethke  P.M.

(Eds.): Geology and geochemistry of epithermal systems. Soci-

ety of Economic Geology, Rev. Econ. Geol. 2, 99–128.

Flörke O.W., Graetsch H., Martin B. & Wirth R. 1991: Nomencla-

ture  of  micro-  and  non-crystalline  silica  minerals,  based  on

structure and microstructure. Neu. Jb. Miner. Abh. 163, 1, 19–42.

Fournier  R.O.  1985:  The  behavior  of  silica  in  hydrothermal  solu-

tions.  In:  Berger  B.R.  &  Bethke  P.M.  (Eds.):  Geology  and

geochemistry of epithermal systems. Society of Economic Ge-

ologists, Rev. Econ. Geol. 2, 45–61.

Godfrey J.D. 1962: The deuterium content of hydrous minerals for

the  East-Central  Sierra  Nevada  and  Yosemite  National  Park.

Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 26, 1215–1245.

Graetsch H. 1994: Structural characteristics of opaline and microc-

rystalline silica minerals. In: Heaney P.J., Prewitt C.T. & Gibbs

G.V. (Eds.): Silica. Physical behavior, geochemistry and mate-

rial  applications.  Mineral.  Soc.  America,  Rev.  Mineral.  29,

209–233.

Graetsch H., Gies H. & Topalovic I. 1994: NMR, XRD and IR study

on microcrystalline opals. Phys. Chem. Miner. 21, 166–175.

Guthrie G.D., Jr., Bish D.L. & Reynolds R.C. Jr. 1995: Modeling the

X-ray  diffraction  pattern  of  opal-CT.  Amer.  Mineralogist  80,

869–872.

Gyarmati  P.  1977:  Intermedier  volcanism  in  the  Tokaj  Mountains.

Ann. Hung. Geol. Inst. 68, 1–195 (in Hungarian with English

summary).

Haas  J.L.Jr.  1971:  The  effect  of  salinity  on  the  maximum  thermal

gradient  of  a  hydrothermal  system  at  hydrostatic  pressure.

Econ. Geol. 66, 940–946.

Haas  J.L.Jr.  1976:  Thermodynamic  properties  of  the  coexisting

phases and thermochemical properties of the NaCl component

in boiling NaCl solutions. USGS Bull. 1421-B, 1–71.

Hartikainen  A.,  Horváth  I.,  Ódor  L.Ó.,  Kovács  L.  &  Csongrádi  J.

1992: Regional multimedia geochemical exploration for Au in

the  Tokaj  Mountains,  northeast  Hungary.  Appl.  Geochem.  7,

533–545.

Hedenquist J.W. & Henley R.W. 1985a: Hydrothermal eruptions in

the  Waiotapu  geothermal  system,  New  Zealand:  their  origin,

associated  breccias  and  relation  to  precious  metal  mineraliza-

tion. Econ. Geol. 80, 1640–1668.

Hedenquist J.W. & Henley R.W. 1985b: The importance of CO

2

 on

freezing  point  measurements  of  fluid  inclusions:  Evidence

from  active  geothermal  systems  and  implications  for  epither-

mal ore deposits. Econ. Geol. 80, 1379–1406.

Hedenquist J.W. & Lowenstern J.B. 1994: The role of magmas in

background image

SHALLOW  LEVEL  LOW-SULPHIDATION  TYPE  EPITHERMAL  SYSTEMS                                 227

formation of hydrothermal ore deposits. Nature 370, 519–527.

Hedenquist J.W. & Arribas A.Jr. 1999: Epithermal gold deposits: I.

Hydrothermal processes in intrusion-related systems. II: Char-

acteristics, examples and origin of epithermal gold deposits. In:

Molnár F., Lexa J. & Hedenquist J.W. (Eds.): Epithermal min-

eralization of the Western Carpathians. Soc. Econ. Geologists,

Guidebook Ser. 31, 13–63.

