background image

194

LATE WEICHSELIAN MAGNETIC RESULTS

FROM DENMARK

N. ABRAHAMSEN

1

 and P.W. READMAN

2

1

Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University, Finlandsgade 8, DK-

8200 Aarhus N, Denmark; geofabe@aau.dk

2

School of Cosmic Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies,

5 Merrion Square, Dublin 2, Ireland

Summary:  Magnetic  secular  variation  results  from  two  nearby  Late  Glacial

cliff-sections at Nr. Lyngby in northern Jutland (Denmark) are summarised. A l2

m marine sequence of laminated Younger Yoldia Clay dated to 14,270±180 BP

covers a period of ca. 1000–1500 y. The Yoldia sequence shows swings of about

this period in inclination and declination, and also more rapid swings particular-

ly  marked  in  the  inclination.  A  slightly  younger  nearby  section  of  freshwater

sediments, also in an open profile, with a 7 m sequence of sand, silt and Allerød

gyttja spans the time interval between ca. 12,000 and ca. 10,700 BP. The Allerød

section shows about 5 cycles in declination and 2 cycles in inclination with am-

plitudes of ca. ±10°. Also cores from the southern Baltic Sea show rapid varia-

tion in the magnatic parameters.

The Yonger Yoldia Clay section

Detailed secular variation results from a rapidly deposited 12.5 m

sequence of marine Younger Yoldia clay was earlier reported from

an open cliff-section at Nr. Lyngby in northern Jutland (Abrahamsen

& Readman 1980). The marine sequence of laminated Yoldia Clay

was 

14

C-dated to 14,270±180 BP. Based upon lamination and local

stratigraphy, the section is estimated to cover a period of ca. 1000–

1500 y. The Yoldia sequence shows magnetic swings of about this

Fig. 1. Magnetic data from the Aller

ø

d sequence at Nr. Lyngby, Denmark (Abrahamsen  & Readman 1997).

I. Basic paleomagnetism, rock magnetism and archaemagnetism

background image

195

period  in  inclination  and  declination,  and  also  more  rapid  swings

particularly  marked  in  the  inclination.  Strong  easterly  declinations

of 80

o

 to 90

o

 in the top half of the profile, which cause the virtual

geomagnetic pole to migrate clockwise to around 50

o

 away from the

geographical pole, has been named the “Nørre Lyngby declination

excursion”.

The Allerød section

A palaeomagnetic investigation of a 7 m sequence of freshwater

sediments from a formerly small lake, which is now dried out in an

open cliff profile, composed by 7 m sand, silt and gyttja was re-

cently  reported  (Abrahamsen  &  Readman  1997).  The  sequence

spans the time interval between ca. 12,000 and ca. 10,700 BP, and

is exposed in the classic Late Glacial Allerød site at Nørre Lyngby

in  North  Jutland  (Abrahamsen  &  Readman  1997).  Magnetically

the sequence shows about 5 cycles in declination and 2 cycles in

inclination with amplitudes of ca. ±10

o

 (Fig. 1). Secular variation

features as those observed at Nr. Lyngby are also recognisable at

sites  in  southern  Sweden  (e.g.  Björk  &  Sandgren  1986),  Finland

(Saarinen 1994) and Soviet Karelia (Bakhmutov et al. 1994). The

secular variation therefore may be a usefull tool for local and re-

gional  stratigraphical  correlation  of  young  sediment  series  on  a

much more detailed timescale than possible by the global magnet-

ic reversal timescale, which off course is very useful for older se-

quences of longer duration.

Late glacial sediments from southern Baltic Sea

Secular variation results have also been obtained from three 5 to

12 m long sediment cores from the Bornholm Basin (Abrahamsen

1995),  coverning  Late  Glacial  varves  and  Ancylus-Yoldia  clays.

Here the magnetic susceptibility, as well as density, NRM intensity

and q-ratio are useful for correlating the cores locally. In this case

shallow values of the inclination may be interpreted as caused by

sediment compaction of ca. 50% by younger sediments, and may

indicate later removel of some 5–8 m of the young sediments by

erosion. In two cores a fairly regular inclination secular variation

pattern  was  also  seen  in  varvic  clays,  while  a  detailed  record  of

declination variations was only resolved in one core.

References

Abrahamsen  N.,  1982:  Pleistocene-Holocene  magnetostratigraphy  at  Sol-

berga, Brastad and Moltemyr, SW Sweden. SGU Ser. C, 93–119.

Abrahamsen N., 1995: Paleomagnetism. Paleomagnetic Investigation. In: E.

Emelyanov,  C.  Christiansen  &  O.  Michelsen  (Eds.):  Geology  of  the

Bornholm Basin. Aarhus Geoscience, 5, 55–63.

Abrahamsen N. & Readman P.W., 1980: Geomagnetic variations recorded

in  Older  (>23000  BP)  and  Younger  Yoldia  Clay  (–14  000  BP)  at

Nørre Lyngby, Denmark. Geophys. J.R. Astr. Soc., 62, 329–344.

Abrahamsen  N.  &  Readman  P.,  1997:  Geomagnetic  Secular  Variation  in

late Weichselian Allerød sediments from Nr. Lyngby (Denmark). Bull.

Geol. Soc. Denmark, 4, 45–58.

Bakhmutov V., Yevzerov V. & Kolka V., 1994: Geomagnetic secular varia-

tions  of  high-latitude  glaciomarine  sediments:  data  from  the  Kola

Peninsula,  northwestern  Russia.  Physics  Earth  Planet.  Interiors,  85,

143–153.

Björk S. & Sandgren P., 1986: A 2000 year geomagnetic record from two

Late Weichselian sequences in south-east Sweden. GFF, 108, 21–29.

Saarinen T., 1995: Palaeomagnetic study of the Holocene sediments of Lake

Päijänne  (Central  Finland)  and  Lake  Paanajärvi  (North-West  Russia).

Bull. Geol. Surv. Finland, 376, 1–87.

NEOGENE PALAEOMAGNETIC

ROTATIONS OF THE CHENOUA MASSIF

(NORTHERN ALGERIA)

T. AÏFA

1

, D. BELHAÏ

2

 and O. MERLE

3

1

Géosciences-Rennes, CNRS UPR4661, Université de Rennes 1, Bt 15,

Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes Cedex, France; aifa@univ-rennes1.fr

2

USTHB, IST, BP32 El-Alia, 16000 Algiers, Algeria

3

Université Blaise Pascal, Dpt Sciences de la Terre, 5 rue Kessler,

63038 Clermont Cedex, France

The  tectonics  of  the  Chenoua  Massif  suggests  rotation  of  the

Neogene  nappes  related  to  the  African-European  plate  conver-

gence through a NNW–SSE direction. It is associated with norther-

ly  dipping  reverse  faults.  Seismicity  and  surface  ruptures  caused

by  the  seismic  event  in  the  Cherchell  area  on  October  the  29th

1989 and the focal mechanism of this seismic event also reveal the

same compressional direction (mean deformation velocity around

0.25  cm/yr)  (Meghraoui  1991).  Sedimentary  and  eruptive  forma-

tions which crop out west of Algiers are related to basins whose

subsidence  started  in  the  Lower  Eocene.  The  Chenoua  Basin  is

part  of  the  Mitidja  and  Cherchell  basins  where  sediments  lie  un-

conformably  on  already  deformed  Meso-Cenozoic  sediments  and

older  Paleozoic  basement  (Belhaï  1996).  These  so-called  post-

nappes  Neogene  terranes  were  not  affected  by  the  two  superim-

posed  Alpine  phases  of  Upper  Eocene  and  Lower  Miocene  age

(Belhaï et al. 1990). From bottom to top, stratigraphic analysis of

the  Neogene  section  shows  that  it  is  composed  of  white  sandy

limestones  with  Amphiope  of  the  Lower  Miocene  (N7–N8  Bio-

zone  of  Blow),  a  red  continental  event,  composed  of  conglomer-

ates, sandstones and pelites, a well developped facies from Chen-

oua  to  Ténès.  Volcanics  overlie  these  continental  formations  and

are covered by a marly marine formation (16–11 Ma) showing lo-

cally yellow limestones. Andesites and rhyolites which outcrop in

the southern and western area of the Chenoua have been dated at

15–16 Ma and 11–13 Ma respectively by K-Ar method (Bellon et

al.  1977).  The  structural  map  shows  that  the  Neogene  have  been

deformed  by  post-Alpine  phases.  It  is  overthrusted  by  the  Creta-

ceous flyschs in the central part of the massif. This overthrusting

marked by an E-W striking reverse fault visible in the central part

of  the  massif  progressively  dies  out  along  the  strike  towards  the

eastern and western sides of the massif. Accordingly, the E–W fold

axes  direction  in  the  central  part  rotates  to  N140 

o

E  in  the  west,

which gives a striking arcuate pattern to the Chenoua Massif. The

Neogene is cut by numerous faults. Structural analysis of the fault

pattern, particularly the syncline of Cap Blanc which is cut by two

major  active  faults  oriented  N30

o

E  and  N340

o

E,  reveals  sinistral

N–E  and  dextral  N–W  strike-slip  faults  suggesting  an  overall

NNW shortening direction. The dipping Neogene strata present in-

ter-bedded  volcanics  of  the  same  vertical  dip.  It  has  been  shown

within the overlying sediments that magmatic vertical intrusion oc-

curs during distension (Hellinger & Sclater 1983). Southward over-

thrusting of the Cretaceous sediments over the Neogene in the cen-

tral  part  of  the  massif  is  associated  with  a  lateral  displacement

gradient leading to an arcuate structure of the massif. This arcuate

structure of the Neogene strongly suggests block rotations associat-

ed  with  differential  transport.  A  palaeomagnetic  study  of  14  sam-

pling sites, distributed in the N–W, the S–E and in the South of the

Chenoua Massif, has been performed to test this hypothesis and to

better understand the Neogene geodynamic history of this massif.

The  NRM  values  are  scattered  for  the  sediments  (3.10

–4

  A/m)

and clustered for the volcanics (3.10

–2

 A/m). Apart from most of

the  volcanics,  AF  demagnetization  is  often  insufficient  for  sedi-

background image

196

ments  because  of  a  resistive  component  of  magnetization,  proba-

bly carried by goethite. Magnetic susceptibilities measured at each

heating step for the sediments (10

–5

 SI) and volcanics (3.10

–4

 SI)

allowed us to track the mineralogical changes which may occur at

the temperatures of 250 

o

C and 450–500 

o

C.

Demagnetization  reveals  two  components  of  magnetization:  a

viscous component below 200–250 

o

C and another one eliminated

up to 250 

o

C. Orthogonal projections show that declination varia-

tion is linked to demagnetization, whereas inclination remains un-

changed.  Principal  component  analysis  confirms  these  observa-

tions  and  makes  it  possible  to  find  an  accurate  direction  for  the

high-temperature component (

α

95 

= 5.7

o

, 6.9

o

 and 8.7

o

 in situ). Af-

ter  unfolding,  the  mean  directions  become  scattered  and  the  fold

test is negative. We interpret this as follows: the Lower Miocene

formations  of  the  Cap  Blanc  syncline  were  folded  and  remagne-

tized  during  the  Pliocene.  Then,  rotation  of  the  whole  structure

took place during the Plio-Quaternary.

Demagnetization diagrams show, first a component of magnetiza-

tion close to the present day field which is eliminated around 75 

o

C,

then  a  reverse  one  which  is  destroyed  above  200 

o

C  and  finally  a

characteristic  (Chr)  normal  component.  This  may  suggest  that  re-

magnetization occurred during at least one polarity change.

Two types of mineralogical behaviour have been observed in the

volcanics.  IRMs  curves  of  type  (I)  show  saturation  before  0.2 T.

This  is  coherent  with  the  existence  of  one  mineralogical  phase  of

weak  coercivity  which  can  probably  be  attributed  to  magnetite.

IRMs curves of type (II) show the presence of two kinds of magnet-

ic  carriers  for  which  saturation  is  not  reached  before  1.2 T.  They

may be goethite and magnetite or titanomagnetite types. Similar be-

haviour type (II) is also observed in sites within sedimentary rocks.

A thermomagnetic study has been performed under vaccum condi-

tions (V) and at atmospheric pressure (A) in some specimens in or-

der  to  determine  the  magnetic  carriers.  It  enabled  us  to  identify  a

Curie temperature around 580 

o

C suggesting the presence of magne-

tite. A mineralogical phase around 300 

o

C is observed (A) for speci-

mens of behaviour (II). This mineralogic phase is still well observed

(V) in specimens of behaviour (II). This could explain the presence

of pyrrhotite like the type which transformed into magnetite up to

300 

o

C.  The  carrier  of  the  Chr  component  is  probably  magnetite.

This is coherent with the IRMs curves. Pyrrhotite type probably car-

ry the secondary component.

The paleomagnetic study of the Neogene in the Chenoua Massif

shows  post-tectonic  remagnetizations.  Frequent  normal  and  re-

verse polarities probably indicate that remagnetization took place

during a quite long time span. In most cases, detailed analysis of

orthogonal projections reveals that these remagnetized directions,

if  isolated  after  an  efficient  cleaning,  are  well  grouped  and  have

accurately carried the magnetic field.

It can be assumed that the clockwise rotations of 30±14

o

 record-

ed by volcanics and 14±8

o

 recorded by sediments occurred since

Tortonian  times.  The  clockwise  rotation  evidenced  in  Cap  Blanc

syncline  took  place  since  8  Ma  (i.e.  since  the  age  of  the  folding

event  which  shortly  predates  the  remagnetization).  Other  sites  of

the Cap Blanc structure registered a counterclockwise rotation of

10±5

o

. This part of the structure is probably related to N140

o

 sin-

istral  strike-slip.  This  could  be  explained  by  a  model  of  indenta-

tion used by Laubscher (1972) related to lateral extrusion.

These rotations are related to recent deformations in this region,

particularly  by  the  conjugated  NE-SW  sinistral  strike-slip  with

NW–SE  dextral  strike-slip,  at  the  origin  of  the  shifted  tectonic

markers. This classical model predicted the clockwise rotations of

blocks that we observed through palaeomagnetic results. The tec-

tonic results are coherent with a model suggesting clockwise rota-

tions at the Western part of the Chenoua (Cap Blanc) and counter-

clockwise  rotations  at  its  South-Eastern  part,  deduced  from  fold

axis changes. The directions of maximum constraints 

σ

1

 deduced

from  faults  and  slikensides  and  from  their  directions  using  the

right dihedra method allowed us to determine a NS subhorizontal

mean  direction  (due  mainly  to  strike-slip)  compatible  with  E–W

folds (observed in the field) and to overthrusts to the South of fly-

schs on the Neogene and to conjugated NE sinistral and NW dex-

tral  strike-slips.  To  the  West  of  the  massif,  synclinal  folds  (Cap

Blanc and Koudiet Beida), of NS direction plunge 5

o

 to the North

on  the  left  side  of  the  Hachem  River  and  5

o

  to  the  South  on  its

right side. They also show a strike-slip fault system with a mean 

σ

1

direction of N10

o

 deduced from the same method.

The bloc rotations in the Chenoua mount since the Pliocene are

comparable to rotations determined in the Chelif Basin (80 km south

of this studied area) for the same period (Aïfa et al. 1992).

References

Aïfa T., Feinberg H., Derder M.E.M. &Merabet N., 1992: Rotations paléo-

magnétiques  récentes  dans  le  bassin  du  Chéliff  (Algérie).  C.R.  Acad.

Sci. Paris, t. 314, série II, 915–922.

Belhaï D., Merle O. & Saadallah A., 1990: Transpression dextre à l’Eocéne

supérieur dans la chaîne des Maghrébides (massif du Chenoua, Algé-

rie). C.R. Acad. Sci. Paris, t. 310, série II, 795–800.

Belhaï  D.,  1996:  Evolution  tectonique  de  la  zone  ouest-algéroise  (Ténès-

Chenoua): approche stratigraphique et structurale. PhD Thesis, Univer-

sity of Algiers, 1–163 (unpubl.).

Bellon H., Lepvrier C., Magné J. & Raymond D., 1977: L’activité éruptive dans

l’Algérois: nouvelles données géochronologiques. Rev. Géol. Méditer. ann.

Univ. Provence, 4, 291–298.

Hellinger S.J. & Sclater J.G., 1983: Some comments on two-layer extensional

models  for  the  evolution  of  sedimentary  basins.  J.  Geophys.  Res.,  88,

8251–8269.

Laubscher H.P., 1972: Some overals aspects of Jura dynamics. Am. Journal.

of Sciences, 293–304.

Meghraoui M., 1991: Blind reverse faulting system associated with the Mont

Chenoua-Tipaza  earthquake  of  29  October  1989  (north-central  Alge-

ria). Terra Nova, 3, 84–93.

PALEOMAGNETIC CHARACTERISATION

OF THE BULGARIAN PART

OF THE MOESIAN PLATFORM

H. HAUBOLD

1

, H.J. MAURITSCH

2

, TZ. TZANKOV

3

,

K. KOURTEV

3

 and G. NIKOLOV

3

1

Paleomagnetic Laboratory “Gams”, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Austria;

herbert.haubold@grz08u.unileoben.ac.at

2

Department for Geophysics, Gams 45, A-8130 Frohnleiten

3

Institute of Geology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences,

Acad. G. Bonchev Str. Bl. 24, Bg-1113 Sofia

The  Moesian  micro-continent  is  a  peri-Gondwanan  continental

fragment  which  broke  its  attachment  in  the  Early  Paleozoic  and

accreted  to  the  sub-Carpathian  and  Dobrudzha  segments  of  the

southern  periphery  of  the  Eurasian  continent  after  the  closing  of

the Paleotethys in the late Paleozoic.

We  obtained  paleomagnetic  results  from  five  sites  of  Neogene

silt-  and  sandstones  (Odarska  and  Karvunska  Formations),  five

sites of the Neogene basalts along the NNE–SSW trending Suhin-

dol-Svishtov fault zone (K-Ar age 22 Ma), five sites of Paleogene

siltstones (Dikilitash and Aladan Formations), two sites of Paleo-

gene  carbonate  rocks  (Komarevo  Formation),  and  eleven  sites  of

Upper Cretaceous carbonate rocks (Nikopol, Mezdra, and Kailaka

Formations) from the broader vicinities of Pleven (middle to west-

background image

197

ern part of northern Bulgaria) and Varna (eastern part of northern

Bulgaria).

The Neogene clastic sediments contain characteristic magnetiza-

tion  components  that  typically  are  stable  up  to  a  temperature  of

more than 500 

o

C, indicating magnetite as the predominant carrier

of the remanence. Unfortunately, all of these sites show very large

within-site scatter and, thus, had to be rejected. The behaviour of the

Neogene volcanics during demagnetization clearly indicates magne-

tite as the only carrier of the remanence. After removal of a viscous

random component at very low alternating fields (AF), the remain-

ing magnetization decays in a univectorial fashion towards the ori-

gin and is stable up to 560 

o

C. Owing to the extremely weak natural

magnetization  of  the  samples  from  the  Paleogene  sediments,  only

three  sites  of  clastics  and  one  site  of  carbonates  yielded  interpret-

able results. Again, the behaviour during demagnetization indicates

magnetite  as  the  predominant  remanence  carrier.  The  Cretaceous

carbonates  show  magnetite  phases  of  various  hardnesses,  as  the

samples  typically  lose  approximately  half  of  their  intensity  when

exposed to an AF of only 5 mT, but their magnetization gradually

decays at higher fields and remains stable up to 30 mT or more than

500 

o

C, respectively. Some of these samples show univectorial mag-

netizations but do not reach a final component, indicating the pres-

ence of a hard magnetic mineral, probably hematite. Of almost half

of the Upper Cretaceous sites no stable magnetization components

could be isolated due to very weak magnetizations, however the re-

maining  sites  show  good  within-site  groupings.  Isothermal  rema-

nence acquisition experiments support the above observations as to

the magnetic mineralogy.

The  following  area  means  were  calculated:  Upper  Cretaceous:

4.4/53.4/7.7/5 (declination, inclination, confidence limit, amount of

sites),  Paleogene:  22.6/53.6/15.8/3,  Neogene  volcanics:  14.8/54.7/

14.3/5. Importantly, the difference between the observed Upper Cre-

taceous direction and the present day field direction is statistically

significant.  Because  most  strata  are  in  a  horizontal  position,  field

tests could not be conducted. Three sites in the eastern part of the

sampling area show unusual site means and were excluded from the

calculation of the area means. By comparison of these values with

the  expected  magnetizations  for  this  area  with  respect  to  the  Eur-

asian apparent polar wander path, rotation and flattening were cal-

culated. In each case, these values are small and statistically not sig-

nificant, because none of them exceed their error limits. This result

implies that the investigated area was contingent upon Europe since

the Late Cretaceous and has not undergone significant movements

relative to the European continental interior since this time.

During the Alpine orogeny, the Moesian microplate formed a part

of  the  active  continental  margin  of  the  Eurasian  continent,  and  its

southern  parts  were  subjected  to  repeated  polyphase  deformations.

The  regional  stress  field  was  characterized  by  sub-horizontal  and

generally  north  oriented  compression  and  sub-vertical  extension.

However, our data indicate that the cratonized parts of the Moesian

microplate  were  not  significantly  affected  by  these  events.  During

the neotectonic (post-Oligocene) a SSW–NNE trending extensional

stress field formed in the area, and since the beginning of the Neo-

gene, the Bulgarian part of the microplate was progressively tecton-

ized.  The  latter  process  is  probably  responsible  for  the  anomalous

site mean directions mentioned above.

In another study (presented at EGS meeting, Nice, F, this year)

we could show that Jurassic carbonates from the Fore Balkan and

Stara  Planina  mountain  ranges  just  to  the  south  of  the  Moesian

platform  were  pervasively  remagnetized  in  an  Oligocene  field,

likely reflecting the thermal events associated with the active con-

tinental margin between the African and Eurasian continents dur-

ing that time. The concordant nature of our data from the Moesian

platform with respect to the European continent and the absence of

remagnetizations implies that the structural motions controlled by

extension within the general Aegean region and lateral movement

along  the  North  Anatolian  transform  fault  still  affected  the  Fore

Balkan and Stara Planina mountain ranges, but ceased at the south-

ern rim of the cratonized Moesian micro-continent.

PALEOMAGNETIC OVERPRINTS AND

ROCK MAGNETISM OF PALEOZOIC

SERPENTINITES FROM THE

GOGO£ÓW-JORDANÓW MASSIF,

SUDETES (SOUTH POLAND)

M. K¥DZIA£KO-HOFMOKL* and M. JELEÑSKA

Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences,

01-452 Warsaw, Ks. Janusza 64, Poland; *magdahof@igf.edu.pl

The serpentinite massif of Gogo³ów-Jordanów (GJ) belongs to the

dismembered Paleozoic ophiolite sourrounding the Sowie Góry Mts.

block  (SG)  and  are  was  recently  intepreted  as  a  „surviving”  frag-

ment of an obducted rock series (Dubiñska & Gunia 1997). Paleo-

magnetic  results  for  its  other  members:  Œle¿a  gabbroic  unit  (SL)

contacting the GJ from NE, and Nowa Ruda and Z¹bkowice massifs,

are given in Jeleñska et al. (1995). To the NW the seprentinites con-

tact the Strzegom-Sobótka (SS) granitoid massif, to S - with the the

SG  block.  The  GJ  rocks  are  older  than  the  SL  gabbros  dated  to

420 Ma  (Oliver  et  al.,1993)  which  penetrate  them  with  udisturbed

apophyses. According to Van Breemen et al. (1988) the GJ massif

came into direct contact with the GS which uplifted during the De-

vonian (380 Ma). This event, as well as intrusion of the SS grani-

toids (299 Ma and 323 Ma, Puziewicz 1990) strongly influenced the

GJ rocks. The first stage of serpentinization took place in an oceanic

environement, several later stages—in continental conditions. Dur-

ing each stage the temperature did not exceed hydrothermal temper-

atures  (Jêdrysek  1988;  Dubiñska  &  Gunia  1997).  Sampling  was

done in four quarries labelled G, K, S and P, where 31 hand samples

and 9 drill cores were taken. Optical microscope and SEM investi-

gations revealed the presence of secondary magnetite of various ori-

gins  and  ages.  Chromites  present  in  great  abundance  altered  into

magnetite passing through the phase of iron-chromium spinel. Apart

from post-chromite magnetite there are also post-pyroxene magne-

tite  lamellae,  post-serpentinite  magnetites,  blastic  magnetites  and

small  (1

µ

m  and  less)  magnetite  grains  residing  within  pyroxenes,

olivines  and  serpentines.  Some  of  the  small  magnetite  grains  are

partly  altered  into  martite.  Magnetite  is  the  only  magnetic  mineral

identified by IRM acquisition curves and by thermomagnetic meth-

ods applied to isothermal remanence Ir in non-magnetic space and

to magnetization I acquired in various fields. In some specimens the

curves obtained show a sudden drop of Ir at temperatures of 150–

200 

o

C and an increase of I measured in fields of several mT up to

300 

o

C. Higher fields screen this effect. Study of hysteresis parame-

ters reveals decreases of Hc, Hcr and saturation remanence Mr after

annealing  to  100–300 

o

C.  Saturation  magnetization  Ms  and  bulk

susceptibility increase in more or less the same temperature range.

Similar behaviour was observed in Mongolian ophiolite by Didenko

(1992).  He  interprets  it  as  due  to  the  presence  of  small  (<1 

µ

m)

magnetite grains with maghemite coating that complete its oxidation

to  maghemite  in  150–300 

o

C.  We  surmise,  that  similar  processes

take place in the GJ serpentinites. Hematite, visible as martite under

the  microscope,  manifests  itself  only  during  thermal  demagnetiza-

tion experiments as the carrier of a component forming several per-

cent of the initial NRM. 68 specimens were demagnetized, nearly all

background image

198

of them thermally. Analysis of demagnetization results revealed the

7 components of NRM shown in Table 1. Their age was estimated

from comparison with reference data for Baltica and Stable Europe.

The  J  component  is  a  Lower  Jurassic  overprint  (Westphal  et  al.

1986) and was isolated in the low temperature range LT<250 

o

C.

The  A  component  dated  as  Carboniferous  and  probably  related  to

the intrusion of SS granitoids was obseved on hematite, in some cas-

es only as a point on the demagnetization curve in the VHT (650–

685 

o

C)  range.  The  A1  component  dated  as  Silurian  is  carried  by

magnetite (HT range, 500–575 

o

C). All other components were iso-

lated in either the HT or VHT ranges. Component D fits the Devo-

nian reference data—it probably originated during uplift of the GS.

Three remaining components are not easily interpreted in terms of

the post Silurian geomagnetic field and are probably artefacts. The

results  obtained  here  support  the  idea  expressed  in  Jeleñska  et  al.

(1995) concerning closeness of the studied ophiolitic units to Balti-

ca since the Silurian.

nence. In both the allochthon and the parautochthon the remaining

high  temperature  stable  paleomagnetic  signal  appears  to  be  older

and forms “tails” in a counterclockwise direction with respect to the

vertical  axis  of  rotation.  This  signal  is  originating  from  a  thermo-

chemical remanence of pure hematite lamellae exsolved in silicates.

The similar character of the “tails” for both the allochthon and the

parautochthon  suggests  that  the  paleomagnetic  component  was  re-

corded before the allochthon was separated from the parautochthon.

The dimensions of the “tails” indicate that the preexisting block pri-

or  to  separation  rotated  about  45

o

.  The  counterclockwise  direction

of  this  motion  is  consistent  with  the  majority  of  sinistral  vertical

faults in this area and with the low temperature recrystallization of

titanhematite grains. Once separated, the allochthon was thrust over

the parautochton. During this motion the allochthon rotated counter-

clockwise around a vertical axis by 162

o

. At the end of this rotation-

al thrust, mafic dikes were implaced in the allochthon and recorded

the Grenville pole direction. This suggests that the suggested coun-

terclockwise rotation had to occur during latest Grenville time, ca.

1000  Ma.  This  structural  tectonic  event  is  consistent  with  sinistral

oblique plate convergence.

NEW NAMURIAN PALEOMAGNETIC POLE

FROM THE WESTERN AFRICAN CRATON

N. MERABET, B. HENRY*,

H. BOUABDALLAH and S. MAOUCHE

Lab. Paleomagnetism et Geodynamique, 4 av. de Neptune,

94107 Saint-Maur Cedex, France; *henry@ipgp.jussieu.fr

Thermal analyses of rock samples, collected at 12 sites in the Na-

murian Reouina redbeds (Tindouf Basin; Algeria), showed that the

natural remanent magnetization consists of two juxtaposed compo-

nents, apart from a weak viscous component A which is destroyed at

low temperature (200–300 

o

C). Component B was defined at tem-

peratures ranging between 200–300 

o

C and 550–580 

o

C in 115 spec-

imens from all the 12 sites. After dip correction, its mean magnetic

direction  is  defined  by  D  =  134.0

o

,   I  =  6.6

o

,  k  =  235, 

α

95 

=  2.8

o

.

Component C was isolated in 193 specimens (covering all the sites)

at temperatures higher than 550–580 

o

C. Its mean direction after dip

correction is D = 126.9

o

, I = 10.8

o

, k = 276, 

α

95 

= 2.5

o

. A representa-

tive set of specimens has been submitted to rock-magnetic experi-

ments in order to discover out the origin of these components. He-

matite and a titanomagnetite (probably magnetite) have been found

as probable carriers of the C and B components respectively. In such

a case, the component carried by the hematite is classically consid-

ered as being a magnetic overprint (chemical remanent magnetiza-

tion), while the magnetite should be the carrier of the primary mag-

netization.  However,  the  general  trend  of  the  evolution  of  the

paleomagnetic  inclination  during  the  Upper  Paleozoic  period  is  a

decrease in algebraic values. Accordingly, the component C is the

oldest one, although it is carried by the hematite. It was thus proba-

bly acquired just after the deposition process. The B component was

then acquired later by the sediments and corresponds to a post-Na-

murian overprint. Its associated paleomagnetic pole (35.4

o

 S, 53.6

o

E) appears to be close to the Stephano-Autunian poles for the Sahar-

an craton (38.5

o

 S, 57.5

o

 E — El Adeb Larache, Henry et al. 1992 —

33.8

o

 S, 61.1

o

 E — Derder et al., 1994 — 29.1

o

 S, 57.8

o

 E — Mera-

bet et al. 1998 — 32.5

o

 S, 56.7

o

 E — Merabet et al. 1997). The pale-

omagnetic pole associated with the C component is situated at 28.4

o

S and 56.9

o

 E. This pole is in good agreement with those of Hassi

Bachir  (Upper  Namurian–Lower  Moscovian;  26.8

o

  S  and  56.6

o

 E;

Daly & Irving 1983) and El Adeb Larache (Moscovian; 28.7

o

 S and

dir

est.age

N/n   D    I

a

95

  k

PlatN PlongE

 GJ A L.Permian 3/24 202   5

 14  80 -33  351

 GJ D M.Devonian 1/5 243  20  11  48  -8

 314

GJ A1 M.Silurian 3/11 195  39    6  70 -16      2

GJ B      ?

1/6 284    2    8  74  13  278

GJ C1      ?

4/19 303  43    8  18  40  277

GJ C2      ?

3/12 276  70    5  74  42  324

GJ J

L.Jurassic

3/8   24  54  11  17  66  141

Table 1: Mean directions and pole positions obtained for four exposures of

Gogo³ów-Jordanów  serpentinites  (lat:  50.9  E,  long:  16 N)  dir  —  direction,

est. age — age in Ma estimated from APWP reference curve for Baltica after

Torsvik & Smethurst (1992), N/n — number of exposures/number of speci-

mens, 

α

 

95

, k — parameters of Fisher statistics, PlatN — pole latitude, PlongE

— pole longitude, letters denoting directions as in Jeleñska et al. (1995).

References

Didenko,1992: Phys. Earth. Pl. Int.

Dubiñska & Gunia, 1997: Geol. Quart., 41, 1, 1–20.

Jeleñska et al., 1995: Geol. J. Int., 122, 658–674.

Jêdrysek,1988: Miner. Pol., 22, 1, 61–76.

Puziewicz, 1990: Arch. Min., XLV, 1–2, 136–153.

Torsvik & Smethurst, 1992: GMAP V.9.0.

Van Breemen et al., 1988: Ann. Soc. Geol. Pol., 58, 3–19.

Westphal et al., 1986: Tectonophysics, 123, 37–82.

PALEOMAGNETIC EVIDENCE FOR OBLIQUE

CONVERGENCE IN THE GRENVILLE

G. KLETETSCHKA* and J.H. STOUT

Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Minnesota, 310

Oillsbury Drive SE, 55455 Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA;

*klet0001@gold.tc.umn.edu

Paleomagnetic evidence from granulite facies gneisses in central

Labrador indicates that the Wilson Lake allochthon has rotated 162

o

about a vertical axis relative to underlying parautochthonous rocks.

The Wilson Lake allochthon has a distinct paleomagnetic signature

when  compared  to  the  paleomagnetic  signature  of  the  surrounding

parautochthon. Our data indicate that the allochthonous paleomag-

netic  pole  (295

o

,   54

o

;  trend  and  plunge,  respectively)  is  displaced

horizontally by 162

o

 from the pole of parautochthon (97

o

, 55

o

). The

horizontal  direction  of  displacement  is  constrained  by  an  offset  of

the  magnetization  that  remained  stable  at  high  temperature  (over

600 

o

C) demagnetization from the direction of the dominant rema-

background image

199

55.9

o

 E; Henry et al. 1992) formations belonging to the stable Sahar-

an craton. The Upper Carboniferous segment of the African appar-

ent polar wander path appears now very well documented. As in the

Stephanian Merkala formation of the Tindouf Basin (Merabet et al.

1997), two juxtaposed components have been found, the older one

being carried by the hematite.

References

Derder M.E.M., Henry B., Merabet N. & Daly L., 1994: Palaeomagnetism

of the Stephano-Autunian Lower Tiguentourine formations from sta-

ble Saharan craton (Algeria). Geophys. J. Int., 116, 12–22.

