background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 50, 5, BRATISLAVA, OCTOBER 1999

365–372

ILLITE CRYSTALLINITY AND VITRINITE REFLECTANCE

IN PALEOZOIC SILICICLASTICS IN THE SE BOHEMIAN MASSIF

AS EVIDENCE OF THERMAL HISTORY

EVA FRANCÙ

1

, JURAJ FRANCÙ

and JIØÍ KALVODA

2

1

Czech Geological Survey, Leitnerova 22, 658 69 Brno, Czech Republic; francu@cgu.cz

2

Department of Geology, Masaryk University, Kotláøská 2, 611 37 Brno, Czech Republic; dino@sci.muni.cz

(Manuscript received December 9, 1998; accepted in revised form June 22, 1999)

Abstract: The thermal maturity of Paleozoic rocks in the SE part of the Bohemian Massif is characterized by clay

minerals and organic matter. The expandability of illite-smectite (S in I-S), illite crystallinity index (IC) and reflec-

tance of (R

r

) were measured and their regional distribution was evaluated. The mutual correlation of IC and R

r

 from

diagenesis to very low-grade metamorphism is compared with the published data and used to distinguish data with

more reliable paleogeothermal information from those affected by other factors. In the SE part the Paleozoic units

have illite-smectites with an expandable component of 15–35 % S. The reflectance values (R

r

 of 0.55–1.1 %) are in

good agreement with the expandability and suggest the oil window range of catagenesis with paleotemperature close

to 100 °C. In the NNW part of the area the clays contain no expandable layers in illite. The illite crystallinity (IC of

0.36–0.24 

°2

Θ

) and vitrinite reflectance (R

r

 from 3.17 to 5.23 %) indicate very low-grade metamorphic conditions

with probable maximum paleotemperatures of 240–300 °C. The systematic change in both clay and organic param-

eters shows the gradual decrease in thermal exposure towards the front of the Variscan orogenic zone in the S and SE

and suggest extensive erosion in the NNW.

Key words: Paleozoic, thermal history, vitrinite reflectance, expandability, illite crystallinity, I-S.

Introduction

The illite crystallinity index (IC), expandability of illite-smec-

tite (S in I-S) and vitrinite reflectance (R

r

) are widely used pa-

rameters of thermal alteration of sedimentary rocks. Smectite

to illite evolution is a typical diagenetic reaction with a gradu-

al decrease of expandable layers (% S), increase of illite layers

in I-S, and progressive ordering (“reichweite” R0 and R > 0)

followed by growth of illite crystals (Œrodoñ & Eberl 1984).

The Al-Si substitution in the tetrahedral sheet, the increase of

the layer charge and irreversible potassium fixation in the in-

terlayer play the decisive role in illitization (Moore & Rey-

nolds 1997). These processes occur in temperature range from

50 to 300 °C covering diagenesis and very low-grade meta-

morphism. The understanding of the structural changes during

smectite to illite conversion benefited from computer simula-

tion of X-ray diffraction profiles (Reynolds & Hower 1970).

The  illite  crystallinity  index  characterizes  the  structural

evolution of illite, mainly the increasing size of coherently

diffracting  domains  and  decreasing  lattice  distortion.  It  is

based on the shape of the first (001) peak of illite (Weaver

1960; Kübler 1964; Weber 1972). The fullwidth at half max-

imum (FWHM) expressed in 

°2

Θ

 is used by most authors

as “IC” — the illite crystallinity index (Kübler 1967; Árkai

& Lelkes-Felvári 1993). A similar parameter is evaluated for

chlorite  using  001  and  002  peaks  (Árkai  et  al.  1995).  The

correlation of the IC of illite and chlorite shows an earlier

narrowing of the chlorite peaks than that of illite during late

diagenesis and very low-grade metamorphism (Árkai 1991).

Organic matter in sedimentary rocks (kerogen) is a sensi-

tive  indicator  of  thermal  stress  in  the  range  of  50–300 °C

(Bostick 1979; Robert 1988). Coalification (thermal maturi-

ty) depends on the total thermal history of the host rocks, that

is both temperature and exposure time (Waples 1985). Vitrin-

ite reflectance (R

r

) is the best established parameter of organ-

ic matter which can be measured in most black shales and

slates. Its application is limited by the absence of terrestrial

plant debris in pre-Devonian or purely marine rocks.

Many authors applied analytical data of clay minerals and

organic matter in regional studies and related them to pale-

otemperatures  in  sedimentary  basins  and  orogenic  belts

(Pearson  &  Small  1988;  Robert  1988;  Francù  et  al.  1990;

Pollastro  1990  and  1993;  Underwood  et  al.  1993;  Œrodoñ

1995). Thermal alteration of both rock components is irre-

versible during uplift and temperature drop. During weather-

ing,  however,  the  clay  minerals  undergo  illite-to-smectite

breakdown which erases the paleo-thermal signature.

