background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 50, 1, BRATISLAVA, FEBRUARY 1999

33–48

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE MAASTRICHTIAN TO PALEOCENE

DISTAL FLYSCH SEDIMENTS OF THE RAÈA UNIT IN THE UZGRUÒ

SECTION (MAGURA GROUP OF NAPPES, CZECH REPUBLIC)

MIROSLAV BUBÍK

1

, MARTA B¥K

2

 and LILIAN ŠVÁBENICKÁ

3

1

Czech Geological Survey, Leitnerova 22, 658 69 Brno, Czech Republic; bubik@cgu.cz

2

Institute of Geological Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Oleandry 2a, 30-063 Kraków,

Poland; bak@ing.uj.edu.pl

3

Czech Geological Survey, Klárov 3, 118 21 Praha 1, Czech Republic; svab@cgu.cz

(Manuscript received February 19, 1998; accepted in revised form September 1, 1998)

Abstract: Late Maastrichtian to Paleocene distal flysch sediments of the Raèa Unit (Outer Flysch Carpathians) at the

Uzgruò section provided a relatively rich fossil record (foraminifers, radiolarians, calcareous nannofossils). The Upper

Maastrichtian can be subdivided into three calcareous nannofossil zones and the Paleocene assigned to one agglutinated

foraminiferal  zone.  Some  prospective  new  marker  species  of  agglutinated  foraminifers  for  subdivision  of  the

Maastrichtian–Paleocene  are discussed. The well preserved (pyritized) radiolarian fauna has brought interesting data

on the radiolarian biostratigraphy. The integrated microbiostratigraphy approach enabled us to find the Cretaceous/

Tertiary transition in a continuous flysch sequence of one partial outcrop. The transition is characterized by an increase

in the frequency of coarser turbidite intervals and disappearance of calcareous sediments. The nannofossils show the

influence of both Boreal and Tethyan bioprovince on the Magura depositional area.

Key words: Western Carpathians, Magura Flysch, Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary, lithostratigraphy,  biostratigraphy,

calcareous nannofossils, Radiolaria, Foraminifera.

Introduction

The  biostratigraphy  in  the  Magura  group  of  nappes  of  the

Carpathian Flysch Belt is limited by usually missing or poor-

ly preserved calcareous micro- and nannofossils especially in

the Cretaceous to Lower Eocene sediments. In the unnamed

brook near the Uzgruò settlement Pesl & Švábenická (1988)

found calcareous nannofossils of CC 25 and CC 26 nanno-

zones in the Soláò Formation. This find proved for the first

time  in  Moravia  the  Cretaceous  (Late  Maastrichtian)  age

within the Soláò Formation.

Švábenická  et  al.  (1997)  studied  the  Uzgruò  section  in

more detail. The rich fossil content of the flysch sediments

makes the Uzgruò section important for the biostratigraphy

of the Soláò Formation. The turbidite calcareous claystones

contained  abundant  calcareous  nannofossils  and  sporadic

planktonic  foraminifers.  Non-calcareous  hemipelagic  clay-

stones  contained  medium  to  high  diversity  assemblages  of

autochthonous  agglutinated  foraminifers  with  strati-

graphically  important  rzehakinids.  In  addition,    well  pre-

served (pyritized) radiolarians were found in several layers

of  claystones  (both  turbidite  and  hemipelagic)  below  the

Cretaceous/Paleocene boundary.

This  paper  presents  the  biostratigraphy  of  the  section

based on foraminifers (M. Bubík), radiolarians (M. B¹k) and

calcareous  nannofossils  (L.  Švábenická)  integrated  to

achieve a more precise subdivision of the Upper Maastrich-

tian-Paleocene sediments of the Magura Flysch.

Fig. 1. Uzgruò section: situation of studied outcrops.

Studied section

The Uzgruò section is represented by several isolated out-

crops situated along the unnamed brook (Fig. 1)  NNE of the

background image

34                                                                               BUBÍK, B¥K and ŠVÁBENICKÁ

Uzgruò settlement (on the road from Velké Karlovice to Ma-

kov close to the Slovak border). The brook generally follows

the strike of the belt consisting mostly of thin bedded flysch

of the Soláò Formation (Fig. 2) with a high claystone/sand-

stone ratio. The  succession of strata within the belt is dis-

turbed by faults and folds as evident from measurements and

biostratigraphic results. Nevertheless, the strikes of beds be-

tween 40

o

 and 90

o

 predominate.

The thin-bedded flysch consists predominantly of dark grey

calcareous  silty  claystones  and  grey-green  non-calcareous

claystones  with  thin  intercalations  of  dark  grey  silty  sand-

stones  and  siltstones.  Banks  of  grey  and  green-grey  fine-

grained sandstones 10 to 40 cm occur less frequently. In places

grey  marlstones  to  marly  claystones  occur  at  the  base  of

rhythms. The Paleocene part of the formation is barren of cal-

careous claystones and marlstones. On the other hand,  thicker

sandstone beds (up to 1.35 m at maximum) seem to be more

frequent.

From  the  sedimentological  point  of  view,  the  non-

complete turbidite rhythms usually consist of Te, Td-e and

Tc-e members (sensu Bouma 1962) in the Maastrichtian and

Td-e, Tc-e and Tb-d in the Paleocene (compare Fig. 3). In

the Maastrichtian, turbidite rhythms beginning with the Te

interval represent about 50 % of all turbidites, while in the

Paleocene they amount to no more than 20 %. Hemipelagites

(non-calcareous  claystones)  are  regularly  present  between

the turbidites. A lack of calcium carbonate and purely agglu-

tinated foraminiferal fauna in the hemipelagites indicate the

conditions  below  the  CCD.  Such  features  are  evidence  of

very distal turbidite sedimentation probably on a lower fan-

bottom plain transition.

Description of studied points:

No.  19.  Low  cuts  along  both  banks  of  the  brook  exposing  the

slightly  folded  thin-bedded  flysch  sequence  with  predominance  of

hemipelagic grey-green non-calcareous claystones. In the lower part

of  the  sequence,  thin  intercalations  of  dark  grey  calcareous  silty

claystones and less frequently grey pelocarbonates are present. The

upper part is completely non-calcareous.  A few banks of grey fine-

grained  calcareous  sandstone  (40  cm  thick  at  maximum)

representing the Tb and Tc intervals are visible. Samples 19A–19G

(see Fig. 3) and 19 (in the stratigraphically highest accessible level).

Soláò Formation.

No. 20. Small outcrops in the bed and both banks of the brook.

Thin-bedded flysch sequence with alternating grey, dark-grey and

green-grey non-calcareous and calcareous claystones, fine-grained

sandstones  (Tc)  and  more  frequent  grey  pelocarbonates.  Samples

(in subsequence from the oldest) 20B, 20, 20A. Soláò Formation.

No.  21.  Small  outcrops  in  both  banks  of  the  brook.  In  the  left

bank  the  thin-bedded  flysch  consisting  of  claystones  and  fine-

grained sandstones includes a thick bed of dark grey fine-grained

unsorted silty sandstone and microconglomerate with silty matrix

(mudflow    body).  In  the  right    bank  the  thin-bedded  flysch  se-

quence  deformed  by  flexure  is  cut  by  the  brook  in  a  3.5  m  high

outcrop. The sequence consists of dark-grey calcareous and green-

grey  non-calcareous  claystones  alternating  with  thin  layers  of

fine-grained  sandstones  and  rarely  marlstones  (samples  21A,

21B). Upstream, a long right cut-bank over 4 m high shows a simi-

lar  flysch  sequence  (sample  21C,  see  Fig.  3).  The  thin  banks  of

grey,  yellowish  weathered  marlstones  are  more  frequent.  Soláò

Formation.

No. 22. Low road-cut in slope debris and slope loams. In places

the  debris  contain  red  brown  non-calcareous  claystones  of  the

Beloveža Formation, transported by gravity process from the slope.

No. 23. Rocky cascade about 7 m high formed by concentration

of thick coarse- to fine-grained sandstone banks 0.6 to 1.35 m thick

strongly    disturbed  by  faults.  Thin  grey  claystone  and  dark-grey

silty  claystone  intercalations  (both  non-calcareous)    were  observed

in  the  highest  part  of  the  sequence  in  the  right  bank  (sample  23).

Soláò Formation.

No.  24.  Small  outcrop  in  the  right  bank  of  the  brook,  mostly

covered  by  debris.  The  thin-bedded  flysch  sequence  consists

predominantly  of  green-grey  black-grey  mostly  non-calcareous

claystones  (both  turbidite  and  hemipelagite).    Limonitized  fine-

grained  sandstones  occur  in  thin  (1–3  cm,  exceptionally  10  cm)

layers. Samples 24A, 24B. Soláò Formation.

No. 25. Poorly exposed outcrops in the bed and right bank of the

brook  covered  by  debris.  Several  sandstone  banks  parallel  to  the

brook  are  accompanied  by  green-grey  non-calcareous  claystone

(sample 25D), dark grey calcareous claystone (25C) and light grey

mottled  marl  and  grey  marly  limestone  (25A,  25B).  Soláò

Formation.

