background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA, 49, 3, BRATISLAVA, JUNE 1998

169–179

LOW-TEMPERATURE METASEDIMENTS

FROM THE NÍZKE TATRY MTS. (WESTERN CARPATHIANS)

BOHUMIL MOLÁK

1

, SERGEI P. KORIKOVSKY

2

 and MARIÁN DUBÍK

1*

1

Geological Survey of Slovak Republic, Mlynská dolina. 1, 817 04 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

2

Institute of Geology of Metallic Mineral Deposits, Petrograhy, Mineralogy and Geochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences,

Staromonetny pereulok 35, 109017 Moscow, Russia

(Manuscript received June 5, 1997; accepted in revised form March 24, 1998)

Abstract: This paper describes the petrological and mineralogical features of the quartz-muscovite metasandstones

(QMM), a lithology found in the form of tectonic slices in an augen-gneissic environment N and W of Jasenie, Nízke

Tatry Mts., Western Carpathians. These rocks have an exemplary psammitic texture, and are composed of detritic

phases, represented by oval quartz grains, large muscovite flakes and sparse individual grains of albite and metamor-

phic phases consisting mainly of quartz and microcrystalline aggregate of muscovite-phengitic mica. Small amounts

of tiny, metamorphic, newly formed albite and needle-like tourmaline are accompanied by scattered scales of chlorite

and crystals of magnetite. Neither the QMM nor the associated siderite-ankerite metasandstones and phyllites (SAMP)

contain biotite indicating that their metamorphic degree did not reach the biotite subzone. The total content of alkalies

in the metamorphic muscovite-phengites is fairly high (>0.86 per formula unit), thus, they should be illite-free and

their estimated degree of metamorphism should correspond to the epizone. This estimate is also supported by the

incomplete compositional and grain size equalization between clastogenic and metamorphic white potash micas at

their  contacts.  In  contrast,  the  metamorphic  white  micas  are  considerably  enriched  in  the  phengite  molecule.

The X-ray and selected area electron diffraction (SAD) analyses made to visualize and to measure the crystallinity of

individual carbonaceous matter (CM) particles revealed that most  samples are composed of a mixture of anthracitic

and graphitic carbon. While the anthracite is an indicator of very low metamorphism, the graphite first forms under

greenschist facies conditions. A search for non-graphitizing carbons, such as shungite, skeleton crystals, or fullerenes,

which form under medium or high-grade metamorphism, has been unsuccessful. Thus, all the ill-ordered carbons in

the samples developed under low-grade metamorphism. This conclusion supports the authors’ earlier view that the

rocks under study are metasediments and not diaphthorites.

Key words: metasediments, low-grade metamorphism, mineralogy of mica, crystallinity of carbon, correlations.

Introduction

The objective of this paper is to describe mineralogical and

petrological  features  of  quartz-muscovite  metasandstones

(QMM)  that  occur  as  tectonic  slices  in  the  augen-gneissic

environment N and W of Jasenie village, Nízke Tatry Mts.,

(Tatric Superunit). It is a follow-up of our previous petrogra-

hic study (Korikovsky & Molák 1995) of the siderite-anker-

ite  metasandstones  and  phyllites  (SAMP),  with  which  the

QMM form a common metasedimentary suite and share tec-

tono-metamorphic development. Both rock types were dis-

covered  in  the  eighties,  during  the  course  of  geological

mapping carried out as part of an exploratory programme to

investigate local Au-W mineralization. As an update to the

methods and criteria to distinguish the sedimentary features

from  the  diaphthoritic  we  have  undertaken  a  study  of  two

important, albeit quantitatively differing constituents of the

QMM  —  white  micas  and  carbonaceous  matter  (CM),  the

former using a microprobe and the latter using transmission

electron  microscopy  (TEM),  selected  area  electron  diffrac-

tion (SAD), X-ray diffraction, differential thermic and ther-

mo-gravimetric (DTA and TGA) analyses.

Since the QMM are generally more susceptible to weather-

ing  than  their  augen-gneissic  host,  they  are  very  poorly  ex-

posed. This is why the best samples for this study were collect-

ed from the diamond drill cores and/or from the tunnels driven

during the above mentioned exploratory campaign. The loca-

tion of the QMM occurrences and samples is shown on Fig. 1.

Geological setting of the low-grade

metamorphic rocks

Klinec  (in  Pulec  et  al.  1983)  described  occurrences  of

low-grade metamorphosed rocks in the augen-gneissic envi-

ronment in the area N of Jasenie village (Fig.1). He and his

adherents  claimed  that  these  rocks,  emplaced  as  tectonic

slices, not only have an appearance but also a mineral com-

position similar to that of their host — augen-gneissic mylo-

nites, so, the two rocks can easily be confused. Other geolo-

gists,  represented  by  Miko  (in  Miko  &  Lukáèik  1983),

refused the presence of low-grade rocks and described them

simply as mylonites of local medium- to high-grade rocks.

To solve the dispute Vozárová (1983) made a detailed pet-

rological  study  of  the  problematic  rocks  and  found,  among

the  mylonites,  fine-grained  conglomerates,  gravelites,

greywackes  and  sericitic  phyllites  which  she  assigned  to  a

Late Paleozoic–Lower Triassic metasedimentary assemblage.