Henry B., Merabet N., Yelles A., Derder M.M. & Daly L., 1992: Geodynami-

cal implications of a Moscovian paleomagnetic pole from the stable Sa-

haran craton (Illizi Basin, Algeria). Tectonophysics, 201, 83–96.

Merabet  N.,  Henry  B.,  Bouabdallah  H.  &  Maouche  S.,  1997:  Lower

Stephanian paleomagnetic pole from the West African craton. EUG 9,

Strasbourg.

Daly L. & Irving E., 1983: Paléomagnétisme des roches carbonifères du Sa-

hara central; analyse des aimantations juxtaposées; configuration de la

Pangée. Annales Geophysicae, 1, 207–216.

Merabet N., Bouabdallah H. & Henry B., 1998: Paleomagnetism of the Low-

er Permian redbeds of the Abadla basin. Tectonophysics, in press.

PALEOMAGNETISM OF MIOCENE -

PLIOCENE ROCKS OF THE CENTRAL

(SIERRA DE LAS CRUCES, MEXICO BASIN)

AND EASTERN SECTOR

OF THE MEXICAN VOLCANIC BELT

M.L. OSETE

1*

, V.C. RUIZ-MARTÍNEZ

1

, R. VEGAS

2

,

C. CABALLERO

3

, J. URRUTIA-FUCUGAUCHI

3

and D. TARLING

4

1

Dpto. Geofísica, F. CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense,

Madrid 28040, Spain; *mlosete@eucmax.sim.ucm.es

2

Dpto. Geodinámica, F. CC. Geológicas, Universidad Complutense,

Madrid 28040, Spain

3

Instituto de Geofísica, Univ. Nacional Autónoma de Mexico,

04150 Mexico D.F., Mexico

4

Dep. Geological Sciences, Plymouth University, Drake Circus,

Plymouth PL4 8AA, U.K.; d.tarling@plymouth.ac.uk

Despite the amount of studies of the so-called Mexican Volcanic

Belt (MVB) there is no consensus about its time of onset, aerial ex-

tension and origin. Many models have been proposed to explain the

tectonic origin and subsequent development of this magmatic activi-

ty, related directly to, or caused indirectly by, the subducting slab of

the Cocos Plate at the Acapulco trench. But any geodynamic model

proposed should consider the rotational-deformational history of the

magmatic arc that palaeomagnetic investigations provide.

Palaeomagnetic  data  available  from  the  central  sector  of  the

TMVB show a significant divergence from the expected directions,

with negative R parameters ranging from –10 to –56 degrees. These

results have been interpreted in terms of counterclockwise rotations

of the studied areas. The eastern sector of the TMVB has practically

not been palaeomagnetically investigated till today. In order to de-

termine the spatial distribution of the proposed block rotations, two

systematic palaeomagnetic studies have been carried out.

A local palaeomagnetic study has been carried out on the Sierra

de las Cruces (western margin of the Mexico Basin, central part of

the MVB) in a NNW-SSE profile of 25 sites of Pliocene andesites. A

total amount of 241 samples has been demagnetized and an easy di-

rectional  behaviour,  related  to  Titanomagnetites  of  low  Titanium

content,  has  been  observed  in  most  samples.  Normal  and  reversed

directions pass the reversal test. The mean direction obtained in this

study  is  D = 353.1,  I = 30.8  (N = 25;  K = 27.7; 

α

95

 = 5.6),  in  line

with the expected direction. Therefore this area has not been affect-

ed by significant block rotations in contrast to the counterclockwise

rotations observed in the central-western sector of the MVB. A mag-

netic zoning has also been observed, as a result of that, a geochrono-

logical study has been carried out. Results indicate a southern mi-

gration of the volcanism.

To present a wider view of the rotational pattern of the MVB, a

regional palaeomagnetic study has been carried out in 221 samples

of 20 volcanic sites from the eastern sector of the magmatic arc. The

investigated volcanism extends from the central part of the MVB to

the Gulf of Mexico: 17 sites are grouped in the Altiplano area, (dat-

ed from 2.4 to 9 Ma by means of geochronological studies), and 3

sites in the Palma Sola Massif, Eastern Volcanic Province (from 1–

2 Ma to 17.0 Ma). Most characteristic directions are carried by Tita-

nomagnetites of low Titanium content, but Titanohematites are also

found. No directional difference has been observed between the in-

vestigated rocks that are older or younger than 5 Ma. Both normal

and reversed polarities have been observed and the characteristic di-

rections  pass  the  reversal  test.  The  obtained  mean  direction  (D =

350.4; I = 38.3; K = 22.7; 

α

95 

= 7.0; N = 20) indicates that little (if

any) counterclockwise rotation has taken place in this sector of the

MVB since the Late Miocene.

References

Cantagrel J.M. & Robin C., 1979: K-Ar Dating on Eastern Mexican Volcanic

Rocks — Relations between the andesitic and the alkaline provinces. J.

Volc. Geoth. Res., 5, 99–114.

Irving  E.  &  Irving  G.A.,  1982:  Carboniferous  Through  Cenozoic  and  the

Assembly of Gondwana. Geophysical Surveys, 5, 141–188.

Mooser F., 1970: Condiciones geológicas acerca del Pozo Texcoco PP I, V.

Reunión Nacional Mexicana de Suelos, 2, 143–161.

Mooser F., A.E.M. Nairn &Negendank F.W. , 1974: Palaeomagnetic Investi-

gations of the Tertiary and Quaternary Igneous Rocks: VIII. A Palaeo-

magnetic and Petrologic Study of Volcanics of the Valley of Mexico.

Geologische Rundschau, 63, 451–483.

Mora-Alvarez  G.,    Caballero  C.,  Urrutia-Fucugauchi  J.  &  Uchiumi  Sh.,

1991:  Southward  migration  of  volcanic  activity  in  the  Sierra  de  Las

Cruces, basin of Mexico? A preliminary K-Ar dating and palaeomag-

netic study. Geofísica Internacional, 30, 2, 61–70.

Pasquaré  G.,  Vezzoli  C.  & Zonchi A.,  1987:  Morphological  and  structural

model of Mexican Volcanic Belt. Geofísica Internacional, 26, 2, 159–

176.

Shubert D.H. & Cebull S.E., 1984: Tectonic interpretation of the Trans-Mexi-

can Volcanic Belt. Tectonophysics, 101, 159–165.

Urrutia-Fucugauchi J. & Böhnel H., 1988: Tectonics along the Trans-Mexi-

can  volcanic  belt  according  to  palaeomagnetic  data.  Physics  of  the

Earth and Planetary Interiors, 52, 320–329.

MAGNETIC AND PALEOMAGNETIC

STABILITY OF NEOVOLCANIC ROCKS

OF DISTINGUISHABLE TYPES

OF MAGNETIC MINERALS

O. ORLICKÝ

Geophysical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 842 28

Bratislava, Slovak Republic; geoforky@savba.sk

Seven dominant groups (B, C, D, F, G, I, J) of magnetism carri-

ers in volcanic rocks have been distinguished by Orlický (1998).

Group B — the dominant phase of T

C1 

 130–220 

o

C corresponds

to quasi homogeneous to partly oxidized titanomagnetites (TMs),

background image

200

second phase of T

C2 

 570 

o

C (in minor portion) corresponds to

oxidized TMs. Group C — the first phase of T

C1 

 210 

o

C corre-

sponds  to  quasi  homogeneous  to  partly  oxidized  TMs,  second

phase of T

C2 

 575 

o

C corresponds to oxidized TMs. The share of

both phases is thought to be equal in the rocks. Group D — the

first-dominant  phase  of  T

C1 

  480 

o

C  and  the  second  magnetic

phase  of  T

C2 

  590 

o

C,  (in  a  minor  portion  in  the  rock).  Both

phases  correspond  to  oxidized  TMs.  Hematite-ilmenites  can  be

present in these minerals. In group F the first magnetic phase of

T

C1 

 420 

o

C or T

C1 

 530 

o

C, and the second phase of T

C2 

 600 

o

C or

T

C2 

  590–600 

o

C.  Both  magnetic  phases  correspond  to  oxidized

TMs with presence of hematite-ilmenites. Group G contains domi-

nantly pure multi-domain magnetite of T

 580 

o

C (small portion of

hematite-ilmenites can be present in this group). Group I — the first

phase of T

C1 

 580 

o

C corresponds to non stoichiometric magnetite

and the second phase of T

C2 

 620–630 

o

C contains hematite-ilmeni-

tes. Group J contains only one magnetic phase of T

 620–640 

o

C;

hematite-ilmenites are present in the rocks of group J.

The thermal demagnetization of rock samples was performed by

the MAVACS system with an automated feed-back compensation of

external field to detect a stable component of RMP. The 50 

o

C step

was applied for demagnetization of each sample within the interval

from room temperature to 650 

o

C. JR-4 instrument was placed in the

centre of the Helmholtz’s coils; a container from mumy metal was

used for transportation of rocks in the laboratory in order to protect

the sample against acquiring a parasitic remanence.

The examples of thermal demagnetization of representative sam-

ples of rocks of the groups F, G (the most unstable rocks) and I, J

(the most stable rocks) have been presented in Figs. 1, 2.

Fisher’s  statistical  parameters  (k-precision  parameter,  and 

α

95

semiangle of cone confidence for P = 0.05) were computed from

the  results  of  individual  steps  of  demagnetization  for  each  tested

sample (the interval from room temperature up to the T

C

 of each

individual sample was taken into account; rock samples with high

dispersion of RMP directions have low k and high value 

α

95

, while

samples of low dispersion of RMP directions point to a high level

of  k  and  low  value  of 

α

95

).  The  mean  values  of  k  (k

M

)  and 

α

95

(

α

95M

) were computed for rocks of the respective groups of mag-

netism carriers (B, C, D, G, F, I ,J).

The following results have been obtained: Group B: k

M

 = 396.6;

α

95M

 = 6.1; n = 65 (n-number of samples). Group C: k

= 210.0;

α

95M

 = 8.0; n = 38. Group D: k

= 148.0; 

α

95M

 = 8.4; n = 46. Group

F: k

= 140.0; 

α

95M

 = 15.6; n = 165. Group G: k

M

 = 110.7; 

α

95M

 =

21.2; n = 89. Group I: k

M

 = 1073.5; 

α

95M

 = 3.9; n = 192. Group J:

k

M

 = 1756.0; 

α

95M

 = 2.1; n = 72.

We  see  that  while  the  rocks  with  the  quasi  homogeneous,  or

partly  oxidized  TMs  of  the  groups  B,  C  and  those  of  partly  oxi-

dized TMs of the group D have pointed out relatively good mag-

netic and paleomagnetic stability, the highly oxidized TMs of the

group F and those of the nearly pure magnetites of the group G are

of low paleomagnetic as well as magnetic stability. The rocks with

the magnetism carriers of both I and J groups-mostly hematite-il-

menites, are the most stable among the neovolcanics under study.

References

Orlický O., 1998: The carriers of magnetic properties in neovolcanic rocks

of  central  and  southern  Slovakia  (Western  Carpathians).  Geol.  Car-

pathica, 49, 181–192.

PALEOMAGNETIC EVIDENCE

FOR THE MODE OF EMPLACEMENT

OF THE TRIASSIC EVAPORITES

IN THE EASTERN MAGHREB

H. ROUVIER, B. HENRY*, M. LE GOFF,

N. HATIRA, E. LAATAR, A. MANSOURI,

V. PERTHUISOT and A. SMATI

*Lab. Paleomagnetism et Geodynamique, 4 av. de Neptune,

94107 Saint-Maur Cedex, France; henry@ipgp.jussieu.fr

The mode of emplacement of the Triassic evaporites in the east-

ern Maghreb is presently the subject of debate. These evaporites are

considered, either as belonging to diapiric bodies taking root under

them (Perthuisot et al. 1997), or as being interbedded in the Albian

strata; in this last assumption, they should come on the surface by

small sized drain and be redeposited on the floor of the Albian sea,

giving  salt  glaciers  (Vila  et  al.  1996).  The  aim  of  this  study  is  to

show that paleomagnetism allows to resolve this controversy.

Northwest of the Jebel ed Debadib, Albian marls and limestones

are  covered  by  the  evaporitic  body  of  El  Kef.  This  formation  has

been  considered  to  be  related  to  diapir  evolution  but  in  an  over-

turned position, or as the floor of a salt glacier in an upright position

(Vila et al. 1996, plate 13B). It has been chosen as one of the sam-

Fig.  1.  Thermal  demagnetization,  Zijderveld  diagrams  and  stereographic

projections of RMP of selected rocks. 225/9 — Pyroxene andesite; 168/9

— Propylitized pyroxene andesite.

Fig. 2. Thermal demagnetization, Zijderveld diagrams and stereographic pro-

jections of RMP of selected rocks. St-217/1 — Biotite-hornblende andesite;

TR24/2 — Hyperstene-biotite hornblende andesite.

background image

201

since the Albian, and this ChRM cannot be an overprint. Assuming

the Albian strata of the studied sites are in upright position, this mag-

netization cannot be true because the polarity of the Earth’s magnetic

field was always normal during the Upper Aptian and Albian periods.

The  reversed  polarity  of  the  primary  magnetization  implies  that  the

studied  series  are  in  overturned  position.  The  scattering  of  the  ob-

tained directions shows that the tilting occurred around axes with var-

ious orientations. At Koudiat ed Delaa, the relatively high value of the

inclination shows that the magnetization was acquired when a moder-

ate dip existed due to the beginning of the tilting.

The implication of these data about the emplacement mode of the

Triassic  evaporitic  bodies  is  unequivocal.  Not  only  all  the  Albian

strata presented as reference of the floor in normal position of the

salt  glacier  appear  in  overturned  position,  but  the  various  axes  of

tilting can only be explained by the emplacement of diapirs. There-

fore, the notion of a salt glacier interbedded within the Albian sedi-

ments has to be discarded.

References

Besse J. & Courtillot V., 1991: Revised and synthetic Apparent Polar Wan-

der Paths of the African, Eurasian, North American and Indian plates,

and  True  Polar  Wander  since  200  Ma.  J.  Geophys.  Res.,  96  (B3),

4029–4050.

Perthuisot V., Aoudjehane M., Bouzenoune A., Hatira N., Laatar E., Man-

souri  A.,  Rouvier  H.  &  Smati  A.,  1998:  Les  corps  triasiques  des

Monts  du  Mellègue  sont-ils  des  diapirs  ou  des  «glaciers  de  sel»  ?

Bull. Soc Géol. France, sous presse.

Smati A., 1986: Les gisements de Pb, Ba et Fe du Jebel Slata (Tunisie cen-

trale-nord): minéralisations épigénétiques dans le Crétacé néritique de

la bordure d’un diapir de Trias. Gisements de Sidi Amor ben Salem et

de Slata-fer. Thèse 3

ème

 cycle, Paris, 1–250.

Vila J.M., Ben Youssef M., Charrière A., Chikhaoui M., Ghammi M., Ka-

moun F., Peybernes B., Saadi J., Souquet P. & Zarbout M., 1994: Dé-

couverte en Tunisie, au SW du Kef, de matériel triasique interstratifié

dans  l’Albien:  extension  du  domaine  à  “glaciers  de  sel”  sous-marins

des  confins  algéro-tunisiens.  Compt.  Rend.  Acad.  Sc.  Paris,  318,  II,

1661–1167.

Vila J.M., Ben Youssef M., Chikhaoui M., Ghammi M. & Kechid-Benkher-

ouf, 1996: Les grands “glaciers de sel” sous-marins albiens des confins

algéro-tunisiens. Proc. 5th. Tun. Petrol. Conf., Tunis, ETAP Mém., 10,

273–322.

PALEOMAGNETIC INVESTIGATION OF

THE SEDIMENTARY AND

VOLCANO-SEDIMENTARY ROCKS

IN THE EAST SLOVAK BASIN

I. TÚNYI

1

, E. MÁRTON

and D. VASS

3

1

Geophysical Institute SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9,

842 28 Bratislava, Slovak Republic; geoftuny@savba.sk

2

Eötvös Loránd Geophysical Institute,

Colombus út 17-23, 1145 Budapest, Hungary

3

Slovak Geological Survey, Mlynská dolina 1,

817 04 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

After the paleomagnetic study of the Tertiary units from Western

and Central Slovakia (Márton et al. 1996) as well as paleomagnet-

ic  study  of  the  Neogene  Volcanics  from  Eastern  Slovakia  (Nairn

1967; Orlický 1996) the measurements on sedimentary and volca-

no-sedimentary rock samples from the East Slovak Basin were car-

ried out. The aim of this investigation is to answer the question of

wheter  the  counterclokwise  rotation  also  occurred  in  this    Easter-

pling sites for the paleomagnetic analysis. At Koudiat ed Delaa, the

Albian strata could also be either overturned or in upright position

as the floor of a salt glacier according to the authors (Perthuisot et

al. 1998; Vila et al. 1994). Samples were taken at several sites in the

limbs and in the pericline of the Koudiat ed Delaa. The Jebel Slata

was considered as a reference example of a diapir (Smati 1986; Per-

thuisot  et  al.  1988).  This  mushroom  like  structure  is  also  now  the

subject of controversy because of the salt glacier assumptions. Sam-

ples for paleomagnetism were taken in the two debated limbs of this

structure, though the presence of post-tectonic ore deposits. The Al-

bian formation of the Jebel Slata pericline at Charen, considered in

upright position by all the authors, was also sampled for a reference

paleomagnetic  direction.

The analysis of hysteresis loops and Curie curves of some speci-

mens indicates that magnetite is the main carrier of the magnetiza-

tion.  A  very  low  anisotropy  of  magnetic  susceptibility  indicates  a

lack of significant internal strain. After at least one month in zero

field, the NRM was measured using a JR-4 inductometer. Because

of the acquisition of parasitic magnetizations during heating to tem-

peratures higher than 400 

o

C, the demagnetization of the NRM was

mostly carried out using heating until 300–350 

o

C, followed by al-

ternating field demagnetization, and eventually again thermal treat-

ment  at  higher  temperatures.  The  NRM  contains  several  different

components. After demagnetization of a viscous component (com-

ponent A), one or two components can be isolated according to the

sites. In the two limbs of the Jebel Slata we found a component B

and a ChRM (component C). The B component was acquired after

deposition  of  a  conglomerate  containing  Triassic  and  Albian  frag-

ments. The orientation of the ChRM C can be estimated only in a

few specimens, because of the formation of parasitic magnetizations

during thermal treatment at high temperatures. However, the polari-

ty of the ChRM is clearly reversed, both before and after correction

for  the  apparent  dip.  In  all  the  other  sites,  only  the  ChRM  C  is

present. The fold test performed at Koudiat ed Delaa shows that this

ChRM was acquired before the folding. This ChRM, after correction

for the apparent dip, is of reversed polarity in all the sites, except in

the Jebel Slata pericline. It has various orientations according to the

areas (Fig.).

The strata known to be in their upright position in the Jebel Slata

pericline retain a ChRM direction and polarity that corresponds to that

expected for a middle Cretaceous magnetization (Besse & Courtillot

1991). For the remaining sites, the ChRM direction does not corre-

spond to either that of the Albian reference pole or any reference pole

Fig. Stereographic projection of the component C with the confidence cir-

cle  in  the  different  studied  sites  after  correction  of  the  apparent  dip.  The

full (empty) symbols correspond to the lower (upper) hemisphere.

background image

202

most  part  of  the  Inner  Western  Carpathians.  We  collected  Eggen-

burgian sediments at one locality, zeolitized rhyolite tuffs of Bade-

nian  age  at  three  localities  as  well  as  Badenian  rhyolite  domes  at

two localities. The number of indepedently and magnetically orient-

ed  samples  was  92.  Standard-size  cylinders  were  measured  and

stepwise  demagnetized  by  thermal,  AF  or  by  combining  AF  and

thermal methods. IRM and low susceptibility versus temperature ex-

periments were performed to help the identification of the magnetic

minerals. Stepwise thermal demagnetization was carried out in Bra-

tislava, the other experiments in Budapest.

The samples from the two rhyolite domes yielded excellent pa-

leomagnetic  directions.  The  zeolitized  rhyolite  tuffs  were  weakly

magnetic;  the  demagnetization  curves  of  the  NRM  were  less

smooth than those of the rhyolites. Nevertheless, the components

of the NRM were well defined. The sediments are of different ages

and  of  different  lithologies.  The  Eggenburgian  locality  yield  a

good paleomagnetic direction. The Sarmatian sediments seemed to

be partly unstable. There was only one locality where 6 of the 8

collected samples gave a good cluster away from the present field

Fig. 1. Typical behaviour of the rhyolites during thermal demagnetization.

Modified  Zijderveld  diagram  and  normalized  intensity/susceptibility  (cir-

cles/dots) curves.

Fig. 2. Site and locality mean paleomagnetic direction with confidence cir-

cles. Numbers refer to Table 1. All inclinations are positive on the plot, i.e.

site mean directions with reversed polarity (l and 5) are shown as equiva-

lent normal polarity directions.

direction. The results are given in Table 1. The typical demagne-

tizing curves of rhyolitic sample are on Fig. 1. Fig. 2 shows mean

paleomagnetic  directions.

As  a  conclusion  we  say  that  the  above  mentioned  paleomagnetic

measurements  gave  information  about  counterclockwise  rotation  of

the Neogene units from East Slovak Basin. The results are very simi-

lar to those obtained by Márton & Pécskay (1995) in the Tokaj Mts.

(Hungary).  The  Eggenburgian  sediments  (1  loc.  20  spec.)  show  a

CCW rotation, of about 80

o

, the zeolitized rhyolite tuffs of the Early-

Middle Badenian age (3 loc. 25 spec.) a CCW rotation of about 60

o

,

the rhyolites (1 loc. 19 spec.) of the Late Badenian age a CCW rota-

tion of about 45

o

 and the youngest sediments of the Early-Middle Sar-

matian age (1 loc. 6 spec.) gave a CCW rotation of about 20

o

.

References

Márton  E.  &  Pécskay  Z.,  1995:  The  Tokaj-Vihorlát-Oas-Ignis  Triangle:

Complex evaluation of paleomagnetic and isotope age data from Neo-

gene  volcanics.  IGCP  Project  356,  Plate  Tectonic  Aspect  of  Alpine

Metallogeny  in  the  Carpatho-Balkan  Region,  3rd  Annual  Meeting.

Athens, 18–19 September 1995. Volume of Abstracts, 30.

Márton E., Vass D. & Túnyi I., 1996: Rotation of the North Hungarian Pa-

leogene  and  Lower  Miocene  rocks  indicated  by  paleomagnetic  data

(S. Slovakia, N-NE Hungary). Geol. Carpathica, 47, 1, 31–41.

Nairn  A.E.M.,  1967:  Paleomagnetic  investigations  of  the  Tertiary  and

Quartenary igneous rocks: III A paleomagnetic study of the East Slo-

vak Province. Geol. Rdsch., 56, 408–419.

Orlický O., 1996: Paleomagnetism of neovolcanics of the East-Slovak Lowlands

and Zemplinske Vrchy Mts.: A study of the tectonics applying the paleo-

magnetic data (Western Carpathians). Geol. Carpatica, 47, 1, 13–20.

PALEOMAGNETISM OF M. DEVONIAN

TO E. CARBONIFEROUS SEDIMENTS

FROM THE DRAHANY UPLAND,

MORAVIAN ZONE, BOHEMIAN MASSIF

J. SLEPIÈKOVÁ

Institute of Geology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic,

Rozvojová 135, Prague 6, Czech Republic

The study is devoted to the principal results of paleomagnetic in-

vestigations carried out in the Middle Devonian to Lower Carbonif-

erous sediments from the Drahany Upland, Moravian Zone, Bohe-

mian Massif. Pilot samples were collected from 12 localities (in the

vicinity of Jesenec, Slavoòov, Jevíèko, Mohelnice and Vitošov), de-

Locality

n/no

D

o

I

o

k a°

95

D

o

c

I

o

c

Age

1

Hrádok

9/9

183  -53  363 3 183 -53 10.5-13.2 Ma

2a

Lesné

3/4

312 63  249 8 312 63

upper

Badenian

2b

Lesné

16/2 311 66 1080 3 311 66

3

Oreské

11/11     2 44    28 9 319 60

lower

Badenian

4

Kuèín

8/9

    8 24    61 7 304 75

lower

Badenian

5

Nižný

6/12   95 -54    34  12

  63 -20

mid

Hrabovec

Badenian

6

Lada

20/21 289 57    14 9 281 30 Eggenburgian

7

Slanèík

6/8

338 +56    24  14

338 46 lower-mid

Sarmatian

Table 1: n/no—number used/collected samples; D, I (Dc, Ic)—declination

before (after) tilt correction; k and 

α

95

—the Fisher’s statistical parameters;

statistics is based on number of specimen (n); loc. 1–2b—rhyolites, loc. 3–

5—zeolithized rhyolite tuffs, loc. 6–7—sediments.

background image

203

tailed sampling was done in two localities (Jesenec, Slavoòov). Pa-

leomagnetic  investigation  of  further  localities  continues  at  the

present time. The principal object of investigation was to find locali-

ties  of  rocks  with  properties  suitable  for  paleomagnetic  analyses,

and hence for derivation of paleotectonic and paleogeographical pa-

rameters. Selected samples were subjected to progressive A.F. (al-

ternating  field)  demagnetization  (15  samples)  and  the  majority  of

samples  to  progressive  thermal  demagnetization  by  means  of  the

MAVACS  apparatus  (78  samples).  The  A.F.  demagnetization  was

found ineffective for the types of rocks investigated. From the deter-

mination  of  the  unblocking  temperature  (within  the  limits  of  310–

330

 o

C) it could be concluded that the pyrrhotite is the principal car-

rier  of  magnetization  for  the  localities  of  Vitošov  (limestones),

Jevíèko  (limestones),  Mohelnice  (limestones,  greywackes,  silt-

stones)  and  Jesenec.  One  site  only  from  those  of  the  locality  of

Jevíèko yielded Middle Devonian greywacke with a wider spectrum

of  unblocking  temperatures,  within  300–580 

o

C.  Hematite  is  con-

tained in some rock samples (shales) from the locality of Slavoòov,

the unblocking temperature is around 660 

o

C. The magnetization of

the Devonian limestones from the locality of Újezd near Boskovice

is carried by minerals with a wider spectrum of unblocking tempera-

tures within 200–500 

o

C (obviously due to different Fe-oxides) and

up to 675 

o

C (due to hematite). Generally, the concentration of ferri-

magnetics  is  low  in  rocks  sampled  at  all  the  localities  mentioned

above. The rock samples collected from the localities near Jevíèko

and  Mohelnice  show  properties  not  suitable  for  paleomagnetic  in-

vestigations. Only greywacke samples from the locality of Jevíèko

and  from  one  site  from  those  near  Mohelnice  showed  magnetic

properties suitable for paleomagnetic analyses. A complicated situa-

tion was found at the locality of Slavoòov, where samples show dif-

ferent properties due to different degree of alteration of rocks at this

locality. However, the samples from all the above localities as well

as  samples  from  the  localities  of  Vitošov,  Jesenec  and  Újezd  near

Boskovice are under laboratory investigations with the aim of veri-

fying their applicability to paleomagnetic studies. The primary (pa-

leomagnetic) magnetization components of the Devonian age were

found in some samples from the locality of Slavoòov and from one

locality near Mohelnice. The Variscan overprint magnetization com-

ponents were found in rock samples from the localities of Vitošov,

Jesenec and Jevíèko. The derived paleolatitudes are similar to those

derived earlier for rocks of similar age in the Bohemian Massif (Krs

& Pruner 1995). The rocks from the Drahany Upland prove paleo-

tectonic rotation similar to that derived from rocks from the Moravi-

an Karst, approx. 120

clockwise.

Reference

Krs  M.  &  Pruner  P.,  1995:  Paleomagnetism  and  paleogeography  of  the

variscan  Formations  of  the  Bohemian  Massif,  comparison  with  other

regions in Europe. Journal of the Czech Geological Society, 40, 1–2.

ARCHAEOMAGNETIC STUDY

OF BURNT CLAY STRUCTURES

FROM EMPORION PISTIROS

(CENTRAL SOUTH BULGARIA)

N. JORDANOVA* and M. KOVACHEVA

Geophysical Institute BAN, Acad. Bonchev str., bl. 3, 1113 Sofia,

Bulgaria; *vanedi@geophys.acad.bg

The  first  archaeomagnetic  studies  on  materials  from  Emporion

Pistiros were made quite recently (Kovacheva & Gigov 1996). As a

result  of  this  first  study,  three  archaeomagnetic  data  points  were

defined: 1 — archaeologically dated about 290 BC; 2 — archaeo-

magnetically dated in the time interval 270–160 BC; 3 — also ar-

chaeomagnetically dated, corresponding to the time interval 430–

380 BC.

In  1995  the  second  sampling  campaign  was  performed.  Sam-

ples  were  obtained  from  six  localities  —  altars  in  squares  B’2,

B’7,  B17,  destructions  in  squares  A13,  A13/A14  and  the  slope

near the site.

The  questions  stated  by  the  archaeologist,  leading  the  excava-

tions, are concerned with the origin of burnt clay found in squares

A13, A13/A14 and the slope — whether they are destructions or

remains of ancient ovens. The other problem to be solved by the

archaeomagnetic investigations relates to the time of last burning

of  the  sampled  structures.  The  large  Bulgarian  archaeomagnetic

data base available (Kovacheva 1997) is used to construct “master

curves” (Kovacheva et al. in press), suitable for dating purposes.

A set of rock-magnetic experiments have been carried out in or-

der to obtain information about the suitability of the material for

direction-  and  intensity-evaluations.  The  obtained  results  suggest

that  the  main  ferrimagnetic  minerals  are  magnetite  and  hematite.

However,  significant  mineralogical  changes  occurred  during  the

laboratory heating experiments, which make the paleointensity de-

terminations  problematic.

The  archaeomagnetic  characteristics  for  altars  in  squares  B’2

and B’7 are quite similar, which is in agreement with the archaeol-

ogist’s opinion. Thus, we regard these two structures as contempo-

rary. The dating procedure carried out (Kovacheva 1995) gives the

most probable dating interval as 282–176 BC. Comparison of this

dating with the results obtained for the first collection (Kovacheva

& Gigov 1996), suggests that the present data coincide well with

the most recent structures (dated between 270–160 BC). The obvi-

ous advantage here is that we have got not only the intensity, but

also the directional results.

Using measurements of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, it

is further proved that the remains of burnt clay, sampled in squares

A13, A13/14 and on the slope, are in fact destructions, rather than

destroyed ovens. However, this means that the direction (D and I)

cannot be obtained for these structures. Thus, only the paleointen-

sity value was used for dating. The obtained results are very close

to those for the altars in B’2 and B’7.

For destructions by the ancient fire, sampled on the slope near

the site, we obtained neither direction, nor paleointensity.

For  samples  taken  from  the  altar  in  square  B17,  the  direction

and  intensity  results  do  not  fit  the  archaeomagnetic  reference

curves for Bulgaria during the Thracian epoch. Therefore the final

dating of this structure is still questionable.

The results of the present study are in a good agreement with

the previous ones. It is found that most probably the structures of

burnt clay, sampled in squares B’2, B’7, A13, and A13/A14 all

can be related to the most recent development phase of Emporion

Pistiros.

References

Kovacheva M., 1995: Bulgarian Archaeomagnetic studies. In: D. Bailey &

I. Panayotov (Eds.): Prehistoric Bulgaria. Monographs in World Ar-

chaeology., Prehistory Press, Madison Wisconsin, No. 22, 209–224.

Kovacheva M. & V. Gigov, 1996: Emporion Pistiros and archaeomagnetic

studies. In: J. Bousek, M. Domaradzki & Z. Archibald (Eds.): Pistiros

I. Excavations and studies. Charles Univ. Press, Prague, 187–196.

Kovacheva  M.,  1997:  Archaeomagnetic  database  from  Bulgaria:  the  last

8000 years. Phys. Earth Plan. Inter., 102, 145–151.

Kovacheva  M.,  Jordanova  N.  &  Karloukovski  V.,  in  press:  Geomagnetic

field variations as determined from Bulgarian archaeomagnetic data.

Part II: The last 8000 years. Surveys in Geophysics.

background image

204

ARCHAEOMAGNETICAL INVESTIGATIONS

OF ROMAN EXCAVATIONS

D. GREGOROVÁ

Geophysical Institute of SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9,

842 28 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

From the first to the fourth century AD the Romans built a sys-

tem of military bases, forts and watch-towers (Limes Romanus) on

both  banks  of  the  Danube  to  protect  the  northern  borders  of  the

Roman Empire from barbarian attacks. There are some important

archaeological localities from this period in South Slovakia. From

two  of  them:  Bratislava-Dúbravka  and  Iža  near  the  city  of  Ko-

márno  archaeomagnetic  samples  were  taken.  The  samples  from

Dúbravka, investigated in 1995,   were from roof tiles (Orlický et

al.  1995).  The  results  of  measurements  by  the  Thellier  method

show, that the rate of the ancient geomagnetic field intensity from

about the third century AD to today´s intensity of the geomagnetic

field is k = 1.24 (Orlický et al. 1995).

The samples from Iža were measured this year. There were four

samples taken from wall-brick or from brick-tile (samples A1–A4)

and six samples from roof-tile (B1–B6). The time of their origin is

about the same as in the other case — about 300 years AD. The ap-

plied  investigation  method  was  the  Method  of  sequential  paired

heating — Thellier method.

The samples were twice — in two exactly defined positions, heat-

ed and cooled step by step to temperatures 50, 100, 150, 200, 300,

350(A), 400, 450, 500, 550, 600, 650(B), 700 Celsius degrees and

after each cooling measured on a spinner. After each step magnetic

susceptibility  was  also  measured.  The  representative  examples  of

curves  of  magnetic  susceptibility,  demagnetization  and  magnetiza-

tion curves  are represented in the enclosed figures.

The shape of the analogous curves for the other A and B  samples

are very similar to these examples.