No.  26.  Right  cut-bank  exposing  thin-bedded  flysch  sequence

(Fig. 3) in subhorizontal position. The calcareous claystones (Te)

of  dark  grey    and  less  frequently  green-grey  and  brown-grey

colours  predominate  over  thin  layers  (1  cm)  of  silty  sandstones.

Three thin banks of grey, yellowish weathered marlstone occur in

Fig.  2.  Geological  map  of  the  area  around  the  Uzgruò  section:

Quarternary:  1  —  fluvial  sediments  (aluvium),  2  —  deluvio-

fluvial and slope sediments; Raèa Unit: 3 — Beloveža Formation

(Paleocene-Eocene), 4 — Soláò Formation (Paleocene), 5 — Soláò

Formation (Senonian).

background image

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE MAASTRICHTIAN TO PALEOCENE DISTAL FLYSCH SEDIMENTS                       35

Fig. 3. Uzgruò section: lithology and sedimentology of the selected outcrops. Lithology: 1 — non-calcareous turbidite claystones, 2 —

calcareous  turbidite  claystones,  3  —  non-calcareus  hemipelagic  claystones  and  clays,  4  —  marly  limestones  and  marlstones,  5  —

pelocarbonates,  6  —  turbidite  siltstones,  7  —  sandstones;  Explanation  of  marks:  8  —  calcareous,  9  —  convolute  lamination,  10  —

ripples,  11  —  parallel  lamination,  12  —  Chondrites  sp.,  13  —  graded  bedding,  14  —  samples  for  foraminifers,  15  —  samples  for

nannofossils.

the  lower  third  of  the  exposed  sequence.  Samples  26A1,  26A2,

26B, 26C. Soláò Formation.

No. 27. Outcrop in the left bank of the brook covered by debris.

The  poorly  exposed  thin-bedded  flysch  sequence  consists  of  alter-

nation  of  green-grey  non-calcareous  silty  claystones  and  siltstones

and dark grey fine-grained sandstones (up to 14 cm thick). Sample

27. Soláò Formation.

No.  28.  Slope  loam  with  debris  of  sandstones  and  red-brown

non-calcareous  claystones  in  the  track-cut  on  the  spur  of  ridge.

Sample 28. Beloveža Formation.

No. 29. Left cut-bank of another unnamed brook 4.5 m high and

over  8  m  long.  The  well  exposed  thin  bedded  flysch  sequence

consists  of  grey-green  non-calcareous  siltstones  (predominating),

silty claystones and dark grey silty sandstones with cubic disinte-

gration. Sample 29. Beloveža Formation.

No. 32. Small (2.3 m high) right cut-bank of the brook exposing

the  thin  to  medium  bedded  completely  non-calcareous  flysch  se-

quence.  The  sequence  consists  of  green-grey  fine-grained  sand-

stones (up to 0.4 m thick), green-grey, less frequently black-grey

and  grey  claystones  and  silty  claystones  (Te  and  hemipelagites)

background image

36                                                                               BUBÍK, B¥K and ŠVÁBENICKÁ

Fig. 4. Stratigraphically important agglutinated foraminifers from the Uzgruò section. a — Rzehakina epigona (Rz.), sample 19F, b —

Rzehakina minima Cush. & Renz, sample 19 F, c — Rzehakina lata Cush. & Jarv., sample 19, d–g — Rzehakina fissistomata (Grzyb.),

sample 19G, h — “Trochammina” cf. sp. 4, sample 19A, i — “Trochammina” sp. 4, sample 27, j–m — Spiroplectammina sp. 1, j —

sample 19G, k–m — sample 22, n–o — Bulbobaculites fontinensis (Terquem), sample 29, h–o in transparency; lenght of bar 0.5 mm.

and  dark-grey  siltstones  and  silty  sandstones.  Sample  32.  Soláò

Formation.

No. 33. Poor outcrop (?debris) in the left bank of a branch of the

unnamed brook. Below the slope loam, weathered red-brown non-

calcareous  silty  claystones  of  the  Beloveža  Formation  were

observed.  Agglutinated  foraminifers  give  evidence  of  Middle
Eocene age (Cyclammina amplectens Zone).

Foraminifers

From the Uzgruò section 19 samples were taken for fora-

minifers, mostly from hemipelagic claystones (Table 1). The

samples were weighed and washed on 0.063 mm sieves. The

taxonomic  concept  of  determined  taxa  and  description  of

species named in open nomenclature (numbered species) is

consistent with the study by Bubík (1995). For the determinat-

ion  of  stratigraphically  important  rzehakinids,  the  biometric

method based on length/width ratio and the involution index

was applied (Bubík, in preparation).

The calcareous silty claystones (turbidite Te interval) stud-

ied  in  three  samples  provided  rare  calcareous  benthos,  as

well as agglutinated benthos and only one test of the plank-

tonic species Abathomphalus mayaroensis Bolli. Neverthe-

less, the find of this species is  stratigraphically very impor-

tant  giving  evidence  of    the  Late  Maastrichtian  A.

mayaroensis Zone.

The  attention  was  focused  on  agglutinated  benthos  from

hemipelagic claystones (see Fig. 4), which was abundant in

all samples and probably represents autochthonous fauna.

The  interval  higher  Lower  Campanian–Maastrichtian  is

equivalent to Hormosina (= Caudammina) gigantea Zone sensu

Geroch & Nowak (1984). In the Uzgruò section Caudammina

gigantea (Geroch) is completely missing and the closely related

C. ovulum (Grzybowski) is also unusually rare. The absence of

C. gigantea is reported also in some formations of the same age

from the Bílé Karpaty Unit (Bubík 1995). On the other hand, the

frequent occurrence of C. gigantea is known in the Soláò For-

mation at some other localities in the Raèa Unit. The occurrence

of this species is probably limited by an unknown paleoenviron-

mental  factor.  A  more  detail  subdivision  of  the  Campanian–

Maastrichtian  interval  based  on  the  agglutinated  foraminifers

and useful in inter-regional correlation remains  problematic.

Rzehakina  fissistomata  (Grzybowski)  is  the  most  impor-

tant  agglutinated  species  for  biostratigraphy  in  the  studied

section. The first occurrence of this species defines the base

of the Paleocene and the base of the Rzehakina fissistomata

Zone sensu Geroch & Nowak (1984).  In the Uzgruò section

R. fissistomata occurs in the completely non-calcareous part

of  the  formation,  where  nannofossil  biostratigraphy  cannot

be applied. At the point No. 19 the first occurrence of this

species was observed in sample 19G above the last intercala-

tion  of  calcareous  claystone  (sample  19E)  which  provided

Late  Maastrichtian  nannofossils  and  Abathomphalus  may-

aroensis (Fig. 3).

“Trochammina” sp. 4 was reported from the Lower Pale-

ocene of the Bílé Karpaty Unit (Bubík 1995). This species is

very rare, what limits its potential use in biostratigraphy. In

the Uzgruò section this species occurs in the non-calcareous

background image

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE MAASTRICHTIAN TO PALEOCENE DISTAL FLYSCH SEDIMENTS                       37

flysch sequence at point No. 27 of probably Paleocene age.

A  similar  form  (megalosphaeric  specimen)  was  found  at

point No. 19 in sample 19A below the last calcareous inter-

calations  containing  Maastrichtian  nannofossils,  that  is    in

the uppermost Maastrichtian close to the C/T boundary.

Another potential marker species Spiroplectammina sp. 1

sensu  Bubík  (1995)  is  very  rare  in  the  Paleocene  of  the

Soláò  and  Beloveža  formations.  Dating  of  its  first  appear-

ance still has to be made more precise. Thit is complicated

by its occurrence in non-calcareous formations without nan-

nofossil calibration.

In  the  probably  youngest  studied  Paleocene  strata  of  the

Uzgruò  section  (point  No.  29,  Beloveža  Formation)

Bulbobaculites fontinensis (Terquem) appears. Although oc-

currence of this species is reported in Carpathian Flysch al-

ready from the Lower Cretaceous (Geroch 1966), an identi-

cal  form  (see  Geroch  1960)  has  been  observed  from  the

Eocene. It will also be necessary to precisely date the first

occurrence of this species.

Radiolaria

Three samples taken originally for foraminifers (20B, 20,

19D) contained abundant pyritized radiolarian fauna (see Pl.

I). The best preserved forms have been recovered in sample

19D.  Specimens  in  the  samples  20  and  20B  are  also

pyritized but unrecognizable.

The recognized  low-latitude radiolarian association is dom-

inated by Nassellaria belonging to the genera Theocapsomma,

Gongylothorax,  Cryptamphorella,  Siphocampe,    Rhopalosy-

ringium, Myllocercion, Eostichomitra, Stichomitra, Dictyomi-

tra, Amphipyndax and Cryptocapsa. Common and characteris-

tic  species  are  Cryptocapsa  asymmetros  Foreman,

Dictyomitra lamellicostata (Foreman), D. multicostata Zittel,

Theocapsomma  teren  Foreman,  T.  comys  Foreman,  T.  aff.

comys Foreman, Gongylothorax verbeeki (Tan), Siphocampe

daseia  (Foreman),  S.  bassilis  (Foreman),  Rhopalosyringium

magnificum Campbell & Clark, Amphipyndax pseudoconulus

(Pessagno), A. tylotus Foreman, Stichomitra stocki (Campbell

&    Clark),  S.  bertrandi  Cayeux,  Eostichomitra  asymbatos

(Foreman), Cryptamphorella conara (Foreman), Myllocercion

acineton Foreman and Dictyodedalus cretaceus (Taketani) and

Afens liriodes Riedel & Sanfilipo.