Regional setting

The surface geology of the studied area consists of the Pa-

leozoic of the Drahany and Zábøeh Uplands (Drahanská and

Zábøežská vrchovina), Lower Miocene and Pliocene of the

background image

366                                                                          FRANCÙ, FRANCÙ

 

and KALVODA

Carpathian Foredeep, and the Tertiary of the Carpathian Fly-

sch Belt. The outcrop and subcrop map of the Paleozoic with

simplified names of regional units and overlain boundaries of

the surface units is in Fig. 2. The sample location numbers re-

fer to Table 1 where more detailed lithostratigraphy is given.

The Paleozoic units of the eastern Bohemian Massif are re-

garded  as  a  part  of  the  Rhenohercynian  and  Subvariscan

Zone (Franke in Dallmeyer et al. 1995) of the Variscan oro-

genic belt (Fig. 1). The Bruno-Vistulian crystalline basement

consolidated during the Cadomian orogeny is overlain in some

places by Lower Cambrian siliciclastics (Vavrdová 1997), one

occurrence of Silurian shales and limestones, and widespread

Middle Devonian “basal clastics”. The stratigraphic profile

continues  upwards  with  Devonian  to  Lower  Carboniferous

carbonates (Macocha, Jesenec, and Líšeò Fms.) and pre-fly-

sch siliciclastics (Stínava-Chabièov and Ponikev Fms.). The

Variscan synorogenic flysch (Culm) of Lower Carboniferous

(Viséan) age (Protivanov, Rozstání, and Myslejovice Fms.)

covers most of the outcrop and subcrop surface of the Paleo-

zoic in this region. The Upper Carboniferous molasse sedi-

ments in the east (Ostrava and Karviná (?) Fms.) are the up-

permost units of the Paleozoic and represent the Subvariscan

Zone (Dvoøák 1995).

The  Mírov  Unit  (Otava  &  Sulovský  1997)  is  a  separate

tectonic  block  adjacent  to  the  NW  of  the  Drahany  Upland

and includes mostly siliciclastics, probably of Devonian age

(Mohelnice Fm.).

Table 1: Geological and analytical characteristics of the studied samples.

Location

Locality

Depth

Age

Formation

Tectonic

Fraction FWHM

% EXP

R

r

R

max

R

min

in map

(m)unit

mm

IC (°2Q)

mean

(%)(%)(%)

1

Mezihoøí

 0

D2.3

Mohelnice

Mírov unit

< 2

0.36

0

3.89*

5.41

0.85

1

Mezihoøí

 0

D2.3

Mohelnice

Mírov unit

  < 0.2

0.53

0

3.89*

5.41

0.85

2

KDH 8A

125.5

D3.C1

Macocha

carbonates

< 2

0.24

0

4.84*

5.78

2.97

2

KDH 8A

171.6

D3.C1

Macocha

carbonates

< 2

0.24

0

5.23*

5.95

3.79

3

KDH 5

158.5

D3.C1

Ponikev

Pre-flysch Paleozoic

< 2

0.34

0

4.24*

5.51

1.69

3

KDH 5

229.4

D3.C1

Ponikev

Pre-flysch Paleozoic

< 2

0.36

0

4.86*

6.00

2.58

4

KDH 1

11

C1

Protivanov

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

0.32

0

3.17*

4.09

1.32

4

KDH 1

  24.5

C1

Protivanov

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

0.32

0

3.56*

4.46

1.75

4

KDH 1

  76.2

C1

Protivanov

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

0.30

0

4.51*

5.63

2.26

5

Sloup-Šošùvka

 0

D2-C1

paleocarst

carbonates

< 2

0.32

< 4

-

-

-

6

Ostrov u Macochy

 0

C1v

Rozstání

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

0.44

< 4

1.79

-

-

7

Jedovnice

 0

C1v

Rozstání

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

0.55

< 4

1.61

-

-

8

Køtiny

 0

C1v

Rozstání

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

0.48

< 4

2.42

-

-

9

Ochoz, Nové Dvory

 0

C1v

Rozstání

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

0.48

< 4

1.92

-

-

10

Mokrá - LV 10

  44.7

C1v

Myslejovice

Variscan flysch belt

  < 0.2

  0.709

(ChC)

< 4

-

-

-

10

Mokrá - LV 10

  44.7

C1v

Myslejovice

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

0.637

(ChC)