    *Present address: Faculty of Civil Engineering, Slovak Technical University, Radlinského 11, 813 68 Bratislava, Slovak Republic

background image

170                                                                           MOLÁK, KORIKOVSKY and DUBÍK

Dionýz Štúr Institute of Geology and in the laboratories of the

Geological Survey in Brno, or in Spišská Nová Ves. The in-

terlayer  distances  (d(002)-parameters)  in  CM  powder

preparates were measured on a Philips 1050 with a goniome-

ter  1050  operating  with  the  crystal  reflected  Ni-filtered,

CuK

α

-radiation,  installed  at  the  Geological  Institute  of  the

Slovak  Academy  of  Sciences  and  on  an  URD-6.  The  ZDS

program, version 5.17 was applied to process the data. A few

samples  were  analysed  using  the  STOE  powder  diffraction

system, stationed at the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slo-

vak Academy of Sciences in Bratislava. Because the contents

of CM in the QMM were usually too low to apply the X-ray

powder diffraction method (some 0.1 wt. %, or even less) we

used the JEOL JEM-200CX and JEM-100 transmission elec-

tron microscopes, the former installed at the Centre for Physi-

ological Research and the latter at the Institute of Materials

and Mechanics of Machines, Slovak Academy of Sciences in

Bratislava,  in  order  to  visualize  single  CM  particles  and  to

measure their d-parameters by means of selected area diffrac-

tion. The SAD pattern of a standard (gold) has been recorded

immediately after each exposure of CM particle to avoid any

degree of freedom (such as the effects of electricity fluctua-

tions, focal distance deviations, etc.) in the subsequent calcu-

lation.  In  a  few  cases  the  standard  was  mounted  onto  the

preparate to record both hkl bands simultaneously. The SAD

patterns  exposed  on  glass  slides  proved  to  be  most  suitable

for measuring the diffraction ring diameters on a micrometric

gauge with an accuracy of 1/100 mm. Construction of a re-

gression  line  computed  from  the  hkl  values  of  the  standard

was  followed  by  an  iteration  procedure  to  exactly  calculate

the interlayer distances d(002). The EDAX systems attached

to both TEMs were also used, firstly to assist indirectly in se-

lecting  carbon  particles  (carbon,  with  its  atomic  number  6

gives no response) and secondly to indicate and study inclu-

sions in the carbon particles.

Petrographic features and mineral composition

An  important  petrological  feature  preserved  in  several

QMM samples is their exemplary psammitic texture account-

ed for by the arrangement of clastogenic or detritic and meta-

Fig. 1. Schematic geological map of the central-western part of the

Nízke Tatry Mts. (after A. Biely, O. Miko, I. Lehotský, E. Lukáèik,

A. Klinec, B. Molák, J. Michálek et al. with sample locations). In-

set  shows  location  of  the  Nízke  Tatry  Mts.  and  the  area  under

study. Legend: 1 — Mesozoic nappes; 2 — Mesozoic cover; 3 —

nebulitic migmatite; 4 — granitoids; 5 — crystalline schists; 6 —

tectonic  lines;  7 —  QMM  sample  locations.  Crossed  hammers:

mines (abandoned) with the main metals mined.

Furthermore, Planderová (1983) identified sporomorphs indi-

cating Stephanian C to Early Permian age in the dark phyllitic

rocks of this assemblage, thus, the sedimentary and low-grade

metamorphic origin of these rocks seemed to be justified.

Further search for low-grade rocks resulted in a finding of

other metasedimentary looking rocks wedged in the tectonic

zones (Molák et al. 1986), in which Planderová (1986) iden-

tified Early Paleozoic microfossils.

The above findings did not help solve the dispute, because

the “tectonists” denied sedimentary structures, low-grade pro-

grade metamorphism of rock-forming minerals, as well as the

authenticity of sporomorphs in the problematic rocks.

Analytical methods

The Camscan microprobe analyzer installed at the Depart-

ment of Petrology, Moscow University, was used to assay the

chemical  composition  of  the  rock-forming  minerals.  The

whole rock chemical analyses were made in the laboratory of

Metamorphic

minerals

Detritic

minerals

SAMPLE Qtz Ser ChlAb Tour Ore Qtz Ms Ab
HE-3

+

+

±

±

-

±

+

+

-

MEL-13

+

+

-

-

-

+

+

+

-

G-4

+

+

+

-

-

±

+

+

-

G-5A

+

+

-

-

-

-

+

+

-

BU-6

+

+

+

-

-

±

+

+

-

HM-8

+

+

-

±

-

±

+

+

±

ŠTR-5

+

+

+

-

±

±

+

+

-

ŠIF-2

+

+

±

±

-

±

+

-

-

BU-2

+

+

-

-

±

±

+

±

-

                                                          Minerals: + major; ± minor; - absent

Table  1:  Mineral  content  of  the  quartz-mica  carbonate-free

metasandstones.

background image

LOW-TEMPERATURE METASEDIMENTS FROM THE NÍZKE TATRY MTS.                                          171

morphic  minerals  (Table  1).  The  detritic  phases  comprise

oval quartz grains, large muscovite flakes and rare individual

grains of albite. In contrast, quartz and sericite (metamorphic

microcrystalline  aggregate  of  muscovite-phengitic  mica)  are

predominant constituents of the metamorphic fraction. Small

amounts of tiny, metamorphic, newly-formed albite, chlorite

as scattered scales, dispersed crystals of magnetite and small

needles  of  newly-formed  tourmaline  were  also  encountered

in some samples.

The  absence  in  the  clastic  fraction  of  albite  and,  more-

over, of potash feldspar, indicate a monomict rather than a

polymict origin of these minerals and suggests a prolonged

sedimentary  process,  accompanied  by  considerable  mass

transport of clastic material.

Clastogenic  minerals

Most quartz grains are well rounded and measure 2–3 mm

across. Their rounding demonstrates that the origin of their

host rock is sedimentary. As a subject of tectono-metamor-

phic processes, quartz was fractured and the voids in it were

filled with sericite or with secondary, newly formed quartz.

The  blastomylonitization  brought  about  an  elongation,  or

dismembering of rounded quartz grains and caused second-

ary extinction under crossed polars.