Hemley J.J., Hostetler P.B. & Mountjoy W.T. 1969: Some stability

relations of alunite. Econ. Geol. 64, 599–612.

Henley R.W., Truesdell A.H. & Barton P.B. Jr. 1984: Fluid minerals

equilibria in hydrothermal systems. Rev. Econ. Geol. 1, 1–267.

Horváth J. & Zelenka T. 1997: The latest data on the Telkibánya no-

ble metal mineralisation and their evaluation. Bull. Hung. Geol.

Soc. 127, 3–4, 405–430.

Ilkey-Perlaki E. 1967: Geological map of the Tokaj Mts. 1:25,000.

Fony. Hung. Geol. Inst.

Ilkey-Perlaki  E.  1968:  Explanations  to  the  geological  map  of  the

Tokaj Mts. 1:25,000. Fony. Hung. Geol. Inst., 1–55 (in Hun-

garian).

Kantor  J.,  Eliᚠ K.,  Ïurkovièová  J.,  Rybár  M.  &  Garaj  M.  1983:

Sulphur isotopes in selected Neogene volcanic-hosted mineral-

isations, Bansk᠊tiavnica — isotopes of S, O, C, H/D. Manu-

script, Geol. Survey of the Slovak Republic, Bratislava, 1–139

(in Slovak).

Kazahaya  K.  &  Matsuo  S.  1985:  A  new  ball-milling  method  for

extraction of fluid inclusions from minerals. Geochem. J. 19,

45–54.

Krupp  R.E.  &  Seward  T.M.  1987:  The  Rotokawa  geothermal  sys-

tem, New Zealand: an active epithermal gold-depositing envi-

ronment. Econ. Geol. 82, 5, 1109–1129.

Matsuhisa Y., Goldsmith J.R. & Clayton R.N. 1979: Oxygen isoto-

pic  fractionation  in  the  system  quartz–albite–anorthite–water.

Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 43, 1131–1140.

Matsuhisa Y., Mastubaya O. & Sakai H. 1971: BrF

5

-technique for

the oxygen isotopic analysis of silicates and water. Mass Spec-

trometry 19, 124–133 (in Japanese with English abstract).

Molnár  F.  1988:  Genetical  peculiarities  of  the  mercury  indications

near Sárospatak (Tokaj Mts., NE-Hungary) on the basis of fluid

inclusion studies. Acta Mineral. Petrogr. Szegediensis 29, 57–68.

Molnár F. 1992: Fluid inclusion studies in precious metal prospect-

ing  of  Hungarian  areas,  II.  (Regéc-Mogyoróska,  Komlóska-

Újhuta).  Manuscript,  Central  Geological  Office  of  Hungary,

Budapest, 1–87 (in Hungarian).

Molnár F. 1993: Genesis of ore deposits and indications of the Tokaj

Mts. on the basis of fluid inclusion studies. Unpublished Ph. D.

thesis, Manuscript, Eötvös L. University, Dept. of Mineralogy,

Budapest, 1–177 (in Hungarian with English abstract).

Molnár F. 1994a: Potassium feldspars in the Telkibánya ore deposit.

Topogr.  Mineral.  Hung.  II,  225–232  (in  Hungarian  with  En-

glish abstract).

Molnár  F.  1994b:  Genetical  pecularities  of  the  Telkibánya  ore  de-

posit on the basis of fluid inclusion studies. Topogr. Mineral.

Hung. II, 113–131 (in Hungarian with English abstract).

Molnár F. 1994c: Reconstruction of hydrothermal processes accom-

pained  by  precious-metal  enrichment  in  the  area  between  Sá-

toraljaújhely-Rudabányácska  and  Vágáshuta,  Tokaj  Mts.,

NE-Hungary. Bull. Hung. Geol. Soc. 124, 1, 25–42 (in Hungar-

ian with English abstract).

Molnár F. 1997: Modeling of formation of epithermal gold deposits

on  the  basis  of  mineralogical-genetic  studies:  Examples  from

the Tokaj Mts. Geol. Explor. (Földt. Kutatás), 34, 1, 8–12 (in

Hungarian).