The magnetic susceptibility of samples A before the first heating

lay

 

in the interval: K

0

 = 6279

×

10

-6

–7780

×

10

-6 

u. SI and of samples

B in interval: 10,504

×

10

-6

–13,227

×

10

-6 

u. SI. The volumes of natu-

ral  remanent  magnetic  polarization  were  also  different.  For  the  B

samples they were twice as big as for the A samples (A: from 127 to

178  nT,  B:  from  303  to  373  nT).  The  two  investigated  magnetic

characteristics indicate a partially different mineralogical composi-

tion of fragments A and B.

By calculation of coefficient k (=intensity of ancient field/intensity

of recent field) we take in acount only that part of curves, where the

susceptibility values were stable. The average  value of koeficient “k”

for samples A is k

= 1.34 and for samles B is k

 B 

= 1.37. It is a little

higher than for samples from the lokality Dúbravka. But these results

correspond to the other data, found in other works for third century

AD and our part of Europe (Krs 1977). These works as well as our re-

sults document, that the intensity of the geomagnetic field in around

the third century AD was about 1.3–1.4 times higher than intensity of

recent magnetic field.

References

Orlický O., Túnyi I. & Elschek K., 1995: Archeomagnetism of the fragments of

the Roman roof tiles from the Dúbravka locality. Proceedings of the 1st

Slovak geophysical conference. Geophysical institute of SAS.

Carmichael  Ch.M.  &  Thellier  E.,  1977:  Paleomagnetic  field  intensity,  its

measurement in theory and practice. Physics of the Earth and planetary

interiors. 13, 4.

Krs M., 1969: Paleomagnetizmus. Academia, Praha.

Sample A1 - demagnetization and magnetization curves

0

50

100

150

200

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

temperature  [ Celsius degrees ]

Magnetic Field Intensity:    Paleomag. field-Jp  [ nT ]    Laboratory field-JL  [ nT ]

Jp
JL

Sample A1 - magnetic susceptibility heating curve 

 K

0

 = 6 841x10

-6 

u.SI  

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

1

1.1

1.2

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

temperature  [Celsius degrees]  

Kn/Kn-max  Ks/Ks-max

Kn
Ks

Sample B3 - demagnetization and magnetization curves

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

temperature  [Celsius degrees]

Magnetic Field Intensity    Paleomag. field - Jp [nT]   Laboratory  field JL [nT] 

Jp
JL

Sample B3 - magnetic susceptibility heating curve  

K

0

 = 11 759x10

-6

 u. SI

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

1

1.1

1.2

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

temperature [Celsius degrees]

Kn/Kn-max    Ks/Ks-max

Kn
Ks

background image

205

(3)

which  enables  modelling  interpretations  in  any  position  of  the  ob-

served point P in the dipole field (Q). This position is determined by

the angle 

υ

.

The characteristic equation of the intensity gradient of the dipole

is written in the case of spherical coordinates of the form:

(4)

with eigen values of the tensor:

(5)

The own vector a

of the intensity gradient (belonging to eigen-

value 

λ

) can be deducted as:

(6)

which  it  is  perpendicular  to  a  plane  drawn  across  the  observed

point P and across the dipole axis. The additional two own vectors

a

2

 and a

will be expressed in the form:

(7)

On the basis of theoretical conclusions mentioned in Eqs. (6) and

(7) it is possible to consider a complete model for the developed in-

terpretative  procedures  of  geophysical  measurements.  This  given

model of own vectors of the intensity gradient in potential (magnet-

ic)  field  can  be  aimed  at  acquiring  new  magnetometric  maps  for

some mining, and geological-prospecting purposes.

The simplicity of the dipole structure is sufficient for modelling

basic tasks in magnetometry, especially if it is for the purpose of op-

erative  approximation  in  variability  of  some  real  geological  struc-

tures. The theoretical principles of modelling confirm the necessity

of introducing concrete hypothetical interpreted parameters into the

interpretative  procedures  for  the  investigated  geophysical  fields  of

some mineral deposit inhomogeneities.

References

Andrejev V.J. & Sokolovskij K.J., 1971: Interpretacija materialov podzemnych

gravitacionnych i magnetnych nabljudenij. Nedra, Moskva, 1–198.

Okál M., 1972: Invarianty a vlastné vektory gradientu intenzity v interpre-

taènej  geofyzikálnej  praxi.  In:  Zborník  vedeckých  prác  VŠT  Košice,

Fig. 1. Scheme of considered dipole.

MODELLING INTERPRETATIVE TASKS

AT THE MINING MAGNETIC SURVEY

V. SEDLÁK

Technical University of Košice, Department of Geodesy & Geophysics,

Park Komenského 19, 043 84 Košice, Slovak Republic;

sedlak@ccsun.tuke.sk

Some theoretical knowledge of the variability of modelling inter-

pretative procedures in mining geophysics are presented. The direct

and inverted magnetometric task in a geological survey of deep min-

eral deposits is solved by means of the mathematical — invariant so-

lution. The object of interest is to give precise and prospective new

mineral  deposit  positions  from  magnetometric  data  observed  from

underground mine profiles (Andrejev & Sokolovskij 1971; Sedlák &

Gašinec 1997). A different view of the interpretative procedures of

the  geophysical  fields  at  the  inhomogeneities  separation  and  back-

ground from the observed underground data is derived from a math-

ematical modelling of these interpretative procedures. The magnetic

field source is approximated by a dipole (Fig. 1).

II. Paleointensity

Considering also the effect of the gravitational field, in case of a

negative value of the charge („abundance“) of the dipole, i.e. m(Q)

< 0 it is the Eq. (1) to be accepted for the intensity K of this dipole

field:

(1)

where p = –m(Q)dl is the moment of the dipole, / is the gravita-

tional constant and U is the potential of the dipole magnetic field.

The  intensity  gradient  of  the  magnetic  potential  of  the  dipole

field in terms of spherical coordinates is written as follows (con-

sidering the scalar value p) (Okál 1972):

(2)

The square of the scalar quantity of this intensity in the case of a

potential field dipole is given by solving of the Hamilton (Laplace)

operator, i.e. by partial derivatives of the intensity according to sep-

arate spherical coordinates in the Eq. (2):

K(Q,P) = -ÑU(Q,P) = Ñ

p

 

H



H 



 

!

Q,P

Q,P

G Q



F

Ñ

(

)

K(Q,P)=-

Gp

r

 e e

e e

e e

e e

e e

r r

r

r

4

6

3

3

3

3

+

+

cos

sin

sin

cos

cos

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ υ

υ υ

6

3

0

3

3

0

0

0

3

0

4

4

4

4

4

Gp

r

 

 -

Gp

r

 

Gp

r

 

-

Gp

r

 -

-

Gp

r

 - 

 =

cos

sin

sin

υ λ

υ

υ

λ

λ













(

)

K (Q,P)=

G p

r

 

+

2

2

2

6

2

3

1

cos

υ

(

)

λ

υ

λ

υ

υ

 

Gp

r

 

and    

Gp

r

+  

,

1

4

1 2

4

2

3

3

2

4 5

=

=

±

cos

cos

cos

a = f ( )e ,  where     f ( )=

 

 +   +   

a    f ( )e , where   f ( )=

 

 -   +   

 

I

i

i i

I I

2

2

3

2

2

3

4 5

2

3

4 5

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

υ

sin

cos

cos

sin

cos

cos

=

a

1

 = ae

ϕ

background image

206

Bratislava, Alfa, 17–23.

Sedlák V. & Gašinec J., 1997: Mathematical Modelling at the Mining Geo-

physical Survey. In: Proceedings — results from recent Study in seismol-

ogy  and  Engineering  Geophysics,  Regional  Conf.  with  Inter.

Participation, (Kaláb, Z.), Ostrava, ÚG ÈAV, April 8–9, 1997, 168–174.

AVERAGED  PALEOFIELD  AND

 GEODYNAMO CURRENT

S.V. STARCHENKO

Longitudinally-averaged  magnetic  and  velocity  fields  show  far

less time dependence than do 3D fields from geomagnetic observa-

tions and MHD dynamo simulations. This allows an additional time-

averaging of the axisymmetric magnetic field on a scale of a few de-

cades.  The  source  of  the  resulting  averaged  paleofield  is

longitudinal  electric  currents  that  have  clear  extrema  near  the

boundaries of the liquid core in the Earth. Thus, it is justified to rep-

resent  averaged  geomagnetic,  archaeomagnetic  and  paleomagnetic

fields by geodynamo currents instead of the usual representation of

magnetic multipoles that have no physical basis.

As a first approximation, we consider two circular current loops

— one at the ICB and the other at the CMB. When the sense of these

electric current loops is the same, we obtain a present day or slightly

higher magnetic field intensity. When the sense of the current loops

oppose one another, the resulting  geomagnetic  field  intensity  sig-

nificantly  weakens.  Reliable  paleomagnetic  and  archaeomagnetic

records support the existence of such levels in paleointensity.

Our natural geodynamo-type currents may also be successfully

used for magnetic tomography of the Earth’s deep interior as well

as more physical representations of the global geomagnetic field.

WAVELET ANALYSIS OF

ARCHAEOMAGNETIC DATA OVER THE

LAST 4,000 YEARS

K. BURAKOV, D. GALYAGIN, P. FRICK,

I. NACHASOVA, M. RESHETNYAK* and D. SOKOLOFF

*Geophysical Institute, Boèní II/1401, 141 31 Prague 4,

Czech Republic; rm@ig.cas.cz

Although geomagnetic secular variation (SV) has its origin within

the liquid core of the Earth, we can only observe the processes in-

volved  beyond  the  core-mantle  boundary.  Its  source  may  involve

MAC-waves  (10

3

  years  timescale)  or  Alfven  waves  (10

years  ti-

mescale),  as  well  as  non-regular  flow  which  may  expel  toroidal

magnetic  field  at  the  boundary.  Since  SV  cannot  be  considered  a

purely  periodic  process,  classical  spectral  analysis  techniques  such

as Fourier or MEM cannot be directly applicable. Here we present

the  wavelet  approach  applied  to  archaeomagnetic  secular  variation

data  from  Bulgaria,  Georgia  (FSU)  and  Central  Asia  for  the  last

4,000 years. The main advantage of this approach is that it may be

applied  to  non-stationary  spectra  as  well  as  time  series  containing

gaps.  The  obtained  wavelet  time  spectrum  is  presented  in  Fig.  1.

Most notable is a 1750-year variation, which is observed in all three

time  series.  The  phase  shifts  of  this  variation  correspond  to  wave

propagation  from  east  to  west  with  velocity  V

ϕ

  =  +0.2

per  year.

Processes occurring on with the smaller timescales demonstrate the

lower level of correlation.

THE XITLE - EL PEDREGAL LAVA FIELD,

MEXICO CITY: ENIGMATIC INTRA- AND

INTER-FLOW PALAEOMAGNETIC

VARIATIONS

H. BÖHNEL* and G. McINTOSH

UNICIT-Instituto de Geofisica UNAM, Campus Juriquilla,

POB 11-742, C.P. 76001 Santiago de Queretaro, Mexico;

*harald@tonatiuh.igeofcu.unam.mx

A  rock-magnetic  and  paleomagnetic  profile  through  a  flow-unit

of the Xitle-El Pedregal lava field (about 2000 BP) is documented.

The  flow  shows  signs  of  emplacement  via  inflation  in  its  internal

structure. Comparison with a previous profile through a Xitle flow

(Böhnel et al. 1997) shows that over the extent of the lava field flow

emplacement  histories  varied,  probably  due  to  topographical  fea-

tures. Broad similarities in the magnetic properties of the two pro-

files suggests that such differences do not impact on the magnetic

mineralogy of the flows. Significant intra- and inter-flow differenc-

es in both the characteristic directions and paleointensities, obtained

using Thellier-type methods, are seen, both in the new profile and

previous studies of sites distributed across the lava field. These vari-

ations do not correlate with any of the measured physical or magnet-

ic properties of the flows. At any one site the mean directions are

well-defined and it is only when considered collectively that the in-

consistencies are recognized. Intra-flow and inter-site paleointensity

variations are large: a total of 117 determinations yield answers be-

tween 36.6 and 139.7 mT. Within this range it is difficult to recog-

nize a best estimate on the basis of rock-magnetic criteria. These re-

sults raise questions about the reliability of lavas as paleomagnetic

recorders and highlight the importance of sampling strategy in ob-

taining representative flow-mean parameters.

Fig. 1 — Bulgaria, 2 — Georgia, 3 — Central Asia and T in years.

background image

207

Böhnel H., Morales J., Caballero C., Alva L., McIntosh G., Gonzalez S. &

Sherwood G.J., 1997: Variation of rock magnetic parameters and pa-

leointensities over a single Holocene lava flow. J. Geomag. Geoelec-

tr., 49, 523–542.

SECULAR VARIATIONS AND RELATIVE

PALAEOINTENSITY OF THE EARTH’S

MAGNETIC FIELD BETWEEN 7,000 BC

AND 500 AD RECORDED BY ANNUALLY

LAMINATED LAKE SEDIMENTS

IN NORTHERN SWEDEN

I. SNOWBALL*, P. SANDGREN and G. PETTERSON

Department of Quaternary Geology, Lund University,

Tornavägen 13, 223 63 Lund, Sweden; *ian.snowball@geol.lu.se

Although  continuous  records  of  geomagnetic  field  variations  can

be recovered through the palaeomagnetic analysis of lake sediments,

Holocene palaeomagnetic secular variation (PSV) master-curves have

generally relied upon 

14

C dating to provide a chronology (Thompson

1983). Recently it has been discovered that 

14

C dates obtained on bulk

lacustrine sediments (even organic rich sediments) can include signif-

icant errors due to the inclusion of ”old” carbon in the dated material,

with the result that calibrated 

14

C dates can overestimate the true age

of sediment deposition by up to 2,000 years (e.g. Snyder et al. 1994;

Barnekow et al. 1998). Such errors are likely to be inherent in early

PSV  master-curves  that  relied  on  the 

14

C  dating  of  bulk  sediments.

Saarinen (1998) has shown that calendar year dated PSV and relative

palaeointensity  data  can  be  obtained  from  the  analysis  of  annually

laminated  lake  sediments  in  Finland  (for  the  last  3,200  years).  We

show here PSV and relative palaeointensity data obtained from an an-

nually laminated lake sediment sequence in northern Sweden, which

covers the time interval between 7,000 BC and 500 AD.

Lake Sarsjön is a small lake (area = ca. 10 ha) that lies at an altitude

of  167  m,  approximately  40  km  north-west  of  the  city  of  Umeå  in

northern Sweden. Due to isostatic land uplift the basin was isolated

from the Ancylus Lake (now the Baltic Sea), and the deposition of al-

ternating minerogenic and organic laminations on an annual basis has

been continuous since the isolation. Bioturbation is absent from these

anaerobic sediments and the laminations are preserved (see Petterson

1996). Counting of the varves (see Petterson et al. 1993 for method-

ological  details)  reveals  that  the  isolation  occurred  at  7,000  ±  200

years BC. Two complete sequences were recovered from the deepest

point of the lake (7.3 m water depth) with a fixed piston corer. The

palaeomagnetic  analyses  (NRM,  ARM  and  AF  demagnetization)  of

subsamples taken at 4 cm intervals from each core (with a 2 cm offset

between cores) were undertaken at the Geological Survey of Finland

with a 2G-Enterprises 755R magnetometer. Magnetic hysteresis anal-

ysis  were  carried  out  with  a  PMC  MicroMag  on  contiguous  2 mm

thick samples that had been imbedded with epoxy resin (ca. 3,000 in-

dividual samples from overlapping sections).

AF demagnetization of the NRM and ARM, temperature depen-

dent magnetic behaviour and the magnetic hysteresis measurements

demonstrate that the NRM is carried by stable-single domain (SSD)

magnetite. A positive linear relationship exists between the concen-

tration of SSD magnetite (reflected by SIRM) and the organic car-

bon content of the sediments (r = 0.94). Biological production in the

lake during the summer is responsible for the deposition of organic

carbon.  Therefore  it  is  most  likely  that  the  SSD  magnetite  is  pro-

duced  extracelluraly  by  dissimilatory  iron-reducing  bacteria  that

live  at  (or  very  near)  the  surface  of  the  sediments  and  which  take

part in the decomposition of organic material. The NRM is therefore

interpreted as a near surface PDRM. The AF cleaned NRM data and

the NRM is plotted against calendar years in Fig. 1. Data for central

Finland, from Saarinen (1998) is also shown.

Fig. 1

background image

208

There is excellent agreement between the palaeomagnetic records

recovered from the two Lake Sarsjön cores (one core is shown for

clarity)  and  also  between  the  Finnish  data  which  extends  back  to

1,200  BC.  In  particular,  the  estimates  of  relative  palaeointensity

(based on ARM standardization of the NRM) are comparable. This

agreement between the Swedish and Finnish data sets indicates that

annually laminated lake sediments do contain high resolution palae-

omagnetic records of direction and intensity which can be used for

(1)  reconstructing  the  behaviour  of  Earth’s  magnetic  field  and  (2)

magnetostratigraphic studies, i.e. the indirect dating and correlation

of sediment sequences.

References

Barnekow L., Possnert G. & Sandgren P., 1998: AMS 

14

C chronologies of

Holocene  lake  sediments  in  the  Abiso  area,  northern  Sweden  —  a

comparison  between  bulk  dated  sediment  and  macrofossil  samples.

GFF, 120, 59–67.

Petterson G., 1996: Varved sediments in Sweden: a brief review. In: Kemp

A.E.S. (Ed.): Palaeoclimatology and Palaeoceanography from Lami-

nated Sediments. Geol. Soc. Spec. Publ., 116, 73–77.

Petterson G., Renberg I., Geladi P., Lindberg A. & Lingren F., 1993: Spatial

uniformity  of  sediment  accumulation  in  varved  lake  sediments  in

northern Sweden. Journal of Palaeolimnology, 9, 195–208.

Saarinen T., 1998: Paleomagnetic study of annually laminated sediments in

Lake Pohjajävri: paleosecular variation and paleointensity in Finland

during the last 3200 years. Physics of the Earth and Planetary interi-

ors. In press.

Snyder J.A., Miller G.H., Werner A., Jull A.J.T. & Stafford Jr., T.W., 1994:

AMS-radiocarbon  dating  of  organic-poor  lake  sediment,  an  example

from Linnévatnet, Spitsbergen, Svalbad. The Holocene, 4, 413–421.

Thompson  R.,  1983: 

14

C  dating  and  magnetostratigraphy.  Radiocarbon,

25, 229–238.

PALEOINTENSITY OF THE EARTH’S

MAGNETIC FIELD MEASURED

ON SUBMARINE BASALTIC GLASSES

M.T. JUÁREZ*, L. TAUXE, J.S. GEE and T. PICK

*Paleomagnetic Laboratory, Fort Hoofddijk, University of Utrecht,

Budapestlaan 17, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands; juarez@geof.ruu.nl

Understanding  the  Earth’s  magnetic  field  requires  a  complete

description  of  both  paleointensity  and  paleodirectional  data.  In

contrast  with  the  directional  behaviour  of  the  Earth’s  magnetic

field during geological and historic times, which has been relatively

deeply  investigated,  the  paleointensity  data  are  still  rather  scarce,

inspite of the many efforts made in the last few decades. This is

mainly due to the difficulty of obtaining reliable paleointensity re-

sults,  a  difficulty  that  is  inherent  to  the  recording  materials  them-

selves. The best and simplest material found up to now for paleoin-

tensity experiments is Submarine Basaltic Glass (SBG). We focused

on SBG obtained from 30 sites sampled by the DSDP and distribut-

ed  throughout  the  world’s  oceans.  The  ages  of  the  studied  sites

range from the present day to the Jurassic. The quality of the data is

supported by parallel rock-magnetic experiments. The rock magnet-

ic  investigation  suggests  that  the  carrier  of  the  remanence  is  pre-

dominantly single-domain magnetite. The magnetic properties from

the studied glasses are very similar regardless of age or geographi-

cal location. The obtained results correspond to virtual axial dipole

moment values that range from 1.8

×

10

22

 to 9.0

×

10

22

 Am

2

.

 

Therefore

suggesting an average dipole moment of approximately half of the

present day field. Finally, comparison of our results with the NRM

record of the sea-floor basalts suggests that changes in the natural

magnetization may also be influenced by the intensity of the dipole

moment and not only by mineralogical alteration with time.

III.  Magnetic fabric, magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and paleotectonics

ROCKMAGNETIC INVESTIGATIONS

OF LATE QUATERNARY SEDIMENTS

FROM LAGO DI MEZZANO

(CENTRAL ITALY)

U. BRANDT*, N.R. NOWACZYK, A. RAMRATH

and J.W.F. NEGENDANK

GeoForschungszentrum, Telegrafenberg, Haus C,

14473 Potsdam, Germany; *brandt@gfz-potsdam.de

Two  sediment  cores  recovered  from  Lago  di  Mezzano,  a  maar

lake in central Italy, reaching back to ca. 31,000 years, were subject-

ed to detailed rock magnetic investigations. The cores, LMZ-C and

LMZ-G, 27 and 17 m in length, were continuously subsampled into

plastic boxes (20

×

20

×

20 mm), providing an average time resolution

of  about  25  years  per  sample.  The  investigations  comprised  mea-

surements of initial magnetic susceptibility, natural remanent mag-

netization (NRM), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and

isothermal  remanent  magnetization  (IRM).  Intra-lake  core  correla-

tion is based on the data of continuous high-resolution susceptibility

measurements, which were carried out using a Bartington M.S.2.F

surface scanning sensor. The bulk susceptibility (

κ

) of the palaeo-

magnetic samples of Cores LMZ-C and LMZ-G was measured with

a Kappabridge KLY-3S (AGICO Brno). Measurement of NRM di-

rections  and  intensity  were  performed  with  a  fully  automated  2G-

Enterprises  755  SRM  (Superconducting  Rock  Magnetometer).  Al-

ternating  field  (AF)  demagnetization  of  all  1800  subsamples  was

carried out in 10 steps of up to 100 mT using the integrated in-line

3-axis  AF  demagnetizer  of  the  cryogenic-magnetometer.  IRM  was

imprinted  with  a  2G-Enterprises  660  pulse  magnetizer,  every  10th

sample of Core LMZ-C was exposed stepwise to peak fields up to

1.5 T. The saturation isothermal remanence (SIRM) was also deter-

mined for the remaining samples of this core.

All  the  recorded  IRM  acquisition  curves  reached  saturation  be-

tween 450 and 1000 mT, indicating that there is no significant con-

tribution from high-coercivity minerals like hematite or goethite in

the samples. In order to obtain information about the uniformity of

magnetic mineralogy and grain size the magnetic parameters ARM,

ARM

sus7

 SIRM and 

κ

 were plotted against each other (Creer & Mor-

ris 1996; King et al. 1982). In all plots, except SIRM versus K, the

data of samples belonging to the same lithological units (Ramrath et

al., submitted-1997) clustered in well-defined groups, the elongated

clusters showing different slopes to the origin. In addition, different

magnetic  parameters  like  S-ratio  and  median  destructive  field

(MDF) of ARM were compared with the dry density record. Periods

of increased dry density, which are interpreted as periods of cooler

temperatures  and  dry  conditions  (Ramrath  et  al.,  submitted-1998)

often  correspond  to  decreases  in  both  magnetic  parameters  men-

tioned above, as well as to increases in ARM, ARM

sus7

 SIRM and 

κ

.

background image

209

These results indicate, that the changes in composition and rate of

sedimentary input in Lago di Mezzano, which are related to climatic

changes, are associated with changes in grain size and composition

of  the  carrier  of  the  magnetic  remanences.  The  associations  are

more  complicated  than  they  appear  to  be  so  I  would  like  to  make

only a general statement in the abstract.

References

Creer K.M. & Morris A., 1996: Proxy-climate and geomagnetic palaeoin-

tensity  records  extending  back  to  ca.  75,000  BP  derived  from  sedi-

ments cored from Lago Grande Di Monticchio, Southern Italy. Quat.

Sci. Rev., 15, 167–188.

King J., Banerjee S.K., Marvin J. & Özdemir Ö., 1982: A comparison of

different magnetic methods for determining the relative grain size of

magnetite  in  natural  materials:  some  results  from  lake  sediments.

Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 59, 404–419.

Ramrath A., Nowaczyk N.R. & Negendank J.F.W., (submitted, 1997): Sedi-

mentological  evidence  for  environmental  changes  since  34,000  yrs

BP from Lago di Mezzano, central Italy. J. Palaeolim.

Ramrath A., Zolitschka B., Wulf S. & Negendank J.F.W. (submitted, 1998):

Late  Pleistocene  climatic  variations  as  recorded  in  two  Italian  lakes

(Lago di Mezzano, Lago Grande di Monticchio). Quat. Sci. Rew.

ROCK MAGNETISM OF EOCENE MARINE

MARLS FROM THE JACA-PAMPLONA BASIN

(SOUTH CENTRAL PYRENEES,

NORTHERN SPAIN)

J.C. LARRASOAÑA

1-2*

, J.M. PARÉS

1-3

, E.L. PUEYO

1-2

,

H. MILLÁN

2

 and J. DEL VALLE

1

Paleomagnetic Laboratory, Institute of Earth Sciences

“Jaume Almera”, CSIC, c/ Solé i Sabarís s/n, 28080 Barcelona, Spain;

*jclarra@ija.csic.es

2

Department of Earth Sciences, University of Zaragoza,

c/ Pedro Cervuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain

3

Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1006 C. C.

Little Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA

We are conducting a magnetotectonic study on the Eocene marls

of the Pamplona-Arguis Formation, which outcrops along the Jaca-

Pamplona Basin (Southern Pyrenees, Northern Spain). It is made up

of  a  monotonous  sequence  (up  to  2000  m  thick)  of  bluish  marine

marls, deposited during middle-upper Eocene in the distal part of a

deltaic system with ESE-WNW polarity (Puigdefábregas 1975). Pre-

vious  magnetostratigraphic  and  magnetotectonic  works  have  pro-

vided the geochronological and geodynamic constraints of the basin

(Hogan  1993;  Hogan  &  Burbank  1996;  Pueyo  et  al.  1997;  Larra-

soaña et al. 1997; among others). We have carried out a rock mag-

netic  study  on  these  rocks  because  their  magnetic  mineralogy  has

still not been well established and up to now little is known about

the origin of the natural remanence.

Specimens  of  these  rocks  are  weakly  magnetized  (NRM  values

about 10

–4

 A/m) and two components are normally revealed by step-

wise  thermal  demagnetization.  At  high  temperatures  the  samples

show  very  weak  magnetization  and  become  thermally  unstable,

sometimes  making  the  interpretation  of  paleomagnetic  data  diffi-

cult. The low temperature component unblocks at temperatures up

to 250–350 

o

C and shows maximum clustering prior to tectonic cor-

rection.  The  high  temperature  component  unblocks  between  320–

460 

o

C, shows both normal and reverse polarity and, in accordance

with the fold test, is a pre-folding magnetization.

IRM acquisition curves reach almost complete saturation at less

than 300 mT, suggesting the predominance of low-coercivity miner-

als such as (Ti) magnetite and/or ferrimagnetic iron sulfides. Low-

temperature measurements of Jrs evidenced the presence of magne-

tite and pyrrhotite. There is also evidence of ultrafine grained mag-

netite in or close to the SP range, in agreement with the short-term

viscous behaviour of IRM. Thermal demagnetization of a composite

IRM shows a decay in remanence at 340

o

 and 580

o

 in the three com-

ponents  (up  to  50  mT;  50–300  mT  and  0.3–1.5  T)  in  accordance

with the presence of magnetite and pyrrhotite with a wide grain-size

distribution. There is no evidence of goethite or hematite. Due to the

very  low  concentration  of  ferromagnetic  minerals  in  the  samples

their  magnetic  hysteresis  loops  are  mainly  controlled  by  the  para-

magnetic  matrix.  After  substraction  of  the  paramagnetic  contribu-

tion, a weak ferromagnetic signal is revealed. Any distorted hystere-

sis  loop  has  been  observed  despite  the  rock  magnetic  evidence  of

pyrrhotite  and  ultrafine-grained  magnetite.  This  is  somewhat  sur-

prising as both components can contribute to distorted loops. Taking

into account that the total magnetization of the samples is the sum of

the  weighted  contribution  of  each  component,  pyrrhotite  and  SP

magnetite are not likely to be present in large amounts on the stud-

ied rocks, which is consistent with other rock magnetic parameters

such as ARM/IRM ratios. Low-T measurements of magnetic suscep-

tibility and thermomagnetic runs have not provided any conclusive

results due to the very low ferromagnetic content and the new for-

mation of magnetic phases during heating.

We  interprete  the  low  temperature  component  as  a  recently  ac-

quired viscous overprint carried by the finer magnetite fraction rath-

er than pyrrhotite. Ultrafine-grained magnetite, rather than iron sul-

fides,  is  likely  to  form  due  to  weathering  in  the  near  surface

environment. The higher temperature component is considered as a

primary  Eocene  magnetization  carried  by  fine-grained  magnetite,

and probably in some cases, pyrrhotite. SEM observations show the

presence  of  framboids  of  primary  iron  sulfides  but  not  clear  evi-

dence  of  magnetite.  Aditional  SEM  and  TEM  analyses  are  being

conducted  to  invesigate  their  possible  genetic  relation  and  thus  to

establish the origin of the primary magnetization.

References

Hogan P.J., 1993: Geochronologic, tectonic and stratigraphic evolution of

the South-west Pyrenean foreland basin, Northern Spain. Ph. D. The-

sis, Univ. Southern California, 1–219.

Hogan P.J. & Burbank D.W., 1996: Evolution of the Jaca piggyback basin

and emergence of the External Sierra, southern Pyrenees. In: Friend

P.F. & Dabrio C.J. (Eds): Tertiary basins of Spain. Cambridge Univ.

Press, 153–160.

Larrasoaña J.C., Pueyo E.L., Del Valle J., Millán H., Parés J.M., Pocoví A. &

Dinares J., 1996: Datos magnetotectónicos del Eoceno de la cuenca de

Jaca-Pamplona: resultados preliminares. Geogaceta, 20, 5, 1058–1061.

Pueyo  E.L.,  Millán  H.,  Pocoví  A.  &  Parés  J.M.,  1996:  Correcciones

geométricas en magnetotectónica: filtrado de rotaciones aparentes debi-

das a pliegues. Geogaceta, 20, 5, 1054–1057.

Puigdefábregas C., 1975: La sedimentación molásica de la cuenca de Jaca,

Pirineos. 104, 1–188.

ROCK MAGNETISM

AND PALEOMAGNETISM

OF PORCELANITES/CLINKERS

FROM THE WESTERN DACIC BASIN

(ROMANIA)

S. C. RÃDAN and M. RÃDAN

Geological Institute of Romania, 1, Caransebes Str.,

79678 Bucharest, Romania; radan@igr.ro

background image

210

1. Introduction

Porcelanites  and/or  clinkers  —  baked  and/or  sedimentary  rocks

generated  by  natural  spontaneous  burning  of  coal  seams  (see  also

the  “Dictionary  of  geological  terms”,  Anchor  Press,  1976)  —  are

exposed at different localities in the western Dacic Basin within the

Upper Pliocene lignite-clay sequences.

Firstly, the existence of such deposits in the area was detected by

one of the authors (S.C.R.), in 1969, on the occasion of creating the

geomagnetic field vertical component map over the Romanian terri-

tory in 1:200,000 scale. Importance of the enhanced magnetic prop-

erties due to porcelanites, which represent modified mineral assem-

blages related to the original clays, was analysed in the context of

the regional magnetic mapping interpretation (Roºca et al. 1973).

Since 1987, when magnetostratigraphic investigations of lignite-

clay sequences in the Motru-Jiu area started, a rock magnetic–pa-

leomagnetic approach of the heated rocks in coal quarries has been

developed.  The  mineralogy  and  geochemistry  of  porcelanites  and

clinkers have also been studied, and magnetic anomalies produced

by  sediments  with  magnetic  properties  of  enhanced  during  post-

depositional thermal perturbation have been measured. The applied

methods  and  some  results  were  reported  in  abstracts  and  research

notes (Rãdan & Rãdan 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1996; Rãdan et al.

1989, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994a, 1994b, 1995, 1996a, 1996b).

2. Methods and instrumentation

Oriented  samples  of  porcelanites,  clinkers  and  porcelanite-like

clays were collected from two lignite quarries (Lupoaia and Jilt Sud)

and some unoriented core fragments were taken from two explora-

tion boreholes (in Lupoaia-Motru area). Moreover, several oriented

monolith-blocks (of about 25 cm thickness) of porcelanites and por-

celanite-like clays were sampled and cut in 2–5 oriented subsamples

and,  afterwards,  to  cubic  specimens.  Magnetic  susceptibility  (MS)

and the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) were measured

using a KLY-2 Kappabridge, and (total) natural remanent magnetisa-

tion (NRM) by a JR-4 spinner-magnetometer. The Koenigsberger ra-

tio (Q = In/kH) was determined, too.

To determine the characteristic remanent magnetisation (ChRM),

a stepwise thermal demagnetisation (STD) was applied by means of

a  TSD-1  Schonstedt  demagnetiser.  MS  was  monitored  during  this

process and, in a few cases, the behaviour of the AMS during mag-

netic cleaning was investigated (see Fig. 1b

3

–b

4

).

A  Geometrics  G-826  magnetometer  was  used  to  examine  nine

magnetic profiles in the Lupoaia-Motru area.

3. Results and discussion

3.1. Rock magnetism
Mineral  transformations  induced  by  heating  during  the  natural

burning of coal beds prove that the forming temperature of porcela-

nite-like  clays,  porcelanites  and  clinkers  has  usually  reached  250–

400 

o

C (no more than 800–850 

o

C); in some cases temperatures of

1000 

o

C  have  been  exceeded,  and  sometimes  1100–1200 

o

C  was

reached (Rãdan et al. 1994a).

Consequently, the detrital remanent magnetisation (DRM) ac-

quired by the original clays with low and very low NRM intesities

(often less than 1mA/m, seldomly higher than 30mA/m) has chaged,

and the thermoremanent feature magnetisation (TRM) produced in

the  heat-affected  rocks  is  a  new  and  important  feature.  The  NRM

structure could include TRM’s (PTRM) and thermochemical rema-

nent magnetisations (TCRM) as well (Jones et al. 1984).

