background image

GEOLOGICA CARPATHICA,  49, 1, BRATISLAVA,  FEBRUARY 1998

51–55

ANALYSIS OF SELF- AND HETERODIFFUSION

IN FERROMAGNETIC AND PARAMAGNETIC 

α

αα

αα

-IRON

FILIPPOS VALLIANATOS

Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Branch of Chania, Chania, Greece*

(Manuscript received March 18, 1997; accepted in revised form December 11, 1997)

Abstract: Self- and heterodiffusion data in 

α

-Fe, in ferromagnetic and paramagnetic state are analysed taking into

account the anharmonic properties of the bulk material. The values obtained for the activation enthalpy, entropy and

Gibbs energy are in agreement with the experimental values, given by Ceise & Herzing (1987) and Cermak et al.

(1989). Using the elastic data of 

α

-Fe, we calculate the 

λ 

parameter which in its definition contains the exchange

integral for an atom at the saddle point and the equilibrium position. Furthermore, the influence of spin ordering in the

activation Gibbs energy, in the Curie temperature zone, is investigated.

Key words: diffusion, paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, iron.

Introduction

Recently, several experimental studies have shown that dur-

ing  the  transition  from  the  ferromagnetic  to  paramagnetic

state,  the  physical  quantities  of  a  magnetic  mineral  change

not suddenly at a given temperature but gradually over a tem-

perature interval called Curie zone (see Cermak et al. 1989).

Self-diffusion experiments shows a strong anomaly in the

Arrhenius plot. This anomaly is the so-called “magnetic dif-

fusion anomaly” (Philibert 1991). Due to the lack of experi-

mental diffusion data in magnetic minerals, we focus our in-

terest in the preliminary study of self and heterodiffusion in

the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state of 

α

-Fe.

The  observed  anomaly  may  be  characterized  by  the  fol-

lowing features:

(a) The diffusivities in the magnetically ordered state are

considerably lower than  would be expected from extrapo-

lating the Arrhenius plot measured in the paramagnetic re-

gion (Kucera et al. 1984).

(b) The  observable  deviation  from  the  linear  Arrhenius

plot starts at a paramagnetic temperature Tp which is higher

than the Curie temperature Tc.

(c) The activation enthalpy  h

f

act

 

  of ferromagnetic state is

higher  than  the  corresponding  h

p

act

 

of  the  paramagnetic

state. The variation of the actual activation enthalpy  h

act

(T)

from h

f

act 

to h

p

act 

is a continuous function of the temperature

T. The physical basis hidden behind the latter experimental

result indicates that the easiest migration occurs in the para-

magnetic  state  and  is  more  difficult  in  the  ferromagnetic

state.  An  explanation  for  the  aforementioned  experimental

fact is based on the effect of the ferromagnetic spin ordering

that  reduces  the  mobility  below  the  Curie  temperature  T

c

.

According to this model a ferromagnetic short range order

already exists in paramagnetic 

α

-iron at a temperature con-

siderably above T

c

. Therefore a smooth decrease of the dif-

fusion coefficient is expected when approaching T

c

 from the

high temperature range  (Ruch et al. 1976).

(d) The elastic constants of many magnetic materials dis-

play anomalies near the magnetic ordering temperature Tc,

suggesting that this anomalous behavior is closely connect-

ed to magnetic ordering (Satija et al. 1985).

The    aim  of  the  present  work  is  to  study,  using  the  so-

called cB

 model (Varotsos & Alexopoulos 1986) the influ-

ence  of  anharmonic  properties  of  bulk  materials  (i.e.  the

temperature  variation  of  the  isothermal  bulk  modulus  and

the lattice parameter) to the temperature dependence of self-

and heterodiffusion curves of 

α

-iron in the transition from

the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic state.