Spumellaria are less common in the association investigat-

ed. They are represented by the genera Pseudoaulophacus,

Patellula, Praeconocaryomma and Orbiculiforma. The most

characteristic species are Pseudoaulophacus floresensis Pes-

sagno and Orbiculiforma renillaeformis Pessagno.

Upper Cretaceous Radiolaria have been studied previously

by many authors (Campbell &  Clark 1944; Foreman 1968,

1975, 1977; Petrushevskaya & Kozlova 1972; Moore 1973;

Riedel  &  Sanfilippo  1974;  Pessagno  1976;  Empson-Morin

1981; Sanfilippo & Riedel 1985; Ling & Lazarus 1990; Vish-

nevskaya 1993). Some of them proposed radiolarian biozo-

nation  for  the  Campanian–Danian  interval  (Moore  1973;

Hollis 1993), but well-documented sections containing Up-

per Cretaceous to Paleocene deposits with known calcareous

plankton  for  biostratigraphic  control  are  rare  (Strong  et  al.

1995; Keller et al. 1997).

The  assemblage  investigated  can  be  correlated  with  the

Late  Campanian  to  Maastrichtian  Amphipyndax  tylotus

Zone of Foreman (1977) on the basis of  the presence of the

index  species  and  A.  liriodes  which  co-occur  with  Sipho-

campe bassilis, S. daseia, E. asymbatos, Cryptocapsa asym-

metros, Theocapsomma teren and T. comys, described also

by  Foreman  (1968)  from  Upper  Maastrichtian  deposits  of

California.

The assemblage can also be correlated with the Theocap-

somma comys Zone of Riedel &  Sanfilippo (1974) of ap-

proximately Maastrichtian age, on the basis of co-occurrence

of the index species with E. asymbatos, Stichomitra stocki,

A. liriodes and Amphipyndax pseudoconulus.

The  presence  of  Orbiculiforma  renillaeformis  together

with  the  above  mentioned  radiolarian  species  allow  the

correlation with Maastrichtian Orbiculiforma renillaeformis

Interval Zone proposed by Pessagno (1976) for the Califor-

nia the Coast Ranges.

The  comparison  of  our  radiolarian  fauna  with  the  above

mentioned zonal schemes allows us to date it as Maastrichtian,

but does not give the precise position of the Cretaceous/Tertia-

ry (C/T) boundary within the profile investigated. This prob-

lem can be discussed on the basis of the radiolarian zonation

proposed by Hollis (1993) for the latest Cretaceous to late Pa-

leocene  deposits  from  the  New  Zealand  region  and  also  by

Keller et al. (1997) from Equador. Hollis (1993) proposed the

Lithomelissa ?hoplites Zone for the Late Campanian to the lat-

est  Maastrichtian  interval,  on  the  basis  of  high-intermediate

latitude radiolarian fauna. Although the index species is lack-

ing in our assemblage, it corresponds to this zone by the pres-

ence of  O.  renillaeformis, A. stocki, M. acineton, E. asym-

batos and D. multicostata. Moreover L. ?hoplites appears near

the  base  of  the  A.  tylotus  Zone  and  was  recommended  by

Foreman  (1977)  for  use  in  the  region  where  A.  tylotus  is

absent. Hollis (1993) defined  the top of this zone as the first

appearance of Amphisphaera aotea Hollis and placed it at the

C/T boundary. According to this author, A. aotea co-occurs

with  the  above  mentioned  species  and  also  with  those  de-

Plate  I:  Fig.  1  —  Flustrella  ruesti  (Campbell  &  Clark),  U715,

×

150.  Fig.  2  —  Pseudoaulophacus  floresensis  Pessagno,  U755,

×

150. Fig. 3  — Patellula  planoconvexa  (Pessagno),  U676, 

×

150.

Fig. 4 —  Dictyomitra multicostata Zittel, U167, 

×

150. Fig. 5 —

Theocapsomma teren Foreman, U322, 

×

300. Fig. 6 — Cryptocap-

sa  asymmetros  Foreman,  U710, 

×

300.  Fig.  7  —  Theocapsomma

comys  Foreman,  U672, 

×

300.  Fig.  8  —  Gongylothorax  verbeeki

(Tan), U162, 

×

300. Fig. 9 — Afens liriodes Riedel & Sanfilippo,

U251, 

×

200.  Fig.  10  —  Siphocampe  daseia  (Foreman),  U736,

×

300.  Fig.  11  —    Theocapsomma  aff.  comys  Foreman,  U456,

×

500.  Fig.  12  —  Rhopalosyringium  magnificum  Campbell  &

Clark, U330, 

×

300. Fig. 13 — Amphipyndax pseudoconulus (Pes-

sagno),  U279, 

×

300.  Fig.  14  —  Dictyodedalus  cretaceus  (Taket-

ani),  U470, 

×

500.  Fig.  15  —  Stichomitra  stocki  (Campbell  &

Clark),  U388, 

×

250.  Fig.  16  —  Stichomitra  bertrandi  Cayeux,

U238,   

×

175.  All  specimens  from  the  sample  19D.  Microphoto-

graphs M. B¹k.

I

background image

38                                                                                                   PLATE I

background image

PLATE II                                                                                                  39

background image

40                                                                               BUBÍK, B¥K and ŠVÁBENICKÁ

Plate II: Figs. 1–4 — Ceratolithoides kamptneri Bram-

lette  &  Martini,  sample  26A1.  Figs.  5,    6  —  Cera-

tolithoides aculeus  (Stradner)  Prins  &  Sissingh,  sample

26A1. Figs. 7, 8 — Micula decussata Vekshina,  sample

21.  Figs.  9,  10  —  Micula  concava  (Stradner)  Bukry,

sample 20B. Figs. 11, 12, 14 — Micula murus (Martini)

Bukry.  Fig.  11  —  sample  20.  Figs.  14,  15  —  sample

26A2. Fig. 13 — Micula swastica Stradner & Steinmetz,

sample 26A1. Fig. 15  — Micula  murus-prinsii,  sample

20B.  Figs.  16–18  —  Micula  prinsii  Perch-Nielsen,

sample  20B.  Figs.  19,  20  —  Lithraphidites  quadratus

Bramlette  &  Martini,  sample  20B.  Figs.  21,  22  —

Biscutum  constans    (Górka  1957)  Black  1967,  sample

21.  Figs.  23,  24  —  Cribrocorona  gallica  (Stradner)

Perch-Nielsen,  sample  26A2.  Figs.  25,  26,  31,  32  —

Cribrosphaerella 

ehrenbergii 

(Arkhangelsky)

Deflandre. Figs. 25, 26 — sample 26A2. Figs. 31, 32 —

sample  26A1.  Figs.  27–30  —  Nephrolithus  frequens

Górka. Figs. 27, 28 — sample 21. Figs. 29, 30 — sample

20B.  Figs.  33,  34  —  ?Cribrosphaerella  daniae  Perch-

Nielsen, sample 26A2. Figs.  35, 36, 39–42  —  Arkhan-

gelskiella cymbiformis Vekshina. Figs. 35, 36 — var. N,

sample 26A1. Figs. 39, 40 — var. W, sample 21. Figs.

41,  42  —  var.  W,  sample  26A1.  Figs.  37,  38  —  Cri-

brosphaerella  sp.  cf.  ?C.  daniae  (fragment  of  a  large

specimen), sample 26A2. Microphotographs L. Šváben-

ická, magnification 

×

2000.

Solaò Formation

Beloveža F.

Lithostratigraphy

Maastrichian

Paleocene

Age

26

C

25

D

24

A

21

B

20

B

20 19

A

19

D

19

E

19

G

19 27 23 32 22 28 29

UZGRUÒ SECTION

r

Abathomphalus mayaroensis (Bolli)

cf.

r

r Ammodiscus bornemanni (Reuss)

r

cf. r

r cf.

r r r

r r r r Ammodiscus cretaceus (Reuss)

r r

r r

Ammodiscus glabratus (Cushman&Jarvis)

cf.

cf.

Ammodiscus infimus Franke

r r r

r cf. r r

cf.

c r r r r r Ammodiscus planus Loeblich

r r r

r

r cf.

r r r

r Ammodiscus tenuissimus Grzybowski

r

r r r r

Ammolagena clavata (Jones & Parker)

r r r

r r r

r r r r

r c c Ammosphaeroidina pseudopauciloculata (Myatl.)

r r r r

r

Arenobulimina sp.,juv.

r

Aschemocella grandis (Grzybowski)

cf.