< 4

-

-

-

11

Mokrá - LV 9

125.6

C1v

Myslejovice

Variscan flysch belt

  < 0.2

1.21

< 4

1.57

-

-

11

Mokrá - LV 9

125.6

C1v

Myslejovice

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

1.33

< 4

1.57

-

-

12

Mokrá - LV 6

  68.7

D2-C1

Líšeò

carbonates

  < 0.2

1.09

< 4

1.38

-

-

12

Mokrá - LV 6

  68.7

D2-C1

Líšeò

carbonates

< 2

1.46

< 4

1.38

-

-

13

Mokrá - LV 11

  41.8

D2-C1

Líšeò

carbonates

  < 0.2

1.36

< 4

1.55

-

-

14

Hády (Džungle) 0

D2-C1

Líšeò

carbonates

< 2

0.44

< 4

2.01

-

-

15

Uhr-13

2563

C1

Myslejovice

Variscan flysch belt

  < 0.2

   1.65**

13

0.55

-

-

16

Dam-1

2791

C2-1

Ostrava

Variscan Foredeep

  < 0.2

   1.98**

32

0.63

-

-

16

Dam-1

3021

C2-1

Ostrava

Variscan Foredeep

  < 0.2

   1.42**

35

0.68

16

Dam-1

3021

C2-1

Ostrava

Variscan Foredeep

< 2

   1.91**

 -

0.68

16

Dam-1

3592

C1v

Myslejovice

Variscan flysch belt

  < 0.2

   2.28**

24

0.75

-

-

16

Dam-1

3592

C1v

Myslejovice

Variscan flysch belt

< 2

  1.68**

 -

0.75

-

-

16

Dam-1

3872

D2-C1

Macocha

carbonates

  < 0.2

   2.26**

19

0.80

-

-

17

Nìm-2

3796

C2-1

Ostrava

Variscan Foredeep

  < 0.2

   1.98**

23

0.80

-

-

17

Nìm-2

3864

C2-1

Ostrava

Variscan Foredeep

  < 0.2

   2.16**

25

0.85

-

-

17

Nìm-2

4243

C2-1

Ostrava

Variscan Foredeep

  < 0.2

   1.92**

23

0.95

-

-

17

Nìm-2

5338

D2-C1

Macocha

carbonates

  < 0.2

   2.14**

 -

1.10

-

-

17

Nìm-2

5338

D2-C1

Macocha

carbonates

< 2

   1.11**

 -

1.10

-

-

* recalculated R

r

 from R

max

 and R

min

        **  IC values have just approximate meaning

Fig.  1.  The  Bohemian  Massif  (BM)  and    its  position  in  the

Variscan orogenic zones of central and NW Europe (modified after

Chaloupský  1989). The grey areas are Variscan massifs. The posi-

tion of the studied area is indicated by the rectangle.

background image

ILLITE CRYSTALLINITY AND VITRINITE REFLECTANCE                                                     367

Fig. 2. Outcrop and subcrop map of the SE part of Moravo-Sile-

sian  Paleozoic  (modified  after  Dvoøák  1995  with  supplements  of

Otava,  personal  com.).  The  geological  subdivision  is  simplified

and each unit includes several formations. Sample numbers  refer

to the more  detailed description in Table 1.

Samples

Surface and borehole core samples of Devonian and Carbon-

iferous sedimentary rocks were collected to characterize the re-

gional trend of thermal maturity from N to S (Fig. 2 and Ta-

ble 1). Lithologically they are mostly siltstones, shales or slates

(occasionally quartzified), and shale interlayers in limestones.

Methods

Clay mineral analysis

The clay fraction was separated from the powdered rocks

after elimination of cements such as carbonates, organic mat-

ter  and  iron-manganese  oxyhydroxides  (Jackson  1975).

Grain size fractions < 2 

µ

m and < 0.2 

µ

m were obtained by

sedimentation and centrifugation. Oriented slides were anal-

ysed by X-ray diffraction both air dry and glycolated (EG, 10

hrs. at 60 °C, then 2 hrs. at 20 °C). Philips diffractometer PW

1830 (generator) and PW 3020 (goniometer) wereused with

0.02° step from 2 to 30  

°2

Θ

. Peak fitting was applied to

substract the ramp background and determine the individual

peak positions in the composite peaks and to evaluate the full

width at half maximum (FWHM). The Ir index (Œrodoñ &

Eberl 1984) defined as the ratio (001/003 air-dry)/(001/003

EG)  was  measured  and  calculated  to  characterize  trace

amounts of expandable layers in highly illitic materials. Ex-

pandability of illite-smectite was evaluated from peak posi-

tions using the plots of Œrodoñ & Eberl (1984) and NewMod

simulations  (Reynolds  1985).  The  illite  crystallinity  index

(IC)  was  measured  as  FWHM  of  the  001  basal  reflection

(Kübler 1967) or the chlorite (002) crystallinity index (ChC)

when illite was absent (Weaver et al. 1984; Árkai 1991).

Organic matter

The measurements of reflectance were carried out in oil on

polished surfaces of rocks using Leitz Wetzlar MPV2 micro-

scope-photometer, objective 50

×

 and Leitz standards of 1.26

and 5.42 %. The reflectance was measured in non-polarized

and plane-polarized light (R

r

, R

max 

and R

min

). In order to ob-

tain a single parameter for the entire range of thermal maturi-

ty, the R

max

 and R

min

 values of particles with higher bireflec-

tance  were  recalculated  to  random  reflectance  using  the

equation R

r

 = (2*R

max

+R

min

)/3 (Teichmüller et al. 1998). The

measured organic particles (macerals) were petrographically

identified as vitrinite, liptinite, inertinite or redeposited ma-

terial following Teichmüller et al. (1998) and only the data of

indigenous  vitrinite  or  vitrinite-like  macerals  were  used  in

further evaluation of the thermal history.