Theoretical remarks

As  has  been  shown  by  Borg  &  Dienes  (1988)  the  diffu-

sion coefficient can be written as

D = fa

2

ν

exp ( –g

act 

/ kT )                                                (1)

a is the lattice parameter, 

ν 

the attempt frequency, f the cor-

relation factor, k the Boltzmann’s constant and g

act

 the acti-

vation Gibbs energy for diffusion. In the case of heterodiffu-

sion the frequency 

ν

 of the diffusing atom is determined by

comparison  to  the  frequency 

ν

m

 

  of  an  atom  of  the  matrix

material after considering the influence of their masses. To a

rough approximation one can set  

ν 

=

 ν

(m

m

/m

i

)

1/2

; m

m , 

m

i

the masses of matrix and diffusing atoms respectively. The

activation  enthalpy  h

act

  and  the  activation  entropy  s

act

  are

defined by the usual thermodynamic relation:

g

act

 = h

act

 – T s

act                                                                                      

(2)

Combining (1) and (2) it follows  D = Do exp(–h

act

 / k

 

T)  where

Do = f a

n exp(s

act

 / k

 

) the proexponential factor.

A  significant  temperature  variation  is  expected  for  the

thermodynamic parameters near the Curie temperature, due

*  Mailing  address:  111  Homirov  St.,  Moschato  18  345,  Athens,  Greece,

    E-mail: fvallian@ee.teiath.gr

background image

52                                                                                         VALLIANATOS

to the influence of spin ordering. In a first approximation we

may write:

g

act 

= g

p

act

 +

 δ

g

act

h

act 

= h

p

act

  +

 δ

h

act

                                                            (3)

s

act 

 = s

p

act

  +

 δ

s

act

where  the  subscript  “p”  denotes  the  paramagnetic  contribu-

tion and 

δ

g

act

δ

h

act

δ

s

act

 are the excess activation Gibbs ener-

gy, enthalpy and entropy respectively. Substituted equations

(3), in (1) and (2) an equation is derived which describes the

diffusion coefficient D in the ferromagnetic state:

D = f a

2

ν 

exp(s

p

act

/ k

 

) exp(–h

p

act

 / kT) exp(–

δ

g

act 

/ kT )  =

= D

op

 exp(–h

p

act

 / k

 

T) exp(–

δ

g

act 

/ kT )                            (4)

where D

op

 is the proexponential factor in the paramagnetic

state.

Equation (4) has been developed in a model proposed by

Ruch et al. (1976) and based on the assumption that the fer-

romagnetic ordering is a similar process to atomic ordering

in order-disorder alloys. Using the theory of order-disorder

alloys Kucera et al. (1984) proposed that the excess activa-

tion Gibbs energy can be expressed in the form:

δ

g

act

 = h

p

act 

λ

 R

2                                                                                      

(5)

where 

λ

  is  a  temperature  independent  parameter  related  to

the  exchange  integral  at  the  equilibrium  point  and  at  the

saddle point; R(T) is a long range magnetic order parameter.

Equations (4) and (5) suggest that the diffusion coefficient

D in the ferromagnetic state can be expressed as a function

of the activation enthalpy  for diffusion in the paramagnetic

state  (Geise & Herzing 1987):

D = D

op 

exp                                                                   (6)

For  low  temperatures    R(T) 

→€

1  and  hence  the  quantity

h

= h

p

act 

(1  + 

λ

)  is  by  definition  the  activation  enthalpy  h

f

for diffusion in the fully ordered  (ferromagnetic) state (Cer-

mak et al. 1989).

On the other hand Varotsos & Alexopoulos (1986) have

proposed  the  so-called  cB

  model  in  order  to  study  the

curved Arrhenious diffusion plots. They suggested that the

Gibbs energy g

act  

is given by the expression:

g

act 

= c

act

 B

                                                                  (7)

where c

act 

is a dimensionless constant, independent of tem-

perature and pressure; B is the isothermal bulk modulus and

 the mean atomic volume.

The  main  physical  idea  hidden  behind  equation  (7)  is  that

there exist two families of parameters associated with the  for-

mation and migration of defects in solids. These two families

of  formation  parameters  result  when  comparing  a  real    (i.e.

containing defects) solid with either an isobaric  perfect crystal

(i.e.  without  defects)  or  an  isochoric  one  (Varotsos  &  Alex-

opoulos 1986). The difference between the corresponding pa-

rameters    comes  mainly  from  the  anharmonicity  of  the  solid

(Valianatos et al. 1995). We clarify that equation (7) is based on

the following two assumptions which can be well justified on

microscopic grounds (see Varotsos & Alexopoulos 1986):

(a) the isochoric defect entropy does not change significantly

with temperature (in contrast to the usual isobaric defect entro-

py which may increase significantly with temperature);

(b) the  isothermal  compressibility  of  the  activation  vol-

ume has a value which is, at most, a few times larger than

the bulk compressibility.