Aschemocella subnodosiformis (Grzybowski)

r

r

r

r Aschemocella sp.

r r r

r

r

cf.

r Bathysiphon gerochi Myatlyuk

r Bulbobaculites fontinensis  (Terquem)

cf. r

Buzasina pacifica (Krasheninnikov)

r r r r r r cf.

r c

r c c r r Caudammina excelsa (Dylazanka)

r

r cf. r

r

Caudammina ovuloides (Grzybowski)

r r r

r r

r

r r c

Caudammina ovulum (Grzybowski)

r

cf. cf. r r r

Caudammina? velascoensis (Cushman)

r

Cystammina sp.

r

r

r

r r r

r

d r Glomospira charoides (Jones & Parker)

r

r

Glomospira diffundens (Cushman&Renz)

cf.

r

Glomospira gaultina (Berthelin)

r

r

r r Glomospira glomerata (Grzybowski)

r

r

r

r r r r Glomospira gordialis (Jones&Parker)

r r r r r r

r r r r r cf.

Glomospira irregularis (Grzybowski)

r

r

r

cf.

r Glomospira serpens (Grzybowski)

r cf.

Glomospira sp. 1

r r

r r cf.

cf.

r

r r r

Glomospirella grzybowskii (Jurkiewicz)

cf.

cf.

r

r

Haplophragmoides horridus (Grzybowski)

r r

Haplophragmoides suborbicularis (Grzybowski)

r r Haplophragmoides walteri (Grzybowski)

cf.

Haplophragmoides sp. 1

r

r Haplophragmoides sp. 2

cf.

cf.

cf. Haplophragmoides sp. 3

cf.

r cf.

Haplophragmoides sp. 5

r

r cf.

c r cf. r Hyperammina nuda Subbotina

r r r

r

r

r r r

r

Kalamopsis grzybowskii (Dylazanka)

cf. r r

r

r

Karrerulina coniformis (Grzybowski)

r

c r

r r

Karrerulina conversa (Grzybowski)

r

r

r

r r

Karrerulina horrida (Myatluyuk)

c Karrerulina tenuis (Grzybowski)

c r r d r c r c d r c r r r c r r Nothia sp.

r r r cf. r

r r

r r r

r

Nothia? latissima (Grzybowski)

r

Nuttallides sp.

cf.

cf. cf.

Paratrochamminoides acervulatus (Grzybowski)

cf.

r cf.

r

r

cf. Paratrochamminoides contortus (Grzybowski)

r

cf.

cf.

cf.

r Paratrochamminoides deformis (Grzybowski)

cf cf. r

r r

r Paratrochamminoides heteromorphus (Grzybow.)

cf.

r

r

r cf.

r

r r

r Paratrochamminoides mitratus (Grzybowski)

r r r r r r r

r r

r r

cf.

Paratrochamminoides olszewskii (Grzybowski)

cf.

Paratrochamminoides uviformis (Grzybowski)

cf.

r

r

r

r r r

r Paratrochamminoides sp.1

r

Plectorecurvoides parvus Krasheninnikov

c Psammosphaera fusca Schulze

r

Psammosphaera irregularis (Grzybowski)

r r r r r

cf. r

r r r

r r Psammosphaera sp. 2

r

cf. cf.

r r

Recurvoidella lamella (Grzybowski)

cf.

r r

. cf.

r

cf.

r

Recurvoides anormis Myatlyuk

r

Recurvoides cf. gerochi   Pflaumann

cf.

cf.

cf.

Recurvoides immane (Grzybowski)

r

r

r

r r

Recurvoides nucleolus (Grzybowski)

cf.

cf.

Recurvoides pentacameratus Krasheninnikov

cf.

Recurvoides aff. primus Myatlyuk

cf. r

cf. r cf. r

r

Recurvoides pseudosymmetricus Krasheninn.

r cf.

Recurvoides recurvoidimiformis (Neagu & Tocor.)

r cf. r cf. Recurvoides walteri (Grzybowski)

r

cf

Recurvoides sp. 2

cf.

r

Recurvoides sp. 3

cf.

cf.

r

r

Recurvoides sp. 5

r

Recurvoides? sp. 6

r

r Reophax duplex Grzybowski

r r r r

cf. r

r Reophax pilulifer Brady

r r

r r

r

Remesella varians (Glaessner)

r

r c

cf r cf. r Rhabdammina cylindrica Glaessner

r r r r

r

r r r r r r d r r r "Rhizammina" sp.

r r r r

Rzehakina epigona (Rzehak)

r r

r r

Rzehakina fissistomata (Grzybowski)

r

r r

Rzehakina lata Cushman & Jarvis

r cf.

r

r r

r

Rzehakina minima Cushman & Renz

c r r r r r r r

r r r r c r r

Saccammina placenta (Grzybowski)

Table  1:  Foraminiferal  distribution  in  the  Uzgruò  section.  (r  —  rare, c  —

common, d — dominant, cf. — species determination uncertain).

scribed  by  Foreman  (1968)  from  the  Upper  Maas-

trichtian  and  unzoned  transitional  interval,  which

have their last occurrence in the Lower Paleocene.

Moreover, the C/T is marked by changes in radi-

olarian composition from Nassellaria to Spumellar-

ia dominance. The radiolarian fauna composition in

our  assemblage  is  dominated  by  Nassellaria  and

also  lacking  A.  aotea.  Those  facts  may  prove  its

Cretaceous  age,  although  an  Early  Paleocene  age

cannot be excluded (compare Fig. 5).

Calcareous nannofossils

Samples  were  taken  from  turbidite  calcareous

claystones  (flysch interval Te sensu Bouma 1962).

Smear  slides  for  nannofossil  study  were  prepared

using the standard method of decantation, the sam-

ples  were  inspected  in  the  light  microscope  at

1000

× 

magnification.  Biostratigraphic  data  were

correlated  with  the  standard  nannoplankton  CC

zones by Sissingh (1977) and Perch-Nielsen (1985).

The data concerning province appurtenance of nan-

nofossil species were interpreted mainly according to

Wind  (1979),  Watkins  (1992)  and  Burnett  (pers.

comm.).

The rich assemblages of moderate to poorly pre-

served nannofossils with relatively high species di-

versity contained typical Maastrichtian species, such

as  Arkhangelskiella  cymbiformis  (specimens  of  A.

cymbiformis var. W and var. N sensu Varol 1989 pre-

I

background image

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE MAASTRICHTIAN TO PALEOCENE DISTAL FLYSCH SEDIMENTS                       41

12, 14) which give evidence for the CC 25c Zone, the

second one is characterized by Nephrolithus frequens

(Pl.  II,  Figs.  27–30),  the  nominate  species  of  the

CC 26 Zone and the third one by the presence of Mic-

ula prinsii (Pl. II, Figs. 16–18) which allowed  corre-

lation  even  with  the  uppermost  part  of  this  stage

(Perch-Nielsen 1985; Seyve 1990).

The  nannofossil  assemblages  yielded  the  so  called

“survivor species” that pass C/T boundary and survive

into the Tertiary, such as  Markalius apertus, M. inver-

sus, Zeugrhabdothus sigmoides, Cyclagelosphaera re-

inhardtii, Neocrepidolithus cohenii, N. fossus, Braaru-

dosphaera  bigelowii,  Thoracosphaera  sp.    (sensu

Pospichal 1991, Burnett pers. comm.). Moreover, the

extremely  rare  occurrence  of  Biantholithus  sparsus

was  recorded  in  two  samples  of  the  Uzgruò  section

(see Table 2 and Pl. III: Figs. 7, 8).

The  first  occurrence  of  Biantholithus  sparsus  is

mostly mentioned at the base of the Paleocene (Mar-

tini 1971; Perch-Nielsen 1985) or it is even used as a

marker for the base of this period (Seyve 1990; Wat-

kins  1992;  Ivanov  &  Stoykova  1994  and  others).

Solaò Formation

Beloveža F.

Lithostratigraphy

Maastrichian

Paleocene

Age

26

C

25

D

24

A

21

B

20

B

20 19

A

19

D

19

E

19

G

19 27 23 32 22 28 29

UZGRUÒ SECTION

r

r

cf. r

r

Sphaerammina  gerochi Hanzlikova

cf

Spiroplectammina dentata (Alth)

r cf.

r Spiroplectammina spectabilis (Grzybowski)

r

r r

Spiroplectammina sp. 1

cf.

r

r r

Subreophax pseudoscalaria Samuel

r

r

cf.

cf. Subreophax scalaria (Grzybowski)

r

r

cf. cf.

r

r cf.

Subreophax splendidus (Grzybowski)

r r r

r r r

r r

r r r r Thalmannammina gerochi (Hanzlikova)

r

r r

r

r

r r r Thalmannammina  ex gr. gerochi (Hanzlikova)

r

Thalmannammina meandertornata Neagu & Tocor.

cf.

r

r Thalmannammina subturbinata (Grzybowski)

r

cf.

Thurammina papillata Brady

r

r

"Trochammina" quadriloba Grzybowski

cf.

r cf. r

Trochammina sp. 3

cf.

r

"Trochammina" sp. 4

r r

cf.

r

Trochamminoides ammonoides (Grzybowski)

r

r

r r

r r r

r cf. r

Trochamminoides dubius (Grzybowski)

r r

Trochamminoides folius (Grzybowski)

r

r r

Trochamminoides cf. proteus (Karrer)

r Trochamminoides cf. septatus (Grzybowski)

r

Trochamminoides subcoronatus (Grzybowski)

cf.

r

r Trochamminoides vermetiformis (Grzybowski)

r cf. r r r

Trochamminoides variolarius (Grzybowski)

r

Turritellella reversa Bubik

Continuation of Table 1

Fig. 5. Comparison of Upper Cretaceous to lower Paleocene radiolarian ranges reported by previous authors.

vail), Cribrosphaerella daniae, Lithraphidites quadratus, Cer-

atolithoides kamptneri, Ahmuellerella regularis etc. (Table 2).