Muscovite  forms  large  flakes,  locally  affected  by  plastic

deformation (Fig. 3), oriented either at random or perpendicu-

lar  to  the  rock  schistosity  (defined  by  the  arrangement  of

metamorphic  sericites,  see  Fig.  4).  As  a  result  of  metamor-

phic processes local desintegration of clastogenic muscovites

took  place  and  included  a  partial  substitution  by  sericite-

quartzite aggregate (Fig. 5). The following features character-

ize the composition of clastic muscovite (Tables 2 and 3): 1)

increased content of TiO

2

 (as much as 1.48 %), 2) high total

content  of  (Na+K)  (exceeding  0.9  per  formula  unit)  and  3)

moderate  admixture  of  Na  and  (Mg+Fe).  All  these  features

make  this  muscovite  akin  to  granitic  muscovites  (Speer

1984).  Elevated  CaO  contents  in  samples  Mel-13  and  Šif-2

are probably due to some contamination. We have no expla-

nation for the much higher than general content of Na

2

O in

the sample G-4.

Metamorphic  minerals

Fine-grained  sericite  makes  up  as  much  as  70  %  of  the

metamorphic fraction and is a major constituent of the ma-

trix.  Its  composition  is  characterized  by  a  relatively  high

content of (Na+K) in the interlayer positions (0.86–0.95 per

formula  unit)  and  by  variable  abundances  of  Mg  and  Fe.

Therefore, it can be classified as muscovite-phengite, a min-

Fig. 2. Clastogenic quartz in quartz–sericite mesostasis. Sample HE-1. 



nicols.

Fig. 3. Clastogenic muscovite in sample HE-3.  



nicols.

Fig. 4. Clastogenic muscovite in quartz–sericite mesostasis. Sample

HE-3.  



nicols.

Fig.  5.  Destruction  and  resorption  of  clastogenic  muscovite  in

quartz–sericite mesostasis. Sample HE-2.  



nicols.

background image

172                                                                           MOLÁK, KORIKOVSKY and DUBÍK

eral  typically  forming  under  epizonal  metamorphic  condi-

tions, or under conditions of the chlorite zone of the green-

schist facies. Low contents of TiO

2

 indicate that the crystal-

lization took place at low temperatures.

Albite  contains  less  than  1 %  of  the  anorthite  molecule

(Table 4) and forms minute, often euhedral, glassy grains set

in a sericitic aggregate matrix.

Chlorite is disseminated in the form of small scales, locally

intergrown with sericite. It belongs to the alumina-rich ames-

ite-daphnite variety (Table 4).

Of the opaque minerals, magnetite representing as much as

4–5 % of the rock, predominates.

Tourmaline occurs in some samples as small needle-shaped

prisms, indicative of its metamorphic origin.

Recrystallization  parameters

Since neither the QMM nor the SAMP contain biotite, the

metamorphism of this complex most likely did not reach the

biotite subzone. In addition, the content of total alkalies in the

metamorphic  muscovite-phengite  is  fairly  high  (10.86  per

formula unit, higher than in typical illites), so our estimated

degree  of  metamorphism  should  correspond  to  the  epizone

(>300 

o

C,  Hunziker  et  al.  1986).  This  estimate  can  also  be

supported  by  other  significant  criteria,  such  as  incomplete

compositional equalization (or retention of original composi-

tion) between clastogenic and metamorphic white potash mi-

cas at their immediate contacts (Figs. 6–7). Regardless of the

fact that this feature was not systematically used to infer an-

chimetamorphic  and  low-grade  conditions,  its  applicability

was justified in the previous studies of Tatric anchimetamor-

phosed  complexes  (Korikovsky  et  al.  1989,  1992;  Korik-

ovsky & Molák 1995; Plašienka et al. 1993) and also seems

to  be  justified  in  this  study.  Figures  6  and  7  exemplify  the

compositional  difference  between  clastogenic  and  metamor-

phic micas, typical for all samples. While the former retain a

composition of high-temperature micas, with high relic con-

tent of Ti and low content of (Mg+Fe) and Na, the latter have

a composition of a low temperature mica, with considerably

Sample

HE-3

MEL-13

G-4

G-5A

BU-6

HM-8

ŠTR-5

ŠIF-2

BU-2

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

SiO

2

TiO

2

Al

2

O

3

FeO

MnO

MgO

CaO

Na

2

O

K

2

O

48.68

0.28

32.95

1.76

-

1.17

0.03

0.07

10.55

48.34

0.25

33.17

1.67

-

0.96

0.13

0.26

10.54

48.40

0.21

31.90

2.51

0.02

1.48

-

0.31

10.08

47.45

0.13

37.69

0.13

-

0.04

0.02

1.51

8.73

48.63

0.25

35.91

0.59

-

0.51

-

1.22

8.56

48.62

0.05

34.56

0.74

0.11

0.98

0.02

0.14

10.30

48.41

0.17

34.47

0.80

0.03

0.88

0.05

0.13

10.35

49.34

0.32

29.30

3.23

-

2.58

0.01

-

10.82

49.18

0.39

28.25

4.50

-

2.62

-

-

10.78

48.87

0.16

29.39

5.22

-

1.88

0.04

0.04

9.97

49.63

0.46

29.56

3.04

-

2.35

0.01

0.13

10.27

50.08

0.35

28.63

3.36

0.05

2.32

0.10

0.20

10.48

49.69

0.55

25.13

6.12

-

3.36

0.19

0.08

10.58

49.61

0.50

24.98

5.90

0.02

3.30

0.06

0.13

10.68

49.17

0.47

30.22

2.82

0.07

1.63

0.13

0.05

10.54

49.17

0.43

30.39

2.97

-

1.64

0.15

0.04

10.87

Total95.49 95.29

94.89 95.70 95.67 95.52 95.29 95.60 95.72 95.57 95.45 95.57 95.70 95.18 95.10 95.66