The first assumption leads to the conclusion that c

act 

is in-

dependent of temperature and the second one that c

act

 is in-

dependent of pressure. A detailed discussion on the range of

the  validity  of  these  assumptions  is  given  in  a  review  by

Varotsos & Alexopoulos (1982). We recall that the reliabili-

ty of equation (7) has already been checked for point defects

in many solids (Varotsos & Alexopoulos 1986; Vallianatos

& Eftaxias 1992; Vallianatos & Eftaxias 1995).

According to this model the diffusion coefficient is given:

D = f a

ν

(m

m

/m

i

)

1/2

 exp(–c

act

 B

 / k

 

T)                       (8)

The  latter  equation  suggests  that  the  plot  of  lnD  versus

B

Ω€

/ kT (instead of the usual plot lnD versus 1/T ), in the

case of one diffusion mechanism, should be a straight line,

with a slope equal to –c

act

.

By recalling that the corresponding entropies s

act 

are given by:

s

act 

= –

(the subscript “p” indicates a derivative under constant pres-

sure),  the  introduction  of  equation  (7)  into  the  relation  (2)

lead to the following expressions:

h

act

 

= c

act

 (B

 – T d(B

) / dT)

(9a)

s

act 

= –c

act

 d(B

) / dT

(9b)

Equations  (9) inticate that the ratio

F =               =                                                                (10)

is a quantity which is a function of temperature and is solely

governed by the bulk properties of the matrix material and

not on the diffusing atom.

We point out that the activation entropy can be estimated

using the proexponential factor (see equation 3) and recall-

ing that s

act

= F h

act 

we lead to:

ln [Do(m

/ m

m

)

1/2

 ] = ln (fa

2

ν

m

) + (F/k) h

act

               (11)

Assuming  that  the  quantity  fa

2

ν

m

  is  almost  temperature

independent (Mirani et al. 1975) equation (11) suggests that

the plot of ln[Do(m

/ m

m

)

1/2

] versus h

act

, for different diffus-

ing  atoms  should  be  a  straight  line,  the  slope  of  which  is

solely governed by the bulk quantities.

–h

p

act

 (1 + 

λ

R

2

(T))

kT

(

)

s

act

h

act

–d(B

) / dT

B

 – T d(B

) / dT

  ∂

g

act

  ∂

T

P

background image

ANALYSIS OF SELF- AND HETERODIFFUSION IN FERROMAGNETIC AND PARAMAGNETIC 

α

-IRON                 53

Fig. 1. (a) The Arrhenius plot of lnD vs. 1/T and (b) the plot of lnD vs. B

/kT for Ni diffusion in 

α

 iron. We point out that Tc

-1

 =9.6

×

10

-4

 K

-1

and that (B

)c/kTc=1100.

Fig. 2. (a) The Arrhenius plot of lnD vs. 1/T and (b) the plot of lnD vs. B

/kT for V diffusion in 

α

 iron for T < Tc.

Fig. 3. (a) The Arrhenius plot of lnD vs. 1/T and (b) the plot of lnD vs. B

/kT for Fe self-diffusion in 

α

 iron for T < Tc.

background image

54                                                                                         VALLIANATOS

Analysis of experimental data

The experimental data used in this study for self-diffusion

in 

α

-Fe ( in the temperature range 1087–1168.5 K) are taken

from Geise & Herzig (1987); data for diffusion of Vanadium

(in  the  range  1058–1607  K)  and  Nickel  (in  the  range  788-

1160 K) in 

α

-Fe are from Geise & Herzig (1987) and from

Cermak et al. (1989), respectively. All of them were collected

using a radiotracer method. These experimental data are plot-

ted in figures 1, 2 and 3, versus 1/T and B

/kT respectively.