Three  distinct  biostratigraphic  intervals  within  the  Upper

Maastrichtian can be recognized in the section. The first one is

documented by the presence of Micula murus (Pl. II, Figs. 11,

Romein & Smit (1981) emended Biantholithus sparsus Zone

(described  by  Perch-Nielsen  1971)  with  a  note    that  the

name-giving species is extremely rare or even absent in the

sediments and that the lowermost part of this zone is charac-

terized  by  high  frequencies  of  the  long-ranging  species

background image

42                                                                             BUBÍK, B¥K and ŠVÁBENICKÁ

Plate III: Figs. 1, 2 — Markalius inversus (Deflandre) Bramlette

&  Martini,  sample  20B.  Figs.  3–6  —  Markalius  apertus  Perch-

Nielsen. Figs. 3, 4 — sample 21. Figs. 5, 6 — sample 20B. Figs. 7,

8 — Biantholithus sparsus Bramlette & Martini, sample 21. Figs.

9,  10  —    Cyclagelosphaera  reinhardtii  (Perch-Nielsen)  Romein,

sample  21.  Figs.  11,  12  —  Braarudosphaera  bigelowii  (Gran  &

Braarud)  Deflandre,  sample  26A2.  Figs.  13,  14  —

Ellipsagelosphaera  britannica  (Stradner)  Perch-Nielsen,  sample

20B.  Figs.  15–18  —  Neocrepidolithus  dirimosus  (Perch-Nielsen)

Perch-Nielsen. Figs. 15, 16 — sample 21A. Figs. 17, 18 — sample

21. Figs. 19–20 — Eiffellithus gorkae Reinhardt, sample 21. Figs.

21,  22  —  Eiffellithus  turriseiffelii  (Deflandre)  Reinhardt,  sample

20B. Figs. 23, 24 — Eiffellithus parallelus  Perch-Nielsen, sample

20B. Figs. 25, 26 — Ahmuellerella octoradiata (Górka) Reinhardt,

sample  21.  Figs.  27,  28  —  Ahmuellerella  regularis  (Górka)

Reinhardt & Górka, sample 20B. Figs. 29, 30 — Prediscosphaera

cretacea  (Arkhangelsky)  Gartner,  sample  26A2.    Figs.  31,  32  —

Prediscosphaera  stoveri  (Perch-Nielsen)  Shafik  &  Stradner,

sample  20B.  Fig.  33  —  Prediscosphaera  arkhangelskyi

(Reinhardt)  Perch-Nielsen,  sample  20B.  Figs.  34–36  —

Prediscosphaera majungae Perch-Nielsen, sample 21. Figs. 34, 35

— lateral view of specimen. Figs. 37, 38 — Cretarhabdus conicus

Bramlette  &  Martini,  sample  20B.  Figs.  39,  40  —  Retacapsa

madingleyensis  (Black)  Black,  sample  21A1.  Figs.  41,  42  —

Prediscosphaera 

grandis 

Perch-Nielsen, 

sample 

20B.

Microphotographs by L. Švábenická, magnification 

×

2000.

Late Maastrichtian

Age

CC25c

CC26

zones

Sissingh (1977), Perch-Nielsen (1985)

M. murus

N. frequens

M. prinsii

local zones

26

A1

26

A2

26

B

25

A

25

B

25

C

24

B

21 21

C

20 20

A

20

B

19

B

19

C

19

E

*1

UZGRUÒ SECTION

A R P P R R P R A A A R P P P

relative sample abundance

c c f f c c x c c c c c c f f

Arkhangelskiella cymbiformis

. . . . . .

f

. .

.

Biscutum constans

. f . . f f

f . f f c

Chiastozygus litterarius

f f .

f

f f f . f . .

Cretarhabdus conicus

c c f f c c

c c c c c c c f

Micula decussata

f f .

f f

f f . . f

Placozygus fibuliformis

c c f f c c f c c c c c f f f

Prediscosphaera cretacea

.

. .

.

.

. . . .

Thoracosphaera sp.

c c c f f c f f f

f

f f

Watznaueria barnesae

f f

.

f

. .

Ahmuellerella regularis

® ®

®

®

®

Aspidolithus parcus constrictus

®

Axopodorhabdus albianus

.

Amphizygus brooksii

.

f f

. f f . f

H Biscutum coronum

f f

.

L Ceratolithoides aculeus

. f

. .

L Ceratolithoides  kamptneri

.

.

Corollithion exiguum

®

?Corollithion kennedyi

f f

f f f

f f f f f

. .

Cribrosphaerella ehrenbergii

. .

.

Cribrocorona gallica

.

.

.

. .

Cyclagelosphaera reinhardtii

®

®

®

®

Eiffellithus eximius

f f

f c f

f f f f c

.

Eiffellithus gorkae

. f

. . .

f . . f f

Eiffellithus turriseiffelii

. .

. .

. . . .

Ellipsagelosphaera britannica

®

®

Eprolithus floralis

f f

f

. f f

f

Gartnerago obliquum

. .

.

.

Glaukolithus compactus

® ®

Glaukolithus diplogrammus

f f

f

.

.

Lithraphidites carniolensis

f f

f f

. .

f f

L Lithraphidites quadratus

. .

.

.

Microrhabdulus attenuatus

. f

f f

.

. . f . .

 Microrhabdulus decoratus

f f

. .

. . f

.

L Micula murus

. .

. .

.

Placozygus sigmoides

.

.

x x f c c .

x

Prediscosphaera   grandis

. c

f

c

Prediscosphaera  majungae

c

. c

. .

Prediscosphaera ponticula

. .

. .

. .

. . .

Prediscosphaera spinosa

.

Quadrum gartneri

.

.

Quadrum gartneri-gothicum

®

L Quadrum trifidum

. f

f f

f f

. f

.

Retacapsa schizobrachiata

.

. .

.

.

Retacapsa madingleyensis

f f

f

. .

Rhagodiscus angustus

. .

.

Rhagodiscus asper

®

®

®

®

Reinhardtites anthophorus

®

® ® ® ® ®

® ®

H Reinhardtites levis

.

Staurolithites mielnicensis

.

.

Staurolithites crux

f f

f f f

f f . f f

.

Retacapsa crenulata

®

®

® ®

®

Tranolithus phacelosus

.

.

.

Watznaueria biporta

. .

. .

Zeugrhabdothus embergerii

.

.

.

Manivitella pemmatoidea

. .

.

Thoracosphaera sp.

. .

. .

. .

Braarudosphaera bigelowii

.

. f c

c f f

f .

H Kamptnerius magnificus

.

. .

Broinsonia sp.

. .

.

.

. . .

Eiffellithus parallelus

. f

Biscutum dissimilis

. .

. .

. .

H Ahmuellerella octoradiata

.

.

.

Cyclagelosphaera margerelii

.

.

. . . . . . . .

Calculites obscurus

. . .

.

Helicolithus trabeculatus < 7m

. . .

. . . .

. .

H Lucianorhabdus cayeuxii

.

. . . . .

.

Lucianorhabdus inflatus

. .

. . . .

Markalius inversus

.

f f

f

H Nephrolithus frequens

f .

. .

.

H Prediscosphaera stoveri

.

Vagalapilla matalosa

.

Zeugrhabdotus theta

.

.

.

Markalius apertus

f

.

. f

.

Micula concava

Table  2:  Calcareous  nannofossils  distribution  and  their  relative

abundances in the Uzgruò section.

Explanations to Table 2:
*1  —  nannofossil  province  appurtenance  (after  Wind  1979;  Watkins

1992 and Burnett, pers. comm.): L — low-latitude species confirmed

in warm waters (tropical areas), H — high-latitude species confirmed

in cold waters (Boreal/Austral areas)
relative nannofossil abundance: c — common (> 5 specimens per one
field  of  view),  f  —  few  (>  5  specimens  per  ten  fields  of  view), 

.

  —

rare (< 5 specimens per ten fields of view), x — fragments, ® — re-

worked
relative  sample  abundance:  A  —  abundant  (>  20  specimens  per  one

field of view), R — rare (20–2 specimens per one field of view), P —

poor (< 2 specimens per one field of view).

I

I

Late Maastrichtian

Age

CC25c

CC26

zones

Sissingh (1977), Perch-Nielsen (1985)

M. murus

N. frequens

M. prinsii

local zones

26

A1

26

A2

26

B

25

A

25

B

25

C

24

B

21 21

C

20 20

A

20

B

19

B

19

C

19

E

*1

UZGRUÒ SECTION

A R P P R R P R A A A R P P P

relative sample abundance

.

.

.

Neocrepidolithus dirimosus

.

Ottavianus giannus

.

.

. .

Prediscosphaera arkhangelskyi

.

.

.

.

?Corollithion madagaskarensis

.

Biscutum boletum

. . .

.

Micula swastica

. .

x

.

H ?Cribrosphaerella daniae

.

.

.

. .

Tranolithus minimus

.

.

Biantholithus sparsus

.