Anyway,  total  NRM  measured  on  porcelanites  and  porcelanite-

like  clays  show  high  values,  usually  ranging  between  1000–

7000 mA/m. The magnetic polarity of total NRM is normal (close

of the present geomagnetic field direction), while the original clays

(thermally non-affected) from the same stratigraphic level (e.g., the

coal seam X; Fig. 1a) usually have reversed NRM (see an example

in Fig. 1c

1

–c

2

).

As  regards  the  anisotropy  of  magnetic  susceptibility  (AMS)  of

porcelanites, magnetic fabric is defined by characteristics similar to

those  of  fresh  clays  (a  (primary)  depositional/sedimentary  fabric):

near — vertical minimum susceptibility axes, and near — horizontal

maximum and intermediate susceptibility axes (belding plane) (see

also the example in Fig. 1b

1

–b

2

; a slight deviation in the porcelanite

case could be noticed). The results can be compared with the data of

Fig. 1.  Rock  magnetic  and  palaeomagnetic  characteristics  for  porcelanites  and  original  clays  (examples  from  Jilt  Sud  quarry,  western  Dacic  Basin).
a)          clay,            coal. Note: The sampling sites (not shown in the figure) for porcelanites (JL 70-JL 73) are at the level of the coal seam X; b) s  maxi-

mum susceptibility;  n  intermediate susceptibility;  l  minimum susceptibility; c) l  normal polarity; 

o

 reverse polarity.

 

_ _

_

::::

background image

211

Perarnau  &  Tarling  (1985)  on  thermal  enhancement  of  magnetic

fabric; they concluded that “irrespective of the mineralogical mod-

els, it is clear that the observed fabric can only be a result of mim-

icking of fabrics that must already exist within the rocks”.

The  enhancement  of  anisotropy  parameters  determined  for  por-

celanites  is  clearly  expresses,  especially  by  magnetic  foliation  (F)

and the anisotropy degree (P); the values range between 1.10–1.20,

reaching even 1.30–1.40, while for the original clays the most fre-

quent F and P values are situated within the interval 1.03–1.05.

Certainly, the mean magnetic susceptibility measured on porcela-

nite-like clays and porcelanites is stronghly enhanced, the MS val-

ues usually being 10–100 times higher than the MS of the original

(thermally non-affected) clays.

Increased  magnetic  properties  (NRM  and  MS)  of  porcelanites

clearly  results  in  strong  magnetic  anomalies  (up  to  1880 nT)  pro-

duced by the respective deposits (the depth, as shown by three bore-

holes,  did  not  exceed  35 m).  The  results  obtained  in  the  western

Dacic Basin are compared with (aero) magnetic data for clinker de-

posits from USA and New Zealand (Hasbrouck & Hadsell; Gay &

Hawley 1991; Lindqvist et al. 1985).

3.2. Paleomagnetism
During thermal demagnetisation, the behaviour of RM and MS

for porcelanites was significantly different from that of the origi-

nal clays (Fig. 1b

3

–b

4

, c

3

–c

4

).

The thermal demagnetisation diagrams show the predominance

of  thermally  distributed  components  of  magnetisation  (according

to  the  terminology  of  Irving  &  Opdyke  1965),  suggesting  some

mineralogical significances as well.

The MS monitoring during STD usually did not reveal ther-

mal  alterations  as  observed  in  many  cases  for  the  original  clays,

especially when they are rich in organic/vegetal material.

Stability  of  the  remanent  magnetisation  direction,  generally  up

to  500 

o

C,  could  give  some  indications  on  the  temperatures  that

were  reached  during  the  natural  baking  of  clays  (see  also,

Lindqvist et al. 1985); a correlation with the temperatures shown

by XRD was established.

The ChRM directions, mostly close to the present geomagnetic

field  direction,  supported  the  calibration  of  the  Brunhes  chron

(0.78 Ma; GPTS, Cande & Kent 1995). The autocombustion pro-

cess  of  the  lignite  seam  which  produced  the  porcelanites  could

have been during the Middle-Upper Pleistocene.

Some comments regarding the normal ChRM of porcelanites

related to the Jaramillo subchron (0.99–0.07 Ma, GPTS-CK95) or

to  the  Cobb  Mountain  subchron  (1.201–1.211 Ma,  GPTS-CK95)

are done, but without arguments for correlation in the case of short

lithostratigraphic segment sampled in the two quarries.

4. Concluding remarks

The  presence  of  porcelanites  within  the  lignite-clay  sequences

in the western Dacic Basin could represent — taking into account

their magnetochronologic characteristics — a noise for the magne-

tostratigraphic scales elaborated in the area (e.g. Rãdan & Rãdan

1995–1997).

On the other hand, the rock magnetic and paleomagnetic results

obtained for porcelanites and/or clinkers which are pointed out in

the paper demonstrate a clear quality of signal with an interesting

geophysical content and various geological significances.

Besides the obtained data, the porcelanites and/or clinkers may

provide a high resolution record of geomagnetic field (directional

variability and paleointensity) in Quaternary.

References (selection)

Gay S., Parker Jr. & Bronson W.H., 1991: Geophysics, 56, 902–913.

Jones A.H., Geissman J.W. & Coates D.A., 1984: Geophys. Res. Lett., 11, 12,

1231–1234.

Krs M., 1968: Pure Appl. Geophys. (PAGEOPH), 69, 158-167.

Lindqvist J.K., Hatherton T. & Mumme T.C., 1985: New Zeal J. Geol. Geo-

phys., 28, 405–412.

Perarnau A. & Tarling D.H., 1985: J. Geol. Soc. London, 142, 1029–1034.

Rãdan S., Rãdan S.C., Rãdan M. & Vanghelie I., 1994a: Int.  Miner. Assoc.,

16th Gen. Meet. Pisa, Italy, Abstracts,  344–345.

Rãdan S.C., Rãdan S., Rãdan M. & Vanghelie I., 1995: Rom. J. Miner., 77,

Suppl. 1, 39.

Rãdan  S.C.,  Rãdan  S.,  Rãdan  M.,  Andreescu  I.  &  Vanghelie  I.,  1996:  An.

Inst. Geol. Rom., 69/I, 324–331.

Rãdan M. & Rãdan M., 1997: An. Inst. Geol. Rom., 70 (in print).

Rosca Vl., Rãdan S.C. & Rãdan S., 1973: St. Cerc. Geol. Geofiz. Geogr., Se-

ria Geofiz., 11, 2, 303–313 (in Romanian, English summary).

Tarling D.H. & Hrouda F., 1994: The magnetic anisotropy of rocks. Chap-

man & Hall, 1–217 (Preprint). as determined, too.

THE MAGNETIC PROPERTIES

OF DOLOMITES WITH DIFFERENT

ORIGINS FROM THE ESTONIAN EARLY

PALEOZOIC SEDIMENTARY BASIN

A. SHOGENOVA

Institute of Geology, Tallinn Technical University, 7 Estonia Ave,

0001 Tallin, Estonia; alla@gi.ee

Dolomites with different origins in the Estonian Early Paleozoic

shallow sedimentary basin were sampled and analysed by compari-

son with neighbouring limestones. All Estonian carbonate rocks in-

clude varying amounts of clay impurities and are characterized by

low-field magnetic susceptibility. This usually increases in sedimen-

tary rocks with increasing clay content (Shön 1996). Magnetic prop-

erties of rock samples were studied together with their bulk chemi-

cal  composition  and  iron  forms  (FeO,  Fe

2

O

3

).  This  permitted

interpretation of differences in the processes leading to changes in

magnetic properties.

Dolomite groups with five different ages and geneses were stud-

ied  and  compared:  1)  samples  from  the  dolomite  layer  of  Pae

Member of Väo Formation, Middle Ordovician (thickness up to 1.5

m); 2) Lower Ordovician widespread dolomite layer with glauco-

nite  impurities  of  Volkhov  stage  (thickness  of  stage  0–20  m);  3)

late diagenetic dolomites associated with fracture zone in Middle

Ordovician  (Shogenova  &  Puura  1997);  4)  Upper  Ordovician;  5)

Silurian (rocks of both last groups are highly argillaceous and do-

lomites are often cavernous).

During  dolomitization  the  chemical  composition  of  carbonate

rocks was changed. Substitution of Ca

2+

 by Mg

2+

 was often accom-

panied by alteration in iron and manganese contents. Increases in to-

tal  iron  content,  causing  increasing  magnetic  susceptibility  were

identified in all the Estonian dolomites. The largest increase in mag-

netic  properties  was  observed  in  the  widespread  dolomite  layer  of

the Väo Formation, which is hard and relatively free from clay im-

purities. Magnetic susceptibility increased there from (0–4)

×

10

–5

 SI

in the limestones to (17–22)

×

10

–5

 SI in the dolomites. It is explained

by  (0–0.9)%  of  Fe

2

O

total  measured  in  the  limestones  and  its  in-

creasing  to  (2.5–2.8)%  in  the  dolomites.  Therefore  two  distinctive

groups of limestones and dolomites can be clearly observed in the

plot  of  magnetic  susceptibility  versus  bulk  density  (Fig.  1a).  The

highest  values  of  magnetic  susceptibility  were  determined  in  the

Lower  Ordovician  widespread  dolomites  including  different

amounts of clay and glauconite impurities. The magnetic suscepti-

bility increased in these rocks from (2–16)

×

10

–5

 SI in limestones to

(8–46)

×

10

–5

 SI in the dolomites (Fig. 1b). Magnetic susceptibility of

the  dolomites  formed  in  fracture  zone  was  also  higher  than  in  the

background image

212

limestones.  It  increased  from  (0–12)

×

10

–5

  SI  to  (4–23)

×

10

–5

  SI  in

the  dolomites  of  different  Middle  Ordovician  formations.  Some

rocks were very porous and therefore had low bulk densities (Fig.

1c). The total iron content in the dolomites of the fracture zone var-

ied in the limits of (1–2.5)% and in the argillaceous in different de-

gree limestones it changed from 0.3 to 1.9 %.

Increases in the magnetic susceptibility of Silurian and Upper Or-

dovician dolomites were not so clearly observed as in the rocks de-

scribed above. These rocks were formed in shallower environments

than  the  underlying  Lower  and  Middle  Ordovician  rocks  and  they

are relatively more argillaceous (Jhrgenson 1988). We could not ob-

serve clearly distinguished groups of rocks in the plots of magnetic

susceptibility versus bulk density for these rocks (Fig.1d, 1e). In or-

der  to  reveal  alterations  in  iron  content  only  rocks  of  similar  clay

content should be compared. Doing this, we noticed that in Upper

Ordovician and Silurian rocks with clay contents less than 8 % the

total iron content increases from 0.2–0.5 % in limestones to 0.5–1.2

%  in  dolomites,  that  is  to  say  it  more  than  doubles.  This  may  the

magnetic susceptibility to double as well. In Silurian rocks with clay

contents  of  10–18  %,  the  total  iron  increased  from  0.3–1.0  %  in

limestones  to  0.8–1.2 %  in  dolomites  with  simultaneous  increases

of  susceptibility  from  (0–4)

×

10

–5

  SI  to  (2–7)

×

10

–5

  SI.  This  was

caused by the increase in FeO. Generally the Upper Ordovician and

Silurian  strongly  argillaceous  rocks  are  characterized  by  higher

magnetic susceptibilities compared to dolomites.

Remagnetization  of  Estonian  rocks  during  dolomitization  may

be caused by different iron forms and may be explained by the fol-

lowing processes. Fe

2+

 may substitute the Mg

2+

 in the crystalline

lattice of the late diagenetic dolomites together with Mn

2+

 (in the

fracture zone and dolomite layer of the Väo Formation — both in

the Middle Ordovician). Fe

2

O

3

 may occur in the form of hematite

in the carbonate matrix of dolomites or may be included as glauco-

nite impurities (Volkhov stage of the Lower Ordovician).

References

Johrgenson E., 1988: Deposition of the Silurian beds in the Baltic. Valgus,

Tallin, 1–175 (in Russian with English summary).

Schon J.H., 1996: Physical properties of rocks: fundamentals and principles

of petrophysics. Handbook of geophysical exploration. Section I, Seis-

mic exploration. Pergamon Press, V. 18, 1–583.

Fig.  1.  Magnetic  susceptibility  vs.  bulk  density  of  limestones  and  dolo-

mites from: a — Väo Formation of Middle Ordovician, b — Lower Ordovi-

cian, c — fracture zone in Middle Ordovician, d — Upper Ordovician, e —

Silurian.

a)

Bulk density (g/ccm)

Magnetic susceptibility (*10

-5

SI)

0

4

8

12

16

20

24

2.6

2.65

2.7

2.75

2.8

2.85

 Limestones

 Dolomite layer

Väo Formation

MIDDLE ORDOVICIAN

c)

Bulk density (g/ccm)

Magnetic susceptibility (*10

-5

SI)

-5

0

5

10

15

20

25

2.1

2.32.5

2.7

2.9

 Limestones

 Dolomite layer

FRACTURE ZONE

b)

Bulk density (g/ccm)

Magnetic susceptibility (*10

-5

SI)

0

10

20

30

40

50

2.5

2.6

2.7

2.8

2.9

 Limestones

 Dolomite

LOWER ORDOVICIAN

d)

Bulk density (g/ccm)

M

agnetic susceptibility (*10

-5

SI)

-2

3

8

13

18

2.4

2.5

2.6

2.7

2.8

2.9

 Limestones

 Dolomites

UPPER ORDOVICIAN

e)

Bulk density (g/ccm)

M

agnetic susceptibility (*10

-5

SI)

-2

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

2.2

2.32.4

2.5

2.6

2.7

2.8

 Limestones

 Dolomites

SILURIAN

background image

213

MAGNETIC FABRIC AROUND

FRACTURES IN THE BOHUS GRANITE,

SOUTHWESTERN SWEDEN

BO A. SJÖBERG

1

 and A. KAPIÈKA

2

1

Swedish Museum of Natural History, Box 50007,

S-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden; Ritva.Woode@nrm.se

2

Geophysical Institute,  Acad. Sci., Boèní II/1401, Prague, Czech

Republic;  kapicka@ig.cas.cz

The Bohus granite of the west coast of Sweden intruded into older

supracrustal rocks about 920 Ma ago (Eliasson & Schöberg 1991). It

occurs  as  gray,  grayish  red  and  red  varieties  (Asklund  1947).  The

rocks are divided by Asklund into different grain size classes, from

one  mm  to  several  mm.  Our  investigation  of  minor  fractures  has

been restricted to a grayish red variety with grains of medium size

(2–7 mm).

Profiles  across  a  few  fractures  were  selected  for  a  study  of  the

magnetic  properties  and  their  modifications  and  dependence  upon

mechanical  and  thermal  modifications.  Samples  were  taken  from

cores  drilled  at  systematically  selected  distances  from  minor  frac-

tures, a few metres or tens of metres long. The magnetic properties

determined from the samples were: the mean magnetic susceptibili-

ty, its degree of anisotropy, the shape factor and its principal axes.

Hysteresis  ratios  of  samples  taken  along  one  profile  were  deter-

mined in order to identify the magnetic carriers.

Rocks  cut  by  fractures  show  relatively  small  differences  in  the

values  of  the  magnetic  susceptibility  and  degree  of  anisotropy  on

both sides of the fractures. The mean principal axes of the magnetic

susceptibility  of  individual  blocks  may  show  minor  clockwise  and

counterclockwise deviations from the mean value.

On the other hand, rocks cut by curving fractures show a wider

range of variation of the magnetic susceptibility. In the vicinity of

some  curving  fractures,  only  slight  changes  of  principal  axes  of

the magnetic susceptibility have been observed and all other prop-

erties remain constant. In other cases of both curving and straight

fractures,  the  mean  magnetic  susceptibility  and  the  degree  of

anisotropy  increase  systematically  with  increasing  distance  (on  a

decimetre  scale)  from  the  fracture;  the  coercivity  increases  with

decreasing  distance,  indicating  that  magnetic  mineral  changes

have taken place. The changes in the magnetic fabric close to frac-

tures of this type may include a metamorphic factor.

References

Asklund B., 1947: Svenska stenindustriomr den. Gatsten och kantsten I-II.

Sveriges Geologiska Undersökning, C 479, 1–187.

Eliasson & Schöberg H., 1991: U-Pb dating of the post-kinematic Sveconor-

wegian (Grenvillian) Bohus granite, SW Sweden: evidence of restitic

zircon. Precambrian Research, 51, 337–350.

MODEL INTERPRETATION

OF PALEOTECTONIC ROTATIONS

IN THE ALPINE AND VARISCAN

COLLISION ZONES

M. KRS, O. MAN and P. PRUNER

Institute of Geology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic,

Rozvojová 135,  Prague 6 - Lysolaje, Czech Republic; housa@gli.cas.cz

Paleomagnetic data from the Permian to the Neogene have been

evaluated for the Western Carpathians (Krs et al. 1996). One of the

first papers on this region suggested the presence of paleotectonic

rotations  of  varying  magnitudes  and  in  different  senses  (Kotásek

& Krs 1965). Subsequent studies resulted in explanation of the ob-

served paleomagnetic declinations in terms of rotational deforma-

tion  about  vertical  axes  of  nappes  and  blocks  during  the  Alpine

folding. Next syntheses of paleomagnetic data carried out by dif-

ferent authors resulted in documentation of numerous paleotecton-

ic rotations in different parts of the Alpine-Carpathian-Pannonian

Zone as well as in other regions of the Alpine tectonic belt. The

paleomagnetic  data  from  the  Western  Carpathians  indicate

marked, mostly counterclockwise paleotectonic rotations of larger

rock complexes, nappes and nappe systems yielding a characteris-

tic distribution of pole positions. Recognition of the separation of

components of tectonic rotation may contribute to a better under-

standing  of  the  paleotectonic  and  dynamic  evolution  of  rock  for-

mations affected by Alpine folding. The scatter of pole positions is

explained by means of a model in which the movements are parti-

tioned into two components. The first component is due to rotation

about a distant rotation pole and relates to the rotation of the litho-

spheric  plate  to  which  the  unit  shows  paleogeographic  affinity.

The second component is due to rotation about a proximal pole of

rotation  and  relates  to  rotation  during  the  Alpine  collision  of

smaller-scale  units  (blocks,  nappes).  —  European  paleomagnetic

data from the Devonian to the Triassic accumulated over the last

thirty  years  for  the  regions  north  of  the  Alpine  tectonic  belt  and

west of the Ural Mts. up to Great Britain were statistically evaluat-

ed, a number of results concerning paleogeography and the paleo-

tectonic  deformation  of  rock  complexes  from  the  Hercynian  oro-

genic belt were obtained. The Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ)

played a significant role in the distribution of paleomagnetic pole

positions. The homogeneous grouping of E. Permian paleomagnet-

ic pole positions for all the territories north of the Alpine tectonic

belt  is  due  to  consolidation  of  the  European  lithospheric  plate

without  major  paleotectonic  deformations  of  its  segments  during

later geological history. The TESZ represents a plate boundary be-

tween  the  East-European  Platform  (cratonic  Europe)  in  the  NE,

and the Hercynian mobile belt on the SW. The Variscan and pre-

Variscan  formations  from  the  Hercynian  belt  show  different  de-

grees  of  paleotectonic  rotations.  The  changes  in  paleomagnetic

pole  positions  due  to  continental  drift  of  the  European  plate  are

small in comparison to the changes in pole positions due to paleo-

tectonic  rotations.  The  paleotectonic  rotations  recognized  both  in

the Alpine and Hercynian tectonic belts are evidently typical fea-

tures  of  collision  zones,  as  may  be  shown  on  models  simulating

translation and rotation movements.

References

Kotásek  J.  &  Krs  M.,  1965:  Palaeomagnetic  study  of  tectonic  rotation  in

the  Carpathian  Mountains  of  Czechoslovakia.  Palaeogeography,

Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 1,  39–44.

Krs M., Krsová M. & Pruner P., 1996: Palaeomagnetism and palaeogeogra-

phy of the Western Carpathians from the Permian to the Neogene. In:

Morris A. & Tarling D.H. (Eds.): Palaeomagnetism and Tectonics of

the  Mediterranean  Region.  Geol.  Soc.  Spec.  Publ.  (London),  105,

175–184.

background image

214

TECTONIC AND STRUCTURAL

IMPLICATIONS OF PALEOMAGNETIC

AND AMS STUDY OF PALEOZOIC ROCKS

IN THE GEMERIC SUPERUNIT, SLOVAKIA

(PRELIMINARY RESULTS)

J.KRUCZYK

1

, M. K¥DZIA£KO-HOFMOKL

1

,

M. JELEÑSKA

1

, I. TÚNYI

2

 and D. NÁVESÒÁK

3

1

Institute of  Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences,  Ks. Janusza 64,

01-452 Warsaw, Poland

2

Institute of  Geophysics, SlovakAcademy of Sciences,

Dúbravská cesta 9, 842 28 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

3

Geocomplex a.s., Geological.Div., Košice Werferova 1, Slovak Republic

The Gemeric Superunit (GEM) is cut by two systems of principal

shear  zones  that  strongly  affected  its  geological  setting:  the  West

system  (WS)  striking  SW-NE  that  has  the  character  of  a  sinistral

strike-slip fault and the East  system (ES) that has the character of a

dextral  strike-slip  fault.  Both  systems  cut  the  Gemeric  Superunit

into a mosaic of blocks.  The shear zones are dated  Lower Creta-

ceous–Middle  Miocene  (Grecula  et  al.  1990).  The  metamorphosed

Paleozoic rocks for this study were sampled within particular blocks

in the following areas: along the most intensive  Košice-Margecany

shear zone (KMSZ—ES system), forming the E border of  the GEM

(4 exposures KV, CR, J, MA), in the vicinity of the Dobšina shear

zone (DSZ—WS system) in the western part of the GEM close to its

N border (two exposures DO, ML) and one exposure (GP) lying in

the middle part of the GEM. The rocks represent strongly metamor-

phosed and mylonitized  sericitic schists (CR, J), cataclasites (MA,

KV), phyllites and schists rich in carbonates (ML, DO, GP).  Micro-

scopic, thermomagnetic and hysteresis study revealed the presence

of magnetite sometimes partly altered to martite, hematite automor-

phic  grains,  tablets,  smears,  Fe-hydroxides.  Magnetite  and  Fe-hy-

droxides are often  of post-pyrite origin.  Amount and distribution of

magnetic minerals in the studied rocks inhomogenous — bulk sus-

ceptibility  and  intensity  of  NRM  differ  even  between  specimens

from the same exposure — see Table 1.

best fit was obtained between the reference Middle-Upper Jurassic

direction and the following results: in situ data of KV, MA and J;

data  obtained for 50% unfolding  of ML and DO; data obtained af-

ter full tectonic correction for GP, after individual CW rotation of

each exposure (block) — Table 2.

Geographic position of GEM : 20.5E, 48.5N; paleomagnetic reference

direction: D=33, I=61

shear z. /exp

D/I in situ

D/I

50%  unfold.

 D/I atc

CCW

rotation

KMSZ—ES

    KV

    MA

      J

 305/50

 275/65

197/-61

            90

          120

            15

DSZ—WS

      DO

      ML

    300/62

    359/59

           85

           35

no shear zone

GP

    330/59

           65

shear z/exp — shear zone/exposure, D/I — declination/inclination,

50% unfold — tectonic tilt unfolded in 50%, atc — full tectonic correction.

Table 2:  Directions of ChRM in appropriate coordination frames, and an-

gles of CCW rotations.

exposure

   KV

    CR

     J

  MA

  DO

    ML

  GP

Kmx10

-4 

SI 32 - 220 40 - 80      2

64 - 700   4 - 7

13 - 90  2 - 6

NRM mA/m 14 - 250 2 - 3.5

0.1 - 0.6 27 - 300  0.2 - 3 0.8 - 40 0.1 - 0.4

       P’

1.04-1.21 1.08-1.17 1.03-1.10 1.10-1.28 1.06-1.13 1.03-1.06 1.03-1.10

Table 1:  Ranges of bulk susceptibility Km, intensity of  NRM and anisot-

ropy parameter P’.

AMS study shows that  the values of anisotropy parameter P’ re-

main in a broad range (Table 1) and that  in the majority of speci-

mens lineation prevails over  foliation.  The latter is similar to the

mylonitic foliation observed by Návesòák  (1993) in the respective

areas:  foliation  S2  connected  with  the  Transgemeric  Shear  Zone

(WS  system)  observed  in  DO,  S3  connected  with  the  Lacember-

Starovod shear zone (WS system) observed  in ML and S4 connect-

ed  with KMSZ (ES system) observed in KV, CR, J and MA. These

results suggest direct relations between shear zones and anisotropy

of susceptibility of the studied rocks.

Standard paleomagnetic procedures led to isolation of secondary

characteristic components of NRM (ChRM) for six exposures (ex-

posure CR did not give any interpretable results). The directions of

ChRMs revealed  some similarity in inclinations with very different

declinations. In order to interpret the results we compared the direc-

tions in situ and after tectonic correction and also after partial cor-

rection for tectonics with the expected  data for Slovakia obtained

after the reference Eurasian data of  Besse & Courtillot (1991). The

The presented results suggest, that all the rocks became remagne-

tized during the Jurassic . One of them (GP) — carries pre-tectonic

remanence, two (DO and ML) — syntectonic remanence and three

(KV, MA and J) —post tectonic remanence.  This implies that fold-

ing processes were extinguished first at the eastern side of the Ge-

meric Superunit and prolonged in its inner parts. The stated various

rotations  remain in agreement with the fact, that the Gemeric Supe-

runit is cut by systems of shear zones into a mosaic of blocks which

behaved  (rotated)  independently.  Our  results  suggest,  that  studied

units rotated in the same, CCW direction.

References

Besse & Courtillot, 1991: J. Geophys. Res., 96, B3, 4029–4050.

Grecula P. et al., 1990: Miner. slovaca, 22, 97–110.

Návesòák D., 1993: Miner. slovaca, 25, 263–273.

PALAEOMAGNETIC AND AMS EVIDENCE

FOR A PROGRESSIVE ROTATION

OF GROIX ISLAND (BRITTANY, FRANCE):

PRELIMINARY RESULTS

J.P. LEFORT

1

, T. AÏFA

1*

, M. JELEÑSKA

2

,

M. K¥DZIA£KO-HOFMOKL

and C. AUDREN

1

1

Géosciences-Rennes, CNRS UPR4661, Université de Rennes 1,

Bt 15, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes Cedex, France;

*aifa@univ-rennes1.fr

2

Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences,

Ks. Janusza 64, 01-452 Warsaw, Poland

Groix Island, located south of Brittany (France), is famous for its

blueschist outcrops (Carpenter 1976). It is mainly formed of garnet,

quartzitic  micaschists,  albitic  micaschists,  quartzites,  glaucophan-

ites, prasinites and few serpentinites. The sediments represent, how-

ever, 90 % of the total outcrop. The blueschist formation, which de-

veloped in high pressure/low temperature conditions has been dated

between 375 and 420 Ma (Peucat & Cogné 1977).

background image

215

The first deformation (D1) which developed in a flat-lying shear

zone, produced sheathed folds. It is sometimes considered that the

shearing  event  resulted  from  movements  oriented  from  the  South-

east  to  the  Northwest  (Cannat  1983).  This  deformation  was  first

considered  as  contemporaneous  with  the  blueschist  metamorphism

(Triboulet  1977,  1991),  but  we  now  know  that  the  sheathfolds

(Quinquis  1980)  developed  in  a  continuous  deformation  regime

which started in the high pressure, continued in the amphibolite fa-

cies and ended in the greenschist facies (Audren & Triboulet 1993),

well before 320 Ma (Djro et al. 1989). Folds oriented NW–SE are

the result of a D2 deformation phase, while the minor D3 deforma-

tion was responsible for an East-West oriented fold axis. The D2 and

D3 deformations are considered to be charaterized by a low green-

schist  facies  metamorphism.  The  most  representative  structure  of

the island, is the D2, N300

o

 oriented anticline, which was modeled

at depth by gravity (Lefort & Vigneresse 1991) and magnetics (Aud-

rain & Lefort 1986).

Because the size of the island is small, the full attitude of the geo-

logical structures can only be understood if one incorporates the off-

shore data (Lefort et al. 1982). These data show that the D2 struc-

tures  of  Groix  can  be  correlated  with  the  D2  deformation  of

Belle-Ile  Island  located  35  km  in  the  South-East.  The  en-echelon

fold axis which links the two islands exhibits an inverted s shape.

The  study  of  the  gravity,  magnetic  and  seismological  (Delhaye

1976) data shows the existence of a 300 km long but narrow disrup-

tion, running parallel to the South Brittany shoreline and located 40

km  South  of  Groix  Island.  This  geophysical  disruption,  character-

ized by well expressed gravity and magnetic highs, is interpreted as

a mafic belt (Poulpiquet & Lefort 1989). It is thought to be a pre-

Variscan suture zone and has been called the South Armorican Su-

ture (SAS) (Lefort 1979). The calculation of the first derivative of

the magnetic data associated with the deep mafic body, and the re-

duction to the actual pole, show the existence of a strong unevenness of

the magnetic contours, just south of Groix Island. The study of the grav-

ity  anomaly  associated  with  the  offshore  extension  of  Pont-L’Abbé

leucogranites, shows that this granite is characterized by a general cur-

vature  which  mimics  in  an  inverse  position  the  Groix-Belle-ile  D2  S

shape. The Pont-L’Abbé Granite curvature and the Groix-Belle-Ile D2

S shape follow the SAS unevenness and are broadly symmetrical (Si-

buet 1972). Since Pont-L’Abbé granite has been dated at 300 Ma (Ber-

nard-Griffiths et al. 1985) and because of the apparent continuity be-

tween  the  two  structures,  it  can  be  suggested  that  the

Pont-L’Abbé-Groix-Belle-Ile  micaschist  and  granitic  formations  were

bent  during  the  same  period  of  time.  It  has  been  suggested  that  this

structural arch resulted from an impingement of the suture.

Paleomagnetic and magnetic studies have been undertaken on the

L1 and D2 structures of Groix in order to better understand the di-

rection changes recorded at Groix and between Groix and Belle-Ile

islands.  The  rock  magnetic  experiments  show  the  occurrence  of  a

weak coercivity mineral, probably of magnetite type, often associat-

ed with sulphides of pyrrhotite type. In some specimens, mineralog-

ical changes controled by susceptibility increase, may occur before

450 

o

C. This is corroborated by the isothermal remanent magnetiza-

tion curves and by their thermal demagnetization. The natural rema-

nent  magnetization,  measured  with  a  cryogenic  magnetometer,

shows an unimodal distribution of the intensities around 3

×

10

–3

 A/

m. Two components of magnetization have been isolated. One be-

fore 300 

o

C, is close to the present dipole field, the other up to 620

o

C,  is  not  far  from  the  Hercynian  directions  already  published  for

Armorica (Van der Voo 1993). The fold test is not significant but the

great  circle  analysis  gives  a  consistant  direction  of  magnetization

which  can  be  attributed  to  a  Late  Hercynian  event.  These  results

show  that  the  North-West  linear  direction  of  the  D2  axis  known

West  of  Groix  Island  and  which  begins  to  veer  towards  a  North-

South  direction  in  the  Southeasternmost  part  of  the  island  (Pointe

des Chats) results from a clockwise rotation.

Although there are only 8 calculated rotation sites, we can clearly

see  that  the  amount  of  rotation  is  not  constant  all  over  the  island.

Broadly speaking, East of the D2 axis, the measured rotations tend

to be smaller as one moves away from the anticlinal. This is not the

case when one moves towards the West. For a better understanding

of the phenomenon, these results have been compared with the L1

lineations and with the AMS measurements.

Comparisons  between  the  maximum  of  the  magnetic  anisotropy

(Kmax)  and  the  L1  lineations  show  good  similarities  between  the

structural and magnetic directions of lineation. This result suggests

that the L1 lineations are the maximum anisotropy markers.

If one incorporates the L1 geological lineations measured in the

field, the Kmax magnetic markers and the results of the paleomag-

netic rotations, it is possible to divide the island into three zones: 1

—  Zone  II,  corresponds  with  a  zone  where  the  L1  lineations  and

Kmax directions are almost superimposed and parallel with the D2

axis. In this zone the clockwise amount of rotation is maximum. 2

—  Zone  III,  corresponds  with  a  zone  where  the  L1  lineations  fit

closely with the Kmax directions but the paleomagnetic clockwise

rotation is smaller than in the West. The L1 and Kmax lineations are

no more parallel with the D2 fold axis, which suggests an original

fanning ditribution of the L1 lineations. 3 — Zone I is notable, be-

cause it shows, at the Westernmost tip of the island, a place where

the L1 lineations make an angle of 40

o

 (Audren et al. 1993) with re-

spect to the D2 axis. Elsewhere, in the same zone, the L1 lineations

are nearly parallel with the D2 axis. This particular area can be con-

sidered  as  a  zone  which  was  not  reoriented,  which  apparently  fits

with the lack of rotation observed by paleomagnetism. However, the

lack of rotation recorded at PMN and PSN sites is in contradiction

with the Northwest-Southeast orientation of the L1 and Kmax linea-

tions since these lineations are homothetic with all the other linea-

tions of the island which suffered a rotation.

A detailed study of this particular area, joining together magnetic

mineralogy, microstructural analysis and thermobarometry gives in-

teresting information on the local appearance and thermal control of

hematites and magnetites (Aïfa et al. 1998). The whole zone is char-

acterized by the presence of two generations of magnetites. One is

related to the D1 phase and the other to the D2/D3 phase. It is clear

that it existed a post-D1 remagnetization. The oldest of the two com-

ponents of magnetization which has been isolated (one being close

to the present day magnetic field) is not far from the Hercynian di-

rections already published for Armorica. This suggests that the giv-

en area has been locally remagnetized at the time of the appearance

of  the  second  magnetite  generation.  This  remagnetization  explain

why the Kmax and L1 lineations are not superimposed on clockwise

rotations like in the other studied sites.