For the estimation of the quantity B

 (Fig. 4) we use the val-

ues of the bulk modulus B and the atomic volume tabulated

by Varotsos & Alexopoulos (1986). We clarify that the iso-

thermal bulk modulus B was estimated using measurements

of the adiabatic one Bs. These values are transformed to iso-

thermal ones according to the thermodynamic formula:

B

-1

 = Bs

-1

 + T 

 

β

2

 Cp

-1

, where 

 the atomic volume, 

β

the  volume  expansion  coefficient  and  Cp  the  specific  heat

under constant pressure.

An inspection in Figs. 1–3 show a diffusion anomaly close

to Tc, even in the case when one plots lnD versus B

/kT as

suggested by Varotsos & Alexopoulos (1986).

Furthermore,  in  the  fully  paramagnetic  or  ferromagnetic

state the diffusion curves are described by straight lines. A

least square fitting to a straight line (using the end points in

the two pure states) leads to a slope which is equal to  -c

p

act

and -c

f

act

 for the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic states re-

spectively (see Table 1). Using the quantities c

p

act

 and c

f

act

the  Gibbs  activation  energy,  entropy  and  enthalpy  can  be

deduced for any temperature in the aforementioned limiting

ranges (i.e. in the pure paramagnetic or ferromagnetic state)

by means of the relations (7), (9a) and (9b). The values esti-

mated in this way are tabulated in Table 2. For the sake of

comparison the available experimental data are also given.

By  comparing  the  calculated  values  with  the  experimental

ones we see an agreement within the experimental limits.

The c

p

act

 value allows the determination of the Debye fre-

quency. Applying equation (8), using the bulk quantity B

(see Fig. 4) and assuming that f = 0.727 (corresponding to a

normal vacancy diffusion mechanism) and a = 2.9

×

10

-10

 m,

we estimate the Debye frequency 

ν

D

 = 2.4

×

10

12.

 s

-1

 which

should  be  compared  with  the  value  5.6

×

10

13

s

-1

  estimated

using the Debye temperature 

Θ

D

 = 428 K (Gray 1972).

We  turn  now  to  the  calculation  of  the  temperature  inde-

pendent  parameter 

λ

    From  equation  (6)  we  lead  to 

λ 

=

(h

f

act

/h

p

act

) – 1. Using the estimated values for the activation

enthalpies, we find 

λ 

= 0.062. The experimental value lies

between 0.060 and 0.088 (Cermak et al. 1989).

We  proceed  finally  to  the  estimation  of  the  temperature

dependence  of  the  excess  Gibbs  activation  energy 

δ

g

act

  in

the Curie temperature zone, for the case of Ni diffusion in

α

-Fe. To estimate 

δ

g

act 

we apply the following approxima-

tion: we make a least square fitting to a straight line of the

lnD  versus    B

/KT    for  the  temperature  range  in  which  a

pure  paramagnetic  state  exists  (i.e. 

δ

g

act

>>0).  The  straight

line fitting leads to the expression lnD = –0.0176 (B

/kT) –

16.704. From there on, we use a linear extrapolation to esti-

Table 1:  The “c” values for self and heterodiffusion in 

α

-Fe, in

ferro-  and  paramagnetic  state,  estimated  using  a  straight  line  fit-

ting  to  the  available  data  in  the  pure  para-  or  ferromagnetc  state

(see text).

Table  2:  Calculated  values  and  experimental  ones  (see  Geise  &

Herzing 1987; Cermak et al. 1989) for activation enthalpy and en-

tropy  for  self  and  heterodiffusion  in  the  ferro  and  paramagnetic

state of 

α

-iron.

D iffusing atom

C alculated atom  value E xperim ental value

N i

hp=2.70 eV

from  2.27 to 2.70 eV

hf=2.87 eV

from  2.74 to 2.96 eV

 sp= 10.75 k

-----

sf=  7.69 k

-----

V

 hp=2.85 eV

(2.85 ±  0.07) eV

sp= 11.3 k

-----

Fe

  hp= 2.92 eV

(2.93 ±  0.02) eV

  sp= 11.63 k

-----

Diffusing atom

cp

cf

Ni

0.01760

0.0219

V

0.01856

---

Fe

0.01904

---

Fig. 5. Temperature dependence of the excess Gibbs activation en-

ergy in the Curie temperature zone for Ni diffusion in 

α

-iron. The

estimated values of 

δ

g are based on a linear regression of the data

presented in Fig. 1.