Results

The clay fraction of the studied series of rocks includes il-

lite, chlorite, kaolinite and mixed-layer minerals. Illite-smec-

tite (I-S) has expandability of 0–35 % S and illite crystallini-

ty  index  (IC)  ranges  from  0.24  to  2.28   

°2

Θ

.  Vitrinite

reflectance (R

r

) increases from 0.55 to 5.23 %. These values

(Table 1) cover thermal alteration from burial diagenesis to

very  low-grade  metamorphism.  The  data  are  divided  into

four groups of samples characterized by typical features in

the XRD patterns which represent subsequent phases of the

shale-to-slate evolution (Figs. 3–7 and 10).

The  first  group  of  data  comprises  Paleozoic  sediments

with the lowest thermal alteration. It is documented by the

XRD patterns (Fig. 3) of an air-dry and glycolated clay (frac-

tion < 2 

µ

m) of an Upper Carboniferous shaly limestone with

a low amount of detrital silt and clay. The IC index of 1.68

°2

Θ

 is too high to be used as a measure of illite crystal size.

The shape and position of I-S peaks change significantly af-

ter glycolation and indicate a mixture of detrital, that is in-

herited illite and newly formed expandable I-S.

The  expandable  component  is  better  characterized  by  an

analysis of the very fine clay fraction (< 0.2 

µ

m) of the same

background image

368                                                                          FRANCÙ, FRANCÙ

 

and KALVODA

sample where the detrital illite is eliminated. Glycolation re-

sults in a split of broad 001 and 002 illitic peaks into pairs of

rectorite-type peaks with expandability of 24 % S and R1 or-

dering  (Fig.  4).  Such  clay  parameters  and  vitrinite  reflec-

tance of 0.55–1.1 % are typical of the burial diagenetic phase

of thermal alteration. Regionally these rocks occur in the S

and SE where boreholes encountered the Devonian and Car-

boniferous below the nappes of the Western Carpathians at

depths of 2.8–5.4 km.

The  second  and  third  groups  of  samples  (Fig.  5)  represent

highly  illitic  material  with  illite  peaks  slightly  changing  their

shape  after  glycolation.  Chlorite  is  common  and  sometimes

even more abundant than illite (Fig. 6). In some samples a shift

of the chlorite peak after glycolation suggests the presence of an

expandable component in the chlorite. Little or no material of

the < 0.2 

µ

m grain size can be separated from the samples in a

non-destructive way, most probably due to crystal growth. The

estimated amount of smectite layers in illite is < 4 % and the il-

lite crystallinity index is 1.46–0.44 

°2

Θ

. The chlorite crystal-

linity index (ChC) is 0.7–0.6 

°2

Θ

. The clay parameters and

vitrinite reflectance of 1.4–2.4 % found in different stratigraphic

Fig.  3.  The  XRD  pattern  of  coarser  clay  fraction  (<  2 

µ

m)  of  a

shaly limestone, Damboøice-1 (3592 m). The sample is enriched in

detrital illite (Id) and chlorite (C) which are associated with illite-

smectite (I-S).

Fig. 4.  The  XRD  pattern  of  the    fine  clay  fraction  (<  0.2 

µ

m)  of  a

shaly limestone, Damboøice-1 (3592 m). Detrital illite is eliminated.

Fig. 5. The XRD pattern of the Hády outcrop sample (V Džungli

Quarry),  fraction < 2 

µ

m. I — illite, C —  chlorite, Q — quartz.

Fig. 6. The XRD pattern from the Mohelnice outcrop, fraction < 2 

µ

m.

Fig. 7. The XRD pattern of  KDH-8A borehole, 171.6 m, fraction

< 2 

µ

m.

units of the Drahany Upland and Mírov Unit correspond to ther-

mal alteration of the late diagenetic phase.

The last group of samples is characterized by almost non-

expanding illitic mineral (Fig. 7) with narrow and sharp peaks

background image

ILLITE CRYSTALLINITY AND VITRINITE REFLECTANCE                                                     369

and IC values of 0.24–0.36 

°2

Θ

. This type of minerals oc-

curs in the Konice area and is associated with high vitrinite re-

flectance  (R

max

  =  4–6,  R

=  3.17–5.23  %)  and  bireflectance

(R

max

 – R

min

 = 2.16–3.82 %) equivalent to the metaanthracite

rank.  Both  parameters  suggest  that  these  rocks  experienced

very low-grade metamorphic conditions.