Si

AlIV

AlVI

Ti

Fe

Mn

Mg

Ca

Na

K

3.22

0.78

1.79

0.01

0.10

-

0.12

-

0.10

0.89

3.21

0.79

1.81

0.01

0.09

-

0.10

0.01

0.09

0.90

3.23

0.77

1.74

0.01

0.14

-

0.15

-

0.04

0.86

3.09

0.91

1.98

0.01

0.01

-

-

-

0.19

0.73

3.16

0.84

1.92

0.01

0.03

-

0.05

-

0.15

0.71

3.20

0.80

1.88

-

0.04

0.01

0.10

-

0.02

0.86

3.19

0.81

1.87

0.01

0.04

-

0.09

-

0.02

0.87

3.30

0.70

1.61

0.02

0.18

-

0.26

-

-

0.92

3.31

0.69

1.55

0.02

0.25

-

0.26

-

-

0.92

3.29

0.71

1.62

0.01

0.29

-

0.19

-

-

0.86

3.31

0.69

1.63

0.02

0.17

-

0.23

-

0.02

0.87

3.35

0.65

1.61

0.02

0.19

-

0.23

0.01

0.03

0.89

3.38

0.62

1.39

0.03

0.35

-

0.34

0.01

0.01

0.92

3.39

0.61

1.40

0.03

0.34

-

0.34

-

0.02

0.93

3.29

0.71

1.67

0.02

0.16

-

0.16

0.01

0.01

0.90

3.28

0.72

1.67

0.02

0.17

-

0.16

0.01

-

0.93

Table 2: Representative microprobe analyses of the metamorphic, fine-grained sericites from quartz-mica metasandstones.

Table  3:  Representative  microprobe  analyses  of  the  detritic,

coarse-grained muscovites from quartz-mica metasandstones.

Sample

HE-3

Mel-13

G-5A

BU-6 HM-8 Štr-5 Bu-2

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

SiO

2

TiO

2

Al

2

O

3

FeO

MnO

MgO

CaO

Na

2

O

K

2

O

46.84

0.83

34.66

1.33

0.02

0.63

0.02

0.44

10.38

47.05

1.48

34.88

1.35

-

0.47

-

0.29

10.58

47.19

1.12

35.27

1.22

0.06

0.57

0.04

0.43

10.26

47.41

1.71

33.15

1.42

-

0.94

0.06

0.26

10.47

46.86

1.20

35.08

1.26

-

0.42

-

0.78

10.16

46.95

1.09

35.13

1.43

0.06

0.46

-

0.66

10.29

46.74

0.89

35.82

0.99

-

0.47

-

0.28

10.77

47.06

1.36

34.81

1.32

0.07

0.49

-

0.45

10.33

47.06

0.63

35.55

1.50

-

0.30

0.02

0.72

10.38

48.00

0.87

33.65

1.80

0.02

1.02

-

0.47

10.00

Total95.15 96.10 96.16 95.42 95.76 96.07 95.96

95.89 96.16 95.83

Si

AlIV

AlVI

Ti

Fe

Mn

Mg

Ca

Na

K

3.12

0.88

1.84

0.04

0.07

 -

0.06

-

0.06

0.88

3.10

0.90

1.81

0.07

0.07

-

0.05

-

0.04

0.89

3.10

0.90

1.83

0.06

0.07

-

0.06

-

0.06

0.86

3.15

0.85

1.75

0.09

0.08

-

0.09

-

0.03

0.89

3.10

0.90

1.83

0.06

0.07

-

0.04

-

0.10

0.86

3.10

0.90

1.83

0.05

0.08

-

0.04

-

0.08

0.87

3.08

0.92

1.86

0.04

0.05

-

0.05

-

0.04

0.91

3.11

0.89

1.82

0.07

0.07

    -

0.05

-

0.06

0.87

3.10

0.90

1.86

0.03

0.08

 -

0.03

-

0.09

0.87

3.17

0.83

1.79

0.04

0.10

 -

0.10

-

0.06

0.84

Table  4:  Microprobe  analyses  of  chlorite  and  albite  from  the

quartz-mica  metasandstone.

ChlAb

SAMPLE

G-4

BU-6

HM-8

1

2

3

SiO

2

26.36

68.32

68.38

TiO

2

0.06

       -

       -

Al

2

O

3

24.76

19.34

19.54

FeO

22.69

       -

       -

MnO

0.16

       -

       -

MgO

13.09

       -

       -

CaO

    -

0.07

0.05

Na

2

O

    -

12.11

11.80

K

2

O

0.29

0.04

0.07

Total87.40

99.88

99.84

X

Fe

,%

49.3

An

0.3

0.2

Ab

99.5

99.4

Or

0.2

0.4

background image

LOW-TEMPERATURE METASEDIMENTS FROM THE NÍZKE TATRY MTS.                                          173

lower abundance of Ti, lower total content of alkalies, higher

contents  of  (Mg+Fe)  and  occassionally  of  Na.  Inasmuch  as

the  metamorphism  under  conditions  of  the  upper  part  of

greenschist facies would ultimately result in a compositional

and grain size equalization, only the very low, or low, in this

case  epizonal  conditions  could  allow  for  a  coexistence  of

both,  equilibrated  (metamorphic)  and  not  recrystallized  and

consequently nonequilibrated (clastogenic) micas of the same

group.  In  other  words,  had  the  metamorphic  temperatures

been higher than medium-grade greenschist facies, the com-

position  of  both  mica  types  would  become  wholy  or  nearly

identical (Frey 1987; Hunziker et al. 1986). A similar conclu-

sion can be drawn to the associating SAMP. In contrast, the

metamorphic white micas in the QMM are considerably en-

riched  in  the  phengite  molecule.  The  metamorphic  phengite

in sample Šif-2 (Table 2) contains 6.12 wt. % FeO, 3.36 wt.

% MgO and 3.38 to 3.39 per formula unit Si

4+

.

Study of carbon

The crystallographic features of carbonaceous matter (CM)

from different metamorphic rocks of the Nízke Tatry Mts., in-

cluding  QMM,  have  been  described  in  our  earlier  papers

(Molák  et  al.  1986,  1989).  Since  then,  however,  our  X-ray

powder  diffraction  facility  has  been  upgraded  to  handle

smaller  samples  and  to  evaluate  data  using  up-to-date  soft-

ware. Therefore, we undertook a further study to test the pre-

vious results and eventually, to strengthen their validity. We

also applied the TEM and SAD (Figs. 8–13) to visualize indi-

vidual CM particles and to measure their interlayer spacings.