The  curvature  of  the  D2  fold  axis  observed  between  Groix  and

Belle-Ile islands which was first interpreted as the result of an im-

pingement by an unevenness of the SAS is confirmed by the clock-

wise rotations measured at all the sites bordering the D2 axis. The

new  paleomagnetic  data  show  that  the  rotation  of  the  D2  Groix-

Belle-Ile axis is a reality and that it developed during late Variscan

times. This rotation was produced by the Northeastern corner of the

impinging uneveness. We can consequently infer that Groix Island

and Belle-Ile may have been in line before Variscan times.

References

Aïfa T., Audren C. & Triboulet C., 1998: Thermal control of magnetite in

Palaeozoic  blueschists  rocks  from  île  de  Groix  (Southern  Brittany,

France),  through  microstructural  thermobarometry.  Geophys.  J.  Int.

(submitted).

Audrain J. & Lefort J.P., 1986: Le levé magnétique de Groix (Massif Armor-

icain) : une aide pour l’interpretation des structures profondes de l’île.

Hercynica, II,1, 65–70.

Audren C. & Triboulet C., 1993a: Les chemins pression-température enregis-

trés au cours de la formation de plis non cylindriques dans les schistes

background image

216

bleus de l’île de Groix (Bretagne méridionale, France). C.R. Acad. Sci.

Paris, t. 317, II, 259–265.

Audren C., Triboulet C., Chauris L., Lefort J.P., Vigneresse J.L., Audrain J.,

Thiéblemont D., Goyallon J., Jégouzo P., Guennoc P., Augris C. & Carn

A., 1993: Notice explicative. Carte Géol. France (1/25000), feuille île

de Groix (415), Orléans: BRGM, 1–101.

Bernard-Griffiths J., Peucat J.J., Sheppard S. & Vidal Ph., 1985: Petrogenesis of

Hercynian leucogranites from the southern Armorican Massif: contribution

of REE and isotopic (Sr, Nd, Pb and O) geochemical data to the study of

source rock characteristics and ages. Earth Planet. Sc. Lett., 74, 235–250.

Cannat M., 1983: Cinématique de charriages ophiolitiques (Klamath mountains,

Semail, Groix) et convergence océanique. Ph. D. Thesis, Nantes, 1–125.

Carpenter M.S.N., 1976: Petrogenetic study of the glaucophane schists and as-

sociated rocks from île de Groix, France. Ph.D. Thesis, Oxford,1–150.

Delhaye A., 1976: Etude de la sismicité récente de la région d’Oléron. The-

sis 3rd cycle, Univ. Paris VI, 1–61.

Djro C.S., Triboulet C. & Audren C., 1989: Les chemins pression-tempera-

ture-temps-déformation-espace  (chemins  P-T-t-d-e)  dans  les  mic-

aschistes  associés  aux  schistes  bleus  de  l’île  de  Groix,  Bretagne

méridionale, France. Schweiz. Mineral. Petrogr. Mitt., 69, 71–88.

Lefort J.P., 1979: Iberian-Armorican arc and Hercynian orogeny in Western

Europe. Geology, 7, 384–388.

Lefort J.P., Audren C. & Max M.D., 1982: The southern part of the Armori-

can orogeny: a result of crustal shortening related to reactivation of a

pre-Hercynian  mafic  belt  during  Carboniferous  time.  Tectonophysics,

89, 359–377.

Lefort J.P. & Vigneresse J.L., 1991: Le lever magnétique et gravimétrique de

Groix: une aide pour comprendre les structures profondes de l’ile et son

mode de mise en place. Bull. Soc. géol. Fr., 163, I, 3–11.

Peucat J.J. & Cogné J., 1977: Geochronology of some bluschists from île de

Groix, France. Geol. Soc. America, Mem., 164, 229–238.

Poulpiquet J. & Lefort J.P., 1989: Modelling of structures representing the

South Armorican suture. Tectonophysics, 165, 93–203.

Quinquis H., 1980: Schistes bleus et déformation progressive: l’exemple de

l’île de Groix (Massif Armoricain). Ph. D.Thesis, Rennes 1–145.

Sibuet J.C., 1972: Contribution de la gravimétrie à l’étude de la Bretagne et

du plateau adjacent. Soc. géol. France. C.R. Somm., 3,124–129.

Triboulet C., 1977: Les glaucophanites et roches associées de l’ile de Groix

(Morbihan,  France):  étude  minéralogique  et  pétrogénétique.  Contr.

Mineral. Petrology, 45, 65–90.

Triboulet C., 1991: Etude géothermo-barométrique comparée des schistes bleus

paléozoïques de l’Ouest de la France (Île de Groix, Bretagne méridionale et

Bois de Céné, Vendée). C.R. Acad. Sci. Paris, 312 II, 1163–1168.

Van der Voo R., 1993: Paleomagnetism of the Atlantic, Tethys and Iapetus

oceans. Cambridge Univ. Press, 1–411.

KINEMATIC RELATIONS BETWEEN

MAGNETIC (AMS, AARM)

AND TECTONIC FABRICS

IN THE NIEMCZA FAULT ZONE,

SUDETES FORELAND, SW POLAND —

PRELIMINARY RESULTS

T. WERNER

Institute of Geophysics P.A.Sc., Warsaw, Poland; twerner@igf.edu.pl

Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anisotropy of an-

hysteretic  remanence  (AARM)  studies  are  being  performed  for  17

sites  with  mylonites,  gneisses,  gabbro,  serpentinite  and  granitoids

within the Niemcza Fault Zone located in the Sudetic foreland in SW

Poland. Previous petrographic, structural and microtectonic studies in

sites  within  the  zone  support  the  process  of  mylonitization  of  the

Sowie Mountains gneisses in the strike-slip sinistral shear zone devel-

oped along the eastern margin of the Sowie Mountains block. The re-

lations  between  magnetic  foliations  (AMS  kmin  and  AARM  kmin

axes)  and  tectonic  foliation  planes  as  well  as  magnetic  vs.  tectonic

lineation are recorded on sample and site scale. The preliminary re-

sults  indicate  that  they  may  be  used  as  the  kinematic  indicators  of

noncoaxial  deformation  with  a  dominant  sinistral  shear  component

within the area. The regional variability of the magnetic fabric (both

direction and anisotropy parameters) will also be correlated with the

postulated Sowie Mountains gneissic origin of the Niemcza zone my-

lonites. The relation of the magnetic fabric of the gabbro, serpentinite

and granitic bodies with those of the mylonites is also tested.

MAGNETIC ANISOTROPIES FOR TOLUCA

AND GIBEON IRON METEORITES

T. FUKUHARA

1*

, M. FUNAKI 

1**

 and H. NAGAI 

2

1

National Institute of Poler Researh, 9-10 Kaga 1,

Itabashi Tokyo, Japan; *fukuhara@nipr.ac.jp  **funaki@nipr.ac.jp

2

Department of physics, Faculty of Science, Shinshu University,

3-1-1 Asahi Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan

It is known that there are lunar magnetic anomalies of magnitude

10 nT to 50 nT. These anomalies are found in Apollo 15 and 16 sub

satellite magnetometer data which were collected at altitudes of be-

tween 15 km and 60 km above the surface of the moon (Hood et al.

1981).  If  there  are  iron  meteorites  below  the  lunar  surface,  these

would cause magnetic anomalies. To understand the role of magnet-

ic meteorites in magnetizing planetary surfaces we must have infor-

mation  about  the  basic  magnetic  properties  of  meteorites.  It  has

been reported by Albertsen et al. (1978) that tetrataenite is ordered

FeNi  with  a  tetragonal  super  lattice.  The  properties  of  tetrataenite

have  been  reported  by  Clarke  &  Scott  (1980).  It  is  important  to

know the properties of tetrataenite because the NRM of a meteorite

is due to the uniaxial character of the meteorite’s structure and the

large magnetocrystalline anisotropy intensity (Néel et al. 1964). We

have examined the relationship between magnetic anisotropies and

octahedron  crystalline  which  is  called  Widmanstätten  structure  for

Toluca and Gibeon meteorites to study the cause of NRM.

We  performed  three  different  experiments  to  examine  magnetic

anisotropies. 1) Microscopic observation with bitter pattern. We can

find  tetrataenite  from  this  observation.  2)  The  measurements  of

NRM. We cut 21 small subsamples from Toluca and 32 from Gibeon

for NRM measurement. 3) Measurements of magnetic anisotropies.

We use a coil magnet and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer for mea-

surements.

We could find tetrataenite in Toluca by microscopic observation

with  bitter  pattern,  but  could  not  find  it  in  Gibeon.  The  average

NRM intensity for Toluca was 1.17

×

10

-3

 Am

2

/kg and for Gibeon it

was  17.2

×

10

–3

  Am

2

/kg.  The  directions  of  NRM  for  Toluca  and

Gibeon  looked  along  Widmanstätten  structure.  The  magnetic

anisotropies  along  Widmanstätten  structure  were  measured  from

Toluca and Gibeon. Toluca had stronger magnetic anisotropy than

Gibeon. This is probably due to the tetrataenite in Toluca.

References

Albertsen J.F., Jensen G.B. & Knudsen J.M., 1978: Structure of taenite in

two iron meteorites. Nature, 273, 453–454.

Clarke R.S. & Scott E.R.D., 1980: Tetrataenite-ordered FeNi, C a new min-

eral in meteorites. Amer. Mineralogist, 65, 624–630.

Hood L.L., Russel C.T. & Coleman P.J., 1981: Counter maps of Luner Re-

manent Magnetic Fields. J.G.G., 86, 1055–1069.

Néel L., Pauleve J., Pauthenet R., Langier J. & Dautreppe D., 1964: Proper-

ties of an iron-nickel single crystal ordered by neutron bombardment.

J. Appl. Phys., 35, 873–876.

background image

217

MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY OF A MIDDLE

TRIASSIC SECTION FROM MARGON

(SOUTHERN ALPS, ITALY)

P.R. GIALANELLA

1

, F. HELLER

2

, A. INCORONATO

1

,

P. MIETTO

3

, V. DE ZANCHE

3

, P. GIANOLLA

3

 and G. ROGHI

3

1

Dept. of Earth Science, University of Naples “Federico II”,

Lgo S. Marcellino 10, I-80128 Naples, Italy

2

Institut für Geophysik, ETH Hönggerberg, CH-8093 Zürich, Switzerland

3

Dept. of Earth Science, Univ. Padova, Via Giotto 1, I-35137 Padova, Italy

Introduction

Recently  Triassic  magnetostratigraphy  in  the  Tethyan  realm  has

received particular attention (Muttoni et al. 1997; Muttoni & Kent

1994; Gallet et al. 1998) because of the necessity to find a correla-

Fig. l. A) Orthogonal vector diagrams of NRM thermal demagnetization of two representative samples after bedding correction. Closed and open symbols: projec-

tions onto horizontal and vertical planes, respectively. B) Stratigraphic distribution of ammonoid zones, VGP latitudes and interpreted polarity zones.

IV.  Magnetostratigraphy

tion for the widely recognized biozones in the Tethyan realm and to

define a polarity scale for the Triassic. In response to this need, the

Middle Triassic pelagic section at Margon (Southern Alps, Italy) has

been  investigated  magnetostratigraphically.  The  palaeontologically

well  constrained  data  obtained  from  this  outcrop  will  provide  key

information for the construction of a standard geomagnetic polarity

time scale.

Geological setting, biochronology and sampling

 During the Triassic-Cretaceous, the Southern Alps were located

at ther northern margin of the Adria on the southern part of the Me-

sozoic Tethyan ocean where thick carbonate sequences were depos-

ited. The Southern Alpine sediments have been studied in detail bio-

stratigraphically: A large number of ammonoids was collected and a

well documented Middle Triassic ammonoid fauna scheme has been

worked out by comparison with the faunal development throughout

the Tethys. The ammonoid scale used in this study was proposed by

Mietto & Manfrin (1995).

background image

218

  About  100  oriented  rock  samples  from  different  stratigraphic

level were collected along 23 m  of the Margon section. It records

the  boundary  between  Fassanian  and  Longobardian  (lower-upper

Ladinian)  and  is  palaeontologically  well  controlled  by  ammonoids

and  conodonts.  The  ammonoid  biozones  recognized  in  the  studied

section  are  Serpianensis,  Chiesense,  Curionii,  Recubarensis,  Mar-

garitosum (Fig. l).

Laboratory measurements

The  natural  remanent  magnetization  (NRM)  has  been  measured

with a three-axes cryogenic magnetometer. Rock magnetic investi-

gations  of  isothermal  remanent  magnetization  (IRM)  acquisition

curves and progressive thermal demagnetization (PTD) of three or-

thogonal  IRM  components  show  the  presence  of  soft  components

(unblocking temperature of 575 

o

C) and hard components (unblock-

ing up to 675 

o

C) interpreted as magnetite and hematite, respective-

ly. In some samples there is a contribution from goethite (unblock-

ing temperature around 120 

o

C).

All  samples  were  subjected  to  PTD.  In  order  to  check  possible

mineralogical alteration during heating, the low field magnetic sus-

ceptibility  was  measured  after  each  heating  step  using  a  KLY-2

bridge. Susceptibility changes above 500 

o

C prevented from defini-

tion of the high temperature NRM component in a few specimens

only. These specimens were discarded.

Discussion and Conclusion

 Nearly all specimens carry two NRM components. One compo-

nent,  removed  up  to  300 

o

C,  represents  the  present  day  field;  the

high  temperature  components,  isolated  between  350-575 

o

C,  are

characterized by both polarities: northerly declinations with positive

inclination and southerly declination with negative inclination. For a

few specimens the definition of a primary component was inhibited

by a strong overprint of the present day field component.

The  high  temperature  component  plotted  as  a  function  of  the

stratigraphic  depht  provides  a  clear  magnetic  zonation  in  the

Margon section as evidenced by the virtual geomagnetic pole lat-

itude (VGP) distribution below. Four main magnetozones are dis-

tinguished. The Margon magnetostratigraphic pattern reflects the

one  defined  in  a  coeval  pelagic  section  in  the  Southern  Alps

(Muttoni  et  al.  1977).  The  close  between-site  agreement  of  the

two Middle Triassic sections underlines the high value of magne-

tostratigraphic  studies  for  correlating  sedimentary  sequences  in

the Tethyan realm.

References

Gallet  Y.,  Krystyn  L.  &  Bess  J.,  1998:  Upper  Anisian  to  Lower  Carnian

magnetostratigraphy from the Northern Calcareous Apls (Austria). J.

Geophys. Res., 103, 605–621.

Mietto P. & Manfrin S., 1995: A high resolution middle Triassic ammonoid

standard  scale  in  the  Tethys  realm.  A  preliminary  report. Bull.  Soc.

Géol. Fr., 166, 539–563.

Muttoni G. & Kent D.W., 1994: Paleomagnetism of latest Anisian (middle

Triassic)  sections  of  Prezzo  Limestone  and  Buchenstein  formation,

sourthern Alps, Italy. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 122, 1–18.

Muttoni G., Kent D.W., Brack P., Nicora A. & Balini M., 1997: Middle Tri-

assic  magnetostratigraphy  and  biostratigraphy  from  the  Dolomites

and Greece. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 146, 107–120.

LOWER TOARCIAN MAGNETO-

STRATIGRAPHY FROM THE IBERIAN

RANGE (SPAIN)

P.R. GIALANELLA

1

, M.L. OSETE

2

, A. GOY

3

,

J.J. VILLALAÍN

4

, J.J. GOMEZ

5

 and F. HELLER

6

1

Dept. of Earth Science, University of Naples “Federico II”,

Lgo S. Marcellino 10, I-80128 Naples, Italy

2

Dept. of Geophysics, Universitad Complutense Madrid,

Ciudad Universitaria, E-28040 Madrid, Spain

3

Dpt. of Palaeontology, Universitad Complutense Madrid,

E-28040 Madrid, Spain

4

Escuela Universitaria Politecnica, Universitad de Burgos,

E-09006 Burgos, Spain

5

Dpt. of Stratigraphy, Universitad Complutense Madrid,

E-28040 Madrid, Spain

6

Institut für Geophysik, ETH Hönggerberg,

CH-8093 Zürich, Switzerland

Introduction

Two well-dated sections covering the lower Toarcian (Lower Ju-

rassic) time interval have been investigated palaeomagnetically. The

sections named Sierra Palomera and Ariòo, are located in the central

part of the Iberian Range (Spain). The collected specimens are char-

acterized by multicomponent magnetizations. The magnetic polarity

stratigraphy  as  defined  by  the  characteristic  component  of  natural

remanent  magnetization  allows  us  to  establish  a  good  correlation

between the two sections.

Geological setting, biochronology and sampling

The Iberian Range, a fold belt formed during the Alpine orogeny

from the Cantabrian Range to the Mediterranean coast. It is divited

into two branches: the Aragonian and the Castillian, which are sepa-

rated  by  a  Tertiary  graben  structure.  The  Sierra  Palomera  and  the

Ariòo sections belong to the Castillian and Aragonian branches, re-

spectively. The lithology at both sections is represented by rhythmi-

cally  alternating  marls  and  marly  limestones  (Goy  et  al.  1997)

which are well dated palaeontologically by means of ammonite bio-

zonation.  The  lower  Toarcian  Tenuicostatum,  Serpentinus  and  Bi-

frons subzones and part of the Variabilis subzones have been sam-

pled  in  both  sections  using  a  gasoline-powered  drilling  machine.

About 100 oriented rock samples were collected along 60 m of the

Sierra Palomera section and 80 oriented specimens across 35 m of

the Ariòo section.

Rock magnetic properties and palaeomagnetic

measurements

The magnetic behaviour of the specimens from the two sections

is  similar.  Acquisition  of  isothermal  remanent  magnetization

(IRM)  and  its  progressive  thermal  demagnetization  indicate  the

presence of hard coercivity components residing in hematite (un-

blocking  temperatures  of  675 

o

C),  coexisting  with  low  coercivity

minerals  interpreted  as  magnetite  (unblocking  temperature

575 

o

C).  The  natural  remanent  magnetization  (NRM)  has  been

measured  using  a  three  axes  cryogenic  magnetometer  (2G  Enter-

prises).  All  samples  were  thermally  demagnetized.  In  order  to

check possible mineralogical changes during heating, the low field

susceptibility was measured with a KLY-2 bridge after each heat-

ing  step.  Mineralogical  changes  occurred  above  450–500 

o

C,

sometimes above 575 

o

C.

background image

219

Discussion and conclusion

Nearly  all  specimens  are  characterized  by  a  multicomponent

NRM. After initial removal of a viscous component, an intermediate

component  (A  component)  was  isolated  between  220 

o

C  and  300-

350 

o

C. This component has always normal polarity and is interpret-

ed  on  the  basis  of  previous  palaeomagnetic  studies  in  this  region

(Juarez et al. 1994) to represent a Cretaceous remagnetization event.

The B component isolated between 350–450 

o

C and sometimes up

to 575 

o

C is interpreted as the characteristic remanence component

(ChRM)  and  carries  both  positive  and  negative  polarity.  Above

575 

o

C, a high temperature unblocking component of uncertain ori-

gin is sometimes observed, if mineralogical changes due to heating

are negligible.

 The virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) latitudes of the ChRM plot-

ted as a function of the stratigraphic level define clear magnetic zo-

nations in both sections. These polarity patterns are similar and can

easily be correlated. They will also be compared with earlier results

from Sierra Palomera (Galbrun et al. 1988) and with Toarcian sites

from the Southern Alps (Horner & Heller 1983).

References

Galbrun  B.,  Baudin  F.,  Comas-Rengifo  M.J.,  Foucault  A.,  Fourcade  E.,

Goy  A.,  Mouterde  R.  &  Ruget  C.,  1988:  Résultats  magnétostrati-

graphiques  préliminaires  sur  le  Toarcien  de  la  Sierra  Palomera

(Chaîne ibérique, Espagne). Bull. Soc. géol. France, IV, l, 193–198.

Goy A., Comas-Rengifo M.J., Arias C., García Joral F., Gómez J.J., Herrero

C.,  Martínez  G.  &  Rodrigo  A.,  1997:  El  tránsito  Pliensbachiense/

Toarciense en el sector central dela Rama Aragonesa de la Cordillera

Ibérica (Espaòa). Cahiers Univ. Catho Lyon, 10, 159–179.

Horner  F.  &  Heller  F.,  1983:  Lower  Jurassic  magnetostratigraphy  at  the

Breggia Gorge (Ticino, Switzerland) and Alpe Turati (Como, Italy).

Geophys. J.R. astr. Soc., 73, 705–718.

Juarez T., Osete M.L., Melendez G., Langereis C.G. & Zijderveld J.D.A., 1994:

Oxfordian magnetostratigraphy of the Aguilon and Tosos sections (Iberi-

an Range, Spain) and evidence of a pre-Oligocene Overprint. Earth Plan-

et. Sci. Lett., 85, 195–211.

HIGH-RESOLUTION

MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY ACROSS

THE J/C BOUNDARY STRATA AT BRODNO

NEAR ŽILINA, W. SLOVAKIA: DEFINITION

OF TWO SUBZONES IN M19 AND M20

V. HOUŠA*, M. KRS, M. KRSOVÁ, O. MAN,

P. PRUNER and D. VENHODOVÁ

Institute of Geology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic,

Rozvojová 135, Prague 6 - Lysolaje, Czech Republic; *housa@gli.cas.cz

Magnetostratigraphic studies of Jurassic-Cretaceous (J/C)  bound-

ary strata were mostly carried out in the Tethyan realm with the aim

of setting up a synoptic scheme of N and R polarity magnetozones

or possibly magnetosubzones, but not aspiring on their detailed def-

inition. The aim of joint efforts of the Paleomagnetic and Paleonto-

logical Groups of the Inst. of Geol., Acad. Sci. Prague was to elabo-

rate  high-resolution  magnetostratigraphic  scales  applicable  to

correlation of chronostratigraphic units of J/C boundary strata in the

Tethyan and later also in the Boreal realms. The Tithonian-Berria-

sian profile at Brodno, near Žilina, W. Slovakia, was selected from

five localities in the Western Carpathians for detailed investigations

due to favourable sedimentation setting, favourable physical proper-

ties of limestone samples and rich calpionellid associations. Up to

the present time, a total of 360 oriented samples have been paleo-

magnetically  analyzed,  with  the  maximum  sampling  density  be-

tween the base of M21r and the base of M18r. In the cross-section,

this interval represents only 10 m of the true thickness of strata. An

innovation  of  the  hitherto  methods  of  data  processing  and  graphic

presentation  of  results  was  introduced  comprising  interpolation,

smoothing techniques and presentation of total angular deflection of

paleomagnetic directions. Two magnetosubzones with reverse pale-

omagnetic directions were detected, the Brodno Subzone (see Fig.)

in the late part of M19n and the Kysuca Subzone in the middle part

of M20n. — The Kysuca Subzone is located at the beginning of the

Crassicolaria Standard Zone, i.e. in the early Upper Tithonian. The

last  Chitinoidella  disappears  immediately  before  the  beginning  of

the  Kysuca  Subzone.  The  beginning  of  the  magnetozone  M19  is

characterized by the appearance of Calpionella grandalpina, which

appears immediately before it and indicates the beginning of the In-

termedia Subzone (late Upper Tithonian). The J/C boundary defined

on  calpionellids  (base  of  Calpionella  Standard  Zone)  is  located  in

the early 35% part of the local thickness of the magnetozone M19n.

The Brodno Subzone is located in the early Berriasian, in the pale-

ontologically  monotonous  part  of  the  Alpina  Subzone.  The  short

acme  of  Crassicolaria  parvula  occurs  approx.  in  the  middle  be-

tween the J/C boundary and the base of the Brodno Subzone.

HIGH-RESOLUTION

MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY ACROSS THE

J/C BOUNDARY STRATA AT THE BOSSO

VALLEY, UMBRIA, CENTRAL ITALY:

CORRELATION WITH THE BRODNO DATA

V. HOUŠA

1*

, M. KRS

1

, P. PRUNER

1

, O. MAN

1

,D. VENHO-

DOVÁ

1

, F. CECCA

2

, G. NARDI

3

 and M. PISCITELLO

3

1

Institute of Geology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic,

Rozvojová 135, Prague 6 - Lysolaje, Czech Republic; *housa@gli.cas.cz

2

Universita di Urbino, Italy,

3

Dipartemento Sci. d. Terra, Universita di Napoli, Italy

Prior  to  the  magnetostratigraphic  investigations  of  the  profile  at

the Bosso Valley, the profile at Brodno was investigated and consid-

ered unique among all the sections studied in the Tethyan realm. Al-

though  the  next  profile  at  Štramberk,  N.  Moravia,  is  based  on  the

analyses of 342 drill samples, it did not reach the accuracy and reli-

ability  of  the  Brodno  profile.  Consequently,  the  next  profile  was

needed  for  high-resolution  magnetostratigraphy  across  the  Jurasic/

Cretaceous (J/C) boundary strata in the Tethyan realm. The profile

at  the  Bosso  Valley  was  selected,  this  110-m  section  of  the  Early

background image

220

Cretaceous Maiolica pelagic limestones was synoptically investigat-

ed by W. Lowrie and J. E. T. Channell (1983). In 1996 and 1997, a

total of 197 hand samples were collected from the basal 40-m part

of the Bosso profile. The studied section of the Bosso profile com-

prises  the  magnetozones  M20n  to  M17r.  Moreover,  two  subzones

with  reverse  paleomagnetic  polarity  were  delineated,  in  the  upper

part of M19n (Brodno Subzone, see Fig.) and in the middle part of

M20 (Kysuca Subzone). Both the subzones detected in the Brodno

and Bosso profiles are located in the same position in relation to the

surrounding  magnetozones  and  they  may  be  well  correlated  with

similar subzones in the sequence of marine magnetic anomalies. Pri-

or to our investigations, these  subzones were known from the ma-

rine  sequence  only  and  have  been  detected  only  sporadically  on

continental profiles.  — The J/C boundary defined on calpionellids

(base of the Calpionella Standard Zone) lies in the early 37% part of

the  local  thickness  of  the  magnetozone  M19n,  i.e.  approx.  at  the

same level as in Brodno. The position of the Kysuca Subzone could

not  be  defined  in  terms  of  calpionellid  biostratigraphy,  because  of

the complete absence of calpionellids in this part of the profile. The

first  stratigraphically  usable  calpionellid  associations  occur  in  the

late  magnetozone  M20n,  i.e.  stratigraphically  above  the  Kysuca

Subzone.  Exactly  as  in  Brodno,  Calpionella  grandalpina  appears

closely before the beginning of the magnetozone M19r. The Brodno

Subzone lies in the Early Berriasian, stratigraphically above a short

acme of Crassicolaria parvula, which here, as in the Brodno profile

is located in the middle between the J/C boundary and the base of

the Brodno Subzone.

ceptibility was 50.6

×

10

-6

 u.SI  and  the  maximum  of  NRMP  was

4.9 nT. The IRM acquisition curves as well as the demagnetizing

characteristics  showed  that  hematite  was  the  dominant  magnetic

mineral in the investigated rocks. All the samples were subjected to

thermal  demagnetization.  Only  normal  magnetic  polarization  was

obtained on both profiles (Figs. 1, 2). This means that according to

biostratigraphical  and  magnetostratigraphical  scale,  presented  by

Mutterlose  (1996),  the  limestones  studied  belong  to  uppermost

Hauterivian normal magnetic subzone CM 4. The measurements of

anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, performed on all samples be-

fore thermal demagnetization, showed sedimentary character with-

out more important deformation.

MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE

CRETACEOUS LIMESTONES FROM THE

KR͎NA NAPPE (WESTERN SLOVAKIA)

J. MICHALÍK

1

, I. TÚNYI

2* 

and Z. DOBIAŠOVÁ

2

1

Geological Institute SAS, Dúbravská  cesta 9,  842 26 Bratislava,

Slovak  Republic; geolmich@savba.sk

2

Geophysical Institute SAS, Dúbravská  cesta 9,  842 28 Bratislava,

Slovak  Republic; *geoftuny@savba.sk

Magnetostratigraphic study of the Cretaceous limestones from the

Krížna Nappe in the North-Western part of Slovakia was carried out

with the aim of precisely dating the sedimentary rocks from the Hau-

terivian/Barremian  boundary.  According  to  Reháková  &  Michalík

(1997),  the  age  of  investigated  rocks  is  l28  mil.  years.  The  lime-

stones were dated by the Borzai and Mortilleti ammonite zones (lat-

est  Hauterivian)    and  Hugii  ammonite  Zone    (earliest  Barremian)

(Vašíèek et al. 1997).  Althogether 332 oriented samples were paleo-

magneticaly  analyzed.  The  samples  came  from  two  profiles:

Dažïová    Ryha  (27  layers)  and  Na  Laze  (11  layers)  sections.  The

rocks were very weakly magnetized. The maximum of magnetic sus-

Fig. 2.  Na Laze Section.

Fig. 1. Dažïová Ryha Section.

References

Mutterlose  J.,  1996:  The  Hauterivian  Stage.  Bulletin  de  L’Institut  Royal

des Sciences Naturalles de Belgique. Procced. “Second Int. Symp. on

Cretaceous Stage Boundaries’’. Brussel, 19–24.

Reháková  D.  &  Michalík  J.,  1997:  Calpionellid  associations  versus  Late

Jurassic and Early Cretaceous sea-level fluctuations. Miner. slovaca,

4–5,  306–307.

Vašíèek Z., Michalík J. &Reháková D., 1997: Polomec Quary. Excursion

background image

221

sal attempt not involving even a short-lived interval of normal po-

larity. Thus, there is reason to believe that the geodynamo attempted

reversal (regardless of success)—no less than 7, and more likely at

least 10 times — during this 400 kyr interval of time. This more-ac-

tive  account  of  the  reversing  geodynamo  during  the  upper  part  of

the Matuyama reverse epoch is consistent with and extends findings

principally  from  the  Brunhes  normal  epoch  (see  Champion  et  al.

1988; Lund et al. 1997), suggesting this level of activity may in fact

represent the geodynamo over the past several millions of years.

quid  book.  Final  Meeting  of  the  Project  No.  362  “Tethyan/Boreal
Cretaceous Correlation”. Miner. slovaca, 4–5, 363–366.

HIGH-RESOLUTION

MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY

OF THE UPPER MATUYAMA:

TEMPO OF THE GEODYNAMO

FROM 

40

AR/

39

AR GEOCHRONOLOGY

B.S. SINGER and K.A. HOFFMAN

Department of Mineralogy, University of Geneva,

1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland

(K.A.H.: permanent address: Physics Department, Cal Poly State

University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 USA)

One important application of magnetostratigraphic data concerns

the problem of the geodynamo; specifically, the frequency at which

polarity reversals are attempted over geologic time. In this regard,

high-precision,  complete  magnetostratigraphic  datasets  are  re-

quired.  Indeed,  Merrill  et  al.  (1997)  demonstrate  that  even  one

missed short polarity interval can have a significant effect on analy-

ses of reversal frequency and the two polarity states. Yet, even the

most comprehensive geomagnetic polarity timescales (GPTSs) pos-

sess limited fidelity. For nearly two decades the GPTS for the final

400  kyr  of  the  Matuyama  reverse  chron  has  contained,  at  most,  5

polarity  reversals  corresponding  to  the  Cobb  Mountain  event,  the

Jaramillo subchron, and the Matuyama-Brunhes transition (see Op-

dyke & Channell 1996).

Newly-conducted 

40

Ar/

39

Ar age determinations at the University

of Geneva on 17 transitionally-magnetized basaltic lavas from flow

sequences at Punaruu Valley, Tahiti, and Haleakala volcano, Maui—

when  considered  with  other  published  upper  Matuyama 

40

Ar/

39

Ar

data—indicate  that  this  picture  is  both  largely  incomplete  and  in

need  of  significant  revision.  The  revised  GPTS  for  the  upper

Matuyama (Fig. 1) includes a total of 5 subchrons and less-under-

stood “events” (2 of which are newly named the Punaruu and Santa

Rosa), in addition to the Matuyama-Brunhes transition (Table 1).

Table 1:

Matuyama (T)

0.779 ± 0.002 Ma

Kamikatsura Event

‡

                    0.886 ± 0.003 Ma

Santa Rosa Event

‡

                    0.920 – 0.930 Ma

Jaramillo Subchron (T)

0.986 ± 0.005 Ma

Jaramillo Subchron (O)

1.053 ± 0.005 Ma

Punaruu Event

1.105 ± 0.005 Ma

Cobb Mountain Event

‡

1.186 ± 0.006 Ma

‡

signifies that normal polarity paleomagnetic data have been reported elsewhere

The fact that normal polarity has been observed during 3 of the 4

events listed in Table 1 suggests that they are short-lived subchrons.

Indeed, the Cobb Mountain is already considered by some to be a

normal polarity subchron. However, we choose to denote any geo-

magnetic activity an “event” until a set of precise non-overlapping

age determinations are available from transitionally magnetized ma-

terials  defining  both  onset  and  termination;  at  such  time  the  term

“subchron”  will  be  invoked.  Nonetheless,  there  is  sufficient  evi-

dence  to  assume  for  this  discussion  that  the  Kamikatsura,  Santa

Rosa,  and  Cobb  Mountain  are  short-lived  normal  polarity  sub-

chrons.  Although  the  same  situation  may  apply  to  the  Punaruu  as

well, we cannot yet argue that two close back-to-back reversals are

involved. On the other hand, the Punaruu may be an aborted rever-

Fig. 1. Revised Geomagnetic po-

larity  timescale  for  the  upper

Matuyama  from  40Ar/39Ar  age

determinations  of  transitionally

magnetized flows.

References:

Champion  D.E.,  Lamphere  M.A.  &  Kunz  M.A.,  1988:  Evidence  for  new

geomagnetic polarity reversal from lava flows in Idaho: Discussion of

short  polarity  reversals  in  the  Brunhes  and  late  Matuyama  polarity

chrons, J. Geophys. Res., 93, 11,67–11,680.

Lund S., Acton G., Clement B., Hastadt M., Okada M., Williams T., and

ODP  Leg  172  Scientific  Party,  1997:  Initial  paleomagnetic  results

from ODP leg 172: Evidence for at least 14 geomagnetic field excur-

sions  during  the  Brunhes  Epoch,  EOS  Trans.  Am.  Geophys.  Union,

78, 181.