Correlation between illite crystallinity

and vitrinite reflectance

The illitization stage and coal rank are primarily controlled

by thermal history (Œrodoñ & Eberl 1984; Robert 1988). Ex-

amination of their mutual correlation is an important step in

the  data  reliability  assessment.  The  cross-plot  of  the  illite

crystallinity  index  (IC)  and  mean  random  vitrinite  reflec-

tance (R

r

) shown in Fig. 8 reviews the earlier published data

(Duba  &  Williams-Jones  1983;  Underwood  et  al.  1991,

1993; Todorov et al. 1992; Henrichs 1993).

Other authors characterize the illite crystalinity and coalifi-

cation rank by Hb

rel

 and R

max

. To convert Hb

rel

 to IC readers

need  to  know  the  value  of  peak  width  at  half  maximum

(FWHM) of the quartz standard (Hb

rel

 = [Hb (001) illite/Hb

(100)  quartz]*100).  Conversion  of  R

max

  to  R

r

  requires  R

min

values  (see  methods  above).  The  published  data  where  the

FWHM of quartz and R

min

 are missing or the R

r

 and IC values

are given only as ranges (Wolf 1975; Kish 1987; Teichmüller

et al. 1979) are, therefore, not included as references in Fig. 8.

The  diagram  in  Fig.  9  summarizes  the  diagenetic  and

metamorphic zones with their boundary values (Teichmüller

et  al.  1979;  Robert  1988;  Kish  1983,  1991).  The  general

trend  shows  decrease  of  vitrinite  reflectance  (R

r

)  with  in-

creasing IC index. The data below this trend (Todorov et al.

1992) represent measurements of authigenic vitrinite and re-

deposited detrital illite. The data which would plot above this

trend (Figs. 8 and 9, upper right corner) do not represent con-

sistent evidence of thermal history. Such a combination of

the R

r

 and IC values may occur when the following materials

are measured:

1. redeposited organic matter from more metamorphosed

rocks associated with authigenic illite-smectite;

2. preserved organic matter and disaggregated illite in sec-

ondary illite-smectite in weathered black slates;

3. graphitized organic matter (or metaanthracite) associat-

ed with poorly aggraded illite in rocks from the contact meta-

morphic zones of igneous bodies (Árkai, personal communi-

cation 1999).

All our measured samples (Fig. 10) plot within the shaded

belt of “good” correlation in Fig. 9.

Regional distribution of the paleothermal signature

The  distribution  of  the  diagenetic-to-metamorphic  alter-

ation based on the illite crystallinity index is shown in the

outcrop and subcrop map of the studied Paleozoic (Fig. 11).

Fig. 8. Review of the published data on diagenesis/metamorphism

(1 — Todorov et al. 1992; 2 — Underwood et al. 1993; 3 — Un-

derwood  et  al. 1991; 4 — Henrichs 1993; 5 — Duba & Williams-

Jones 1983). Our data plot within the dashed line envelope.

Fig.  9.  Generalized  relationships  between  illite  crystallinity  (IC)

and random vitrinite reflectance (R

r

). The boundaries of the meta-

morphic  zones  are  given  according  to  Teichmüller  et  al.  (1979),

Robert (1988), Kisch (1983).

Fig. 10. Cross plot of two paleothermal indicators in Paleozoic sam-

ples  from  the  southeastern  part  of  the  Bohemian  Massif.  Different

symbols  represent  the  partial  areas.  The  open  symbols  (fraction

< 0.2 

µ

m) linked with  black symbols (< 2 

µ

m) belong to the same

raw  samples.  The  arrow  indicates  the  estimated  equivalent  illite

crystallinity derived from the chlorite crystallinity index (ChC).

background image

370                                                                          FRANCÙ, FRANCÙ

 

and KALVODA

The Carboniferous strata below the West Carpathian over-

thrust have diagenetic expandable illite-smectite and organic

maturity equivalent to the oil generation zone of diagenesis

(c.f.  Francù  et  al.  1989;  Pollastro  1990;  Pereszlényi  et  al.

1993, 1997; Milièka et al. 1994; Masaryk et al. 1995). The

present  results  of  clay  analysis  support  the  earlier  conclu-

sions  based  only  on  vitrinite  reflectance  (Dvoøák  &  Wolf

1979; Dvoøák 1989; Krejèí et al. 1994). The expandability

values  correspond  to  the  maximum  burial  temperatures  of

80–130  °C  observed  in  other  basins  (Francù  et  al.  1990)

which is also well constrained by the vitrinite reflectance of

R

r

 = 0.55–1.1 %.

In the SE part of the Drahany Upland (e.g. Mokrá quarry)

the clay and organic data (ChC of 0.64, R

r

 of 1.38–1.57 %)

suggest a late diagenetic phase (dry gas zone) with an esti-

mated paleotemperature of 130–170 °C.

In  the  central  Drahany  Upland  the  illitic  material  in  the

< 2 µm fraction has an expandable component of < 4 % S. The

IC ranges from 0.32 to 0.55 

°2

Θ

 and vitrinite reflectance (R

r

)

from 1.9 to 2.4 %. These data are typical of late diagenetic

conditions with temperatures of 170–200  °C (Bostick 1979;

Underwood et al. 1991, 1993).