Although, for most QMM samples we have both, the mi-

croprobe and the CM study results, for some no latter data is

available because the amounts of CM in them are too small

for analysis. Therefore, we present a few results from other

QMM samples and add data and diagrams for the reference

graphites from the medium- to high-grade rocks that crop out

in this area, and also for an anthracite from a low-grade black

shale  from  Smolník  (Gemeric  Superunit)  and  for  a  graphite

from  the  high-grade  graphitic  gneiss  from  Èeský  Krumlov

(Bohemian  Massif).  Their  list  is  attached  to  the  caption  to

Figs. 14, 15 and 16.

TEM and SAD

As shown in Table 5, the crystallinity of carbon in QMM

samples  (HE-1,  HE-2,  G-5,  MEL-13,  MEL-21  and  BU-1)

ranges between semianthracite and graphite.

The  elliptical  diffractograms  obtained  from  some  A  and

MA samples were previously thought to indicate lattice de-

formations. However, more recent research into the problem

has shown that they can more reasonably be explained as di-

agonal  transmissions  of  electron  beams  through  tubular  or

curly features, which typically occur in the particles of sub-

graphitic carbon (Figs.10 and 12). In such cases, the d-param-

eters  can  be  calculated,  although  with  somewhat  reduced

accuracy, from the longer diameters of the elliptical rings.

Because the carbons in the samples under study are either

anthracite–graphite mixtures, or homogeneous graphite, their

host rock must have been subject to either an anchimetamor-

phic–greenschist facies metamorphism in the former, or to an

amphibolite facies in the latter case. Thus, the anthracite can

either  be  resedimented  carbonaceous  detritus  from  the  very

low metamorphosed rocks or, more likely, it is an authentic

organic  material.  In  any  case,  had  the  superimposed  meta-

morphism exceeded the epizonal conditions, it would achieve

a much higher degree of crystallinity. Although, the graphites

first  form  under  epizonal  conditions,  their  abundance  and

crystalline perfection grows from the biotite zone through the

amphibolite  to  granulite  facies  metamorphism,  which  was,

obviously, not achieved in our samples. Therefore, much of

this graphite must have been introduced in the QMM through

resedimentation  processes  from  the  desintegrated  higher

grade  rocks.  This  conclusion  supports  our  concept  of

metasedimentary development of the rocks under study.

X-ray, STOE, DT and TG analyses

To further check our earlier reported X-ray and DTA results

(Molák et al. 1986, 1989; Molák 1990), some additional sam-

ples were X-rayed and DT/TG analysed. As shown, the new

results either comply with, or only slightly deviate (Figs. 14,

15 and 16) from the former ones. Thus, the conclusion that

the host rocks have a sedimentary origin, and that they were

metamorphosed at low-grade, seems justified.

As  can  be  observed  on  Figs. 14, 15  and  16,  the  samples

cluster in, or occupy two fields, a low-metamorphic one and a

medium- to high-metamorphic one. The carbonaceous matter

from QMM samples falls, together with the reference sample

from Smolník (Gemeric Superunit), into the former, while the

reference  graphites  from  the  Tatric  Superunit  and  from  the

Bohemian Massif fall into the latter field. An interesting fea-

ture, common for the carbons from QMM and from the Ge-

Table 5: Crystallinity of carbon and graphite in QMM samples.

 SAMPLE    d(002) (Å)

         TYPE

—————————————————————————

 HE-1

   3.3676

            G

   d

1

= 3.3287, d

2

= 3.3846             MA

—————————————————————————

 HE-2

   3.3699

            G

   d

1

= 3.3946, d

2

= 3.4038             MA

   3.3830

            MA

   3.4043(*)

            A

—————————————————————————

 G-5

   3.3635

            G

   3.3658

            G

   d

1

= 3.3542, d

2

= 3.4226             A

—————————————————————————

 MEL-13

   3.3717

—————————————————————————

 MEL-21

   3.3713

            SG

   3.3903

            MA

   3.4499

            SA

—————————————————————————

 BU-1

   3.3890

            MA

—————————————————————————

Explanation: SA — semianthracite, A — anthracite, MA —

metaanthracite, SG — semigraphite, G — graphite; d

1

,d

2

 — short

and long diameters in elliptic hkl rings, * — measured with inter-

nal standard.

background image

174                                                                           MOLÁK, KORIKOVSKY and DUBÍK

Fig. 6.  Compositional difference between clastogenic (o) and metamorphic (

) micas: Ti vs. Na/(Na+K).

Fig. 7.  Compositional difference between clastogenic and metamorphic micas: K+Na vs. Mg+Fe.

meric  Superunit  is  shown  on  the  STOE  diffractograms

(Fig.17).  The  dilated  002  peaks  are  in  all  these  cases  com-

posed of four maxima indicating mixtures of four, crystallo-

graphically  nearly  identical  varieties  of  carbon.  In  addition,

our  earlier  carbon  isotope  study  (Molák  &  Buchardt  1996)

has shown that these carbons have a similar enrichment in the

heavy isotope. Although this structural and isotopic likeness

of carbons in the QMM and in the Gemeric black shale sug-

gests a similar origin and metamorphic history, this sugges-

tion cannot be accepted without reservations until more infor-

mation is available to reasonably explain these features.

A review of imperfectly crystalline carbon from

medium- to high-grade environments

In medium and high metamorphic environments, sparse va-

rieties of imperfectly crystalline, hard or non-graphitizing car-

bon  occur,  such  as  shungite  (Khavari-Khorasani  &  Murchi-

son  1979),  graphite  skeleton  crystals  (Weis  1980)  and

fullerenes (Buseck et al. 1992), which are likely to preserve

their low crystallinity even after being exposed to subsequent

low metamorphism. Therefore, we made a survey of whether

such  substances  occur  in  our  samples,  which  would  cast

some doubts on our concept of QMM’s low metamorphism.