Merrill R.T., McElhinny M.W. & McFadden P.L., 1996: The Magnetic Field

of the Earth. Academic Press, 1–527,

Opdyke  N.D.  &  Channell  J.E.T.,  1996:  Magnetic  Stratigraphy.  Academic

Press, 1–341.

ULTRA-FINE MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY

IN SHALLOW WATER CARBONATES:

SECULAR VARIATIONS IN THE LOWER

CRETACEOUS

D.H. TARLING

1

, M. IORIO

2

 and B. D’ARGENIO

3

1

Department of Geological Sciences, University, Plymouth, PL4 8AA,

U.K.;  d.tarling@plymouth.ac.uk

2

Geomare sud Research Institute, C.N.R., Via Vespucci 9, Napoli, Italy

3

Dip. Scienze della Terra, Univ. di Napoli, Largo San Marcellino 10, Napoli, Italy

Shallow-water  carbonates  undergo  diagenesis  and  cementation

very rapidly after deposition. This process involves the formation of

background image

222

biogenetic  magnetite  within  the  anoxic  zone  immediately  below

the depositing carbonates. These grains are free to align with the

geomagnetic  direction  until  cemented  by  largely  authigenic  car-

bonate-saturated  fluids.  The  cementation  preserves  the  sediment,

with  its  associated  remanence,  against  most  later  changes,  unless

exposed to prolonged meteoritic diagenetic processes, such as can

occur  at  the  top  of  Milankovich-driven  (planetary  orbital  varia-

tions) sedimentary thickness cycles. In southern Italy during most

of the Lower Cretaceous, the gradual subsidence of the basin re-

stricted  such  meteoritic  diagenesis  to  the  prolonged  emersions  at

the top of the major sedimentary cycles (superbundles) while those

at the tops of lesser cycles were apparently at or near sea-level for

only  brief  intervals.  Consequently  a  largely  continuous  record  of

geomagnetic  field  behaviour  is  preserved  throughout  most  of  the

sequence  (D’Argenio  et  al.  in  press).  Bore  cores,  with  a  total

length of 120 m, have been obtained in the Monte Raggeto area of

the  Southern  Apennines,  N  of  Naples,  where  the  sequences  are

well exposed in quarries and have been shown to be largely free

from tectonic activity, other than a uniform tilt occurring as a re-

sult  of  nappe  development  during  the  Late  Miocene.  Combined

sedimentological  and  palaeomagnetic  studies  at  1–2  cm  intervals

(Iorio  1995;  Iorio  et  al.  1995,  1996a,b,  in  press;  Tarling  et  al.

1997) have shown that the magnetic polarity zonations can be cor-

related  with  those  identified  in  oceanic  marine  anomalies  of  the

Pacific and that a fine-scale geomagnetic structure can also be iso-

lated which can be ascribed to ca. 700 year smoothed geomagnetic

secular variations (Tarling et al. submitted).

Spectral  analyses  of  the  sedimentological  and  palaeomagnetic

parameters enable the duration of each of the sedimentary cycles

to be determined. Since identical cycles can also be determined in

the palaeomagnetic parameters, but these are not controlled by the

sedimentary  features  (linear  correlation  coefficients  between  the

magnetic  and  sedimentary  characteristics  are  all  close  to  zero),

these  enable  precision  of  the  duration  of  the  sedimentary  and

palaeomagnetic  cycles  with  1  cm  =  360±16  years  on  average.

Stratigraphic  correlations  can  be  undertaken,  at  this  level,  over

several kilometres. Current studies are of the overlap sections be-

tween the two bore cores (300 m apart), as well as to coeval sur-

face exposures, to elucidate and date the time scale of diagenetic

changes within these sediments on the basis of this smoothed geo-

magnetic  secular  variation  record.  The  data  also  provide  major

time constraints on the polarity zones used for coarser scale mag-

netostratigraphic  dating  and  have  implication  for  geomagnetic

field behaviour.

References

D’Argenio B., Ferreri V., Iorio M., Raspini A. & Tarling D.H., in press: Di-

agenesis  and  remanence  acquisition  in  the  Cretaceous  carbonates  of

Monte Raggeto, southern Italy. Geol. Soc. (London), Spec Publ.

Iorio M., 1995: High Resultion Palaeomagnetic Analyses of Cretaceous Shal-

low-water Carbonates. Ph.D. thesis, University of Plymouth, 1–393.

Iorio M., Tarling D., D’Argenio B., Nardi G. & Hailwood A.E., 1995: Mi-

lankovitch  cyclicity  of  magnetic  directions  in  Cretaceous  shallow-

water  carbonate  rocks,  Southern  Italy.  Boll.  Geof.  Teor.  Appl.  37,

109–118.

Iorio M., Nardi G., Pierattini D. & Tarling D.H., 1996a: Palaeomagnetic evi-

dence of block rotations in the Matese Mountains, Southern Apennines,

Italy. In:  A. Morris & D.H. Tarling (Eds.): Palaeomagnetism of the Med-

iterranean. Geological Society, Special Publication, 105, 133–139.

Iorio M., Tarling D.H., D’Argenio B. & Nardi G., 1996b: Ultra-fine magneto-

stratigraphy  of  Cretaceous  shallow  water  carbonates,  Monte  Raggeto,

southern Italy. In: A. Morris & D.H. Tarling, D.H. (Eds.): Palaeomagnetism

of the Mediterranean. Geol. Soc. (London), Spec. Publ., 105, 195–203.

Tarling D.H., D’Argenio B. & Iorio M., 1997: Astronomical influences on

biomagnetic  activity  some  120  Ma  ago:  The  potential  for  estimating

the  evolution  of  ancient  planetary  orbits  within  the  Solar  System.  In:

Cosmovici C.B., Bowyer. S. & Werthimer D. (Eds.): Astronomical and

Biochemical Origins amd the Search for Life in the Universe. Editrice

Compositori, Bologna, 245–252.

Tarling D.H., Iorio M. & D’Argenio B., (submitted): Geomagnetic Secular

Variations and Polarity Transitions in Italian Lower Cretaceous Shal-

low-Water Carbonates. Geophys. J. Internat.

V. Rock magnetic methods and experiments

THERMOREMANENT MAGNETIZATION:

THEORIES AND EXPERIMENTS

D. J. DUNLOP

Physics Department, Erindale College, University of Toronto,

3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1C6;

dunlop@physics.utoronto.ca

An  elegant  theory  of  thermoremanent  magnetization  (TRM)  in

single-domain  (SD)  grains  was  given  by  Néel  (1949)  but  the  ac-

quisition  of  TRM  in  larger,  non-uniformly  magnetized  grains  is

more  difficult  to  explain.  SD  TRM  is  a  frozen  high-temperature

partition between two microstates: spins parallel or antiparallel to

an applied magnetic field. Non-uniformly magnetized grains have

a  much  greater  choice  of  microstates  (local  energy  minimum  or

LEM states) and partitioning among various LEM states continues

to change during cooling. These changes may involve Barkhausen

jumps of domain walls between positions of minimum local ener-

gy or nucleation of new domains and walls.

Because  of  the  lower  remanence  capacity  of  non-uniform  mi-

crostates  compared  to  the  uniform  SD  state,  TRM  intensity  de-

creases  as  grain  size  increases,  although  certain  microstates,  e.g.

single-vortex states, seem to contribute little to TRM. Thermal de-

magnetization  of  TRM  begins  just  above  room  temperature  and

continues to the Curie point, quite unlike the sharp unblocking of

SD TRM. This continuous demagnetization, resulting from chang-

es  in  microstates  driven  by  the  changing  internal  demagnetizing

field during heating, profoundly affects the separation of different

components of natural remanent magnetization and the determina-

tion of paleomagnetic field intensity.

A peak in the intensity ratio TRM/ARM (anhysteretic remanence)

around 100–200 nm in magnetite appears to pinpoint the appearance

of vortex states. To explain the peak, it is necessary to hypothesize

that vortex  structures  are  responsible for  ARM  but  structures with

much higher remanence, possibly metastable SD states, carry TRM.

If this is true, the LEM state in magnetite grains just above SD size

is strongly dependent on magnetic history, being quite different for

weak-field  thermal  processes  like  TRM  and  thermal  demagnetiza-

tion than for strong-field isothermal processes like ARM, IRM, and

AF demagnetization.

Recent experiments concerning partial TRM’s of large multidomain

magnetites and their thermal demagnetization will also be discussed.

background image

223

TEMPERATURE VARIATIONS IN DOMAIN

STATE OF MAGNETITE-BEARING

VOLCANIC ROCKS AS REVEALED

BY HYSTERESIS MEASUREMENTS

A. A. KOSTEROV* and V. A. SHASHKANOV

Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, 1, Uljanovskaya, St. Petergoff,

198904 St. Petersburg, Russia; *kosterov@snoopy.phys.spbu.ru

Magnetic  hysteresis  loops  for  magnetite-bearing  volcanic  rocks

of different origin and age ranging from about 1 million years to 180

million  years  have  been  measured  in  as  a  function  of  temperature

between 90 K and 873 K, using the vibrating sample magnetometer

at the Institute for Rock Magnetism, Minneapolis. All measurements

above room temperature have been done in a helium atmosphere.

Below and at room temperature hysteresis parameters for all sam-

ples  are  in  the  pseudo-single-domain  (PSD)  range.  Moreover,  this

PSD state remains stable up to 750–800 K, depending on a sample.

Between 250 K and about 780–800 K, coercive force (H

c

) is propor-

tional to  J

s

n

, the n factor being in a narrow range from 1.2 to 1.6.

This can be interpreted in favor of mainly magnetostrictive control

of coercivity, since the magnetostriction constant 

λ

 of magnetite is

known to vary with temperature as J

s

2.3

 (Moskowitz 1993) and H

c

 ~

λ

 /  J

s

 (Hodych 1986). Our findings are in general agreement with

previous  studies  (Hodych  1986,  1990,  1996);  however  it  is  worth

noticing  that  these  latter  studies  were  carried  out  on  samples  with

probably coarser grain sizes than ours and below room temperature

only. It appears  that this “magnetostrictive” zone does not extend

up to the Curie point: above 780–800 K the coercive force exhibits

much  slower  decrease  with  temperature,  probably  indicating  the

transition from PSD into SD state occurs.

In most of our samples over 70 per cent of TRM is blocked above

500 

o

C, which is a common situation for magnetite-bearing basaltic

rocks.  Since  nucleation  of  new  domain  walls  in  weak  fields  is

strongly inhibited (Dunlop et al. 1994), TRM is likely to be initially

acquired through a single-domain-like mechanism. On further cool-

ing this high-temperature SD state becomes metastable, and, on ap-

plying magnetic fields at room temperature or on moderate heating,

it can easily evolve develop into a non-SD state with significantly

lower remanence. Such process would result in hysteresis and A.F.

demagnetization  characteristics  like  those  of  the  pseudo-single-do-

main range, and a demagnetization of TRM would occur at tempera-

tures lower than the true blocking temperatures.

References

Dunlop D.J., Newell A.J. & Enkin R.J., 1994: Transdomain thermoremanent

magnetization. J. Geophys. Res., 99, 19,741–19,755.

Hodych J.P., 1986: Evidence for magnetostrictive control of intrinsic sus-

ceptibility  and  coercive  force  of  multidomain  magnetite  in  rocks.

Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 42, 184–194.

Hodych J.P., 1990: Magnetic hysteresis as a function of low temperature in

rocks: evidence for internal stress control of remanence in multi-do-

main and pseudo-single-domain magnetite. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter.,

64, 21–36.

Hodych J.P., 1996: Inferring domain state from magnetic hysteresis in high

coercivity  dolerites  bearing  magnetite  with  ilmenite  lamellae.  Earth

Plan. Sci. Lett., 142, 523–533.

Moskowitz B.M., 1993: High-temperature magnetostriction of magnetite and

titanomagnetites. J. Geophys. Res., 98, 359–371.

SIGNIFICANCE OF HIGH-COERCIVITY

RHOMBOHEDRAL OXIDES AND FINE-

GRAINED MAGNETITE FOR THE ORIGIN

OF STRONG REMANENCE-DOMINATED

AEROMAGNETIC ANOMALIES,

SOUTH ROGALAND, NORWAY

S.A. McENROE

1*

, P. ROBINSON

1,2

, S. RONNING

1

and P.T. PANISH

1,2

1

Geological Survey of Norway, PO Box 3006-Lade, N-7002 Trondheim,

Norway; *suzanne.mcenroe@ngu.no

2

Dept. of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst,

MA 01003, USA

A case study from ilmenite-rich norites and their anorthosite host

rocks from the Proterozoic basement in southern Norway shows the

importance  of  rock-magnetic,  petrophysical  and  petrological  data

needed  for  accurate  geological  interpretation  of  aeromagnetic  sur-

veys, especially high-resolution surveys. A closely spaced helicop-

ter aeromagnetic survey in the South Rogaland area (Rønning 1995)

showed  strong  induced-  and  remanence-dominated  anomalies.  The

variations  found  in  compositions  and  textures  of  the  magnetic  ox-

ides and in oxide exsolution in the silicate grains can help explain

the  different  magnetic  responses  found  (McEnroe  et  al.  1996).  In

this region there is a large variation in remanent intensities from <1

to >100 A/m, susceptibility from 10

–4

 to 10

–1

SI, and Koeningsberg-

er ratios ranging from 0.1 to 237. The active and historical ilmenite

ore deposits in general have remanence-dominated anomalies which

we  believe  are  controlled  by  the  ilmenite  mineralogy  (McEnroe

1997) and oxide exsolution in pyroxenes.

Rock-magnetic  tests  combined  with  reflected-light  petrography

aided in the identification of the high-coervicity phases responsible

for  the  remanence-dominated  anomalies  in  the  norites.  The  major

phases were identified by reflected-light microscopy and composi-

tions  were  determined  by  microprobe  analyses.  Abundant  ilmenite

with  multiple  generations  of  hematite  exsolution  is  the  common

high-coercivity  phase.  MPMS  measurements  were  used  to  help

identify phases that were not visible optically. A Verwey transition

was  measured  in  samples  where  magnetite  was  not  optically  ob-

served,  indicating  the  presence  of  fine-grained  magnetite.  Surpris-

ingly,  a  Morin  transition  was  not  identified  in  any  sample  though

abundant hematite is present as Ti-hematite to almost pure hematite.

The  hematite  is  present  in  discrete  ilmenite  grains  as  exsolution

lamellae  and  as  an  exsolution  product  in  ilmenite  needles  in  py-

roxenes. Even samples from almost pure hemo-ilmenite dikes (up to

97  %  hemo-ilmenite)  with  abundant  hematite  exsolution,  did  not

show  a  Morin  transition.  The  lack  of  the  Morin  transition  may  be

due to the Ti-content of the hematite.

In thin section many pyroxene grains have abundant highly elon-

gate blades of ilmenite and magnetite. The blades are a few microns

or less in thickness and up to 20 microns long. Magnetite in the cli-

nopyroxenes has exsolved in elongated blades parallel to (010) with

long  axes  parallel  to  either  a-  or  c-crystallographic  axes.  Ilmenite

has exsolved in similar elongated blades but parallel to (100) with

long  axes  parallel  to  the  b-crystallographic  axes  as  described  by

Morse (1970) in Laborador. Ilmenite oxidation-exsolution lamellae

were observed in many of the magnetite blades. Mineral separates

of clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene were analyzed by MPMS and

the Verwey transition was consistently found, verifying that magne-

tite  is  a  common  exsolution  phase  in  the  clinopyroxene.  Hematite

exsolution in the ilmenite was observed in many of the clinopyrox-

ene samples but not in the orthopyroxene grains.

background image

224

In addition to the high coercivity phases, up to 5 % of co-existing

large  MD  magnetite  grains  with  ilmenite  oxidation-exsolution  were

common in many samples from localities having remanence-dominat-

ed anomalies. Norites with low Q values have magnetite as the domi-

nant oxide and are from areas of induced anomalies. Though magne-

tite-rich, these rocks have a range in Q values that may be explained

by the different oxidation-exsolution textures in the magnetites.

Most  anorthosite  regions  have  remanence-dominated  anomalies.

Anorthosite  samples  have  low  susceptibility  and  high  remanence

with corresponding high Q values, up to 237. Hemo-ilmenite is the

predominant  oxide  in  the  anorthosites,  occurring  as  fine  discrete

grains and as extremely fine ‘exsolution’, along with sulphides, in

the plagioclase.

Acknowledgments:  The  first  author  gratefully  acknowledges  the

Institute  of  Rock  Magnetism  in  Minnesota,  USA  where  the  rock-

magnetic experiments were performed.

References

McEnroe  S.A.,  1997:  Ilmenite  mineral  magnetism:  implications  for  geo-

physical exploration for ilmenite deposits. Norges Geologiske Under-

søkelse Bulletin, 433, 36–37.

McEnroe S.A., Robinson P. & Panish P.T., 1996: Rock-magnetic properties,

oxide mineralogy, and mineral chemistry in relation to aeromagnetic in-

terpretation and the search for ilmenite reserves. Norges Geologiske Un-

dersøkelse Report, 96,060, 1–148.

Morse S.A., 1970: Preliminary chemical data on the augite series of the Kigla-

pait layered intrusion (abstract). Amer. Mineralogist, 55, 303–304.

Rønning  S.,  1995:  Helikoptermålinger  over  kartblad  1311–IV  Sokndal.

Norges Geologiske Undersøkelse Report, 95,120.

A MODERNIZED COERCIVITY

SPECTROMETER

P.G. JASONOV, D.K. NURGALIEV, B.V. BUROV,

F. HELLER*

Institut für Geophysik, ETH Hoenggerberg, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland;

*frieder@mag.geo.phys.ethz.ch

A coercivity spectrometer which had already been designed at the

Palaeomagnetic Laboratory of Kazan University, Russia some years

ago (Burov et al. 1986), has been reconstructed, modernized and in-

terfaced to an IBM compatible personal computer. The instrument

which is fully controlled by the computer, consists of a non-magnet-

ic disk, housing a 1cc volume sample and rotating with a speed of

about 22 Hz between the pole tips of an electromagnet. The magnet-

ic field is continuously changed and monitored whereby the sample

is  measured  outside  and  inside  the  applied  field.  Thus,  isothermal

remanent  magnetization  (IRM)  and  saturation  magnetization  (M

S

)

as well as coercivity (B

0

)

c

 and coercivity of remanence (B

0

)

cr

 can be

measured  easily,  quickly  and  with  high  sensivity.  At  least  10000

magnetization values may be recorded in one run — in less than 6

minutes — up to the maximum field (B

max

=300 mT in the present

configuration)  and  to  the  corresponding  back  field.  This  contrasts

the  usual  palaeomagnetic  IRM  acquisition  experiment  where  only

10 to 15 steps are taken up to the maximum field in a much more

time consuming manner (about 15 to 20 minutes per sample). IRM

Fig. 1. (Abstract Jasonov et al.). Explanations see next page.

background image

225

coercivity  spectra  are  extremely  well  documented  allowing  for

spectral analysis and modelling (Eyre 1996) as well as for interpre-

tation according to Preisach-Néel theory. All hysteresis parameters

are measured which are necessary for analysing ferrimagnetic grain

size using the Day-method (Day et al. 1977). This low-cost instru-

ment may be of great value for many palaeomagnetic laboratories.

References

Burov B.V., Nurgaliev D.K. & Jasonov P.G., 1986: Paleomagnetic Analy-

sis.  Kazan University Press, 1–176 (in Russian).

Eyre J.K., 1996: The application of high resolution IRM acquisition to the

discrimination  of  remanence  carriers  in  Chinese  loess.Studia  Geo-

physica et Geodetica, 40, 234-242.

Day R., Fuller M. & Schmidt V.A., 1977: Hysteresis properties of titanomag-

netites: grain-size and compositional dependence.Physics of the Earth

and Planetary Interiors, 13, 260-267.

CHEMICAL REMANENT MAGNETIZATION

DURING THE TRANSFORMATION

OF GOETHITE TO HEMATITE:

POSSIBLE FORMATION OF

INTERMEDIATE SPINEL PRODUCT

Ö. ÖZDEMIR

Department of Physics, Erindale College, University of Toronto, 3359

Mississauga Road N., L5L IC6 Mississauga, Ontario, Canada;

ozdemir@physics.utoronto.ca

Chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) was studied in the go-

ethite-hematite transformation, starting from synthetic, acicular go-

ethite crystals. Mössbauer spectra, X-ray analysis and low-tempera-

ture  demagnetization  of  saturation  remanence  (SIRM)  confirmed

that  the  starting  material  was  pure  goethite.  In  the  CRM  experi-

ments,  samples  were  heated  in  zero  field  to  temperatures  between

150 and 600 

o

C, held for 2.5 hours in a 1 Oe field, and cooled in

zero field to room temperature. The CRM intensity reached a maxi-

mum after the 250 

o

C run, which is close to the spontaneous dehy-

dration  temperature  of  goethite,  then  decreased  in  the  range  275–

500 

o

C. The resulting CRM’s were always in the direction of the ap-

plied field. The dehydration of goethite to hematite around 250 

o

C

was marked by a weight loss in thermogravimetric analysis (TGA),

and was also indicated by sharp increases in coercive force, coerciv-

ity of remanence and saturation remanence ratios which are sensi-

tive to magnetic grain size.

Low temperature induced magnetization was measured as a func-

tion of temperature from 10 K to 300 K with the MPMS to identify

the mixture of phases in the dehydration product. Goethite and he-

matite  are  the  magnetically  dominant  phases  after  all  runs  except

500 and 600 

o

C at which hematite is the only remanence carrier. The

partially dehydrated goethites after the 240–400 

o

C runs show broad

susceptibility peaks or inflections around 120 K, probably indicat-

ing formation of an intermediate spinel phase. These samples were

next given an SIRM in a field of 2 T at 10 K and the remanence was

measured continuously during zero field warming to 300 K. A de-

crease in remanence was observed at the Verwey transition (120 K)

indicating the presence of magnetite.

The possible formation of even a small amount of magnetite is a

matter  of  serious  concern  in  studies  of  goethite-bearing  sediments

and rocks. CRM of this strongly magnetic spinel phase would sig-

nificantly modify or even overwhelm the original CRM of the goet-

hite. It would also be a new source of paleomagnetic noise as far as

primary NRM’s carried by other mineral phases are concerned.

EXPERIMENTAL MODELLING OF THE

FERRIMAGNETIC CRYSTALLIZATION

PROCESS UNDER VARIOUS

P-T -pO

2

 CONDITIONS

Y. GENSHAFT, V. TSELMOVITCH* and A. GAPEEV

Geophysical Observatory “Borok”, Nekouzskij region, Yaroslavskaya

oblast, 152742 Russia; *otselm@ibiw.yar.ru

The study of the “picrobasalt-ilmenite” system, started in 1996, is

continued in a range of pressure up to 50 kbar and temperature up to

Fig. 1.  1. row — IRM and induced magnetization versus the field applied in two antiparallel directions (“forward” an “backward”) of a loess and a palaeo-

sol sample from the Chinese Loess Plateau, as measured using the modernized coercivity spectrometer. 2. row — “Forward” IRM (J

r,a

) and difference of

“backward”–“forward” IRM (J

r,b-a

) versus applied field. 3. row — Derivatives of 2. row parameters.

Continuation of Fig. 1

background image

226

1450 

o

C. The study of the crystallization of the system <alkaline ba-

salt–ilmenite> is done under the same conditions. The influence of

firm buffers Fe–FeO, Mt–Hem, Ni–NiO on crystallization Fe-Ti ox-

ides in ilmenite-containing systems is investigated. It is shown, that

crystallization of ferrimagnetic phases (titanomagnetites) occurs by

the use of the buffer Mt–Hem and in oxidizing conditions with the

addition of K

2

CO

3

: in a basalt system with variable contents of Fe,

Ti, K at lgfO

2

 > –9, temperature 1150 

o

C and P < 20 kbar titanomag-

netite crystallizes. In basalt systems with increased concentration of

Fe and Ti at pressure 20–50 kbar picroilmenite containing more than

40 % of geikielite in a solid solution crystallizes in association with

silicate phases. In the condition of the experiment lgfO2 > –9 picro-

ilmenite crystallizing at P = 20–37 kbar contains less hematite. Ex-

pansion of rutile field at increasing P was observed. At P = 50 kbar

rutile can be a near-liquids phase. Basalt with a high concentration

of K is characterized by the expansion of the field of crystallization

of  olivine  (up  to  P  =  35 kbar).  Under  increased  contents  of  fluid

phase  (H

2

O,  CO

2

)  in  near-liquids  conditions  crystallize  phlogopite

up  to  pressure  35  kbar.  The  phase  diagram  of  the  ‘picrobasalt–il-

menite’ system was studied at pressures of up to 50 kbar and tem-

peratures up to 1450 

o

C. Crystallization in the system ‘alkaline ba-

salt–ilmenite’ is done under the same conditions from the melt. The

compositions are substantially different: in picrobasalt >Mg and Na,

K, while in the alkaline basalt- >alkalis and <Mg. The influence of

the buffers Fe–FeO, Mt–Hem, Ni–NiO on the crystallization of Fe-

Ti oxides in ilmenite-containing systems is investigated. Ferrimag-

netic phases (titanomagnetites) crystallize under P, T, fO

2

 conditions

dictated by the buffer Mt–Hem. Oxidizing conditions created by ad-

dition  of  K

2

CO

3

  (at  the  conditions  of  our  experiments  is  liberated

out at the decomposition of potash CO

2

 acts as oxidizer) in a basalt

system with variable contents of Fe, Ti, K at logfO

2

 > –9, also yield

titanomagnetite at 1150 

o

C and P < 20 kbar. In basalt systems with

higher concentrations of Fe and Ti at pressures of 20–50 kbar picro-

ilmenite containing more than 40 % of geikielite in a solid solution

crystallizes,  along  with  silicate  phases.  In  the  experimental  condi-

tions (logfO

2

 > –9, P = 20–37 kbar (the of temperature interval near

200 

o

C below liquidus)), picroilmenite contains less Fe. The struc-

ture of crystallizing picroilmenite depends on the P–T of the basalt

system, and results in the expansion of the field of rutile crystalliza-

tion. Rutile begins to crystallize in a rich titanium silicate system at

pressures  over  25 kbar  and  under  certain  fO

2

.  The  field  of  rutile

crystallization is increased at the expense of the field of crystalliza-

tion of ilmenite. Probably, ilmenite does not crystallize at pressures

>60  kbar,  but  rutile  crystallizes  instead  of  ilmenite  in  the  silicate

systems in the field of existence of the melt. At P = 50 kbar rutile

can be a near-liquidus phase. Basalts with a high concentration of K

are characterized by an expansion of the olivine crystallization field

(up to P = 35 kbar). Non-magnetic flogopite (silicate phases, which

existing  in  association  with  picroilmenite)  crystallizes  under  in-

creased  contents  of  fluid  phase  (H

2

O,  CO

2

)  in  near-liquids  condi-

tions up to pressure 25 kbar.

THE INFLUENCE OF LOW-TEMPERATURE

OXIDATION OF MAGNETITE GRAINS

ON THE INTERPRETATION OF ROCK

MAGNETIC PARAMETERS

A.J. VAN VELZEN

Paleomagnetic Laboratory “Fort Hoofddijk”, University of Utrecht,

Budapestlaan 17, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands; velzen@geof.ruu.nl

The magnetic properties of magnetite grains change under the in-

fluence of low-temperature oxidation, giving rise to erroneous inter-

pretation of some of the widely used rock magnetic parameters. Sur-

face  oxidation  of  magnetite  may  occur  under  atmospheric  condi-

tions at ambient temperature. Weathering is the most common ex-

ample  of  low-temperature  oxidation.  This  study  shows  how  to

recognize  the  presence  of  low-temperature  oxidation,  investigates

whether  it  is  related  to  weathering  and  proposes  a  method  to  esti-

mate the original magnetic properties of the rock.

Oxidation of magnetite grains at ambient temperature under mild-

ly  oxidizing  conditions  is  initially  confined  to  the  surface  layer  of

the  grains.  Considerable  internal  stress  results  and  causing  an  in-

crease  of  coercivities.  Related  rock  magnetic  properties  are  modi-

fied accordingly (van Velzen & Zijderveld 1995). Heating to moder-

ate  temperatures  (150 

o

C)  reduces  the  coercivities  to  values

expected for unoxidized magnetite. These are the same values found

in samples that are demonstrably less affected by weathering. The

changes after heating to 150 

o

C can serve as a test for surface oxida-

tion of magnetite grains.

The 150 

o

C heating effect was initially discovered in only slightly

weathered outcrops of marine sediments (van Velzen & Zijderveld

1992), but was also recognized in samples from the surface of vol-

canic rocks. So far, it was only found in pure magnetite, not in tita-

nomagnetite.  Loess  is  an  interesting  study  object  in  this  respect.

During the history of formation of a loess-paleosol sequence, there

are  many  opportunities  for  low-temperature  oxidation.  Recent

weathering  in  the  outcrop  is  the  most  likely  cause,  but  oxidation

might  also  occur  during  wind  transport  before  deposition,  during

soil formation or in a later stage due to exposure to groundwater.

In  loesses  from  several  areas,  the  reduction  of  coercivities  after

heating to 150 

o

C has been observed. The effect of the enhanced co-

ercivities  on  other  rock  magnetic  parameters  depends  on  the  grain

size distribution of the magnetite in each case. The most common

effects are an increase of IRM, a decrease of ARM and a decrease of

magnetic susceptibility. Often used parameters such as S(–100 mT)

or S(–300 mT) (back field remanences of saturation IRM) will indi-

cate  an  erroneously  large  amount  of  high-coercivity  minerals  such

as goethite or hematite in the rock, while the high-coercivities are in

fact due to slightly oxidized magnetite.

The first aim is now to separate the effects of recent weathering

from  possible  earlier  low-temperature  oxidation.  This  can  be  done

by  comparing  the  properties  of  samples  with  different  degrees  of

weathering. The timing of the oxidation can have important conse-

quences for the interpretation of variations in rock magnetic param-

eters. In the simple case of recent weathering, only a correction of

rock magnetic parameters is required. If the low-temperature oxida-

tion is not recent, but took place before or shortly after deposition of

the loess, the degree of oxidation can possibly be a direct indicator

of paleoclimatic circumstances.

References

Van Velzen A.J. & Zijderveld J.D.A., 1992: A method to study alterations of

magnetic  minerals  during  thermal  demagnetization  applied  to  a  fine-

grained marine marl (Trubi formation, Sicily). Geophys. J. Int., 110, 79–90.

Van Velzen A.J. & Zijderveld J.D.A., 1995: The effects of weathering on single domain

magnetite in Early Pliocene marine marls. Geophys. J. Int., 121, 267–278.

SHOCK-INDUCED MAGNETIZATION

(SIM) AT 10 AND 20 GPa

ON GIBEON IRON METEORITE

M. FUNAKI

1

, Y. SHONO

2

 and T. YAMAUCHI

3

1

 National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo; funaki@nipr.ac.jp

2

 Tohoku University, Sendai Japan

3

 Shinshu University, Matsumoto Japan

background image

227

Introduction

All meteorites have experienced shocks when their parent bodies

were crushed by hypervelocity-collisions among asteroids. We have

almost  no  information  that  the  natural  remanent  magnetization  ac-

quired on the primordial asteroid can survived the shocks. In order

to estimate a possibility shock loading magnetization for meteorite,

two disks prepared from a Gibeon iron meteorite (octahedrite) were

examined at 10 and 20 GPa produced by explosive gun.

A projectile of aluminum or stainless steel 1cm in diameter col-

lided with the target (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) of Gibeon

at 10 GPa or 20 GPa respectively. The magnetic field was 37.5 T (I

= 55.1, D = 271.4) at the sample holder made of iron steel and cop-

per, although it could not be measured in the holder due to too nar-

row  space.  Shock  was  loaded  toward  the  perpendicular  with  the

disks. The samples were removed from the holder using a lathe with

magnetization of less than 5 Oe.

Experimental results

Two disk samples of A and B were demagnetized up to 100 mT

by  AF  demagnetization.  Their  NRM  intensity  decayed  from

7.365

×

10

–3

 to 3.830

×

10

–4

 Am

2

/kg for sample A and from 1.480

×

10

–2

to 1.922

×

10

–4

 Am

2

/kg for sample B. Shocks of 10 and 20 GPa were

loaded to the samples A and B respectively. The magnetization in-

creased consequently to 8.871

×

10

–3

Am

2

/kg (I = –4.8, D = 222.6) for

sample A and to 3.349

×

10

–2

Am

2

/kg (I = 5.2, D = 347.4) for sample

B. When the sample A was cut into 4 subsamples, their directions of

remanence scattered maintaining low inclination. This characteristic

was also observed in the sample B. In general, the intensities of re-

manence  of  the  subsamples  acquired  at  20 GPa  were  larger  than

those acquired at 10 GPa.

Discussion

If the sample acquired some magnetization referred to the ambient

magnetic field triggered shock, the remanence should be acquired to

the field direction. The scattered directions of remanence among the

subsamples may suggest that the remanence is acquired disregarding

the  ambient  magnetic  field.  Although  we  have  estimated  that  these

samples acquired magnetization as a shock-induced magnetization by

hypervelocity  collision,  the  shape  anisotropy  of  samples  should  be

considered to elucidate the acquisition mechanism.

ON THE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF AN

ASSEMBLE OF INTERACTING SD GRAINS

B.E. LAMASH*, V.P. SHCHERBAKOV and N.K. SYCHEVA

Dept. of Physics, Far East State University, 8 Suhanova str.,

690600 Vladivostock, Russia; *lamash@phys.dvgu.ru

Monte  Carlo  method  (MCM)  is  used  last  years  for  analysis  of

TRM, CRM and VRM of SD interacting grains randomly distributed

within  a  specimen.  As  is  well  known  this  method  should  be  used

with  care  to  obtain  reliable  results.  An  independent  way  to  testify

the results of the MCM is comparison of the results with those ob-

tained by more rigorous approach.