Dodekapodorhabdus noeliae

. f

Micula prinsii

.

Tranolithus gabalus

.

Staurolithites aachena

.

Neocrepidolithus fossus

.

Haqius circumradiatus

.

H Monomarginatus quaternarius

.

Orastrum campanensis

Continuation of Table 2

background image

PLATE III                                                                                                43

background image

44                                                                               BUBÍK, B¥K and ŠVÁBENICKÁ

Braarudosphaera bigelowii and/or Thoracosphaera opercu-

lata. Nevertheless, they marked B. sparsus with a question

mark already in the uppermost Maastrichtian within the Mic-

ula prinsii Zone (l.c., p. 297, fig. 1).

The appearance of Biantholithus sparsus in the uppermost

Maastrichtian, i.e. already below the C/T boundary is men-

tioned  in  further  works.  Van  Heck  &  Prins  (1987)  noticed

that B. sparsus “has been observed on rare occasions in as-

semblages which are otherwise Maastrichtian” (l.c., p. 295).

Pospichal & Wise (1990, p. 470, Table 2) recorded this spe-

cies in the Late Maastrichtian within the Cribrosphaerella da-

niae Subzone from the Weddell Sea off Eastern Antarctica.

Pospichal & Bralower (1992 — see table 1, p. 741) reported

the isolated occurrence of B. sparsus in the uppermost Maas-

trichtian sediments of the Northwest Australian Margin. Bur-

nett  (pers.  comm.)  considered  B.  sparsus  with  a  question

mark to be a so called “survivor Cretaceous taxon”.

In the Uzgruò section it also cannot be used as a marker of

the Paleocene age for following reasons: 1. No enrichment is

evident in “blooming species”, such as B. bigelowii, Thora-

cosphaera sp. and C. reinhardtii (sensu Seyve 1990); 2. No

occurrence of Paleocene species s.s. (such as representatives

of genera Cruciplacolithus, Prinsius etc.) was observed.

The  thanatocoenoses  are  completed  by  reworked  nanno-

fossils (up to 5 %) mostly from the Campanian sediments, in-

cluding:  1.  species    with  occurrences  known  only  in  the

Campanian–Early  Maastrichtian  interval,  such  as  Aspido-

lithus  parcus  constrictus,  Ceratolithoides  arcuatus,  Qua-

drum trifidum and Reinhardtites levis, 2. species with their

last known occurrence within the Late Campanian, i.e. Eiff-

ellithus eximius, Glaukolithus diplogrammus and  Reinhardt-

ites anthophorus. Moreover, there were also rare reworked

nannofossils of the Cenomanian age: Corrolithion kennedyi

and Axopodorhabdus albianus.

Discussion

Thin-bedded  flysch  with  frequent  clayey  turbidites  and

hemipelagites deposited below the CCD is usually termed dis-

tal flysch. Such sedimentation can be expected on continental

rise to bottom plain transition in the abyssal zone in terms of

recent oceanic morphology. The autochthonous assemblages

of  agglutinated  foraminifers  from  hemipelagic  claystones  of

the Soláò and Beloveža formations in Uzgruò can be assigned

to the flysch-type DWAF biofacies and paleobathymetric zone

of lower slope (1500 to more than 2500 m paleodepth) sensu

Kuhnt  et  al.  (1989).  In  fact  the  absolute  paleodepths  of

sedimentation  in  Carpathian  Flysch  basins  are      difficult  to

estimate, because the CCD has changed with time.

As stated above, the calcareous sediments common in the

Maastrichtian  disappear  in  the  Paleocene.  This  fact  corre-

sponds well with the decrease in carbonate production at the

Cretaceous/Tertiary (C/T) boundary worldwide. For example

this trend is clearly visible in the C/T sections in  the “Gos-

sau” facies of the Eastern Alps.

Another trend — the relative increase in frequency of coars-

er turbidite intervals in the Paleocene as shown above — can

be explained by worldwide sea-level fall at the C/T boundary.

In  the  Uzgruò  section,  common  occurrences  of  high-  and

low-latitude  nannofossils  were  observed  in  the  Late  Maas-

trichtian showing the influence of both the Boreal and Tethyan

bioprovinces. With regard to the presence of Campanian re-

worked material, attention was focussed on the species with

distributions  known  only  in  the  Maastrichtian.  Assemblages

contain Micula murus and Lithraphidites quadratus which are

supposed to be low-latitude (Mediterranean/Tethyan) species.

On the other hand, Nephrolithus frequens which prefers cold

waters  was  also  present  in  these  sediments.  Moreover,  the

abundance of Arkhangelskiella cymbiformis, the presence of

Prediscosphaera stoveri, Biscutum coronum, B. boletum, Cri-

brosphaerella daniae, Monomarginatus quaternarius etc. may

also be regarded as feature of the Boreal/Austral bioprovince

(Wise 1983; Watkins 1992).

In the flysch sediments, a complete C/T boundary section

using nannofossils  was described by de Kaenelet al. (1989)

in the Gurnigel Flysch of the Swiss Alps and by Sinnyovsky

& Stoykova (1995) in the Emine Flysch in Bulgaria. In these

section a nannofossil record through the C/T boundary was

also obtained from the turbidite claystones. In addition, the

boundary at the former section was proved by the presence of

the Ir-anomaly.

In  the  Uzgruò  section  the  C/T  boundary  sediments  are

probably  present  at  the  outcrop  point    No.  19  (Fig.  3)  in

continuous thin-bedded flysch sequence. Unfortunately, the

nannofossil record is preserved only in the lower part of the

outcrop. The highest turbidite calcareous level (sample 19E)

provided only Maastrichtian nannofossils. Sample 19G taken

approximately 5.6 m above sample 19E yielded Rzehakina

fissistomata, which already proves the  Paleocene. The C/T

boundary can be expected within this 5.6 m thick sequence

not  studied  in  detail.  The  youngest  nannofossil  in  sample

19E are considered to be synsedimentary redepositions docu-

menting the age of turbidite sedimentation. This is also sup-

ported by a radiolarian assemblage of the Amphipyndax tylo-

tus  Zone  found  only  75  cm  below  the  sample  19D.  The

sample was taken from hemipelagite, that is autochthonous

sediment. The radiolarian assemblage is interpreted as proba-

bly Maastrichtian in age.

To complete the integrated microbiostratigraphy, there is

still  a  chance  to  search  for  a  dinocyst  fossil  record  which

could  be  preserved  in  the  dark  layers  through  this  5.6  m

thick interval. The iridium anomaly may also be preserved

as the hemipelagite/turbidite ratio is relatively high (30 % of

the given thickness are hemipelagites).

Conclusions

The  Uzgruò  section  provides  the  possibility  to  study  the

biostratigraphy of the Late Maastrichtian to Paleocene distal

flysch  facies  (deposited  below  the  CCD)  of  the  Raèa  Unit

(Outer Flysch Carpathians).

The rich fossil content (foraminifers, radiolarians, calcare-

ous nannofossils) enabled succesful application of the inte-

grated microbiostratigraphy approach to subdivision of these

sediments (see Figs. 6, 7). Although the single fossil groups

themselves  did  not  enable  subdivision  of  the  given  strati-

background image

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE MAASTRICHTIAN TO PALEOCENE DISTAL FLYSCH SEDIMENTS                       45

graphic interval, integrated microbiostratigraphy enabled to

definition of three nannozones within the Upper Maastrich-

tian  and  one  agglutinated  foraminiferal  zone  through  Pale-

ocene with prospective subdivision based on potential new

marker species. There is no disproportion between the results

from single fossil groups in the studied section.

The Uzgruò section also provided interesting data on the ra-

diolarian biostratigraphy considering the fact, that well-docu-

Fig. 6. Distribution of stratigraphically important micro- and nannofossils in the Upper Maastrichtian–Paleocene of the Uzgruò section.

Lithology  of  idealized  section:  1  —  thin-bedded  flysch  (claystones/sandstones  ratio  >  1),  2  —  predominantly  medium-bedded  flysch

(claystones/sandstones ratio = 1), 3 — claystones and siltstones, 4 — thick beds of coarse-grained sandstones.

Fig. 7. Stratigraphic correlation zonal chart of the Maastrichtian to Paleocene sediments of the Uzgruò section.

background image

46                                                                               BUBÍK, B¥K and ŠVÁBENICKÁ

mented sections across the Upper Cretaceous to Paleocene de-

posits with biostratigraphic control are very rare.

The  nannofossils  show  the  influence  of  both  the  Boreal

and Tethyan bioprovinces on the Magura depositional area.

Integrated microbiostratigraphy enabled us to find the Cre-

taceous/Tertiary (C/T) boundary in one partial outcrop of the

Uzgruò section. Two trends were observed on the C/T transi-

tion: 1. increase in frequency of coarser turbidite intervals; 2.

disappearance of calcareous turbidite claystones. There is a

potential  opportunity  for  precise  determination  of  the  C/T

boundary  using    palynology  (dinocysts)  and  geochemistry

(iridium anomaly).