Soft  carbons,  such  as  anthracites  and  anthraxolites,  start

to  graphitize  under  biotite  zone  conditions.  In  contrast,

shungite  described  from  a  Precambrian  sedimentary  se-

quence at Shunga, Karelia, (Inostrancev 1886), was subject-

ed to a high degree of organic metamorphism due to the in-

jection  of  diabase  melt  into  the  sedimentary-organic

horizon,  a  principal  agent  responsible  for  the  considerable

degree  of  molecular-structural  ordering.  During  the  course

of thermal metamorphism, the original OM formed a resist-

ent and strongly cross-linked structure due to low H content

and high O content, or both, which prevented graphitization.

background image

LOW-TEMPERATURE METASEDIMENTS FROM THE NÍZKE TATRY MTS.                                          175

Fig. 8.  A graphite particle in sample G-3 (TEM), 7500

×

.

Fig. 9.  SAD pattern of graphite particle, sample G-3.

Fig. 10. A meta-anthracitic particle, sample BU-1 (TEM), 6000

×

.

Fig. 11. SAD pattern of meta-anthracitic particle, sample BU-1.

On heating up to 2900 

o

C, the structure of shungite remained

an ill-ordered, granular and fine mosaic, with a high content

of mineral matter, typical of a substance with inferior coking

properties (Khavari-Khorasani & Murchison 1979).

The fullerenes (C

60

 and C

70

), known to occur in interstellar

space  and  as  an  artificial  form,  have  been  found  quite  re-

cently within the fracture filling films in shungite (Buseck

et al. 1992).

The skeleton graphite crystals were found to be associat-

ed with the ordinary flaky graphite in Precambrian graphitic

marbles  from  New  York  and  Montana  (Weis  1980).  As  a

product of granulite facies metamorphism, this marble con-

background image

176                                                                           MOLÁK, KORIKOVSKY and DUBÍK

Fig. 12. A meta-anthracite particle, sample BU-6 (TEM), 20,000

×

.

Fig. 13. SAD pattern of meta-anthracite particle, sample BU-6.

tains less than 5 % of skeleton crystals of the total graphite

with a lower degree of crystallinity.

A  crosscheck  of  our  results  with  the  above  data  shows

that none of the above mentioned non-graphitizing carbons

occurred in our samples. Firstly, neither of the attributes in-

dicative of shungite (granular or mosaic structure, substan-

tial  amounts  of  mineral  matter)  were  observed.  Although,

Francù (in Molák et al. 1986) reported some massive vitri-

nitic carbon particles with R

max 

= 4.5 and R

min 

= 3.4 %, as-

sociated  with  the  photometrically  non-measurable  microc-

rystalline  graphite  particles,  these  cannot  be  attributed  to

shungite  variety,  because  the  mineral  inclusions  are  too

scarce and much smaller than in shungite. Secondly, the ab-

sence  of  shungite  automatically  eliminates  the  presence  of

fullerenes in our samples, and thirdly, the skeleton crystals

cannot be expected to occur in our samples because marbles

are not present in the area of the QMM outcrop, and neither

is  a  marbled  rocks  admixture,  like  that  in  the  associated

SAMP.

The above observations allow us to draw the conclusion

that the non-graphitized CM in the samples under study has

been  subjected  to  low-grade  metamorphism  and  never  had

anything to do with medium- or high-grade metamorphism,

as postulated by some petrologists.

Age of QMM

Another question to answer is the age of the QMM. The pa-

lynomorphs found by Planderová (1986) in this suite indicate

an Early Paleozoic age, but their authenticity cannot be taken

for granted because Rapant et al. (1986) found a mixture of

palynomorphs originating from various lithologies and strati-

graphic  horizons  in  the  spring  waters  in  surrounding  areas.

This suggests that the palynomorphs can be washed out from

the rocks by circulating waters and subsequently dissipated in

tectonically affected rocks, such as the QMM. However, the

relatively  small  stratigraphic  range  of  microfossils  in  the

QMM somewhat contradicts this postulate.

Although,  the  degree  of  metamorphism  inferred  for  this

suite would probably be too low to destroy microfossils in the

QMM, it cannot be used as a proof of their autochthonity.

Recent  zircon  dating  of  volcanic  rocks  from  the  Jánov

Grúò Formation, considered on the basis of geological data as

a  Lower  Paleozoic  suite,  and  as  a  possible  analogue  of  the

QMM,  gave  Late  Paleozoic  age  (Kotov  et  al.  1996).  White

micas and zircon in the QMM should also be submitted to ra-

diometrical dating in order to shed more light upon their age.

Conclusion

Emplaced in the augen-gneissic environment N and W of

Jasenie,  Nízke  Tatry  Mts.,  the  quartz-muscovite  metasand-

stones  are  composed  of  detritic  and  metamorphic  phases

and have an exemplary psammitic texture. While the former

phases comprise oval quartz grains, large muscovite flakes

and  sparse  individual  grains  of  albite,  the  latter  consist

mainly of quartz and microcrystalline aggregate of musco-

vite-phengitic mica. Rounding of clastogenic quartz clearly

demonstrates  that  its  host  rock  has  a  sedimentary  origin.

Due to blastomylonitization the quartz grains are elongated

or dismembered. Clastogenic muscovite forms large flakes,

locally  affected  by  plastic  deformation,  oriented  either  at

background image

LOW-TEMPERATURE METASEDIMENTS FROM THE NÍZKE TATRY MTS.                                          177

Fig. 14. Relation of d(002) vs. FWHM of CM.

Fig. 15. Relation of d(002) vs. DTA Tmax of CM.

Fig. 16. Relation of d(002) vs. TGA Tmax of CM. Carbons and graphites in Figs. 14, 15 and 16: QMM samples: G-4, G-8, G-9, HE-1,

HE-2, HM-1 and HM-5; reference samples: G-1, G-3, MAT-1, VNT-11, 12 and 15 series, and NT are graphites from bimicaceous parag-

neisses, commonly turned into phyllonites and from migmatites, from the area N and W of Jasenie, (see Fig. 1). Sample S-1 is an anthra-

cite from black shale, Smolník mine (Fe-Cu), Gemeric Superunit and ÈK-MV is a graphite from the graphite deposit Mìstský Vrch near

Èeský Krumlov, Bohemian Massif.