Fig. 4. Temperature dependence of the bulk quantity B

 for 

α

-iron.

background image

ANALYSIS OF SELF- AND HETERODIFFUSION IN FERROMAGNETIC AND PARAMAGNETIC 

α

-IRON                 55

mate the diffusion values D

(SL)

 predicted by the straight line

(SL)  in  all  the  temperature  range.  By  definition 

δ

g

act 

=

g

act

(T) – g

p

act

(T) = kT ln [D

(SL)

/Dexp]  where Dexp the ex-

perimentally  observed  diffusion  values  (Cermak  et  al.

1989). In figure 5 we give the plot of 

δ

g

act

 versus the tem-

perature.

Conclusion

The  self-diffusion  data  of 

α

-Fe  and  the  heterodiffusion

data of Ni and V in 

α

-Fe, in the ferromagnetic and paramag-

netic  state  were  analysed,  by  using  the  cB

  model.  Intro-

ducing the temperature and pressure independent constants

c

and c

f

 we calculate the activation enthalpy in paramagnet-

ic and ferromagnetic state, in the examined cases.

The  calculated  values  agree  with  the  experimental  ones

reported  in  the  literature  and  enable  the  calculation  of  pa-

rameter 

λ 

using only the elastic data of 

α

-Fe in the exam-

ined magnetic states.

Furthermore,  using  the  published  experimental  data  we

estimate the excess Gibbs activation energy 

δ

g

act

 which rep-

resents the thermodynamic influence due to spin ordering.

References

Borg R. & Dienes G., 1988: An introduction to Solid State Diffu-

cion. Academic Press, Boston.

Cermak J., Lubbehusen M. & Mehrer H., 1989: The influence of

the  magnetic  phase  transformation  on  the  heterodiffusion  of

Ni in 

α 

iron,  Z. Metalikde, 80, 213–219.

Geise J. & Herzing C., 1987: Impurity diffusion of Vanadium and

self-diffusion in iron, Z. Metalikde., 78, 291–294.

Gray D.E., (Ed.), 1972: American Institute of Physics Handbook,

3rd ed., Mc Graw-Hill.

Kucera J., Kozak L. & Mehrer H., 1984: Magnetic anomalies and

self-diffusion and Co heterodiffusion in 

α 

Fe, Phys. Stat. Sol.

(a), 81, 497–505.

Mirani H., Harthoom R., Zuurendonk T., Helmerhorst S. & Vries

G.,  1975:  The  influence  of  the  ferromagnetic  transition  on

self-diffusion in b.c.c FeSi, Phys. Stat. Sol. (a), 29, 115–127.

Philibert J., 1991: Atom movements. Diffusion and mass transport

in solids. Les Editions de Physique, Paris, 118–120.

Ruch L., Djordije S., Helen Y. & Girifaleo L., 1976: Analysis of dif-

fusion in   ferromagnets.  J. Phys. Chem. Solids, 37, 649–653.

Satija S., Comes R. & Shirone G., 1985: Neutron scattering mea-

surements of phonons in iron above and bellow Tc. Phys. Rev.

B., 32, 3309–3311.

Vallianatos F. & Eftaxias K., 1992: The application of cB

 model

for the  calculation of variation of the activation volume for

creep  with  depth  in  the    earth’s  lower  mantle,  Phys.  Earth

Planet. Inter., 71,  141–146.

Vallianatos F. & Eftaxias K., 1994: Some thermodynamic aspects

of   estimation methods for activation volume, Acta Geophys.

Pol., XLII, 13–23.

Vallianatos F., Eftaxias K. & Vassilikou-Dova A., 1995: A material

science    approach  for  the  evaluation  of  the  rheological  state

into the Earth’s Lower mantle. Radiation effects and Defects

in Solids, 137, 217–221.

Varotsos  P.  &  Alexopoulos  K.,  1982:  Current  methods  of  lattice

defects  analysis using Dilatometry and Self-diffusion. Criti-

cal review and proposals. Phys. Stat. Sol. (b), 110, 9–31.

Varotsos P. & Alexopoulos K., 1986: Thermodynamics of point De-

fects and their  relation with bulk properties. North Holland.