Acknowledgements:  The  finantional  support  of  the  Grant

Agency  of  the  Czech  Republic  (Grants  Nos.  205/93/0677

and  205/97/0687)  is  gratefully  acknowledged.  The  authors

thank to Dr. Salaj, Dr. Stránik and anonymous rewiever for

critical reading of manuscript and valuable suggestions. This

is  the  contribution  to  IGCP  Project  No.  362:  Tethyan  and

Boreal Cretaceous.

Appendix 1

Calcareous nannofossil species  considered in this report, in alpha-

betical order of the Species epithets

Cretaceous

Staurolithites aachena  Bukry 1969

Ceratolithoides aculeus  (Stradner 1961) Prins & Sissingh in Siss-

ingh 1977

Axopodorhabdus albianus  (Black 1967) Wind & Wise in Wise &

Wind 1977

Retacapsa  schizobrachiata  (Gartner  1968)  Grün  in  Grün  &  Alle-

mann 1975

Rhagodiscus angustus  (Stradner 1963) Reinhardt 1971

Reinhardtites anthophorus  (Deflandre 1959) Perch-Nielsen 1968

Prediscosphaera arkhangelskyi  (Reinhardt 1965) Perch-Nielsen 1984

Rhagodiscus asper  (Stradner 1963) Reinhardt 1967

Microrhabdulus attenuatus  (Deflandre 1959) Deflandre 1963

Watznaueria  barnesae    (Black  in  Black  &  Barnes  1959)  Perch-

Nielsen 1968

Watznaueria biporta  Bukry 1969

Biscutum boletum  Wind & Wise in Wise & Wind 1977

Ellipsagelosphaera britannica  (Stradner 1963) Perch-Nielsen 1968

Amphizygus brooksii  Bukry 1969

Orastrum  campanensis    (Èepek  1970)  Wind  &  Wise  in  Wise  &

Wind 1977

Lithraphidites carniolensis  Deflandre 1963

Lucianorhabdus cayeuxii  Deflandre 1959

Haqius circumradiatus  (Stover 1966) Roth 1978

Glaukolithus compactus  (Bukry 1969) Perch-Nielsen 1984

Micula  concava    (Stradner  in  Martini  &  Stradner  1960)

Bukry1969

Cretarhabdus conicus  Bramlette & Martini 1964

Biscutum constans (Górka 1957) Black 1967

Biscutum coronum  Wind & Wise in Wise & Wind 1977

Prediscosphaera cretacea  (Arkhangelsky 1912) Gartner 1968

Retacapsa crenulata  (Bramlette & Martini 1964) Grün in Grün &

Allemann 1975

Staurolithites crux  (Deflandre &  Fert in Deflandre 1954) Caratini 1963

Arkhangelskiella cymbiformis Vekshina 1959

?Cribrosphaerella daniae  Perch-Nielsen 1973

Microrhabdulus decoratus  Deflandre 1959

Micula decussata  Vekshina 1959

Glaukolithus diplogrammus  (Deflandre in Deflandre & Fert 1954)

Reinhardt 1964

Biscutum dissimilis  Wind & Wise in Wise & Wind 1977

Cribrosphaerella  ehrenbergii    (Arkhangelsky  1912)  Deflandre  in

Piveteau 1952

Zeugrhabdothus embergeri  (Noël 1959) Perch-Nielsen 1984

Corollithion exiguum  Stradner 1961

Eiffellithus eximius  (Stover 1966) Perch-Nielsen 1968

Placozygus fibuliformis  (Reinhardt 1964) Hoffmann 1970

Eprolithus floralis  (Stradner 1962) Stover 1966

Neocrepidolithus fossus  Romein 1979

Nephrolithus frequens  Górka 1957

Tranolithus gabalus  Stover 1966

Cribrocorona gallica  (Stradner 1963) Perch-Nielsen 1973

Quadrum gartneri  Prins & Perch-Nielsen in Manivit et al. 1977

Ottavianus giannus  Risatti 1973

Eiffellithus gorkae  Reinhardt 1965

Prediscosphaera grandis  Perch-Nielsen 1973

Lucianorhabdus  inflatus    Perch-Nielsen  &  Feinberg  in  Perch-

Nielsen 1984

Ceratolithoides kamptneri  Bramlette & Martini 1964

?Corollithion kennedyi  Crux 1981

Reinhardtites levis  Prins & Sissingh in Sissingh 1977

Chiastozygus litterarius  (Górka 1957) Manivit 1971

?Corollithion madagaskarensis Perch-Nielsen 1973

Retacapsa madingleyensis  (Black 1973) Black 1975

Kamptnerius magnificus  Deflandre 1959

Prediscosphaera majungae  Perch-Nielsen 1973

Cyclagelosphaera margerelii  Noël 1965

Vagalapilla matalosa  (Stover 1966) Thierstein 1973

Staurolithites mielnicensis  (Górka 1957) Perch-Nielsen 1968

Tranolithus minimus  (Bukry 1969) Perch-Nielsen 1984

Micula murus  (Martini 1961) Bukry 1973

Dodekapodorhabdus noeliae  Perch-Nielsen 1968

Gartnerago obliquum  (Stradner 1963) Reinhardt 1970

Calculites  obscurus    (Deflandre  1959)  Prins  &  Sissingh  in  Siss-

ingh 1977

Amhuellerella octoradiata  (Górka 1957) Reinhardt 1966

Eiffellithus parallelus  Perch-Nielsen 1973

Aspidolithus parcus constrictus  (Hattner et al. 1980) Perch-Niels-

en 1984

Manivitella pemmatoidea  (Deflandre in Manivit 1965) Thierstein 1971

Tranolithus phacelosus  Stover 1966

Prediscosphaera ponticula  Bukry 1969

Micula prinsii  Perch-Nielsen 1979

Lithraphidites quadratus  Bramlette & Martini 1964

Monomarginatus quaternarius  Wind & Wise in Wise & Wind 1977

Ahmuellerella regularis  (Górka 1957) Reinhardt & Górka 1967

Cyclagelosphaera reinhardtii (Perch-Nielsen 1968) Romein 1977

Prediscosphaera spinosa  (Bramlette &  Martini 1964) Gartner 1968

Prediscosphaera stoveri  (Perch-Nielsen 1968) Shafik & Stradner 1971

Micula swastica  Stradner & Steinmetz 1984

Zeugrhabdotus theta  (Black in Black & Barnes 1959) Black 1973

Helicolithus trabeculatus  (Górka 1957) Verbeek 1977

Quadrum  trifidum    (Stradner  in  Stradner  &  Papp  1961)  Prins  &

Perch-Nielsen in Manivit et al. 1977

Eiffellithus turriseiffelii  (Deflandre in Deflandre & Fert 1954) Re-

inhardt 1965

Survivors

Markalius apertus  Perch-Nielsen 1979

Braarudosphaera bigelowii  (Gran & Braarud 1935) Deflandre 1947

Neocrepidolithus dirimosus  (Perch-Nielsen 1979) Perch-Nielsen 1981

background image

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE MAASTRICHTIAN TO PALEOCENE DISTAL FLYSCH SEDIMENTS                       47

Markalius inversus  (Deflandre 1954) Bramlette & Martini 1964

Cyclagelosphaera margerelii  Noël 1965

Cyclagelosphaera reinhardtii  (Perch-Nielsen 1968) Romein 1977

Placozygus sigmoides  (Bramlette & Sullivan 1961) Romein 1979

Thoracosphaera sp.

Biantholithus sparsus  Bramlette & Martini 1964.

References

Bouma A.H., 1962: Sedimentology of some flysch deposits; a graphic

approach to facies interpretation. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1–168.

Bubík M., 1995: Cretaceous to Paleogene agglutinated Foraminifera

of the Bílé Karpaty Unit (West Carpathians, Czech Republic).

In:  Kaminski  M.A.,  Geroch  S.  &  Gasinski  M.A.  (Eds.):  Pro-

ceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on Agglutinat-

ed  Foraminifera,  Krakow,  Poland,  September  12–19,  1993.

Grzybowski Foundation Spec. Publ. no. 3, Krakow,  71–116.

Campbell  A.S.  &  Clark  B.L.,  1944:  Radiolaria  from  Upper  Creta-

ceous of Middle California. Geol. Soc. Amer., Spec. Pap., 57, 61.

Caron  M.,  1985:  Cretaceous  planktonic    Foraminifera.  In:  Bolli

H.M.,  Saunders  J.B.  &  Perch-Nielsen  K.  (Eds):  Plankton

stratigraphy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 17–86.

De Kaenel E., von Salis Perch-Nielsen K. & Lindinger M., 1989:

The    Cretaceous/Tertiary  boundary  in  the  Gurnigel  Flysch

(Switzerland). Eclogae Geol. Helv., 82, 2, 555–581.

Empson-Morin  K.,  1981:  Campanian  Radiolaria  from  DSDP  Site

313, Mid-Pacific Mountains. Micropaleontology, 27, 249–292.

Foreman  H.P.,  1968:  Upper  Maastrichtian  Radiolaria  of  Califor-

nia. Spec. Pap. Palaeont., 3, 1–82.

Foreman H.P., 1975: Radiolaria from the North Pacific, Deep Sea

Drilling Project, Leg 32. In: Larson R.L. & Moberly R. et al.

(Eds.): Init. Rep. Deep Sea Drilling Project, 32, 579–676.