According to the Boltzmann’s distribution the susceptibility:

χ

=

Σ

m

α

exp(-E

α

/kT)/

Σ

exp(-E

α

/kT)                                          (1)

where m

α

 

is a total magnetic moment, E

α

 is the energy of the ensem-

ble  where  the  summation  is  done  over  all  possible  configurations

numbered by symbol 

α

. Let the number of the particles in the en-

semble to be N. Because of number of the possible states 

α

 increases

in geometric progression N

s

=2

N

, use of the relation (1) in practice is

restricted  by  relatively  small  N.  For  example  for  N=30  we  have

N

s

=2

30

 

10

9

  which  set  a  limit  of  calculations  of 

χ

  for  N  >30  by

means of the eq. (1) even for powerful computers. Additional com-

plexities in direct calculations of 

χ

 result from the necessity of aver-

aging the result over the possible space distribution of grains which

strongly reduces a possibility to carry out rigorous analysis.

 Let consider first a system consisting from only two oriented SD

grains with equal magnetic moments m. The result of their mutual

interaction  on 

χ

  depends  on  their  relative  space  disposition:  f.e.  if

the second particle is placed near the pole of the first one, the sus-

ceptibility  increases  as  compared  with  the  susceptibility  of non-

interacting  grains 

χ

0

.  On  the  other  hand  if  the  second  particle  is

placed near the equator of the first one, the susceptibility decreases.

Integration  over  the  space  gives  0.84< 

χ/χ

0

<1  depending  on  the

strength of the interaction. In this simple example the magnetostatic

interaction leads to reduction of the susceptibility though the value

of the reduction is very modest.

Next numerical calculations of 

χ

 according to eq. (1) for N=(2–

20) of non-oriented particles with size d=40 nm at T =460 °C were

carried out. The space averaging of the values of 

χ

 was done by ran-

dom selection of 10,000 space configurations of the particles. The

results showed a tendency of decreasing the susceptibility with in-

creasing N, the stronger are the interactions, more significant is the

decrease. However the tendency is rather gentle: even for strong in-

teractions  at  the  volume  concentration 

χ

=5%  the  decrease  is  no

more  than  50%.  For  moderate  concentrations  c=(0.5–2)%  the  de-

pendence 

χ

(N) shows saturation; hence we can suggest that for big

N, representing a macro-ensemble, the relation 

χ/χ

0

 would be close

to one. If so, then the magnetostatic interactions do not significantly

change the thermodynamic value of the susceptibility as compared

with  the  susceptibility  of  the  non-interacting  systems.  This  deduc-

tion agrees with the conclusion of Shcherbakov et al. (1995) when

modelling the TRM acquisition by the MCM: ‘the only important re-

sult of the interactions is the increase in the blocking temperatures

of the grains compared with the non-interacting case’.

Fig. 1.

Fig. 2.

background image

228

The blocking temperatures are determined by the kinetics of the

attainment of the steady state by the susceptibility. For the non-in-

teracting system with identical grains 

χ

(t) = 

χ

0

(1-exp(-t/

τ

0

)) where t

is time and 

τ

0

 is the relaxation time for reaching equilibrium. For the

example given above

 τ

0

 = 1s at the condition that the potential barri-

er is determined by shape anisotropy with the demagnetising factor

N

d

 =1. However if the interactions are taken into account, a number

of grains with 

τ

 exceed 

τ

0

 by many orders of value and the depen-

dence 

χ

(t) approaches log(t).

The general conclusion is that the magnetostatic interactions do

not affect the value of the susceptibility significantly but drastical-

ly change the spectrum of relaxation times which leads to quasi-

logarithmic increase of VRM with time even for the ensemble of

identical grains.

References

Shcherbakov V.P., Lamash B.E. & N.K. Sycheva, 1995: Monte-Carlo mod-

elling  of  thermoremanence  acquisition  in  interacting  single-domain

grains. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 87, 197–211.

THE CONCEPT OF

‘PARTIAL SUSCEPTIBILITIES’

T. VON DOBENECK

University of Bremen, Germany; dobeneck@uni-bremen.de

Environmental  magnetic  studies  of  marine  and  terrestrial  sus-

ceptibility records usually draw additional information from min-

eral and grain-size selective rock magnetic parameters such as an-

hysteretic (M

ar

), isothermal (M

ir

) and high field (M

hir

) remanence

and  frequency  dependent  susceptibility  (

κ

fd

).  A  new  multivariate

method for the quantitative analysis of the carriers of susceptibili-

ty is proposed, which has many advantages over traditional verbal

interpretations.

Susceptibility is carried by discrete rock magnetic fractions, e.g.

SP, SD, MD magnetite, high-coercive, para- and diamagnetic min-

erals. Consequently, the experimentally observed volume suscepti-

bility 

κ

obs

 can be expressed as a sum of (fictive) partial suscepti-

bilities:

κ

obs

 = 

κ

sp

 + 

κ

sd

 + 

κ

md

 + 

κ

hi

 + 

κ

para

 + 

κ

dia

The above cited selective rock magnetic parameters 

κ

fd

, M

ar

, M

ir

,

M

hir

 are uncalibrated linear concentration measures for four of these

fractions. Their individual contributions to susceptibility can be ap-

proximated  by  multiplication  with  suitable,  but  a  priori  unknown

calibration factors 

β

β

4. The sum of all contributions should then

be a predicted susceptibility:

κ

pre

 = 

β

0

 + 

β

1

κ

fd

 + 

β

2

 M

ar

 + 

β

3

 M

ir

 + 

β

4

 M

hir

The  five  unknown  coefficients 

β

β

4  can  be  determined  from

the  studied  sample  set  itself,  by  solving  the  second  equation  for

κ

obs

  instead  of 

κ

pre

,  using  a  multiple  regression  algorithm.  Obvi-

ously, most terms of the above equations can be identified: 

β

1

κ

fd

 

κ

sp

β

2

M

ar

 

 

κ

sd

β

3

M

ir

 

 

κ

md

β

4

M

hir

 

 

κ

hi

, and 

β

0

 

 

κ

dia

. The values

obtained  as  calibration  coefficients  vary  with  magnetic  lithology

and  experimental  settings  (acquisition  fields  etc.).  They  should

therefore  be  neither  generalized  nor  applied  to  different  sample

sets, but hold diagnostic value.

As the given example, a pelagic sediment core (GeoB 1505-2)

from  the  central  equatorial  Atlantic,  illustrates,  it  is  possible  to

Fig. Compared to SPECMAP, a global climate reference (fat line), the ob-

served susceptibility signal 

κ

obs

 (circles) of central equatorial Atlantic core

GeoB 1505-2 shows similar as well as dissimilar pattern sections. To ana-

lyze this complex record quantitatively, partial susceptibilities of four mag-

netic fractions (SP, SD, MD magnetite, hematite) were determined by cali-

brating (formulas given in graph) their corresponding magnetic parameters.

By summation, they yield the predicted susceptibility 

κ

pre

 (gray), which co-

incides very well with 

κ

obs

. Transformed into percentages of 

κ

pre

-

β

0

, relative

partial  susceptibilities  document  internal  mineral  and  grain-size  shifts  of

the magnetic mineral assemblage. In this specific case, the visible loss of

the finer magnetite fractions in several core sections deposited within cold

oxygen  isotope  stages  (gray  bands  and  numbers)  is  indicative  for  partial

magnetite dissolution by reductive diagenesis and related to enhanced or-

ganic deposition. Particular lithologies such as intercalated sand and tephra

layers independently modify the susceptibility signal.

predict  and  thereby  explain  a  complex  susceptibility  signal  in

amazing detail from cumulative partial susceptibilitites, if the un-

derlying parameters represent all magnetic fractions of the sample.

A diamagnetic value of –12.4 

×

10

–6

 SI, typical for calcite and wa-

ter, was found for 

β

0

. To equally quantify 

κ

para

, a selective parame-

ter  for  paramagnetism  such  as  non-ferromagnetic  susceptibility

κ

nf

,  the  asymptotic  incline  of  the  outer  hysteresis  branch  would

have  to  be  included  in  the  regression.  If  this  laborious  measure-

ment is omitted, the regression algorithm will still correct for the

paramagnetic fraction to make 

κ

pre

 as close to 

κ

obs

 as possible. In

consequence, the coefficients of other magnetic fractions geologi-

cally  ‘associated’  with  paramagnetism  will  be  augmented  ac-

cordingly.

0

25

50

75

100

κ

sp

0

25

50

κ

sd

0

25

50

75

κ

hi

SP Magnetite

SD Magnetite

Hematite

PSD-MD Magnetite

κ

sp

 = 3.97 

κ

fd

κ

sd

 = 0.35 M

ar

κ

hi

 = 0.16 M

hir

κ

md

 = 0.09 M

ir

   ! "

#

$

%

&

'





0

25

50

75

100

125

150

κ

md

    

 

Sand

Layer

Tephra

Layers

0

25

50

75

100

125

150

175

200

225

250

κ

   [

al

l S

us

ce

pt

ib

ilit

ie

in

 1

0

-6

 S

I]

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

Age [ka]                                                                                                                            

δ

18

O Stage

0

200

400

M

hi

r

0

500

1000

1500

M

ir

    [

all 

in

 1

0

-3

 A

/m

]

0

100

M

ar

0

10

20

κ

fd

  [1

0

-6

 S

I]

-2

-1

0

1

2

SPECM

AP 

δ

18

O

  [st

and.
]

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

κ

sp

κ

sd

κ

hi

κ

md

  [%

 o

κ

pre

β

]

δ

18

O

κ

obs

κ

pre

GeoB 1505-2

Central Equatorial Atlantic

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

P

art

ia

l S

us

ce

ptib

ilit

y

   P

er

cent
ages

background image

229

The  transformation  of  concentration-dependent  magnetic  pa-

rameters into partial susceptibilities is linear and leaves signal pat-

terns unchanged. It enables us to compare and add individual sedi-

mentary  magnetic  fractions  and  determine  their  absolute

contribution to susceptibility.

ARTIFICIAL MAGNETITE-BEARING

SEDIMENTS WITH DIFFERENT INITIAL

MAGNETIC STATES OF MAGNETIC

PARTICLES: FIELD DEPENDENCIES

OF THEIR ORIENTATIONAL

MAGNETIZATION AND ANISOTROPY

V.A. SHASHKANOV and A.A. KOSTEROV*

Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg University, 1, Uljanovskaya, St. Petergoff,

198904 St. Petersburg, Russia; *kosterov@snoopy.phys.spbu.ru

To  investigate  a  relationship  between  the  acquisition  of  detrital

remanent magnetization (DRM) and the magnetic state of precipitat-

ing ferrimagnetic grains, eight sets of artificial clayey sediments (8

sediments in each set) were deposited in horizontal magnetic fields

H

0

 ranging from 0 to 48 Oe. The initial states of the magnetic parti-

cles were either absolute zero state (AZS) created by heating a mag-

netic above its Curie point in zero field, or various TRMs acquired

in the magnetic fields H

t

 from 0.5 to 300 Oe. These states were ex-

pected to cover the whole range of possible particles’ magnetic mo-

ments. The magnetic phase was represented by submicron magnetite

grains extracted from the crushed iron ore deposit of Kostomuksha

(Karelia). Concentration of the magnetic phase in the sediments was

taken about 0.7 weight per cent.

Analysis of the experimental results has led to a conclusion that

the field dependencies of detrital remanence magnetization (DRM)

cannot  generally  be  treated  as  emerging  from  a  single  Langevin-

type deposition process. Instead, it was shown that all the data on

DRM (H

0

, H

t

) field dependencies could be considered as a set of bi-

modal Langevin processes as follows:

DRM(H

0

)  =  I

·

 

Lang  (H

0

  /  H

chaot,1

)  +  I

·  Lang  (H

/  H

chaot,2

);

 Lang (X) = coth (X) – 1 / X.

Here I

and I

2

 are the limit magnetizations of the first and second

modes, and H

chaot,1

 and H

chaot,2

 are their respective chaotization pa-

rameters. The values of these parameters in function of the thermo-

magnetization field H

t

 are given in the Table.

suggesting  that  some  PSD-like  mechanism  is  at  the  origin  of  the

magnetization  of  this  mode.  The  second  mode,  whose  moment  I

2

shows a regular increase with thermomagnetization field H

t

, would

then be a result of the “true”, i.e. taking place by a displacement of

domain walls, thermoremanent magnetization process.

The orientational magnetic anisotropy, defined as the ratio of an-

hysteretic remanences acquired parallel and orthogonally to the sed-

imentation  field  respectively  (Kosterov  &  Shashkanov  1996),  for

these  sediments  approached  values  of  about  four  in  sedimentation

field of 48 Oe. In terms of the above model this can be readily inter-

preted as a direct evidence for the predominantly uniaxial intrinsic

anisotropy  of  magnetite  grains  belonging  to  the  second  (highly

aligned) mode.

References

Kosterov A.A. & Shashkanov V.A., 1996: A phenomenological model of ori-

entational  magnetic  anisotropy  of  sediments.  Geophys.  J.  Int.,  125,

149–162.

A LARGE GYROMAGNETIC EFFECT

IN  GREIGITE

A. STEPHENSON

1

 and I.F. SNOWBALL

2

1

Dept. of Physics, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne,

NE1 7RU, England; alan.stephenson@ncl.ac.uk

2

Dept. of Quaternary Geology, Lund University, Tornavagen 13,

S-223 63 Lund, Sweden; ian.snowball@geol.lu.se

The  mineral  greigite  is  often  found  in  marine  and  freshwater

sediments and contributes to the NRM of such material since it ac-

quires  a  CRM.  Two  sediment  samples  used  here  were  from  (a)

Bjorkerods Mosse and (b) Bare Mosse in Sweden and were taken

from  horizons  known  to  contain  high  concentrations  of  greigite.

The samples were made by embedding the sediment in resin and

cutting out cubes of side 1 cm.

RRM  and  ARM  acquisition  curves  were  measured  up  to  peak

fields of 80 mT at a rotation frequency of 95 revolutions per second

(rps). While the ARM (0.07 mT direct field) increased almost linear-

ly with peak field, the RRM increased approximately exponentially.

The effective field Bg, defined in this case as 0.07

×

RRM/ARM, was

about 1.2 mT for the two samples after the application of an AF of

80 mT peak. These values are about 10 times higher than those pre-

viously  observed  for  fine-grained  magnetite  of  about  1  micron  in

size. It should be noted that although greigite is the dominant ferri-

magnetic  mineral  present  in  these  samples,  other  studies  have

shown that low concentrations of detrital multidomain magnetite are

also present. Magnetite has always been found to have a lower value

of Bg than this and thus the high value quoted here must be regarded

as a lower limit for greigite.

Measurements of RRM and ARM were then carried out at differ-

ent rotation rates using an AF of 80 mT peak and the usual 0.07 mT

direct field for the ARM. The results were compared with those for a

2.2–4.4 micron fraction of natural magnetite which had been mea-

sured some years ago but was remeasured here, partly as a calibra-

tion check. As expected, the magnetite fraction gave a low negative

RRM at low rotation rates. (RRM antiparallel to the rotation vector

of the spinning sample is defined as negative). At about 5 rps the

RRM reversed sign and at about 35 rps it once more became nega-

tive. Above 50 rps (AF frequency 50 Hz), the RRM became positive

and  much  stronger.  These  results  are  similar  to  previous  measure-

ments on magnetite and magnetite-bearing rocks. The ARM, which

was  measured  simultaneously,  was  almost  constant  as  expected,

H

,

 

Oe 0 (AZS) 0.5 1.0 2.0 5.0

15 100 300

I

1

,a.u.

143

94.5 39 36.5 93.5 42.5 93.5 90

H

chaot,1

,Oe

36

36

36

36

36

36

36

36

I

,a.u.

5

1.5

3

10

9

34 49.5 89

H

chaot,2

, Oe 0.8

0.6 0.7 1.55 0.9 1.25 1.3 2.05

The two modes that can be identified in the DRM field dependen-

cies  might  be  related  to  peculiarities  of  the  initial  thermomagnetic

states of magnetite grains contained in our sediments. The magnetic

moment of the first mode, characterized by a strong H

t

-independent

chaotization  field,  reaches  its  maximum  in  the  absolute  zero  state,

background image

230

showing  no  dependence  on  either  rotation  frequency  or  RRM.  Bg

for this magnetite sample under the above conditions was 0.028 mT,

in agreement with values obtained previously.

Unlike the magnetite sample, both greigite samples had a nega-

tive RRM at all rotation frequencies below 50 rps but, like the mag-

netite sample, there was a large increase in RRM from low negative

to large positive values above 50 rps. In addition unlike the magne-

tite, the ARM was not constant but approximately halved as the ro-

tation frequency increased from below to above 50 rps and the RRM

not well known. Therefore, we plan to further investigate the mag-

netic properties of natural and synthetic greigite and pyrrhotite.

Schoonen & Barnes (1991) designed a method to synthesize py-

rite hydrothermally at easily controlled reaction conditions. Dekkers

& Schoonen (1994, 1996) adapted this method to synthesize greigite

at 140 

o

C and pyrrhotite from 190 

o

C upward. This method yields

precipitates that can easily be handled during subsequent rock mag-

netic experiments. We plan to adjust this method to investigate the

dependency of mineral magnetic properties on formation conditions

and grain-size. For example, the high temperatures and fairly alka-

line conditions of the Dekkers & Schoonen (1994, 1996) hydrother-

mal  synthesis  may  not  represent  natural  formation  conditions,  but

synthesis  at  low  pH  can  be  done  at  a  lower  temperature  (e.g.,

Yamaguchi & Wada 1970).

References

Dekkers M.J., 1988: Magnetic properties of natural pyrrhotite Part I: Behav-

iour of initial susceptibility and saturation-magnetization-related rock-

magnetic parameters in a grain-size dependent framework. Phys. Earth

Planet. Inter., 52, 376–393.

Dekkers M.J., 1989: Magnetic properties of natural pyrrhotite. II. High- and

low-temperature  behaviour  of  J

rs

  and  TRM  as  function  of  grain  size.

Phys. Earth Planer. Inter., 57, 266–283.

Dekkers M.J. & Schoonen M.A.A., 1994: An electrokinetic study of synthetic

greigite and pyrrhotite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 58, 4147–4153.

Dekkers M.J. & Schoonen M.A.A., 1996: Magnetic properties of hydrother-

mally synthesised greigite (Fe

3

S

4

)-I. Rock magnetic parameters at room

temperature. Geophys. J. Int., 126, 360–368.

Canfield D.E. & Berner R.A., 1987: Dissolution and pyritization of magnetite in

anoxic marine sediments. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 51, 645–659.

Menyeh A. & O’Reilly W., 1991: The magnetization process in monoclinic

pyrrhotite (Fe

7

S

8

) particles containing few domains.

Morse J.W., Millero F.J., Cornwell J.C. & Rickard D., 1987: The chemistry

of the hydrogen sulfide and the iron sulfide systems in natural waters.

Earth-Science Reviews, 24, 1–42.

Passier H.F, Middelburg J.J., van Os B.J.H. & de Lange G.J., 1996: Diagenetic

pyritisation under eastern Mediterranean sapropels caused by downward

sulphide diffusion. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 60, 751–763.

Passier H.F., Middelburg J.J., de Lange G.J. & Böttcher M.E., 1998: Modes

of  sapropel  formation  in  the  eastern  Mediterranean:  some  constraints

based on pyrite properties. Mar. Geol., in press.

Roberts  A.P.  &  Turner  G.M.,  1993:  Diagenetic  formation  of  ferrimagnetic

iron sulphide minerals in rapidly deposited marine sediments, South Is-

land, New Zealand. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 115, 257–273.

Roberts A.P., Stoner J. & Richter, C., 1998: Diagenetic magnetic enhancement of

sapropels from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, Mar. Geol., in press.

Schoonen M.A.A. & Barnes H.L., 1991: Mechanisms of pyrite and marcasite

formation  from  solution:  III.  Hydrothermal  processes.  Geochim.  Cos-

mochim. Acta, 55, 3491–3504.

Snowball I.A., 1997: The detection of single-domain greigite (Fe

3

S

4

) using rotational

remanent  magnetisation  (RRM)  and  the  effective  gyro  field  (B

g

):  mineral

magnetic and palaeomagnetic applications. Geophys. J. Int., 130, 704–716.

Snowball  I.  &  Thompson  R.,  1990:  A  stable  chemical  remanence  in  Ho-

locene sediments. J. Geophys. Res., 95, 4471–4479.

Yamaguchi S. & Wada H., 1970: Zur Synthese von Greigite. Neues Jahrb.

Mineral. Monatsh.,  139–140.

became strong and positive. Thus there appeared to be an interac-

tion between the ARM and the RRM.

At present it is not clear why gyromagnetic effects (e.g. the ac-

quisition of RRM) are so strong in greigite. Such high values of Bg

have never been observed before except in the very special case of

a  self  reversing  lithium  chromium  ferrite  near  its  compensation

temperature. Such high values of Bg might enable RRM /ARM to

be used as an indicator for greigite.

VI.  Environmental magnetism

MARINE  GEOCHEMISTRY  AND

ROCK  MAGNETISM

H. F. PASSIER* and M. J. DEKKERS

Paleomagnetic Laboratory “Fort Hoofddijk”, Budapestlaan 17,

3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands; *hpassier@geof.ruu.nl

Diagenetic processes in sediments may change and even destroy

the magnetic mineralogy during or after deposition. The presence of

sedimentary organic matter and the availability of sulphate in pore

water  and  seawater  sustain  bacterial  sulphate  reduction  in  sedi-

ments.  The  main  product  of  sulphate  reduction  is  dissolved  sul-

phide. Sulphide may react with dissolved reduced iron and particu-

late  iron  (hydr)oxides  including  the  important  NRM-carrier

magnetite  (reductive  dissolution;  Canfield  &  Berner  1987).  The

products of the reaction between sulphide and iron are iron sulphide

minerals such as mackinawite, pyrrhotite, greigite, and pyrite (e.g.,

Morse et al. 1987).

An example of destructive diagenesis is the reductive dissolution

of iron oxides within and below sapropels in the eastern Mediterra-

nean  (Passier  et  al.  1996,  1998).  Sapropels  are  recurrent  organic-

rich  layers  centimetres  to  decimetres  in  thickness  in  the  Neogene

sedimentary record of the eastern Mediterranean. These layers were

deposited  as  a  result  of  orbitally  controlled  climatic  and  oceano-

graphic variations. Within sapropels bacterial sulphate reduction oc-

curred  during  and  shortly  after  deposition  of  the  layers.  The  pre-

dominant  iron  sulphide  associated  with  the  sapropels  is  pyrite.

Pyrite  formation  was  limited  by  iron  availability  within  sapropels.

This resulted in the downward diffusion of sulphide out of the or-

ganic-rich layers into the sediments directly below, causing reduc-

tive  dissolution  of  iron  oxides  and  pyrite  formation  there  as  well

(Passier et al. 1998).

Whereas sulphate reduction and subsequent reductive dissolution

of iron (hydr)oxides by sulphide stopped soon after burial of most

sapropels,  sulphate  reduction  presumably  still  occurs  at  very  low

rates in an extremely organic-rich Pliocene sapropel recovered dur-

ing ODP Leg 160. In this sapropel other iron sulphide compounds

than  pyrite  were  found,  and  were  magnetic  (Roberts  et  al.  1998;

Passier et al. 1998).

Although pyrite is the predominant iron sulphide mineral in ma-

rine sediments, magnetic sulphides (greigite, pyrrhotite), which are

intermediates in pyrite formation, have been reported to accumulate

in marine sediments as well (e.g., Roberts & Turner 1993). This is

partly  due  to  the  recent  development  of  rock-magnetic  criteria  for

their detection (e.g., for pyrrhotite: Dekkers 1988, 1989; Menyeh &

O’Reilly 1991; for greigite: Snowball & Thompson 1990; Dekkers

&  Schoonen  1996;  Snowball  1997).  It  is  not  yet  clear,  however,

what the exact contribution of magnetic iron sulphides to rock mag-

netic signals in sediments is. In addition, the exact influence of for-

mation conditions and grain-size on mineral magnetic properties is

background image

231

PALEOWINDS AND MAGNETO-

CLIMATOLOGY IN SIBERIA

T. EVANS

1

, N. RUTTER

2

 and J. CHLACHULA

3

1

Institute of Geophysics, Meteorology & Space Physics, University of Alberta,

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2J1; evans@phys.ualberta.ca

2

Department of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta,

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E3

3

Laboratory of Paleoecology, Technical University Brno, 762 72 Zlín, Czech

Republic

Our published magnetic susceptibility results (GJI, 132, 128–132,

1998) indicate that the Kurtak section in southern Siberia contains a

climate proxy record that is in the opposite sence to that found in the

classic  sites  of  the  Chinese  Loess  Plateau.  In  China  cold  periods

produce  low  susceptibilities  (<3

×

10

–7

  m

3

kg

–1

),  whereas  intergla-

cials  are  characterized  by  pedogenically-driven  magnetic  enhance-

ment. In Siberia, on the other hand, cold periods yield high suscepti-

bilities  (>40

×

10

–7

  m

3

kg

–1

).  The  Kurtak  susceptibility  pattern  (549

samples spanning a 34 m section) implies a magnetite volume frac-

tion of ~0.2% at the peak of glacial intervals (oxygen isotope stages

2 and 4), which decreases to ~0.05% in stages 1, 3 and 5. We at-

tribute the lowering of magnetic content to density sorting and de-

creased average wind vigour during interglacials, in the manner sug-

gested by Begt et al. (Geology, 18, 40–3, 1990) for loess in Alaska.

This suggestion is supported by sympathetic variations in the dust-

flux record from core V21–146 in the north Pacific (Hovan et al.,

Nature, 340, 296–298, 1989). To test this notion further, we sought a

well-defined natural analogue as a model of atmospheric dispersal.

To this end, we have initiated a study of the 1980 Mount St. Helens

ash  (samples  of  which  are  archived  in  the  Department  of  Earth  &

Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Alberta). Preliminary re-

sults indicate that susceptibility drops by more than a factor of two

between sites situated 150 to 300 km from the vent; this agrees with

the qualitative predictions of the wind-vigour model.

Although the paleosols at Kurtak have low susceptibility values

(~10

×

10

–7

 m

3

kg

–1

), they do show increased frequency-dependence

of susceptibility (as determined by measurements at 0.47 and 4.7

kHz). This implies the presence of ultrafine magnetite particles near

the  stable  single-domain/superparamagnetic  threshold  (~30  nm),

which, in turn, indicates that magnetite was produced pedogenical-
ly  during isotope stages 1, 3, 5 and 7.

PALEOMAGNETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL

MAGNETIC RECORD FROM SAANICH INLET,

VANCOUVER ISLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA

K.L. VEROSUB* and R. KARLIN

Dept. of Geology, University of California, One Shields Ave.,

CA 95616 Davis, USA; *verosub@geology.ucdavis.edu

Saanich  Inlet  is  a  fjord  on  Vancouver  Island,  British  Columbia,

with  a  very  high  rate  of  sedimentation.  In  1996,  ODP  Leg  169S

cored the sediments of Saanich Inlet in seven holes at two sites. The

deepest hole at each site penetrated approximately 60 meters of Ho-

locene varved sediment and 50 meters of Late Pleistocene glacioma-

rine  muds.  A  complete  suite  of  U-channel  samples  was  collected

from  two  overlapped  holes  at  each  site.  Each  U-channel  was  sub-

jected to a ten-level alternating field demagnetization of natural re-

manent magnetization (NRM), anhysteretic remanent magnetization

(ARM) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM).

The measurements were done at a one-centimeter sampling interval

and resulted in a database that contains over one million paleomag-

netic  vector  determinations.  Measurements  were  also  made  of  the

magnetic susceptibility and backfield IRM ratios. All paleomagnetic

measurements  were  done  on  the  automated,  long-core  cryogenic

magnetometer at the University of California, Davis.

High-resolution  correlation  between  the  Holocene  portions  of

each pair of holes was achieved by X-radiography of the varves in

the U-channels. An initial correlation with centimeter to decimeter

precision was achieved by visual inspection of homogeneous, faint-

ly laminated and well-laminated intervals seen in the X-radiographs.

The X-radiographs were then digitized with an automated densitometer,

and time series analyses of varve counts, varve widths, and systematic

lithologic  variations  were  used  to  refine  the  correlations  further.  A

detailed chronology was then constructed from the varve series and

was calibrated with 35 

14

C dates on wood and shell fragments.

After removal of a very soft drilling overprint, the sediments of

Saanich Inlet appeared to yield an excellent record of Holocene and

Late  Pleistocene  geomagnetic  field  behaviour.  The  Holocene  por-

tion of the record contains the same declination and inclination fea-

tures that are found in the paleosecular variation record from Fish

Lake, Oregon. In addition, the ARM-normalized record of NRM in-

tensities from Saanich Inlet is similar to the relative paleointensity

record  from  Fish  Lake  as  well  as  to  the  absolute  paleointensity

record from Holocene lava flows in the western United States. The

Late Pleistocene to Holocene transition is clearly marked by a more

than  ten-fold  decrease  in  magnetic  susceptibility  and  in  the  ARM

and  SIRM  intensities.  Other  environmental  magnetic  parameters

also change dramatically at this boundary. These changes in a ma-

rine sequence are similar to changes previously reported across sim-

ilar  boundaries  in  lacustrine  sequences  from  northern  California.

The  homogenous  intervals  in  the  Holocene  portion  of  the  Saanich

Inlet records are 0.1 m to 1 m thick and appear to indicate intervals

when anoxic conditions were interrupted. The environmental mag-

netic  record  also  provides  evidence  for  the  occurrence  of  massive

floods during the Late Pleistocene.

PALEOCLIMATIC CORRELATIONS

BETWEEN ROCK MAGNETIC PROPERTIES

AND OXYGEN ISOTOPES OF SEDIMENTS

FROM THE TANNER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

BORDERLAND (ODP LEG 167 SITE 1014)

F. HEIDER

1*

, J.M. BOCK

1

, J.P. KENNETT

and I. HENDY

2

1

Institut fuer Allgemeine und Angewandte Geophysik,

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Theresienstr. 41,

80333 München, Germany;

*fheider@rockmag.geophysik.uni-muenchen.de

2

Department of Geological Sciences, University of California,

Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA

The top 20 meters of the sediments at Site 1014 in the Tanner Ba-

sin (California Borderlands) were sampled at 5–11 cm resolution for

rock  magnetic  and  stable  isotope  investigations.  The  Brunhes-

Matuyama boundary lies 65 meters below the seafloor. AF demag-

netization of single specimens every 10 cm did not show any excur-

sions  during  the  Brunhes  chron.  Remanence  acquisition  over  an

extended  time  period  or  a  strong  paleoclimatic  influence  on  the

magnetic properties of the sediment could be the reason. A complete

oxygen  isotope  record  was  determined  with  10  cm  resolution  on

benthic foraminifera (Uvigerina) between stage 6 (170 ka) and the

background image

232

Holocene. Each of the 200 paleomagnetic samples from the top 20

meters  was  given  an  anhysteretic  remanent  magnetization  (ARM)

which was subsequently demagnetized in an alternating field of 15

mT. The ratio of ARM/ARM (15 mT) was used as a measure of mag-

netic stability. A comparison of this ARM ratio with the oxygen iso-

tope record shows a clear correlation between the two. The magneti-

cally  harder  minerals  occur  0.5  m  to  1  m  below  the  interglacial

stages. The magnetically softer grains are found in high concentra-

tion at the transition from warmer to colder intervals (e.g. stage 5.e

to 5.d). The increased magnetic input at the transition from intergla-

cial to glacial intervals may be due to enhanced erosion when sea-

level decreases. Stepwise thermal demagnetization of isothermal re-

manent  magnetization  shows  the  presence  of  titanomaghemite  and

magnetite in varying proportions along the cores. Therefore the rock

magnetic properties of the sediments from the Tanner Basin seem to

be controlled by two climatically controlled fluxes. Larger size tita-

nomaghemites dominate during dropping sealevel, while small size

magnetite grains control the magnetic properties during warm peri-

ods.  Most  of  the  24  Dansgaard-Oeschger  cycles,  first  observed  in

the  Greenland  ice-core  GRIP,  appear  to  be  resolved  by  the  rock

magnetic ARM ratio.

MAGNETIC CHARACTERISTICS

OF A LOESS/PALAEOSOL SECTION

IN NORTH-EASTERN BULGARIA

D. JORDANOVA* and G. YANCHEVA

Geophysical Institute BAN, Acad. Bonchev str., bl. 3, 1113 Sofia,

Bulgaria;  *vanedi@geophys.acad.bg

Part of the rock-magnetic data in the present contribution are de-

scribed in a paper submitted for publication (Jordanova & Petersen,

submitted). This part will be only briefly discussed here.

The  studied  loess/palaeosol  section  is  situated  in  NE  Bulgaria

(near  the  village  of  Koriten),  where  the  thickest  loess  profiles  on

Bulgarian  territory  are  found.  It  covers  the  complete  sequence  of

seven loess beds and six interbedded palaeosols with a total thick-

ness of 34 m. Using a high-resolution susceptibility curve, obtained

from  measurements  on  loose  bore-hole  material,  complementary

samples of solid non-oriented pieces were cut, in order to study fur-

ther stability and viscous behaviour of undisturbed samples.

The  magnetic  mineralogy  inferred  from  the  carried  out  thermal

demagnetization of induced magnetization is dominated by the pres-

ence of magnetite/maghemite. The particular behaviour, observed in

the  Holocene  soil  So  is  characterized  by  clear  indication  about

(characteristic of a significant) maghemite contribution. Upon heat-

ing, a new strongly magnetic phase is created, promoted by the pres-

ence of organic matter. The first three palaeosols (S1, S2, S3) which

are of chernozem type, experienced significant low-temperature ox-

idation, resulting in almost complete transformation of “in situ” pro-

duced magnetite to maghemite. In older palaeosols low-temperature

oxidation  probably  causes  a  development  of  stress-controlled

grains,  which  leads  to  a  decrease  in  the  effective  grain-size  (Van

Velzen & Zijderveld 1995).