Molnár F. & Zelenka T. 1995: Fluid inclusion characteristics and pa-

leothermal structure of the adularia-sericite type epithermal de-

posit  at  Telkibánya,  Tokaj  Mts.,  Northeast  Hungary.  Geol.

Carpathica 46, 4, 205–215.

Molnár F., Zelenka T., Mátyás E., Pécskay Z., Bajnóczi B., Kiss J. &

Horváth I. 1999: Epithermal mineralization of the Tokaj Moun-

tains,  Northeast  Hungary:  Shallow  levels  of  low-sulfidation

type systems. In: Molnár F., Lexa J. & Hedenquist J.W. (Eds.):

Epithermal  mineralization  of  the  Western  Carpathians.  Soc.

Econ. Geologists, Guidebook Ser. 31, 109–153.

Pécskay  Z.,  Balogh  K.,  Széky-Fux  V.  &  Gyarmati  P.  1987:  K/Ar

geochronology  of  the  Miocene  volcanism  of  the  Tokaj  Mts.

Bull.  Hung.  Geol.  Soc.  117,  237–253  (in  Hungarian  with  En-

glish and Russian summary).

Poty B., Leroy J. & Jachimowitz L. 1976: A new device for measur-

ing temperatures under the microscope: the Chaixmeca micro-

thermometry  apparatus.  Fluid  Inclusion  Res.,  Proc.  COFFI

Washington 9, 173–178.

Roedder E. 1984: Fluid inclusions. Rev. Mineral. 12, Mineral. Soc.

Amer. 1–644.

Rye R.O., Bethke P.M. & Wasserman M.D. 1992: The stable iso-

tope geochemistry of acid sulfate alteration. Econ. Geol. 87, 2,

225–262.

Sillitoe  R.H.  1993:  Epithermal  models:  Genetic  types,  geometrical

controls and shallow features. In: Kirkham R.V., Sinclair W.D.,

Thorpe  R.I.  &  Duke  J.M.  (Eds.):  Geol.  Assoc.  Canada  Spec.

Pap. 40, 403–417.

Simmons S.F., Browne P.R.L. & Brathwaite R.L. 1992: Active and

extinct  hydrothermal  systems  of  the  North  Island,  New

Zealand. Soc. Econ. Geologists, Guidebook Ser. 15, 1–121.

Stoffregen R.E., Rye R.O. & Wasserman M.D. 1994: Experimental

studies of alunite I. 

18

O-

16

O and D-H fractionation factors be-

tween alunite and water at 250–450 °C. Geochim. Cosmochim.

Acta 58, 2, 903–916.

Ueda  A.  &  Sakai  H.  1983:  Simultaneous  determinations  of  the

concentration  and  isotope  ratio  of  sulfate-  and  sulfide-sulfur

and carbonate-carbon in geological samples. Geochem. J. 17,

185–196.

Wasserman M.D., Rye R.O., Bethke P.M. & Arribas A.A.Jr. 1992:

Methods  for  separation  and  total  isotope  analysis  of  alunite.

USGS Open-file Rep. 92–9, 1–20.

Weissberg B.G. 1969: Gold-silver ore-grade precipitates from New-

Zealand thermal waters. Econ. Geol. 64, 95–108.

White N.C., Wood D.G. & Lee M.C. 1989: Epithermal sinters of

Paleozoic  age  in  north  Queensland,  Australia.  Geology  17,

718–722.

White  N.C.  &  Hedenquist  J.W.  1995:  Epithermal  gold  deposits:

styles, characteristics and exploration. Soc. Econ. Geol. News-

lett. 23, 1, 9–13.

Zentai  P.  1991:  Programme  of  the  regional  geophysical  survey  in

the Zemplén Mts. Manuscript, Eötvös Loránd Geophysical In-

stitute, Budapest (in Hungarian).