Foreman H.P., 1977: Mesozoic Radiolaria from the Atlantic basin

and its borderlands. In: Swain F.M. (Ed.): Stratigr. Micropale-

ont. Atlantic Basin and Borderlands, 305–320.

Foreman  H.P.,  1978:  Cretaceous  Radiolaria  in  the  eastern  South

Atlantic, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 40. In: Bolli H.M. &

Ryan  W.B.F.  et  al.  (Eds.):  Init.  Rep.  Deep  Sea  Drilling

Project, 40, 839–843.

Geroch  S.,  1960:  Microfaunal  assemblages  from  the  Cretaceous

and  Paleogene  Silesian  Unit  in  the  Beskid  œl¹ski  Mts.

(Western Carpathians). Biul. Inst. Geol., 153, 138.

Geroch  S.,  1966:  Lower  Cretaceous  small  Foraminifera  of  the

Silesian series, Polish Carpathians. Rocz. Pol. Tow. Geol., 36,

4, 414–480.

Geroch S. & Nowak W., 1984: Proposal of zonation for the Late

Tithonian-Eocene,  based  upon  the  arenaceous  Foraminifera

from  the  outer  Carpathians,  Poland.  In:  Oertli  H.  (Ed.):

Benthos ´83; 2nd International Symposium on Benthic Fora-

minifera, Pau (France), April 11–15, 1983.  Elf Aquit., ESSO

REP and TOTAL CFP, Pau & Bordeaux, 225–239.

Hollis C.J., 1993: Latest Cretaceous to Late Paleocene radiolarian

biostratigraphy:  A  new  zonation  from  the  New  Zealand  re-

gion. Mar. Micropaleont., 21, 295–327.

Ivanov M.I. & Stoykova K.H., 1995: Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary

in  the  area  of  Bjala,  eastern  Bulgaria  —  biostratigraphical

results.  Geologica Balcan., 24, 6, 3–22.

Keller  G.,  Adatte  T.,  Hollis  C.J.,  Ordóñez  M.,  Zambrano  I.,

Jiménez  N.,  Stinnesbeck  W.,  Aleman  A.  &  Hale-Erlich  W.,

1997:  The  Cretaceous/Tertiary  boundary  event  in  Equador:

reduced biotic effect due to eastern boundary current setting.

Mar. Micropaleont., 31, 97–133.

Kuhnt W., Kaminski M.A. & Moullade M., 1989: Late Cretaceous

deep-water  agglutinated  foraminiferal  assemblages  from  the

North  Atlantic  and  its  marginal  seas.  Geol.  Rdsch.,  78,  3,

1121–1140.

Ling H.Y. & Lazarus D.B., 1990: Cretaceous Radiolaria from the

Weddell  Sea:  Leg  113  of  the  Ocean  Drilling  Program.  In:

Barker P.F. & Kennett J.P. et al. (Eds.): Proc. Ocean Drilling

Program, Sci. Res., 113, 353–363.

Moore T.C., 1973: Radiolaria from Leg 17 of the Deep Sea Drill-

ing Project. In: Winterer E.L. & Ewing J.I. et al. (Eds.): Init.

Rep. Deep Sea Drilling Project, 17, 797–869.

Perch-Nielsen K., 1971: Neue Coccolithen aus dem Paläozän von

Dänemark, de Bucht von Biskaya und dem Eozän der Labra-

dor See. Bull. Geol. Soc. Denmark, 21, 51–66.

Perch-Nielsen  K.,  1985:  Mesozoic  calcareous  nannofossils.  In:

Bolli H.M., Saunders J.B. & Perch-Nielsen K. (Eds.): Plank-

ton  Stratigraphy.  Cambridge  University  Press,  Cambridge,

329–426.

Pesl V. & Švábenická L., 1988: Late Maastrichtian calcareous nan-

noplankton  in  the  Soláò  Formation.  (25–24  Turzovka).  Zpr.

geol. výzk. v roce 1985, Praha, 153–155 (in Czech).

Pessagno  E.A.,  1976:  Radiolarian  zonation  and  stratigraphy  of  the

Upper Cretaceous portion of the Great Valley Sequence, Califor-

nia Coast Ranges. Micropaleontology, Spec. Publ., 2, 95.

Petrushevskaya M.G. & Kozlova G.E., 1972: Radiolaria: Leg 14,

Deep Sea Drilling Project. In: Hayes D.E. & Pimm A.C. et al.

(Eds.): Init. Rep. Deep Sea Drilling Project, 14, 495–648.

Pospichal  J.J.,  1991:  Calcareous  nannofossils  across  Cretaceous/

Tertiary  boundary  at  Site  752,  Eastern  Indian  Ocean.  Pro-

ceedings  of  the  Ocean  Drilling  Program,  Scientific  Results,

Washington, 121, 395–414.

Pospichal  J.J.  &  Wise  S.W.  Jr.,  1990:  Maastrichtian  calcareous

nannofossil biostratigraphy of Maud Rise ODP Leg 113 Sites

689 and 690, Weddell Sea. In: Barker P.F. & Kennett J.P. et al.

(Eds.): Proc. Ocean Drilling Program, Sci. Res., Washington,

113, 465–487.

Pospichal  J.J.  &  Bralower  T.J.,  1992:  Calcareous  nannofossils

across the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary, Site 761, Northwest

Australian Margin. In: von Rad U. & Haq B.U. et al. (Eds.):

Proc.  Ocean  Drilling  Program,  Sci.  Res.,  Washington,  122,

735–751.

Riedel  W.R.  &  Sanfilippo  A.,  1974:  Radiolaria  from  the  southern

Indian Ocean, DSDP Leg 26. In: Davies T.A. & Luyendyk B.P.

et al. (Eds.): Init. Rep. Deep Sea Drilling Project, 26, 771–814.

Romein  A.J.T.  &  Smit  J.,  1981:  The  Cretaceous/Tertiary

boundary: calcareous nannofossils and stable isotopes. Palae-

ontology, Proc. B 84, 3, 295–314.

Sanfilippo  A.  &  Riedel  W.R.,  1985:  Cretaceous  Radiolaria.  In:

Bolli H.M., Saunders J.B. & Perch-Nielsen K. (Eds): Plank-

ton  stratigraphy.  Cambridge  University  Press,  Cambridge

573–712.

Sinnyovsky  D.S.  &  Stoykova  K.H.,  1994:  Cretaceous/Tertiary

boundary in the Emine Flysch Formation, East Balkan, Bul-

garia:  nannofossil  evidence.  Comptes  rendus  de  l’Académie

Bulgare des Sciences, Sofia, 48, 3, 45–48.

Sissingh W., 1977: Biostratigraphy of Cretaceous nannoplankton,

with Appendix by Prins B. and Sissingh W. Geol. en Mijnb.

56, 37–65.

Strong  C.P.,  Hollis  C.J.  &  Wilson  G.J.,  1995:  Foraminiferal,

radiolarian,  and  dinoflagellate  biostratigraphy  of  Late  Creta-

ceous  to  Middle  Eocene  pelagic  sediments  (Muzzle  Group),

Mead Stream, Marlborough, New Zealand. N. Z. J. Geol. Geo-

phys., 38, 171–212.

Švábenická L., Bubík M., Krejèí O. & Stráník Z., 1997: Stratigra-

phy of Cretaceous sediments of the Magura group of nappes

in Moravia. Geol.  Carpathica, 48, 3, 179–191.

Van Heck S.E. & Prins B., 1987: A refined nannoplankton zona-

background image

48                                                                               BUBÍK, B¥K and ŠVÁBENICKÁ

tion for the Danian of  the Central North Sea. In: Stradner H.

& Perch-Nielsen K. (Eds.): International Nannoplankton As-

sociation,  Vienna  Meeting  1985,  Proc.  Abh.  Geol.  Bunde-

sanst., Wien, 39, 285–303.

Varol O., 1989: Quantitative analysis of the Arkhangelskiella cym-

biformis  Group  and  Biostratigraphic  usefulness  in  the  North

Sea Area. J. Micropalaeontol., 8, 2, 131–134.

Vishnevskaya V., 1993: Jurassic and Cretaceous radiolarian bios-

tratigraphy  in  Russia.  In:  Blueford  J.  &  Murchey  B.  (Eds.):

Radiolarian of giant and subgiant fields in Asia. Micropale-

ontology, Spec. Publ., 6, 175–200.

Watkins  D.K.,  1992:  Upper  Cretaceous  nannofossils  from  Leg

120,  Kerguelen  Plateau,  Southern  Ocean.  In:  Wise  S.W.  &

Schlich  R.  et  al.:  Proc.  Ocean  Drilling  Program,  Sci.  Res.,

Washington, 120, 343–369.

Wind F.H., 1979: Maastrichtian-Campanian nannofloral provinces

of the Southern Atlantic and Indian oceans. In: Talwani M. &

Hay W. et al. (Eds.): Deep Sea Drilling Results in the Atlantic

Ocean:  Continental  Margins  and  Paleoenvironment.  Am.

Geophys. Union, 123–127.

Wise S.W. Jr., 1993: Mesozoic and Cenozoic calcareous nannofos-

sils recovered by Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 71 in the Falk-

land Plateau region, Southwest Atlantic Ocean. Init. Rep., Deep

Sea Drilling Project, Washington, 71, 481–550.