SAMPLE

DTA

d 002

G-1

790

3.356

G-3

725

3.360

G-4

595

3.410

G-8

625

3.400

G-9

635

3.400

HE-1

645

3.410

HE-2

660

3.400

HM-1

605

3.400

HM-5

585

3.400

S-1

550

3.440

ÈK-MV

885

3.356

Relation d 002 vs Tmax (DTA)

3.350

3.370

3.390

3.410

3.430

3.450

400

500

600

700

800

900

tmax

d 002

SAMPLE

TGA

d 002

G-1

706

3.356

G-3

627

3.360

MAT-1

819

3.359

MEL-21

669

3.390

NT-1

895

3.350

NT-6/2

850

3.360

VNT-11 (51,5m)

773

3.357

VNT-12 (38,5 m)

726

3.354

VNT-15 (114 m)

769

3.358

ÈK-MV

849

3.356

relation d 002 vs Tmax TGA

3.340

3.350

3.360

3.370

3.380

3.390

3.400

500

700

900

Tmax

d 002

random or perpendicular to the rock schistosity. As a result

of metamorphism the muscovite is locally desintegrated or

partially substituted by sericite-quartzite aggregate. Its com-

position differs from that of the metamorphic muscovite by

having  increased  contents  of  TiO

2

,  total  (Na+K)  and  by  a

moderate admixture of (Mg+Fe) which make it akin to gra-

nitic muscovite. Small amounts of tiny, metamorphic, newly

formed  albite  and  chlorite  in  the  form  of  scattered  scales,

dispersed crystals of magnetite and small needles of newly

formed tourmaline, also occur.

SAMPLE

 d 002

FWHM

G-1

3.355

0.22

G-3

3.353

0.3

MAT-1

3.359

0.33

VNT-12 (38.5 m)

3.351

0.24

VNT-15 (114 m)

3.358

0.27

MEL-21

3.396

0.53

Interlayer  spacing  vs FWHM

0

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

3.34

3.36

3.38

3.4

d 002

FWHM

background image

178                                                                           MOLÁK, KORIKOVSKY and DUBÍK

Fine-grained, metamorphic muscovite is a major constitu-

ent of the matrix. It has a relatively high content of (Na+K) in

the  interlayer  positions  and  variable  abundances  of  Mg  and

Fe, so, it can be classified as a muscovite-phengite. Low con-

tents of TiO

2

 indicate low crystallization temperatures.

Neither  the  QMM  nor  the  associated  SAMP  contain  bi-

otite, indicating that their metamorphism most likely did not

reach the biotite subzone. The total content of alkalies in the

metamorphic muscovite-phengites is fairly high (>0.86 per

formula unit), thus, they ought to be illite-free and their esti-

mated  degree  of  metamorphism  should  correspond  to  epi-

zone. This estimate is compatible with the incomplete com-

positional  and  grain  size  equalization  between  the

clastogenic  and  metamorphic  white  potash  micas  at  their

contacts.  In  contrast,  the  metamorphic  white  micas  are

considerably enriched with phengite molecules.

To  test  our  earlier  carbon  crystallinity  results,  we  made

additional X-ray analyses and also applied the SAD to visu-

alize and to measure the crystallinity of individual CM par-

ticles. This study revealed that the samples are composed of

a  mixture  of  anthracitic  and  graphitic  carbons,  the  former

being  a  result  of  anchimetamorphic  or  greenschist  facies

metamorphism, and the latter formed during the amphibolite

facies metamorphism. The anthracite is either a resediment-

ed carbonaceous detritus from rocks with a very low level of

metamorphism or, more likely, it is an authentic organic ma-

terial.  In  contrast,  well  crystallized  graphite,  which  first

forms under biotite zone conditions and which grows both,

in  abundancy  and  crystalline  perfection  with  increasing

metamorphic  grade,  must  have  been  introduced  in  the

QMM from the higher grade rocks via resedimentation pro-

cesses.  This  conclusion  supports  our  earlier  view  that  the

rocks under study are low-grade metasediments and not di-

aphthorites of medium- to high-grade rocks.

A survey has been made to find out whether the samples

under  study  contain  a  variety  of  non-graphitizing  carbon,

which  would  undermine  our  concept  of  low  metamorphism

of the QMM. However, neither shungite, nor skeleton crys-

tals, nor fullerenes were identified in the CM indicating that

the ill-ordered carbons developed under the low-grade meta-

morphism, and were not subjected to medium- or high-grade

metamorphism. Therefore, the QMM, together with the asso-

ciating SAMP, can be assigned to a single metasedimentary

suite.

The  age  of  QMM  remains  a  matter  of  dispute.  Although,

the  degree  of  their  metamorphism  would  be  too  low  to  de-

stroy  Early  Paleozoic  microfossils,  the  authenticity  of  these

microfossils is still uncertain, because they could easily have

been  washed  out  from  an  unknown  lithology  by  circulating

waters and dissipated later in tectonically affected rocks, such

as the QMM. The only suspect is a relatively narrow strati-

graphic  range  of  microfossils  compared  to  that  reported  by

Rapant et al. (1986). Surprisingly, the recent zircon dating of

volcanic  rocks  from  a  possible  analogue  of  QMM  —  the

Jánov Grúò Formation — gave a Late Paleozoic, and not an

Early Paleozoic age, as indicated by the geological data. The

white-mica and zircon present in the QMM should be dated

to help shed more light upon their age.

Acknowledgement: This paper was supported by the Rus-

sian Foundation of Fundamental Investigations.

References

Buseck P.R., Tsipursky S.J. & Hettich R., 1992: Fullerenes from the

geological environment. Science, 257, 215–217.