The  first  three  palaeosol  units  are  characterized  by  higher  coer-

civities (H

c

, H

cr

) in comparison with older palaeosols and lower con-

tent of SP particles (deduced from Xfd(%) and X/J

s

 variations) (For-

ster  et  al.  1994;  Banerjee  1994;  Heller  &  Evans  1995).  Viscous

decay experiments, conducted for a period of 24 days storage in a

mu-metal space, reveal an increasingly higher portion of NRM de-

stroyed, reaching 100 % for units S4, L5, S5, L6 and S6. In order to

specify the possible influences of different coercivity spectra of fer-

rimagnetic carriers in each unit on the one hand, and different expo-

sure time of samples, belonging to units of different age (up to M/B

age of L7) on the other, we have obtained a viscosity index, using

the Thellier methodology (reference: Thellier E. & Thellier O. 1959;

Sholpo 1964) (equal exposure time along and opposite to the local

magnetic field). Thus, excluding the time factor, representative sam-

ple of each unit acquire laboratory VRM. According to the results

obtained so far, samples from S2 and S3 show maximum viscosity,

while  S4,  S5  and  S6,  in  spite  of  their  enhanced  SP  content  (high

Xfd(%) and X/J

s

 values) are not capable of significant viscous ac-

quisition (Sv in the range 0–20 %). AF-demagnetization of acquired

laboratory  VRM  gives  additional  data  about  the  coercivity  of  the

viscous  fraction.  The  lowest  stability  (expressed  by  MDF  values)

are inherent to the old loesses and pedocomplexes (S4–L7) and the

highest — to L1, L2 and S1. As could be deduced from the distribu-

tion of data points on the Sv–MDF plot, the lowest stability is asso-

ciated with the lowest viscosity coefficient, which suggests that in

older palaeosols only a small part of viscous SD/SP grains have re-

laxation times, corresponding to the critical volumes for remanence

acquisition.

The  following  conclusions  could  be  drawn  from  the  carried  out

investigations:1) The younger palaeosols (So–S3) show effectively

“coarser” magnetic grain sizes, which is expressed by their higher

ability for viscous acquisition, lower values of Xfd and X/J

s

 parame-

ters, accompanied by high coercive forces.

2)  The  main  part  of  the  pedogenic  ferrimagnetic  fraction  in  the

old palaeosols (S4, S5, S6) is in the SP domain state, while viscous

acquisition is very restricted. One possible reason for that could be

the presence of internal stresses, due to maghemitization processes,

which cause stabilization of primary remanence.

References

Banerjee S.K., 1994: Contributions of fine-particle magnetism to reading the

global paleoclimate record (invited). J. Appl. Phys., 75, 10, 5925–5930.

Forster Th., Evans M. & Heller F., 1994: The frequency dependence of low

field susceptibility in loess sediments. Geophys. J. Int., 118, 636–642.

Heller F. & Evans M.E., 1995: Loess Magnetism. Reviews of Geophysics, 33,

2, 211–240.

Jordanova D. & Petersen N., submitted: Palaeoclimatic record from loess-soil

section in NE Bulgaria. Part I: Rock-magnetic properties. Geophys. J. Int.

Sholpo  L.,  1964:  Role  of  viscous  magnetization  in  natural  remanence  of

rocks. Geophys. Explorations, Leningrad, 100–117 (in Russian).

Thellier E. & Thellier O., 1959: The intensity of earth’s magnetic field dur-

ing historical and geological time. Izv. AN USSR, No. 9 (in Russian).

Van Velzen A.J. & Zijderveld J.D., 1995: Effects of weathering on single-domain

magnetite in Early Pliocene marine marls. Geophys. J. Int., 121, 267–278.

MAGNETOSTRATIGRAPHY

AND ENVIRONMENTAL MAGNETIC

RECORD OF THE CIROS-1 CORE,

ROSS SEA, ANTARCTICA

K.L. VEROSUB*, G.S. WILSON, A.P. ROBERTS,

L. SAGNOTTI and F. FLORINDO

Dept. of Geology, University of California, One Shields Ave,

CA 95616 Davis, USA; *verosub@geology.ucdavis.edu

In 1986, cores were obtained to a depth of 702 m from the CIROS-

1 drill hole beneath the Ross Sea in Antarctica. Glaciogene sediments

identified near the base of the hole mark the earliest known record of

Antarctic glaciation. Initial biostratigraphic analysis indicated that the

lower 336 m of the core was early Oligocene in age, and that the up-

per  366  m  was  of  late  Oligocene–early  Miocene  age.  Recently,  the

background image

233

chronology of the CIROS-1 core has been questioned. We have de-

veloped a magnetostratigraphy for the lower 400 m of the CIROS-1

core  to  clarify  the  chronology.  Our  magnetobiostratigraphic  results

indicate that the base of the CIROS-1 core is early late Eocene in age.

We  identify  the  Eocene/Oligocene  boundary  at  about  410–420  m,

which makes the CIROS-1 core the highest latitude site from which

this datum event has been recognized. We recognize three major cli-

matic episodes in the CIROS-1 core: 1) the late Eocene (430–702 m),

when relatively warm conditions dominated with high sedimentation

rates  and  some  glacial  activity;  2)  the  late  Eocene/early  Oligocene

boundary interval (340–430 m), which was a transition from relative-

ly warm to cooler conditions that coincided with glacial intensifica-

tion, sea level fall, and subaerial erosion of the shelf, and; 3) the late

Oligocene-early  Miocene  (50–340  m),  when  large-scale  glaciation

dominated the region, with glaciers grounding across the continental

shelf.  From  correlation  with  global  oxygen  isotope  and  sea  level

records,  we  infer  that  the  Antarctic  climate  and  surrounding  oceans

cooled after separation of Australia and Antarctica and development

of deep-water circulation between them.

The Eocene-Oligocene boundary has recently been recognized as

a critical time for Antarctic climatic evolution. In conjunction with

the  magnetostratigraphic  study,  we  conducted  an  environmental

magnetic  study  of  the  lower  half  of  the  CIROS-1  core.  Measured

magnetic  properties  included  magnetic  susceptibility,  intensity  of

natural  and  artificial  remanences,  hysteresis  parameters  and  mag-

netic anisotropy. The data show a clear magnetic signature, with an

alternation  of  intervals  of  high  and  low  concentration  of  magnetic

minerals. The boundaries of these intervals do not correspond to the

lithostratigraphic zonation of the core. Pseudo-single domain mag-

netite is the main magnetic mineral throughout the sequence. Sharp

decreases  in  magnetite  concentration  correspond  to  changes  in  the

clay mineralogy close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, reflecting

a transition to physical weathering under a cooler climate. We con-

clude  that  large  amounts  of  detrital  magnetite  were  shed  from  the

continent  into  the  basin  during  periods  of  intense  weathering  in  a

relatively warm and humid climate, whereas small amounts of mag-

netite were deposited in a relatively cold and dry climate. By this in-

terpretation, the rock magnetic properties may be used to trace the

alternation of gross and small scale fluctuations in the Antarctic pa-

leoclimatic regime.

ENVIRONMENTAL/CLIMATIC STUDY

ON CLASTIC SEDIMENTS DEPOSITED

IN KULNA CAVE, CZECH REPUBLIC

DURING THE LAST GLACIAL

AND INTERGLACIAL

P. SROUBEK*, J. DIEHL, J. KADLEC, K. VALOCH

and F. HELLER

Dept. of Geology, Michigan Technol. Univ.,  MI 49931 Houghton,

MI, USA; *pasroube@mtu.edu

Mineral magnetic properties of loess/paleosol sequences are very

sensitive  indicators  of  climatic  change.  Cave  entrances  offer  thick

deposits of loess or loess like sediments. Their stratigraphy, trans-

port and mode of deposition may be more complex than in surficial

deposits, nevertheless they are intriguing to investigate. We present

the results of a study of sediments deposited in the entrance of Kul-

na Cave, Czech Republic. The goal of this study is to determine the

source of the cave sediments as well as the mode of transport, and to

decipher  the  climatic/environmental  signal  which  they  carry.  We

have been using mineral magnetic methods supported by X-ray dif-

fraction, heavy mineral analysis and quartz exoscopy.

Kulna Cave is located near the northern margin of the Moravian

Karst. It has a tunnel like shape and is situated on the side of a river

valley. Its large entrance contains a 15 m thick sequence of stratified

clastic  sediments.  These  sediments  consist  of  loess-like  deposits

with varying amount of limestone debris which overlie fluvial silts

and  gravels.  Accumulation  occurred  between  the  Last  Interglacial

and the onset of the Holocene. Previous work (Valoch 1988), based

primarily  on  paleontological  and  archaeological  findings  led  to  a

climatic/environmental reconstruction that has recently been corre-

lated to the stable oxygen isotope record (Valoch 1992). The results

of  preliminary  mineral  magnetic  measurement  are  described  in

Sroubek et al. (1997).

We visited Kulna Cave several times in the last 4 years and col-

lected  approximately  600  samples  throughout  6  major  profiles  lo-

cated in the cave entrance.

Magnetic  susceptibility  (MS)  was  measured  in  all  the  samples.

Other mineral magnetic parameters (FDMS, ARM/MS, ARM/SIRM,

S-ratio) were measured throughout one composite profile including

all  the  major  layers.  Paramagnetic  susceptibility,  thermal  behavior

of  SIRM,  anisotropy  of  MS  (AMS),  directions  of  remanence  and

mineral  composition  (X-ray  diffraction)  were  measured  in  several

samples from each layer.

MS shows in general the same trends in all profiles. In the upper

layers (Last Glacial), MS varies between 20 and 50

×

10

–8

 m

3

/kg. The

interglacial  sediments  in  the  lower  part  of  the  section  have  fairly

constant  MS  around  10

×

10

–8

  m

3

/kg.  Paramagnetic  susceptibility

contributes in the upper layers 10–25 % and in the lower more than

40 %. In the upper part of the profile FDMS and SIRM show a very

similar  trend  to  MS.  Magnetic  grain-size  (ARM/MS  and  ARM/

SIRM) is fairly constant in the upper part of the profile, but an in-

crease in grain-size can be seen in the interglacial sediments. The S-

ratio varies between 0.85–0.90 in the upper part of the profile and

drops to values of 0.65–0.80 in the interglacial sediments.

Thermal demagnetization of SIRM indicates the presence of goet-

hite,  magnetite  and/or  maghemite  and  hematite.  X-ray  diffraction

analysis on one magnetic separate confirmed the presence of goet-

hite and magnetite/maghemite.

Fig. 1. Magnetic susceptibility record throughout loess-like sediments depos-

ited in Kulna Cave during the Last Glacial Period. Full and dash line show

results from two different profiles. The sediments are mostly silt to sandy silt

(layer 7d). Layers 7a, 7d and 11b are rich in limestone debris. Layer labelling
after Valoch (1988).

background image

234

The shape of AMS ellipsoids does suggest that in most cases the

sediments have a depositional style magnetic fabric. Maximum MS

axis in nearly all the layers have a preferred orientation which varies

within the NW-SE quadrants.

The characteristic remanent magnetization has normal directions

in all layers except for one layer near the Glacial/Interglacial bound-

ary. Both samples from this layer show excursional directions. Re-

sults  of  X-ray  diffraction  show  that  all  the  dominant  minerals

(quartz,  calcite,  plagioclase,  kaolinite  and  muscovite)  with  the  ex-

ception  of  calcite  are  present  in  all  the  layers.  SEM  analysis  of

quartz grains confirms eolian transport.

Our results suggest that variations in magnetic susceptibility char-

acterize changing source material. The originally windblown material

has undergone weathering on the surface probably in the vicinity of

the cave. Depending on the intensity of the weathering process mag-

netic enhancement and dissolution of calcite occurred. The weathered

material was then redeposited by fluvial and slope processes into the

cave. The variations in AMS may indicate a changing mode and di-

rection of transport into the cave.

References

Valoch K., 1988: Die Erforschung der Kulna Höhle 1961-1976. Anthropos

(MM Brno) 24, N.S., 16, 1–204 (in German).

Valoch K., 1992: Contribution to the Stratigraphy of the Upper Pleistocene

in Moravia. Scripta (Brno), 22, 77–79.

Sroubek P., Diehl J., Kadlec J. & Valoch K., 1996: Preliminary study on the

mineral magnetic properties of sediments in the Kulna Cave (Moravi-

an Karst), Czech Republic. Studia Geoph. et Geod., 40, 301–312.

SEABED SUSCEPTIBILITY VARIABILITY IN

COASTAL ESTUARINE-LIKE SEDIMENTS

ANDIRON OXIDES FATE DURING EARLY

DIAGENESIS

A case study in littoral sediments from NW Spain

D. REY*, O. PAZOS, B. RUBIO, N. LOPEZ-RODRIGUEZ,

M.A. NOMBELA and F. VILAS

Dep. Xeociencias Marinas e Ordenacian do Territorio, Universidade de Vigo,

36200 VIGO, Spain; *danirey@uvigo.es

This study intends to evaluate the reliability of magnetic suscepti-

bility measurements to assess the marine influence and heavy-metal

adsorption    capabilities  of  coastal  sediments.  We  present  a  double

approach using  geographically and vertically distributed data. Mea-

surement of low-field susceptibility of over 200 samples of surficial

(top 10 cm)   seabed sediments of the Rias of Vigo and Pontevedra

(Fig.  1)  in  NW  Spain  (1  per  square  km)  showed  a  significant  in-

crease towards the open sea and away from polluted continental in-

fluenced areas. Vertical variability of the susceptibility was evaluat-

ed in 80 samples (1 every 3 cm) obtained from three 60 to 80 cm

long gravity corers in the Ria de Pontevedra. These samples showed

a very strong   decrease in susceptibility with depth (Fig. 2).

The  surficial  susceptibility  value  correlated  well  with  existing

data on  their grain-size distribution, organic matter and carbonate

content. Samples  were then split into their coarse and fine fractions

and susceptibility measured separately for each fraction. This result-

ed in new and very revealing spatial variability patterns suggesting

a link between sediment  provenance and origin of the magnetic sig-

nal. To further evaluate these  relationships, the available sedimen-

tological data were completed with  elemental (ICP-AES) and min-

eralogical  analysis  of  the  clay  (XRD)  and  sand    (SEM-EDX)

505000

510000

515000

520000

525000

530000

UTM longitude

670000

675000

680000

685000

690000

695000

700000

U

TM

 la

tit

u

de

TOTAL SAMPLE SUSCEPTIBILITY

          (in SI per mass units

          (in SI per mass units

0E+000

1E-007

2E-007

3E-007

4E-007

5E-007

6E-007

7E-007

Ria de Vigo

Ria de

Pontevedra

5 km

1.0E-8

1.0E-7

1.0E-6

1.0E-5

0

15

30

45

60

75

90

5 1

Core 1

Core 2
Core 3

?

depth (cm)

Fig. 1: Geographical location of the study area. The Galician Rias are deep

elongated embayments of about 30 km long and 12 km wide at their mouth.

Sedimentologically they function as estuarine-like environments and are rel-

atively  well  protected  from  Atlantic  storms.  The  isolines  map  on  the  right

shows  the  geographical  variability  of  the  total  sample  susceptibility  along

the Rias. In general terms, the susceptibility increases towards the open sea

and  decreases  towards  the  coastline.  Mean  values  for  both  Rias  varied  be-

tween cca 1 and 11 E-07 SI (mass units). Sampling sites marked with a dot.

Fig. 2: Cores 1, 2 and 3 are located respectively in the external, middle and

central part of the longitudinal axis of the Ria de Pontevedra. Cores 2  and 3

showed a quick loss in susceptibility of nearly two orders of  magnitude at their

upper part. The bottom part is characterized in both cores by a sharp disruption

of the precedent decreasing trend. Core 1 is  characterized by a moderate vari-

ability around a central value similar to  the lower part of cores 2 and 3, resem-

bling the tendency observed in the  lower part of cores 2 and 3.

background image

235

contributing to contaminants in various environments through abra-

sives  which  contain  iron/iron-oxides  and  REEs.  As  these  flint-de-

rived particles are ubiquitous in laboratories and in the environment

they should not be neglected in studies of the kinds mentioned be-

low. Our investigation should help to understand the nature of such

contaminants, which are of concern in the fields of:

(1) Magnetism (“magnetic contaminations”),

(2) Environmental  magnetism  (“carriers  of  magnetic  informa-

tion in environmental samples”),

(3) Environmental Chemistry (“heavy metals”),

(4) REE-geochemistry  (“REE-distribution  patterns  in  the  geo-

sciences”),

(5) Public Health (“Health-Risk, toxicology”).

Magneto-mineralogy and REE

By using a cigarette or gas lighter a profusion of abrasives from

the flint and the drive wheel (made of steel) is created which con-

sists of a mixture of metal shavings and spheres. The flints are man-

ufactured  from  pyrophoric  alloys  which  have  excellent  sparking

properties. In general, they contain a high weight proportion (about

75  %)  of  rare  earth  elements  (so-called  mischmetal,  consisting

mainly  of  Ce  and  La),  about  20–25  %  Fe  or  SiFe  and  smaller

amounts of Cu, Mg and other elements. Due to the strong reducing

power of mischmetal, some of the particles are ignited by the heat of

friction, and they may reach fairly high temperatures and even melt

during the oxidation process. Some of the particles subsequently so-

lidify  from  the  liquid  state  as  nearly  perfect  spheres.  SEM  studies

revealed  that  many  of  the  highly  magnetic  particles  which  formed

during sparking have spherical shapes with a large grain size distri-

bution (about 1–100 m). However, very sharp and sometimes nee-

dle-like metal-shavings are also observed. EDAX and EMP analyses

reveal  the  presence  of  iron  and  iron-oxides  with  Ce-  and  La-con-

tents  depending  on  the  particle  size.  Micron-sized  particles  are  al-

most Ce- and La-free. Thermomagnetic runs revealed a T

c

 of about

615 

o

C which is ascribed to a maghemite-like phase, and a smaller

portion of a magnetic phase with a T

> 700 

o

C. This could be due to

an iron-like phase. These data are supported by IRM-, hysteresis-,

and  backfield-measurements  as  well  as  X-ray  analyses  and  micro-

scopic observations. The findings provide a new explanation for the

ubiquitous presence of spherical magnetic grains which very often

disturb high precision magnetic measurements and geochemical in-

vestigations (REE) in the laboratory.

Health effects of REEs

Distribution and some uses of REEs

REEs can be found in many products and production processes.

They  are  present  in  emissions  from  coal  burning,  electrowelding,

metallurgy  and  certain  alloys,  in  Neodym-Iron-Boron  magnets,  in

dental  instruments  and  —  orthopedics.  Organocerium  compounds

are  used  in  fluid-cracking  catalysts  in  petroleum  refining  and  are

also considered as replacements for organolead antiknock agents for

internal combustion engine fuels. REEs also find wide applications

in fireworks, and as Ce rich alloys in gas/cigarette lighter flints.

Uptake and metabolism

REE uptake is principally possible by inhalation, orally, through

the skin, and by in vivo (i.v.) injection (Seiler et al. 1988). The most

important route of uptake is by inhalation, e.g. of fumes at the work-

place, and possibly by smoking. Aerosol particles can travel down

the respiratory tract to the alveoli. This is followed by a slow inges-

tion by macrophages, with lymphogenic transportation into other or-

gans. After i.v.-application in the animal model most of the REE are

deposited in the liver and the spleen if basic and the bones if acidic

solutions were used.

fractions.  In  addition  some  basic  magnetic  parameters  associated

with  the  magnetization  of  saturation  (M

s

,   M

sr

)  and  coercivity  (H

c

,

H

cr

)  were    obtained  for  selected  specimens.  Additional  magnetic

data on representative  samples comprised the study of the tempera-

ture and frequency dependence of the susceptibility. A similar pro-

cedure was applied to the gravity cores, but no granulometric frac-

tioning was   carried out attending to their high content in clays. The

total fraction showed a characteristic and considerably higher (two

orders of magnitude) variation of the susceptibility with depth relat-

ed to the early diagenetic evolution of iron oxides and hydroxides.

The combined analysis of these data showed that the spatial vari-

ability of  the susceptibility observed in the different granulometric

fractions  can  be  spatially  related  to:  (a)  sediment  provenance  and

origin, (b) hydrodynamic  regime established between the Rias and

the  adjacent  shelf,  (c)  antropogenic  solid  particulate  pollution.

There is a strong negative correlation between  elemental contami-

nants and susceptibility but no direct causality could be  established.

Finally, it can also be concluded that the evolution of the magnetom-

ineralogical phases during the early stages of burial and diagenesis

is controlled by the organic matter content which in turn controls the

redox  potential.

(This  abstract  is  a  contribution  to  projects  MAR95-1953  and

MAR97-0627 of programe CYTMAR of the Spanish research agen-

cy C.Y.C.I.T.).

CIGARETTE LIGHTERS: A SIGNIFICANT

SOURCE OF ANTHROPOGENIC MAGNETIC

AND REE-BEARING AEROSOL PARTICLES

— A POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK?

V. HOFFMANN

1*

, M. HANZLIK

2

, M. WILDNER

3

,

P. HORN

and K.TH. FEHR

4

1

Institüt für Geologie und Palaontologie, Arbeitsbereich Geophysik,

Universitat Tübingen, Sigwartstr. 10, D-72076 Tübingen;

viktor.hoffmann@uni-tuebingen.de

*also at: Physics Department, University of Toronto/Erindale,

3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga L5L 1C6, Ontario/Canada

2

Institut für Geophysik, Universitat München, Theresienstr. 41,

80333  München

3

Bayrischer Forschungsverbund “Public Health”,

Pettenkoferstr. 35, 80799 München

4

Institut für Mineralogie, Petrologie und Geochemie,

Universitat München, Theresienstr. 41, 80333 München

Introduction

We report the finding of nearly perfect spheres and metal shav-

ings which contain Rare Earth Elements (REE: Ce, La, Nd, Sm, etc.)

and originate from the use of mechanical cigarette and gas lighters.

Furthermore, and of concern for those working in the field of (envi-

ronmental-)  magnetism,  it  has  been  recognized  that  strongly  mag-

netic particles may stem from the very same sources. In our ultra-

clean laboratories, aimed at magnetic and geochemical studies, such

particles  are  frequently  observed.  This  kind  of  sphere  was  even

found in geological samples during laboratory studies, and was be-

lieved to be of extraterrestrial origin. This leads to profoundly mis-

interpreted REE abundance patterns (Nyquist et al. 1987). The nega-

tive health-effects of cigarette-smoking are well known, as well as

frequent disturbances in the performance of sensitive electronic in-

struments  and  computers  as  a  result  of  cigarette  smoke  particles.

Less  known  is  the  fact  that  cigarette  lighters  are  also  significantly

background image

236

Toxicity

Generally,  the  toxicity  of  compounds  of  the  REEs  are  low,  and

unlikely for uptake by mouth. The most important route of uptake

however is by inhalation as airborn pollutants, as mentioned above

(Seiler et al. 1988). Cases of rare earth pneumoconiosis and pulmo-

nary fibrosis have been reported following industrial exposure (Su-

lotto et al. 1986). Whether lanthanides can act as component carcin-

ogens by facilitating malignant transformation is unknown. Possible

pathogenic  mechanisms  could  be  related  to  contamination  with

strongly fibroplastic Thorium, and to ionising irradiation. Whether

uptake of REEs via the respiratory tract on cigarette lighting, or dur-

ing  occupational  exposure,  is  contributing  to  common  serious  dis-

eases like lung cancer is unknown at the moment. Certainly, the as-

sociation  of  exposure  to  REEs  from  lighter  flints  with  cigarette

smoke introduces a strong confounder, but may also obscure the ef-

fects of REE as a contributing cause. The synergistic effect of Ra-

don exposure together with smoking on lung cancer is well known,

and radioactive byproducts of REE could well have similar effects,

if uptake is of a significant amount. Quantification of REEs deposits

in the lung macrophages could serve as a proxy for this specific ex-

posure.

References

Nyquist L., Bansal B., Wiesmann H., Shih C. & McKay G., 1987: Isotopic

studies of shergottite chronology: II. Possible effect of contamination

on the Sm-Nd system. Lunar Planet. Sci,. XVIII, 730–731.

Seiler H. G., Sigel H. & Siegel A.,1988: Handbook on toxicity of inorganic

compounds. Marcel Dekke, Inc., 769–85.

Sulotto F., Romano C., Berra A., Botta G.C., Rubino G.F., Sabbioni E. &

Pierta R., 1986: Rare-earth pneumoconiosis: A new case. Amer. J. In-

dustr. Med., 9, 567–575.

PECULIARITIES IN THE MAGNETIC

PROPERTIES OF THREE DIFFERENT SOIL

TYPES FROM BULGARIA

D. JORDANOVA and N. JORDANOVA

Geophysical Institute BAN, Acad. Bonchev str., bl. 3, 1113 Sofia,

Bulgaria;  vanedi@geophys.acad.bg

Studying  the  magnetic  characteristics  of  different  soil  types  can

give valuable information about iron diagenesis and its depth distri-

bution. Such knowledge can highlight directions and peculiarities of

pedogenic  processes  in  each  particular  case.  Specific  combination

of the main soil-forming factors (Jenny 1941) results in a wide vari-

ety of soil types. General occurrence of iron oxides in different soil

environments (Schwertmann 1988) as well as the obtained magnetic

properties  (e.g.  Maher  1986)  show  their  high  sensitivity  to  the

changes in soil environment. Three different soil types are presented

here: Meadow Chernozem, Leached Meadow Cinnamonic Soil and

Pellic  Chernozem-like  Vertisoil.  Each  of  them  is  characterized  by

specific  behaviour  of  magnetic  characteristics,  influenced  by  the

type of parent material, as well as by climatic factors.

Meadow Chernozem

The section is situated on the first non-flooded terrace of Russen-

ski Lom River and formed on delluvial loess material. Magnetic sus-

ceptibility  variations  show  significant  magnetic  enhancement,  ob-

served  also  for  other  chernozem  soil  profiles  (Jordanova  et  al.

1997).  The  behaviour  of  the  hysteresis  parameters  (coercive  force

H

c

, coercivity of remanence H

cr

, ratios J

rs

/J

s

, H

cr

/H

c

) measured for a

few representative samples from different soil horizons suggest that

the uppermost humic horizon is enriched with more stable ferrimag-

netic minerals, while downward relative contribution of softer carri-

ers  (probably  in  PSD  state)  is  higher.  Following  the  variations  of

viscosity  coefficient  Sv,  it  appears  that  in  conjunction  with  stable

SD ferriminerals, highly viscous SP/SD grains are also present. At

the  same  time,  the  ratio  of  saturation  remanence  to  susceptibility

(SIRM/X)  shows  relatively  uniform  values,  thus  suggesting  an  in-

variable MD fraction (Thompson & Oldfield 1986). Consequently,

the main factor, determining magnetic properties, is the concentra-

tion of “in situ” formed pedogenic ferrimagnetic particles.

Leached Meadow Cinnamonic Soil

The  second  soil  profile,  presented  in  this  study,  is  a  Leached

Meadow Cinnamonic Soil, developed on the alluvial deposits of the

Maritza  River  in  Central  South  Bulgaria.  In  contrast  to  the  more

widely occurring case of magnetic enhancement in the soil horizon,

compared to lower values in the parent material, we observe the op-

posite behaviour. Thermal demagnetization of composite isothermal

remanence  point  to  the  presence  of  magnetite  as  a  main  carrier,

which  is  significantly  affected  by  low  temperature  oxidation.  The

maximum  susceptibility  values,  found  in  the  parent  material,  are

probably connected with an enhanced MD content, as far as they are

accompanied  by  high  SIRM/X  values.  As  a  result  of  an  increased

oxidation  process  towards  the  top  of  the  soil,  effective  grain  sizes

decrease,  which  lead  to  the  lower  susceptibility  observed.  More-

over,  the  authigenic  production  of  the  ultrafine  grained  fraction  is

obviously very limited, as could be concluded from the low Xfd(%)

values (with a maximum of 3.9 %). In spite of this, Xfd(%) varia-

tions very successfully distinguish this part of the section, affected

by pedogenic processes.

Pellic Chernozem-like Vertisoil

Pellic Vertisoils are quite specific soil type, found at the Balkan

Peninsula, as well as at some sites in Africa, India and Indochina.

The present section is situated in the Sofia Valley. Like the previous-

ly  described  soil  profile,  the  Pellic  Vertisoil  presented  here  shows

lower  susceptibility  values  along  the  soil  height  and  higher  values

—  in  the  parent  Pliocene  clays.  Having  in  mind  the  initial  water

logged phase in its history, we could suppose that exactly this cir-

cumstance predetermines the soil’s magnetic characteristics. Lower

X-enhancement,  accompanied  by  an  increased  organic  content,

bringing about Fe-organic complexation, is a logical result (Schw-

ertmann 1988). The experiments carried out to investigate the coer-

civity  of  the  remanence  spectra  reveal  an  interesting  evolution.

From the top to the bottom, first a wide high-coercivity spectra ap-

pears (humic horizon), followed by a low-coercivity peak for sam-

ples of illuvial horizon, and downward a two-peak spectra are estab-

lished, obviously reflecting both pedogenic and lithogenic fractions.

The viscosity coefficient Sv also points to a maximum SP/SD contri-

bution at the bottom of the illuvial horizon. The higher SIRM/X val-

ues, permanently found in the Pliocene clays, suggest that their en-

hanced susceptibility is of MD origin. The strong visual enrichment

with Mn-concretions in the carbonate horizon could also influence

the magnetic properties.

Conclusions

1. Two equally important factors could bring about the presence

of soil profiles, where magnetic susceptibilities are lower than that

of the parent material: a) coarse grained parent material with a high

content of minerals with high weathering resistivity and b) a water

logged phase, involved in soil development.

2. The humic horizons of all three profiles studied are characterized

by the presence of a pedogenic fraction with higher coercivities.

background image

237

References

Jenny H., 1941: Factors of soil formation. A system of quantitative pedol-

ogy. Foreword by R. Amundson, Dover Publ. Inc., New York (1994).

Jordanova D., Petrovsky E., Jordanova N., Evlogiev J. & Butchvarova V.,

1997: Rock magnetic properties of recent soils from northeastern Bul-

garia. Geophys. J. Int., 128, 474–488.

Maher B.A., 1986: Characterization of soils by mineral magnetic measure-

ments. Phys. Earth Plan. Inter., 42, 76–92.

Thompson  R.  &  Oldfield  F.,  1986:  Environmental  magnetism.  Allen  and

Unwin, Winchester, Mass.

Schwertmann U., 1988: Occurrence and formation of iron oxides in various

pedoenvironments.  In:  Stucki  J.,  Goodman  B.  &  Schwertmann  U.

(Eds.): Iron in Soils and Clay Minerals. NATO ASI Series, Series C:

Mathematical and Physical Sciences, vol. 217., Reidel Publ. Compa-

ny, 267–308.

MAGNETIC MAPPING OF ROAD-SIDE

POLLUTION AND CORRELATION

WITH HEAVY METALS

M. KNAB

1*

, V. HOFFMANN

1

, E. APPEL

1

,

N. JORDANOVA

2

 and R. BECK

3

1

Institut für Geologie und Palaontologie, Arbeitsbereich Geophysik,

Universitat Tübingen, Sigwartstr. 10, D-72076 Tübingen;

*mathis.knab@uni-tuebingen.de

(V.H. also at: Physics Department, University of Toronto/Erindale,

3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga L5L 1C6, Ontario/Canada)

2

Geophysical Institute, Acad. Sci. Czech Rep., Boèní II/1401,

14131 Prague 4, Czech Republic

3

Geographisches Institut, Universität Tübingen, Hölderlinstr. 12,

D-72074 Tübingen

Introduction

Only  few  investigations  are  known  which  focus  on  the  link  be-

tween magnetism and pollution due to traffic (Flanders 1994; Hoff-

mann et al. 1989; Hopke et al. 1980; Unger & Prinz 1992). Distin-

guishing  between  natural  magnetic  minerals  and  man  made

magnetic  phases  is  of  basic  importance  for  such  studies  (Dekkers

1997;  Flanders  1994).  We  report  magnetic  susceptibility  (

χ

)  map-

ping  along  highways  and  detailed  analyses  of  magnetic  phases  re-

sponsible  for  the  susceptibility  signal.  Correlations  between  the

magnetic signal and the content of certain heavy metals were calcu-

lated to detect possible links between them.

Results and interpretation

Our  results  of  susceptibility  mapping  along  roadsides  can  be

summarized as follows (Hoffmann et al. 1997):

— A Bartington susceptibility bridge MS2 and a D-Sensor were used.

— Generally,  an  exponential  decay  of  susceptibility  (

χ

)  with  in-

creasing distance from the highway and increasing depth from the

soil-surface on the roadsides was detected.

— The factors which influence the 

χ

 distribution are traffic density,

weather conditions, wind direction, topography on the roadsides and

the geological background.

— Depending on the traffic density 

χ

 is enhanced up to a distance of

about 25 m from the highway.

— Repeated  measurements  within  3  weeks  without  any  precipita-

tion (rain. snow, etc.) revealed a significant increase of the 

χ

 signal

on a selected profile.

— For isolated emission sources and a low background signal, 

χ

 map-

ping allows a quick and cheap mapping of potentially polluted areas.

A representative profile was sampled after 

χ

 mapping up to a depth

of 0.5 m. A series of mineralogical and magnetic parameters were de-

termined on these samples (hysteresis-data, IRM, ARM, 

χ

-T, M

s

-T).

With optical microscope at least 5 ferri(o)magnetic components were

recognized,  partly  revealing  spherical  shapes  and  showing  dentritic-

or skeleton-structures. The latter particles are thought to be quenched

from a melting state and may be abrasion products from car brakes. In

general, an a-magnetite like phase with a large grain size range was

found in all samples. An enrichment of this phase is found at shorter

distances from the highway (<1 m), also the grain sizes depend on the

distance from the tar surface (the shorter the distances the larger the

sizes are). Consequently, air transport seems to dominate the distribu-

tion  of  the  magnetic  particles  (Hoffmann  et  al.  1989;  Lygren  et  al.

1984; Unger & Prinz 1992). Besides magnetite, we have also detected

hematite  and  goethite-like  phases.  In  addition,  a  ferri(o)magnetic

phase  with  a  Curie-temperature  of  about  250–300 

o

C  was  found

which is unknown in natural systems. We expect that this phase is of