Even  higher  thermal  maturity  is  observed  in  the  Mírov

Unit (Mohelnice Fm.) NW of the Drahany Upland (Table 1,

Figs. 10 and 11).

In  the  Konice  window  the  vitrinite  reflectance  is  of  the

metaanthracite rank and the illite crystallinity is in the very

low-grade metamorphic range. From comparison with simi-

lar data (Milièka et al. 1991; Šucha et al. 1994) or supported

also by fluid inclusions (e.g. Robert 1988; Frey et al. 1980;

Frey 1986) it may be estimated that the evaluated Variscan

flysch and pre-flysch sediments were buried at a temperature

of 240–300 °C.

Conclusions

Illite crystallinity and vitrinite reflectance in the Paleozoic

sedimentary rocks of the SE Bohemian Massif show a rather

broad but clear correlation belt. The data suggest a close link

between the maximum paleotemperature and position within

the Variscan orogen. High temperature exposure, deep burial

and significant erosion probably occurred in the inner part of

the Variscan thrust and fold belt which is now situated in the

NW part of the Drahany Upland.

Intermediate  paleo-thermal  signature  is  observed  in  the

central and SE part of the Drahany Upland and in the Mírov

Unit (Zábøeh Upland).

Low thermal maturity gives evidence of shallower burial

in  the  frontal  Rhenohercynian  and  Subvariscan  zones  now

buried under the nappes of the Outer Carpathians.

Acknowledgements:  The  authors  wish  to  express  their

many thanks to J. Otava, J. Dvoøák, P. Müller, and J. Œrodoñ

for helpful suggestions and to V. Šucha and P. Árkai for the

revision of the manuscript.

References

Árkai P., 1991: Chlorite crystallinity and empirical approach and

correlation with illite crystallinity, coal rank and mineral fa-

cies  as  exemplified  by  Paleozoic  and  Mesozoic  rocks  of

northeast Hungary. J. Metamorphic Geol., 9, 723–734.

Árkai P. & Lelkes-Felvári G., 1993: The effect of lithology, bulk

chemistry and modal composition on illite “crystallinity” — a

case study from the Bakony Mts., Hungary. Clay Miner., 28,

417–433.

Árkai P., Sassi F.P. & Sassi R., 1995: Simultaneous measurements

of  chlorite  and  illite  crystallinity:  a  more  reliable  tool  for

monitoring  low-to  very  low  grade  metamorphism  in

metapelites. A case study from the Southern Alps (NE Italy).

Eur. J. Mineralogy, 7, 1115–1128.

Bostick  N.H.,  1979:  Microscopic  measurements  of  the  level  of

catagenesis  of  solid  organic  matter  in  sedimentary  rocks  to

aid exploration for petroleum and to determine former burial

temperatures — a review. SEPM, 26, 17–43.

Chaloupský  J.,  1989:  Major  tectonostratigraphic  units  of  the  Bo-

hemian Massif. Geol. Soc. Amer., Spec. Pap., 230, 101–114.

Dallmeyer R.D., Franke W. & Weber K. (Eds.), 1995: Pre-Permian

geology of Central and Eastern Europe. Springer-Verlag, Ber-

lin, 1–604.

Duba  D.  &  Williams-Jones  A.E.,  1983:  The  application  of  illite

Fig. 11. Regional distribution of the illite crystallinity index (IC,

°2

Θ

) in Paleozoic shales and shaly limestones of the SE Bohemi-

an Massif. The symbols are identical to  those in Fig. 10.

background image

ILLITE CRYSTALLINITY AND VITRINITE REFLECTANCE                                                     371

crystallinity,  organic  matter  reflectance,  and  isotopic  tech-

niques  to  mineral  exploration:  a  case  study  in  south-western

Gaspe Quebec. Econ. Geol., 78, 1350–1363.

Dvoøák J. & Wolf M., 1979: Thermal metamorphism in the Mora-

vian  Paleozoic  (Sudeticum,  È.S.S.R.).  Neu.  Jb.  Geol.

Paläont. Abh., Mh., 10, 597–607.

Dvoøák J., 1989: Anchimetamorphism in the Variscan tectogene in

Central  Europe  its  relationship  to  tectogenesis.  Vìst.  ÚÚG,

64, 1, 17–30 (in Czech).

Dvoøák  J.,  1995:  Stratigraphy.  In:  Dallmeyer  R.D.,  Franke  W.  &

Weber K. (Eds.): Pre-Permian geology of  Central and East-

ern Europe. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 479–489.

Francù J., Rudinec R. & Šimánek V., 1989: Hydrocarbon genera-

tion  zone  in  the  East  Slovak  Neogene  basin:  model  and

geochemical  evidence.  Geol.  Zbor.  Geol.  Carpath.,  40,  3,

355–384.