Frey M., 1987: Very low-grade metamorphism of clastic sedimenta-

ry  rocks.  In:  Frey  M.  (Ed.):  Low  temperature  metamorphism.

Blackie & Son Ltd., Glasgow, 9–58.

Hunziker J.C., Frey M., Clauer N., Dallmeyer R.D., Friedrichsen H.,

Flehming W., Hockstrasser K., Roggwiller P. & Schwander H.,

1986:  The  evolution  of  illite  to  muscovite:  mineralogical  and

isotope data from the Glarus Alps, Switzerland. Contr. Mineral.

Petrology, 92, 157–180.

Fig. 17. STOE diffractograms for samples MEL-21, HE-1 and G-4 (QMM) and for S-1 (Smolník, Gemeric Superunit). z — zircon, r — rutile.

background image

LOW-TEMPERATURE METASEDIMENTS FROM THE NÍZKE TATRY MTS.                                          179

Inostrancev A., 1886: Über “Schungit”, ein äuserstes Glied in der Reihe

der amorphen Kohlenstoffe. Neues Jahrb. Mineral., 1, 92–93.

Khavari-Khorasani  G.  &  Murchison  D.G.,  1979:  The  nature  of

Karelian shungite. Chem. Geol., 26, 165–182.

Korikovsky  S.P.,  Jacko  S.  &  Boronichin  V.A.,  1989:  Alpine  an-

chimetamorphism of the Upper Carboniferous sandstones from

the  sedimentary  mantle  of  the  Èierna  Hora  Mts.  crystalline

complex  (Western  Carpathians).  Geol.  Zbor.  Geol.  Carpath.,

40, 6, 579–598.

Korikovsky S.P., Putiš M. & Boronichin V.A., 1992: Anchimetamor-

phism  of  Permian  sandstones  of  the  Struženík  Group  in  the

Nízke Tatry Mts. (Western Carpathians). Geol. Zbor. Geol. Car-

path., 43, 1, 97–104.

Korikovsky  S.P.  &  Molák  B.,  1995:  Siderite–ankerite–muscovite

metasediments in the Nízke Tatry Mts.: their geological posi-

tion, phase equilibria and protolith. Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath.,

46, 4, 217–226.

Kotov  A.B.,  Miko  O.,  Putiš  M.,  Korikovsky  S.P.,  Salnikova  E.B.,

Kovach V.P., Yakovleva S.Z., Bereznaya N.G., Krá¾ J. & Krist

E. 1996: U/Pb dating of zircons of postorogenic acid metavol-

canics  and  metasubvolcanics:  a  record  of  Permian-Triassic

taphrogeny of the West-Carparthian basement. Geol. Carpathi-

ca, 47, 2, 73–79.

Miko  O.  &  Lukáèik  E.,  1983:  Petrographical  study  of  crystalline

rocks from the area NE of Kyslá near Jasenie (in Slovak). In:

The scheelite – gold-bearing mineralization in the Nízke Tatry

Mts. Conferences, Symposia and Seminars, D. Štúr Institute of

Geology, Monograph, 39–47.

Molák B., 1990: Sources of metals and timing of W-Au mineraliza-

tion on the southern slopes of the Nízke Tatry Mts. Ph.D. the-

sis, Comenius University, Bratislava, 1–192.

Molák B., Miko O., Planderová E. & Francù J., 1986: Early Paleozo-

ic metasediments on the southern slopes of the Nízke Tatry Mts

near village Jasenie. Geol. Práce, Spr., 84, 39–64.

Molák B., Buchardt B., Vozárová A., Ivan J., Uhrík B. & Toman B.,

1989: Carbonaceous matter in some metamorphic rocks of the

Low Tatra Mts. (West Carpathians). Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath.,

40, 2, 201–230.

Molák B. & Buchardt B., 1996: Stable isotope composition of car-

bon in selected carbonaceous units of Slovakia with reference

to Úrkút (Hungary) and Copperbelt (Zambia) examples. Slovak

Geol. Mag., 1, 27–43.

Planderová  E.,  1983:  Biostratigraphy  of  the  low-grade  metamor-

phosed  sediments  in  the  area  of  Jasenie  village.  In:  The

scheelite – gold-bearing mineralization in the Nízke Tatry Mts.

Conferences, Symposia and Seminars, D. Štúr Institute of Geol-

ogy, Monograph, 55–56 (in Slovak).

Planderová  E.,  1986:  New  knowledge  on  age  of  metasediments  in

the Ïumbier crystalline (Jasenie area, Central Slovakia), Low

Tatra Mts. Miner. slovaca, 18, 3, 237–251.

Plašienka D., Korikovsky S.P. & Hacura A., 1993: Anchizonal Al-

pine metamorphism of Tatric cover sediments in the Malé Kar-

paty Mts. (Western Carpathians). Geol. Zbor. Geol. Carpath.,

44, 6, 365–371.

Pulec M., Klinec A. & Bezák V., 1983: The scheelite – gold-bearing

mineralization in the Nízke Tatry Mts..  Conferences,  Symposia

and  Seminars,  D.  Štúr  Institute  of  Geology  Monograph,  11–37

(in Slovak).

Rapant S., Planderová E. & Bodiš D., 1986: Application of palynol-

ogy in geochemistry. Miner. slovaca, 18, 1, 79–88.

Speer J.A., 1984: Micas in igneous rocks. In: Bailey S.W. (Ed.): Re-

views in Mineralogy, Micas, 13, 299–356.

Vozárová A., 1983: Petrographic study of metasediments from the area

of Kyslá near Jasenie. In: The scheelite – gold-bearing mineraliza-

tion in the Nízke Tatry Mts. Coferences, Symposia and Seminars,

D. Štúr Institute of Geology Monograph, 49–53 (in Slovak).

Weis P.L., 1980: Graphite skeleton crystals — A newly recognized

morphology  of  crystalline  carbon  in  metasedimentary  rocks.

Geology, 8, 296–297.