Francù  J.,  Müller  P.,  Šucha  V.  &  Zatkalíková  V.,  1990:  Organic

matter  and  clay  minerals  as  indicators  of  thermal  history  in

the Transcarpathian depression (East Slovak Neogene Basin)

and the Vienna basin. Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath., 41, 5, 535–

546.

Frey M., 1986: Very low-grade metamorphism of clastic sedimen-

tary  rocks.  In:  Frey  M.  (Ed.):  Low-temperature  metamor-

phism. Blackie, Glasgow, 9–58.

Frey  M.,  Teichmüller  M.,  Teichmüller  R.,  Mullis  J.,  Künzi  B.,

Breitschmid  A.,  Gruner  U.  &  Swizer  B.,  1980:  Very  low-

grade metamorphism in external parts of the Central Alps: Il-

lite  crystallinity,  coal  rank  and  fluid  inclusion  data.  Eclogae

Geol. Helv., 73, 1, 173–203.

Henrichs  C.,  1993:  Sedimentographische  Untersuchungen  zur

Hochdiagenese  in  der  Kossen-Formation  (obere  Trias)  der

westlichen  Ostalpen  und  angrenzender  Südalpengebiete.  Bo-

chumer Geol. Geotechn., Arb., 40, 206.

Jackson M.L., 1975: Soil chemical analysis-advanced cours. Mad-

ison, Wisconsin, 1–386.

Kisch  H.J.,  1987:  Correlation  between  indicators  of  very  low-

grade  metamorphism.  In:  Frey  M.  (Ed.):  Low  temperature

metamorphism. Blackie, Glasgow, 227–301.

Kisch  H.J.,  1983:  Mineralogy  and  petrology  of  burial  diagenesis

(burial metamorphism) and incipient metamorphism in clastic

rocks.  In:  Larsen  G.  &  Chilingar  G.V.  (Eds.):  Diagenesis  in

Sediment  and  Sedimentary  Rocks  2.  Elsevier,  Amsterdam,

289–493, 513–541.

Kisch H.J., 1991: Illite crystallinity: Recommendations on sample

preparation,  X-ray  diffraction,  settings,  and  interlaboratory

samples. J. Metamorphic Geol., 9, 665–670.

Krejèí O., Francù J., Müller P., Pereszlényi M. & Stráník Z., 1994:

Geologic  structure  and  hydrocarbons  generation  in  the  Car-

pathian flysh belt of southern Moravia. Vìst. ÈGÚ, 69, 4, 13–26.

Kübler B., 1964: Les argiles, indicateurs de métamorphisme. Rev.

Inst. Franç. Petrole, 19, 1093–1112.

Kübler B., 1967: La crystallinitede l´illite et les zones tout a fait su-

perieures du metamorphisme. In: Etages Tectoniques, Colloque

de Neuchatel, 1966, A la Baconniere, Neuchatel, 105–122.

Masaryk P., Milièka J., Pereszlényi M. & Pagáè I., 1995: Geophys-

ics,  geochemistry  and  lithofacies  in  the  Paleogene  of  the

Levoèa  Mts.  In:  Kalièiak  M.  (Ed.):  Proceedings  of  the  3

rd

Conference  in  mem.  J.  Slávik.  GÚDŠ,  Bratislava,  47–54  (in

Slovak).

Milièka J., Francù J., Horváth I. & Toman B., 1991: Optical, struc-

tural  and  thermal  characterization  of  meta-anthracite  from

Zemplinicum. Geol. Carpathica, 42, 1, 53–58.

Milièka  J.,  Pereszlényi  M.,  Šefara  J.  &  Vass  D.,  1994:  Organic

geochemical study of the junction zone of the Danube Basin

and  Inner  West  Carpathians,  Slovakia.  First  Break,  12,  11,

571–574.

Moore  D.M.  &  Reynolds  R.C.,  1997:  X-ray  diffraction  and  the

identification and analysis of clay minerals. Oxford Universi-

ty Press, Oxford, New York, 1–378.

Otava  J.  &  Sulovský  P.,  1997:  Material  comparison  of  the  Mo-

helnice  Formation  (Mírov  development)  and  Moravosilesian

Culm.  Geol.  výzk.  Morav.  Slez.  v  r.  1996,  Brno,  28–30  (in

Czech).

Pearson M.J. & Small J.S., 1988: Illite-smetite diagenesis and pa-

leotemperatures in northern north sea Quaternary to Mesozo-

ic shale sequences. Clay Miner., 23, 109–132.

Pereszlényi  M.,  Milièka  J.  &  Vass  D.,  1993:  Geochemistry  and

modelling of oil generation window in the Danube Basin. In:

Rakús  M.  &  Vozár  J.  (Eds.):  Geodynamic  model  and  deep

structure  of  the  West  Carpathians.  GÚDŠ,  Bratislava,  201–

206 (in Slovak).

Pereszlényi M., Vitáloš R., Milièka J., Jankù J. & Slávik M., 1997:

Oil  and  gas  potential  of  the  accretionary  wedge  of  the  West

Carpathians.  Proceedings  of  the  3

rd

  International  Conference

on Oil and Gas Bussiness Activities. Moravian Oil Company,

Hodonín, 197–199 (in Slovak).

Pollastro  R.M.,  1990:  The  illite/smectie  geothermometer  —  con-

cepts  methodology,  and  application  to  basin  history  and  hy-

drocarbon  generation.  In:  Nuccio  F.  &  Barker  C.E.  (Eds.):

Application of thermal maturity studies to energy exploration.

RMS-SEPM, 1–18.

Pollastro  R.M.,  1993:  Considerations  and  applications  of  the  illite-

smectite  geothermometer  in  hydrocarbon-bearing  rocks  of  Mi-

oceneto Mississipian age. Clays and Clays Miner., 41, 119–133.

Reynolds R.C. Jr., 1985: NEWMOD, a computer program for the cal-

culation  of  one-dimensional  diffraction  patterns  of  mixed-lay-

ered clays. R.C.Reynolds Jr., 8 Brook Rd., Hanover, N.H.

Reynolds  R.C.  &  Hower  J.,  1970:  The  nature  of  interlayering  in

mixed-layer  illite-montmorillonite.  Clays  and  Clay  Miner.,

18, 25–36.

Robert P., 1988: Organic metamorphism and geothermal history. Elf-

Aquitaine and D. Reidel publishing company, Dordrecht, 1–311.

Œrodoñ J. & Eberl D.D., 1984: Illite. In: Bailey S.W. (Ed.): Micas,

13, Miner. Soc. Amer., 495–544.

Œrodoñ  J.,  1995:  Reconstruction  of  maximum  paleotemperatures

at present erosional surface of the Upper Silesia Basin, based

on  the  composition  of  illite-smectite  in  shales.  Stud.  Geol.

Pol., 108, 9–20.

Šucha  V.,  Kraus  I. &  Madejová  J.,  1994:  Ammonium  illite  from

anchimetamorphic  shales  associated  with  anthracite  in  the

Zemplinicum  of  the  Western  Carpathians.  Clay  Miner.,  29,

369–377.

Teichmüller M., Taylor G.H. & Littke R., 1998: The nature of or-

ganic matter — macerals and associeted minerals. In: Taylor

G.H., Teichmüller M., Davis A., Diessel C.F.K., Littke R. &

Robert  P.  (Eds.):  Organic  petrology.  Gebrüder  Borntraeger,

Berlin, 175–274.

Teichmüller M., Teichmüller R. & Weber K., 1979: Inkohlung und

Illit-Kristalinitat Vergleichende Untersuchungen im Mesozoi-

kum und Paleozoikum von Westfalen. Fortschr. Geol. Rheinl.

Westf., 27, 201–276.

Todorov I., Schegg R. & Chochov S., 1992: Maturity studies in the

Carboniferous  Dobroudja  coal  basin  (northeastern  Bulgaria)

—  coalification,  clay  diagenesis  and  thermal  modelling.  Int.

J. Coal Geol., 21, 161–185.

Underwood  M.B.,  Brocculeri  T.,  Bergfeld  D.,  Howell  D.G.  &

Pawlewicz  M.,  1991:  Statistical  comparison  between  illite

crystallinity  and  vitrinite  reflectance,  Kandik  region  of  east-

central  Alaska.  In:  Bradley  D.C.  &  Dusel-Bacon  C.  (Eds.):

Geologic  studies  in  Alaska  by  the  U.S.  Geological  Survey,

background image

372                                                                          FRANCÙ, FRANCÙ

 

and KALVODA

1991. USGS Bull., 2041, 222–237.

Underwood M.B., Laughland M.M. & Kang S.M., 1993: A com-

parison among organic and inorganic indicators of diagenesis

and  low-temperature  metamorphism,  Tertiary  Shimanto  belt,

Shikoku, Japan. Geol. Soc. Amer., Spec. Pap., 273, 45–61.

Vavrdová M., 1997: Acritarchs of Cambrian age in the basal clas-

tics  underlying  the  Moravian  Devonian  (Nìmèièky-6  bore-

hole). Zem. Plyn Nafta, 42, 1, 31–32 (in Czech).

Waples D.W., 1985: Geochemistry in petroleum exploration. RE-

IDEL, Boston, 1–232.

Weaver C.E., 1960: Possible use of clay minerals in the search for

oil. Bull. Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geologists, 44, 1505–1518.

Weaver  C.E.,  Highsmith  P.B.  &  Wampler  J.M.,  1984:  Chlorite

(Chapter 5). In: Weaver C.E. & Associates (Eds.): Shale-slate

metamorphism  in  southern  Appalachians.  Developments  in

Petrology, 10, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 99–140.

Weber K., 1972: Notes on determinatin of illite crystallinity. Neu.

Jb. Mineral Abh., Mh., 267–276.

Wolf M., 1975: Relationship of illite crystallinity and coalification.

Neu. Jb. Geol. Paläont. Abh., Mh., 437–447 (in German).